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THE GLOBAL TRAVELS OF LIVE ANIMALS

live animals

THE GLOBAL TRAVELS OF LIVE ANIMALS

Horses, Asses, Mules and Hinnies Atop the Tariff Schedule

Unless you’re a farmer or animal breeder, the first item in Chapter 1 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule is one we may think about the least – Live Animals. For most Americans, live animals are a long supply chain away from the supermarket.

At over $21 billion in 2017, global trade in live animals has increased 140 percent over the last two decades. Some 45 million hogs, 16 million sheep, 11 million head of cattle, 5 million goats and 1.9 million poultry (mainly chickens) were transported around the globe, some for breeding and about 80 percent intended for consumption.

A specialized segment within the transportation sector is dedicated to transporting live animals by air, land and sea – from air cargo, tractor trailers and trains, to ocean container shipping.

HTS snippet 0101

Shifting Resource Burdens

The world will be home to 9.7 billion people by 2050. With more mouths to feed, agriculture production must become more efficient against the challenges of limited arable land, energy and water resources, especially in developing countries. International development agencies promote raising livestock as a way to increase income for smallholder farmers (owners can sell products and/or offspring) and to achieve greater food security in rural areas through access to high quality proteins. Importing livestock in the last few months of their life can reduce expenses associated with animal feed and veterinary care while conserving limited water resources.

The water-stressed Middle East region has become a major importer of live animals. Demand for meat and dairy products has grown steeply in Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar and Saudi Arabia. Importing mature live animals avoids the need to rear animals from birth, shifting the water burden while meeting demand for animals freshly slaughtered in adherence to religious requirements.

Trade in live animals 3x increase

Trade in Genetics, No Goats No Glory

Countries are investing in improving their livestock by either importing live animals or importing frozen semen and embryos for artificial insemination, a process that is achieving higher success rates as costs are coming down. Global trade in purebred animals for breeding in 2017 was a $780 million industry. The animal genetic market is projected to grow from $4.2 billion in 2018 to $5.8 billion by 2023.

In November last year, 1,503 U.S.-origin Holstein heifers valued at $3 million were sold out of Statesville, North Carolina and shipped to Egypt aboard a livestock carrier in an effort by the Government of Egypt to improve the country’s dairy operations supporting output of milk for yogurt and cheese. Qatar is importing American-born dairy cows to surmount trade bans by neighboring countries.

Chickens are by far the largest category of live animals traded globally with hogs coming in second. But it’s dairy goats that could prove key to achieving the United Nations’ 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Goats consume fewer resource inputs than cows, goat milk is nutritious, and women often have strong roles in dairy goat ownership and management.

Caprikorn Farms is the oldest goat dairy in Maryland. Raising some of the best dairy goats in the United States and the world, their genetics are in demand. They have worked with Russian authorities to not only send several live animal shipments to Russia but also improve Russia’s health protocol for international shipment. Ten of their goats even flew to Qatar on a private jet.

Bees also get in on the global trade act. Not only do bees circulate throughout the United States to pollinate our many crops, $48.1 million worth of live bees – including Queen bees and semen — were exported globally in 2018. Europe shipped $26.5 million or 55.2 percent of the global total.

Live animal trade routes 2017

Protecting Livestock on the Journey

While North American cattle and hogs have a short truck ride or may even live on ranches along the borders, many animals face a long ocean journey during which their health can be compromised. They are sometimes relegated to older vessels that may be converted from general cargo and not purpose-built to transport the animals in safe conditions. Often on journeys for weeks at a time, animals are at risk for fatigue, heat stress, overcrowding, injury and the spread of disease in close quarters.

The World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) issued the Terrestrial Animal Health Code in 2019 that provides standards for transporting animals by land, sea and air to protect the health and welfare of the animals and prevent the transfer of pathogens via international trade in animals.

As the global population increases and agricultural producers seek to maximize the resources available to them while improving output, global trade in live animals is likely to continue to grow. Standards and cooperation in international trade practices will need to evolve along with that trend.

Contributor Sarah Smiley lives on her family farm in Appalachia where they have raised fainting (myotonic) goats and Charolais cattle for more than 20 years.

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Sarah Smiley is a strategic communications and policy expert with over 20 years in international trade and government affairs, working in the U.S. Government, private sector and international organizations.

This article originally appeared on TradeVistas.org. Republished with permission.

antwerp xl

ANTWERP XL: Nominate Yourself or a Colleague for the Breakbulk 40 Under 40 NOW!

Antwerp XL is searching for the breakbulk industry’s 40 most dynamic and influential professionals under the age of 40 in a new initiative celebrating the next generation of the industry.

Professionals working in the industry are encouraged to self-nominate if they are under 40, or nominate eligible colleagues if they believe they have contributed significantly to the sector.

