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European Greenhouse: What Climate Change and Green Politics Mean for Business in Europe

european

European Greenhouse: What Climate Change and Green Politics Mean for Business in Europe

France, Germany and the Netherlands broke 40-year temperature records this year. Traditional wine areas, such as Bordeaux, have had to accept new grape types into the area for the first time in 80 years to combat the devastating impact of new weather patterns. In Germany and other central European countries, large swaths of forest died off this summer due to climate conditions. 

This summer of extreme weather follows on the heels of a dramatic gain in Green party popularity during and after the spring European parliament elections. What does this mean for companies that do business in the European Union? How will markets and regulations change in the near future as a result of rising concern over climate change across the Atlantic?  

European voters (and consumers) and highly concerned about climate change, with many of them naming climate change as the greatest threat to world security. Equally important, there are substantially fewer people in European Union member states who doubt the impact that climate change is having on the world compared to countries such as the United States. 

In a recent poll, thirteen percent of U.S. respondents expressed doubt over the existence of climate change or that it was due to human influence. This American response was the highest level of skepticism in the developed world; double that of Germany or France, and much higher than other countries such as Spain, where polls have shown as little as 2% of the population voicing any doubt as to the reality and danger of climate change.

Why Europe having fewer skeptics matters

Extreme weather in the summer is not a new issue in Europe. The heat wave of 2003 was estimated to have killed as many as 30,000 people in Europe due to the lack of air conditioning and infrastructure to care for those vulnerable to heat strokes, such as the elderly. The heat wave that broke records across the EU this summer was even hotter. These weather changes, hand-in-hand with the sudden surge in Green party success in EU and national elections, underscore that there is both pressing concern over climate change and a willingness to prioritize it among voters. 

Without climate deniers across the political aisle to delay or weaken environmentally-oriented legislation, it is likely that the business environment will soon be dramatically changed as the EU and member state governments adjust policies and regulations to combat climate change and protect their populations from future extreme weather.

Why the ‘American solution’ won’t work and building styles won’t change

The U.S. has extreme heat on a constant basis in places like Arizona and Texas, but the classical solution – to air condition every building – will not work in Europe because energy costs are twice the U.S. average and likely to rise quickly as governments are forced to switch to more expensive (in the short-term) renewable sources. The EU’s renewable energy directive was modified in 2018 to establish a 32% renewable energy target for 2030, which will likely keep energy prices high as more investments are needed to help develop renewable sources such as solar, wave and wind energy ‘farms’.  

Logical efforts to change building materials and styles to improve the ambient temperatures for residents are near impossible to implement in established cities in Europe. Traditional building styles that are intended to save on heating costs by trapping air inside often exacerbate heat waves since these buildings cannot effectively cool. New materials and building styles in the suburbs offer energy-efficient solutions to newer areas, but traditional architectural areas in downtown Prague, Rome and Paris are poorly positioned to embrace these options. It is inevitable that air conditioning use will increase (currently only 5% of European buildings are equipped with air conditioning, compared to 90% in the U.S.) but based on electricity costs and emission reduction goals in the EU, it is only a partial answer to the extreme weather problem.  Europe must find its own solution, and this search for alternatives will open up new opportunities for innovative companies.

What business opportunities appear as Europe combats climate change?

How will consumer habits change in the face of public concern over emissions and fears over ever-worsening extreme weather? What new business opportunities can we expect to see in Europe as Green-leaning governments and climate-conscious voters bring wholesale changes to the regulatory structure of the European Union in an attempt to combat climate change? Three areas of interest jump out: new government and venture capital funding for innovation, sharply increased transportation costs which will change logistics patterns and purchasing habits, and dramatic shifts to the land use and building traditions which should open up opportunities to U.S. companies.

Innovation will be valued and funded as never before

According to the Global Innovation Index for this year, seven of the top ten most innovative nations are located in Europe, and yet the U.S. (number three on the Index) outspent Europe on research and development by 20%. That is not to say that Europe is not investing in climate change innovation. On the contrary, in 2018, the European Investment Bank committed over 16 billion Euros to combating climate change, a number which has increased each year for a decade. Over $23 billion (US) was invested in innovative new European companies through venture capitalism last year alone.  These numbers will shoot up in the years to come as governments scramble to support new solutions to extreme weather challenges and climate change. 

The EU has already announced plans to focus on battery innovation and production, and will legislate an increasing use of renewables; supporting wind, wave and solar power projects to reduce oil, gas and coal use. Cleantech and Greentech projects are surging in clusters such as Cambridge, Copenhagen and Rotterdam. But there is a need for even more venture capital, and a growing recognition that governments will have to step in and add to research and start-up funding, as well as help scale up successful companies to compete regionally and globally.