Mark Rimmer, AntwerpXL Divisional Director, says, “Attracting and retaining the next generation of talent is absolutely critical to the long-term success of the breakbulk industry. It’s where the industry’s future ideas, innovation, inspiration and leaders will all come from.”

“That’s why we are so proud to be launching our 40 Under 40 initiative.  We want to identify and celebrate those younger players within the industry and showcase their contribution so far. So, if you know someone who merits being recognised, or you are that person, we want to hear from you.”

Entrants will be judged by a panel of industry experts looking for young professionals who, thanks to their excellence and commitment, are making a real difference to their organisation and/or the wider breakbulk industry. The official 40 Under 40 will comprise those with the greatest potential to become industry leaders in the future and those who have achieved greatness already.

The successful XL 40 Under 40 will be celebrated at AntwerpXL, the world’s only event dedicated exclusively to maritime breakbulk set to be held 21 – 23 April 2020, with a dedicated gallery on the AntwerpXL website and a special drinks reception held in their honour at the event itself.

The selected 40 will also receive VIP passes for AntwerpXL, giving them access to the event’s conference programme and exclusive zones including the VIP lounge. They will also be invited, as guests of honour, to a special NextGen debate taking place during the show and have access to other exclusive events in the year after Antwerp XL.

Entries close Friday 27 March. To find out more about AntwerpXL or to nominate yourself or a colleague, visit: www.antwerpxl.com/40Under40.

parcel

The State of “Fast and Free” Delivery: What Retailers and Parcel Carriers Should Know

Thanks primarily to Amazon (and the explosive growth of Amazon Prime), consumers in 2020 are conditioned to expect that virtually anything bought online can be shipped for free. That’s true for small orders like prescriptions and batteries, and for huge items like appliances and tires. If it means a shopper has to buy an annual subscription, or spend a little more to meet a free-shipping minimum, most people would consider that a low bar to meet.

But as every retailer and ecommerce seller knows, shipping is never free. Today’s multi-billion-dollar parcel carriers are getting paid. They moved nearly a billion parcels this past peak season. That shipping cost is being ultimately absorbed by sellers and is reflected in the price buyers are paying for products.

And parcel volume growth isn’t slowing down – it’s accelerating. According to the Pitney Bowes Parcel Shipping Index, global parcel shipping volume grew 70% from 2014 to 2017, to 74.4 billion parcels. The index projects global parcel volume to rise at a rate of 17% to 28% from 2018 to 2020, surpassing 100 billion parcels this year.

Handling increasing parcel volume isn’t just about figuring out how to do more of the same. The process of getting things where they need to go is under a transformation. In a recent report, Gartner found that transportation is the largest portion of delivery costs, due to a shift from carriers handling bulk freight to small parcels.

[Parcel and last-mile delivery will] continue to be the fastest-growing shipment segments due to increases in multichannel retail, eCommerce in B2B and same-day delivery offerings.

Gartner also observed what many companies are feeling. As volume continues to grow, companies only have time to react instead of plan. That means many are missing opportunities to revolutionize parcel logistics with innovation and alternative delivery models.

How fast does “fast” need to be?

According to research from Freightwaves, consumers unsurprisingly still have an appetite for fast delivery, with 60% of shoppers saying they’ve abandoned an online purchase because of slow delivery times. With record volumes to handle – and so much at stake with consumer expectations – efficiency, on-time consistency, and flexibility are key for parcel delivery services, whether it’s same-day, next-day or deferred.

This year’s U.S. peak shipping season saw about a billion package deliveries (up 4.5% from 2018). Retailers are offering more same-day options, which increases demand and the need for trucks, local delivery vehicles, drivers, warehouses and warehouse workers.

This year, the challenge was also complicated by a shorter selling season (the holiday season was six days shorter in 2019 than is typical), new restrictions on driver hours of service, and the December 16 implementation of new rules for Electronic Logging Devices in commercial trucks. All of these factors impact capacity and the ability of networks to deliver fast and on time.

Emerging shift in consumer behaviors

On the flip side of the “freer and faster” coin is Gartner research analyst Tom Enright. He’s counseled retailers on their supply chain and fulfillment strategies for more than a decade.

In a groundbreaking report published in November 2019, he detected an emerging shift in consumer behavior: “Consumers are starting to express increased concern about the environmental impact of retailer’s shipping practices, and are seeking slower, more sustainable options.”

Consumers are now defining convenience as order fulfillment on their terms, and they’re expressing more and more concerns about the environmental impact of fast, one-off deliveries.

It’s a conflict between three consumer choices:

-The desire for instant gratification

-The price reduction they can get for waiting longer for a delivery

-The impact fulfillment speed has on transportation, packaging and other environmental issues.

According to Enright, for retailers, these shifting demands are driving the emergence of two new requirements that are somewhat at odds with current models:

-Retailers must be more environmentally sustainable in order fulfillment operations.

-Retailers must offer a wide range of shipping speeds and prices, especially if incentives or other benefits are included in the offering.

Considerations for retailers and parcel carriers

That means retailers – and their parcel delivery partners – need to consider more flexible fulfillment options. These will need to be able to satisfy a consumer who wants a totally different delivery than currently exists. Companies will need to consolidate multiple online purchases from different retailers, have them combined using less packaging and have it delivered as one shipment a week from Tuesday. That’s instead of three separate shipments expedited for delivery tomorrow – or even same-day.

Major retailers like Amazon, Walmart, Target, and The Home Depot are doubling down on offering same-day delivery options. And for parcel delivery providers, it remains a highly fluid and exciting market. New network models are not only welcome, but will be required to meet the ever-evolving demands of shippers.

The explosive growth of package volumes, and consumers’ desire for next-day and, increasingly, same-day delivery, aren’t likely to wane anytime soon. And retailers and parcel carriers will need to pursue creative, innovative ways to keep up with those expectations and meet that demand.

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Valerie Metzker is the Head of Business Development at Roadie, a crowdsourced delivery service that works with consumers, small businesses and national companies across virtually every industry to provide a faster, cheaper, more scalable solution for scheduled, same-day and urgent delivery. With over 150,000 verified drivers, Roadie covers 89% of U.S. households — the largest local same-day delivery footprint in the nation.

medical equipment

Guide to Preparing Medical Equipment for Shipping

Shipping medical equipment is inseparable from diverse challenges shippers have to face and overcome to orchestrate and eventually conduct the process without any difficulties. The most common challenges refer to the efforts to provide these items with utmost security through each and every stage of the process. Should any of the items get damaged or destroyed, the party in charge will have to deal with costly repairs or, even worse, complete replacement of the item.

The most viable solution lies in preparing medical equipment for shipping properly so as to minimize the chances of an accident. Here is what you have to bear in mind before you start negotiating shipping terms.

Evaluation prior to packing

What inevitably precedes the process of packing and preparing medical equipment for shipping is a thorough evaluation. This step is necessary because these items vary considerably in terms of size, shape, fragility, and weight. Consequently, to be able to complete the task efficiently and successfully, one has to know precisely the type and amount of equipment that is to be shipped.

Medical equipment should be handled with the utmost care and by experts who possess the expertise, experience, and appropriate equipment to respond to the demands of the task accordingly. An amateur cannot understand the delicacy of the process, which further results in increasing the risks of damage or even destruction to some of the medical equipment during the shipping process.

Tailored packing is crucial

While ordinary packing supplies will undeniably be suitable for some medical equipment, there are those items that require using custom-built crates or specific packaging solutions for impeccable security. The above-mentioned evaluation, hence, proves to be crucial for this purpose. Once you know exactly the size of items and when you analyze those which are awkwardly-shaped or extremely heavy, you will be able to request engineering of the crates that guarantee protection from abrasion, shock, moisture, temperature change, and vibration.

What packing supplies are necessary?

When preparing medical equipment for shipping, using specialized packing materials is a must. Understandably, for some pieces of equipment, you can use standard cardboard or plastic boxes, but generally, the most sensitive pieces require the already mentioned custom-built crates for excellent protection. In addition, using premium-quality cushioning materials is the strategy you need when eliminating any chances of damage is what you strive for.

If you opt for maritime shipping after analyzing the pros and cons of this decision, looking for vapor barrier packaging solutions becomes inevitable. In these circumstances, it is of utmost importance to use moisture and vapor-proof packaging to prevent corrosion on metal surfaces that can seriously harm the functionality of the equipment.

Professional assistance is mandatory when preparing medical equipment for shipping

There are numerous, respectable companies in the shipping industry that offer their impeccable service to various clients. Regardless of the airfreight vs. sea freight dilemma you might be experiencing, there is no place for questioning your decision to hire professionals for this task. However, to be able to monitor the process and assess the quality of the service you get, it is critical to get an insight into the usual practice when preparing medical equipment for shipping is in question.

Conduct detailed research before you find the shipping company you can trust. You need one which employs genuine professionals who know how to pack diagnostic, surgical and lab equipment, CT scanners, lasers, X-ray devices, and MRI machines. They need to be reliable and competent to dismantle these pieces of equipment, secure all the parts, pack, and, finally, load these into a shipping container. Online reviews are a good starting point for your search. Requesting free no-obligation cost estimates can help you know what budget you will need for this endeavor.

Obtain insurance

An essential step in the process of preparing medical equipment for shipping is getting the proper insurance by all means. No matter how well the preparations have been conducted, there is always a risk of unforeseen accidents that might endanger the safety of equipment in the shipping process. Concerning the value of the items you want to ship, obtaining proper insurance must not be neglected. It is important to be entitled to a reasonable compensation should some of your pieces of equipment get damaged or destroyed on the way to their final destination. This is the only solution that guarantees you peace of mind and the knowledge that you have covered all the potential scenarios of the upcoming shipping process.

Preparing medical equipment for shipping requires time

Time is what you need to handle each task with utmost commitment and undivided attention and finally prepare medical equipment for shipping well enough. Starting well in advance means an opportunity to reconsider some decisions before you make them final. If you understand how delicate this process is, you will understand how important it is to bring all the potential difficulties to a minimum. Professional assistance is the core of this process because you need the expertise to complete the process successfully.

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Ian Miller has devoted his time to studying shipping industry challenges and he frequently writes articles on this subject for companies such as Four Winds Bahrain. Ian has cooperated with many shipping companies and is now writing a study on the effects of technology on the shipping industry.

ro/ro

DOMINATE AND EXPAND: THIS STRATEGY PROPELS RO/RO LEADING PORTS OF BALTIMORE AND SAVANNAH/BRUNSWICK

Being the Nos. 1 & 2 busiest roll-on/roll-off (Ro/Ro) ports in the nation isn’t quite good enough for the ports of Baltimore and Savannah/Brunswick. At least the Maryland Port Authority and Georgia Ports Authority are not resting on their laurels, anyway. These East Coast ports are doing their best to maintain their top-two rankings through initiatives such as investments in expansion and training programs for warehouse workers that are designed to increase efficiency and reduce damage and accidents in the loading/unloading process.

These growth initiatives are helping to not just cement the ports’ statuses in the Ro/Ro world—Baltimore has been the No. 1 Ro/Ro port in the United States for eight years running—but it’s making them even more desirable and competitive places for automobile manufacturers to do business.

Port of Baltimore

The Port of Baltimore continues to expand and thrive despite an uncertain trade climate. Larry Johnson, sales manager of Trade Development, Automotive, credits his port’s success to efforts to maintain positive relationships with their automotive industry partners, keeping those industry partners loyal.

One such partner, Volkswagen Group of America, recently began a partnership with Port of Baltimore to begin importing vehicles through the Tradeport Atlantic in Sparrows Point, which could provide an increase of 120,000 vehicles annually—and an additional 100 jobs.

The port also benefits from its proximity to the Midwest—it’s the closest seaport to Middle America—and with top notch services like efficient rail, cargo can get to destinations faster than from any other port on the East Coast. Baltimore’s strategic location is within two-thirds of the U.S. with just an overnight drive.

The Baltimore port’s training initiatives have helped cultivate the lowest damage rates in the industry. The port has also pioneered a program, Ro/Ro Rodeo, which is an intensive class to educate manufacturers in the highly specialized processes required to handle each specific type of vehicle that is processed through the port. Ro/Ro Rodeo has even developed a program for the highly specialized processing of farm and other industrial equipment

With almost 200 acres of pavement at the Dundalk Marine Terminal alone, the Port of Baltimore consistently breaks its own records for Ro/Ro processes, often increasing its volume as frequently as month to month, and their investments in expansion and training will likely keep that volume increasing for years to come.

“The Port of Baltimore is the No. 1 auto port in the nation and continues to break cargo records every month,” says Maryland Governor Larry Hogan in the September/October 2019 edition of Helen Delich Bentley Port of Baltimore Magazine. “Our administration is committed to furthering this growth and strongly supports our great port and its thousands of hardworking men and women handling the millions of tons of cargo coming in throughout the year.”

Ports of Savannah and Brunswick, Georgia

The Georgia Ports Authority (GPA) is the No. 2 Ro/Ro port in the United States. Its Port of Savannah increased volume almost 250,000 TEUs in 2019, according to the GPA. This growth of 5.6 percent over the previous year came at a time when auto sales are actually dropping–a true testament to the hard work of the port employees at Savannah and Brunswick.

A banner year for the ports, the Ocean Terminal recently won contracts with both Volvo and General Motors. The Colonel’s Island Terminal in Brunswick is a Ro/Ro-only port that is already home to International Auto Processing, Wallenius Wilhelmsen Solutions and Mercedes Benz USA.

The GPA properties are undergoing an expansion that will eventually create an additional 150,000 spaces for automobiles, bumping their processing capacity from 900,000 annually to 1.5 million. There are currently three dedicated Ro/Ro berths that process cargo via nine different steamship lines.

“Both Savannah and Brunswick are outperforming the market, with Garden City container trade growing at a rate three times faster than the U.S. total, and Brunswick Ro/Ro units increasing despite a drop in U.S. vehicle sales in 2019,” says GPA Board Chairman Will McKnight in a Jan. 28 statement.

Growth Despite Uncertainty

Strategic locations, ample space and work ethics that include faster cargo processing, in-depth training and safety records that far eclipse many competing ports are just a few reasons that these ports are leading the pack in Ro/Ro. With the onset of trade tariffs, such as those imposed on China, and reports that the United States’ manufacturing industry has experienced slowed growth recently, these ports have nevertheless managed to increase growth consistently. Growth when economic uncertainly looms large is a true testament to the power of excellent service and sound investment.

If these and other Ro/Ro ports can continue to capitalize on trends such as exporting goods to other countries competing for business with China, they will have learned that they can not just maintain their positions in the Ro/Ro processing rankings, but keep growing.

ecommerce shipping

Shipping 101 For Ecommerce Platforms

The ecommerce sales are set to touch 6.5 billion USD in 2021. With the ever-expanding ecommerce industry, the shipping industry is also set for an explosion. Coupled with the changes brought about by technology and dynamic user preferences impacting the ecommerce shipping field, how do you prepare to excel, then? This article will work as a beginner’s guide to tell you all about ecommerce shipping. The world of shipping will no longer be a difficult mystery.

Shipping 101

Here is how you can map out your shipping plan to streamline and organize:

1. Shipping Strategy

Creating a shipping strategy is the first step. Here are the key points you need to consider:

Shipping rates: Will you charge flat shipping rates for all your orders or will they differ from destination to destination? A customer might abandon the cart if the shipping rate is too high, and you might incur a loss if it is too low. Decide on the shipping-rate policy first. You can also increase product prices slightly and offer free shipping.

Inventory/order management: Will you manually update every order and maintain the inventory or will you automate it? Automation is recommended as it minimises the errors.

Global or local? Will you ship across the globe? Or will you ship only in your country? This question is important to answer as it will determine how much you spend on shipping, the carrier you use, the time taken for delivery, etc.

Shipping methods: What mode will you ship through? Air, sea, or land? There might be higher risk and lower shipping cost when you choose sea over land and air, but shipping by air will afford you to deliver faster. Make a list of the pros and cons of all methods to decide.

Shipping insurance: Shipping carriers offer insurance, and this can give you a great deal of security. Get the coverage, especially if you have large volumes.

2. Shipping Costs

While calculating shipping costs, these are the four points you need to keep in mind:

Shipping carrier: Shipping carriers like FedX, Aramex, DHL, UPS are popular with ecommerce companies. But if you are only going to ship locally, ask for quotes from your local carriers, the rates might be much much cheaper. Use the shipping carrier’s calculator to compare.

Source and destination countries: The distance between the source and the destination and whether both the points are in the same country will play a huge role in determining the shipping costs.

Product dimensions and weight: It is advisable to measure all your products before you list them online – every shipping carrier charges depending upon the weight and dimensions of your package.

Margin-wise: Be margin wise. Are the shipping costs too heavy on the pocket? How much profit margin do you want to keep? Shipping is a major expense, and you should never ignore the small charges.

3. Packaging and labelling

You can either source the packaging from your shipping carrier, or use it as a way for branding. With increasing awareness, sustainable packaging is much in demand, but it is also expensive. You can also offer personalised packaging or special packaging for gift orders.

Another important part is the labelling. Each order must be labelled with the order number, the addresses among other details. Doing this incorrectly might result in a mix-up.

4. Invoicing

Many countries have laws that require multiple copies of invoices to be sent with the package. One for you, one for the customer, one for the shipping carrier, one for taxation purposes etc. Invoicing can be automated too. Just invest in good virtual infrastructure.

5. Communication and tracking

Once the order is shipped, most automation software solutions send an e-mail to the customer with the tracking link. This is a very important part of the shipping process. If the customer doesn’t receive communication from your end, it not only looks bad on your company but also might result in complaints.

6. Auditing Shipments

This is the part which most ecommerce companies fail to do. And even if they audit their shipments, they do it manually. Auditing your shipments allows you to claim for refunds from your shipping carrier. There might be duplicate or incorrect charges on your shipping invoice, or the carrier might have damaged or lost your package. You can get reimbursed for it and save on shipping costs.

7. Customs

If you are shipping globally, be well-aware of prohibited items that differ from country to country. Also, the documentation should be spick and span for the package to clear the customs zone. Know about the customs fees and don’t forget to add it to your ecommerce platform, so the customer is not kept in the dark. Most shipping carriers offer information about customs declaration on their websites.

Questions to Ask Yourself Before Making a Shipping Plan

-What is your shipping budget? Will you charge real-time carrier rates for all your orders?

-Will you offer next-day or same-day delivery?

-What packaging will you use?

-Where will you ship and where will you not?

-Will there be a minimum order cost for free shipping?

-How will you communicate regarding the orders with your customers?

-Will you opt for third-party logistics?

-Will you choose automation software solutions when it comes to shipping management?

Quick Tips

-Focus on creating a great customer experience when you package and ship the product.

-Premium packaging can encourage repeat customers.

-If your shipping strategy doesn’t work, always have plan B.

Know the rules and regulations of all the states and countries you are shipping to. Some products might be banned.

Remember to one order might have multiple shipments. That’s double-triple the work.

Outsourcing the logistics and the auditing might save a lot of work, and you can let the experts handle it for you.

There are multiple variables when it comes to ecommerce shipping. Understand, plan and then execute. While shipping might seem like a not-so-important aspect of your ecommerce business as sales, it is actually a driving factor – one that can help you achieve success.

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Ana Shan is a product evangelist at AuditShipment.com, an AI-driven audit service that automatically captures more than 20 carrier errors and helps businesses save up to
16% of their shipping costs.

oil crops

Global Oil Crops Market 2020 – Key Insights

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘World – Oil Crops – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The global oil crops market revenue amounted to $394.4B in 2018, picking up by 7.6% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price).

The market value increased at an average annual rate of +4.7% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2008 with an increase of 19% year-to-year. The global oil crops consumption peaked in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

Consumption By Country

The countries with the highest volumes of oil crops consumption in 2018 were China (173M tonnes), the U.S. (89M tonnes) and Argentina (56M tonnes), together comprising 47% of global consumption. India, Brazil, Indonesia, Russia, Ukraine, the Philippines, Canada and Germany lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 29%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of oil crops consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Ukraine, while oil crops consumption for the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, China ($100.8B) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the U.S. ($47.1B). It was followed by India.

In 2018, the highest levels of oil crops per capita consumption was registered in Argentina (1,262 kg per person), followed by Canada (378 kg per person), Ukraine (345 kg per person) and the U.S. (271 kg per person), while the world average per capita consumption of oil crops was estimated at 88 kg per person.

In Argentina, oil crops per capita consumption expanded at an average annual rate of +1.4% over the period from 2007-2018. The remaining consuming countries recorded the following average annual rates of per capita consumption growth: Canada (+7.2% per year) and Ukraine (+12.4% per year).

Consumption By Type

Soya beans (380M tonnes) constituted the product with the largest volume of consumption, accounting for 56% of total volume. Moreover, soya beans exceeded the figures recorded for the second-largest type, rape or colza seed (78M tonnes), fivefold. Coconuts (61M tonnes) ranked third in terms of total consumption with a 9% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of the volume of oil crops consumption of soya beans amounted to +5.1%. With regard to the other consumed products, the following average annual rates of growth were recorded: rape or colza seed (+3.8% per year) and coconuts (-0.1% per year).

In value terms, soya beans ($165.8B) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by ground-nut (in-shell) ($52.3B). It was followed by rape or colza seed.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of the market volume of soya beans totaled +6.2%. For the other products, the average annual rates were as follows: ground-nut (in-shell) (+3.3% per year) and rape or colza seed (+4.3% per year).

Production 2007-2018

In 2018, the amount of oil crops (primary) produced worldwide stood at 673M tonnes, jumping by 4.4% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +3.7% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2013 when production volume increased by 11% year-to-year. Over the period under review, global oil crops production attained its maximum volume in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the immediate term. The general positive trend in terms of oil crops output was largely conditioned by a noticeable expansion of the harvested area and a slight increase in yield figures.

Production By Country

The countries with the highest volumes of oil crops production in 2018 were the U.S. (134M tonnes), Brazil (128M tonnes) and Argentina (61M tonnes), together comprising 48% of global production. These countries were followed by China, India, Canada, Ukraine, Indonesia, Russia, the Philippines and Paraguay, which together accounted for a further 35%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of oil crops production, amongst the main producing countries, was attained by Ukraine, while oil crops production for the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Harvested Area and Yield 2007-2018

In 2018, the total area harvested in terms of oil crops production worldwide stood at 246M ha, picking up by 3.2% against the previous year.

Global average yield amounted to 2.7 tonne per ha in 2018, flattening at the previous year. The yield figure increased at an average annual rate of +1.1% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed in certain years.

Exports 2007-2018

In 2018, approx. 199M tonnes of oil crops were exported worldwide; going up by 9% against the previous year. Overall, the total exports indicated a resilient increase from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +7.2% over the last eleven years.

In value terms, oil crops exports amounted to $89.4B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

Brazil was the key exporter of oil crops exported in the world, with the volume of exports finishing at 83M tonnes, which was approx. 42% of total exports in 2018. The U.S. (47M tonnes) ranks second in terms of the total exports with a 24% share, followed by Canada (9.7%). Argentina (6,255K tonnes), Paraguay (6,080K tonnes), Ukraine (5,835K tonnes), Romania (3,478K tonnes), Australia (3,452K tonnes) and Uruguay (3,385K tonnes) took a relatively small share of total exports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Australia, while exports for the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Brazil ($33.2B), the U.S. ($23.6B) and Canada ($8.3B) appeared to be the countries with the highest levels of exports in 2018, with a combined 73% share of global exports. These countries were followed by Argentina, Ukraine, Paraguay, Romania, Australia and Uruguay, which together accounted for a further 13%.

Australia experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to the value of exports, among the main exporting countries over the period under review, while exports for the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Exports by Type

Soya beans represented the largest type of oil crops exported in the world, with the volume of exports resulting at 158M tonnes, which was approx. 79% of total exports in 2018. It was distantly followed by rape or colza seed (29M tonnes), mixing up a 14% share of total exports. Sunflower seed (6,083K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

In value terms, soya beans ($67.1B) remains the largest type of oil crops supplied worldwide, comprising 75% of global exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by rape or colza seed ($13B), with a 15% share of global exports. It was followed by sunflower seed, with a 4.4% share.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the average oil crops export price amounted to $449 per tonne, jumping by 5.9% against the previous year. Overall, the export price indicated measured growth from 2007 to 2018: its price increased at an average annual rate of +2.2% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, oil crops export price increased by +9.2% against 2016 indices. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2008 an increase of 39% against the previous year. The global export price peaked at $587 per tonne in 2012; however, from 2013 to 2018, export prices stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Average prices varied somewhat amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, major exporting countries recorded the following prices: in the U.S. ($500 per tonne) and Australia ($451 per tonne), while Uruguay ($370 per tonne) and Paraguay ($370 per tonne) were amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the U.S., while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Prices varied noticeably by the product type; the product with the highest price was poppy seed ($2,378 per tonne), while cottonseed ($309 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by mustard seed, while the other products experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

coronavirus

Coronavirus Disrupts Maritime Industry, Supply Chains

With reports that the U.S. military is preparing for a global coronavirus pandemic, companies dependent on China-based production are highly vulnerable to the adverse impacts on the modes of the supply chain, namely in commercial aviation, maritime shipping and overland transport, according to an industry analysis.

“The outbreak has already disrupted some commercial maritime operations and is set to have a much greater impact as international concerns over the virus intensifies,” states Hong Kong-based A2 Global Risk, which supplies its client businesses with a complete picture of global politics, security and trade.

“As large sections of China’s economy grinds to a halt and regional supply-chain mobility becomes tightly restricted, the macro-economic outlook becomes increasingly dire,” A2 Global Risk adds. “More factory closures are a near certainty as the Chinese government tries to control the spread of the disease. Foreign companies heavily reliant on China’s manufacturing sector will be forced to either weather the storm or shift their supply chains to less risky markets.”

TT Club, a UK-based insurance provider, is warning freight forwarders, logistics service providers and other intermediaries of potential unforeseen exposures that may also accrue. “Restrictions due to labor shortages at ports and cancellations of inland transport links within China, constraints in the supply of goods due to factory closures and reduced schedules of air, ocean and rail carriers may expose forwarders to claims arising from delivery delays and cargo deterioration,” states a TT Club briefing that was compiled with the assistance of specialist international lawyers.

“Up-to-date status reports on their cargo’s progress, or lack of it, are vital to shippers,” emphasizes TT Club’s Risk Management Director Peregrine Storrs-Fox. “Forwarders and logistics operators will certainly prove their mettle if they can consistently make customers aware of the ongoing attempts to problem-solve. Careful recording of communication trails detailing such actions will also help in any disputes in the future.”

Global e-retailer Alibaba Group has responded to the coronavirus threat by continuously sending medical supplies, including masks and protective suits, to medical personnel in Wuhan, Wenzhou and Hangzhou, which are at the center of the outbreak and in the most need.

“We are grateful. And we need more help,” states Alibaba, which launched a global sourcing platform for suppliers and distributors of medical goods across the world to join in the campaign.

parcels

UK and Germany Ship the Most Parcels in Europe

Technology has allowed us to exchange information, images, and video more easily than ever before. Back when the internet was first taking off, many predicted that this would spell the end for traditional parcel delivery. But these predictions have been proven to be wrong: the global shipping industry is in ruder health than ever, thanks to the rise of online retailers, and of an increasingly interconnected global economy.

In Europe, two nations stand clearly ahead of the rest of the pack: the UK and Germany. Both countries shipped around 3.5 billion parcels in 2019, according to the Pitney Bowes Shipping Index. That was a 12.4% annual increase for the UK, where there are around fifty-three parcels shipping per capita each year, which is the second-highest number of any country in the world.

Both countries have extremely consolidating shipping industries, with a handful of major carriers accounting for a majority of parcels shipped. In the UK, customers can compare the various services on offer through comparison sites like Parcel2Go.

So where does that put the rest of Europe? France sits way behind, at just 1.3 billion parcels shipped per year, while Italy is way down at less than a billion. Norway and Sweden are down at 61 and 127 million respectively – which is far less than the major players, even after you account for their respective populations.

Where does the UK sit Globally?

All of this has to be judged, of course, against a global backdrop. Shipping has more than doubled over a five-year period going back from 2018 when eighty-seven billion parcels were shipped in a single year. That was a volume increase of 17% from the previous year’s total of seventy-four billion, and works out at around 2,760 parcels shipped every single second. Somewhat incredibly, this explosion in shipping has almost kept pace with the population growth; there were twelve parcels per person shipped in 2014, and twenty-three in 2018.

Three nations stand out as major players in the global shipping industry. These are China, the US and Japan, who collectively account for some 83% of global traffic. China, as you might expect, sits way ahead of the pack with an incredible 51 billion parcels shipped. The US comes in significantly behind, at 13 billion, and Japan just behind that at 9 billion. Japan accounts for the highest per-capita shipping frequency.

What’s Next?

This trend shows no sign of abating in the future, and is likely to only accelerate as new markets emerge. The report indicates that shipping will likely double again over the next six years, with global parcel-shipping reaching an incredible 200 billion parcels.

breakbulk europe

Breakbulk Europe to Return to Bremen in 2021

Breakbulk Europe, the world’s largest event for the project cargo and breakbulk industry, will return to Bremen, Germany, for the fourth consecutive year in 2021 at Messe Bremen from 18-20 May.

“It’s a great pleasure to be returning to Bremen in 2021, a city that has gone above and beyond to welcome breakbulk and project cargo professionals from more than 3800 companies,” Nick Davison, Portfolio Director for Breakbulk and CWEIME events, Hyve Group (formerly ITE Group) said. “The city of Bremen has proved to be a good fit for the Breakbulk attendees with its unique blend of historical charm, modern amenities, maritime environment and visitor affordability.”

Breakbulk Europe has grown significantly since the move to Bremen in 2018, and with over 120 countries represented, its reach embraces the world. Exhibitors at the 2019 event overwhelmingly demonstrated their satisfaction with Breakbulk Europe, Messe Bremen and the city itself, by rebooking 89 percent of exhibition space for 2020 by the end of the show. Along with many repeat exhibitors, the 2020 edition will feature 70 new companies, such as Sarens, CEVA Logistics, DP World, and Airbus, who has chosen Breakbulk Europe to promote their Beluga XL aircraft.

“We are committed to bringing a world-class event to this industry that is critical to the world’s economy,” Davison said. “As we move further into this decade, we will consider alternate locations for 2022 and beyond to deliver new markets and fresh thinking, but for now, Bremen is the right choice and we would not hesitate to return in the future.”

The 2021 announcement comes three months before the opening of Breakbulk Europe 2020, and already the indicators point to another success. Online registration is tracking 13 percent ahead compared to this time last year. A strong lineup of partnerships has been secured, including companies for each of the three content areas: Masters Arena by Aurelis Real Estate Service, Main Stage by Port of Gdańsk and Tech & Innovation Hub by Erhardt. New to the 2020 experience will be a pair of professional workshops focused on risk management and chartering essentials, Education Day for local students and those new or looking to enter the industry, and the first Europe-based Women in Breakbulk breakfast, part of Breakbulk’s global networking platform for female professionals.

About Breakbulk Europe

Breakbulk Europe has become the global hub for the industrial project supply chain, including the world’s foremost manufacturers, oil & gas companies, EPCs, carriers, ports, logistics firms, specialized transporters and related service providers. This year’s event is expected to bring together around 10,000 professionals from more than 120 countries. To request exhibiting and sponsorship information and to register for the event, visit europe.breakbulk.com.

Breakbulk Europe is one of four Breakbulk global events, along with Breakbulk Middle East in Dubai, 25-26 Feb. 2020, Breakbulk Asia in Shanghai, 18-19 March 2020 and Breakbulk Americas in Houston, 29 Sept.-1 Oct. 2020.

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Hyve Group plc is a next generation FTSE 250 global events business whose purpose is to create unmissable events, where customers from all corners of the globe share extraordinary moments and shape industry innovation.  Hyve Group plc was announced as the new brand name of ITE Group plc in September 2019, following its significant transformation under the Transformation and Growth (TAG) programme. Our vision is to create the world’s leading portfolio of content-driven, must-attend events delivering an outstanding experience and ROI for our customers.

Press contact: Leslie Meredith -Marketing  & Media Director, Breakbulk Events & Media

E: Leslie.Meredith@breakbulk.com

T: +1 801 201 5971