A dramatic increase in transportation costs will shift production and consumer habits

Much like in the U.S., many European companies have a tendency to source materials and production overseas to lower costs. Unlike the U.S., they have generally been able to avoid the impact of the U.S.-China trade war. However, this breather is short-lived, as the EU seems to recognize the cost of transportation to society in the way of pollution and congestion and is likely going to be forced to ramp up emissions taxes in the near future, which will impact both the external and internal movement of goods. This, in turn, will force companies to recalibrate their logistics and likely move production closer to the point of sale. 

Companies will find that supporting local production becomes more reasonable as transportation costs go up, and EU member states with lower labor costs (under 10 euros an hour) such as Latvia, Lithuania, Romania, and Bulgaria should begin to see production facilities become more competitive compared to Asia as shipping costs increase in the face of emission taxes. Companies that were previously exporting goods into Europe will find that shifting production to Europe in support of EU clients is going to become substantially more cost-friendly (with the added advantage of avoiding import tariffs, should the global trade war broaden).

Land use and building codes are going to shift dramatically

A recent international climate change report supported what European farmers already have experienced: drought and extreme heat are forcing a rethink as to what is produced in Europe and how.  Climate change activists and consumer groups are also dragging EU trade agreements into the spotlight as countries like Brazil are accused of dramatically harming the global environment through wasteful agricultural practices – in part to increase beef sales to Europe. Increasing focus on how land is used and food produced in Europe will open up opportunities for innovative producers and new products (such as meat alternatives) in the European market. At the same time, European builders of new developments are being forced by regulations and consumer sentiment to use more environmentally-friendly materials and styles. 

The U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED certification has become a benchmark in Europe as well, and U.S. companies with know-how in this area of construction and building design can find robust new markets and development and construction partners throughout the EU who will be challenged by new regulations and public scrutiny to ‘green’ up their building projects.

Environmental challenges mean new opportunities for savvy companies

Changes in consumer demands and regulations imposed from the EU to the local level will open doors for companies that can bring in new, efficient and effective products. Governments attempting to be responsive to extreme weather challenges without taxing their voting population too directly (which is what sparked the ‘Yellow Vest’ protests in France) will demand more energy-efficient products and processes from businesses. Innovative companies, ready to expand and take on new challenges, will find it relatively quick and painless to register in the European market to take advantage of the possibilities that are manifesting due to environmental and consumer changes.   

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Kirk Samson is the owner of Samson Atlantic LLC, a Chicago-based international business consulting company which offers market research, political risk assessment, and international negotiations assistance.  Mr. Samson is a former U.S. diplomat and international law advisor who lived and worked in ten different countries.

GT Podcast – Episode 120 – Sean Strawbridge with Port of Corpus Christi

In this epsode we welcome special guest, Chief Executive Officer of Port of Corpus Christi, Sean Strawbridge to take a deeper look at doing business with ports and some of the important considerations to keep in mind when choosing the right port, and we will even touch on the recent drone attacks on the Saudi Arabian Oil Infrastructure.

Qatar Trade Summit

Qatar Trade Summit: Innovation and Disruption Revolutionising the Logistics Industry in Qatar.

Valuable insights into the future of Qatar’s Trade and investments sector aligned with logistics and supply chain in the region will be showcased at the exclusive Qatar Trade Summit scheduled to take place from 25th to 27th November 2019 in Doha, Qatar, The summit is Qatar’s only event focusing on the nation’s economic diversification plans and progress with strategic plans on becoming the regions logistics hub. 

The summit will strive to examine the nation’s potential on becoming the region’s economic powerhouse via 3 days of deliberations on sea ports development, Shipping and Air Cargo industry, future of logistics and supply chain as well as a final day dedicated to engage in interactive sessions on Qatar’s trade and investment prospects. Attending delegates and partners will get a first-hand knowledge of Qatar’s logistics and supply chain industry, the planned development of sea ports to support regional growth, the influence of shipping air cargo and the free zones in opening up opportunities for regional and foreign companies to invest and do business in Qatar” stated Allan Martin, Communications Director, Qatar Trade Summit. 

All aspects of the shipping industry, port development, air cargo, supply chain and logistics and trade and investments will be discussed at this summit. The event will engage the entire ecosystem of the logistics business in Qatar focusing on procurement, forwarding, planning, new business, infrastructure and investments. The theme of the summit is to explore the scale of innovation and disruption which is revolutionizing the logistics industry in Qatar and the nation’s keen intent on diversifying into a thriving economy prior to the prestigious FIFA 2022 football world cup taking place in Qatar. Qatar Trade Summit will directly impact a comprehensive range of sectors in the region and will cover solutions and products to uplift these sectors. The areas covered will be Ship building, Port management, Port Infrastructure development, Air Cargo expansion, Logistics and supply chain solutions and the investments and business opportunities in Qatar. 

The summit’s profile includes key dignitaries such as H.E. Akbar Al Baker, Group CEO, Qatar Airways, Capt. Abdulla Al-Khanji, CEO, Mwani Qatar, Qatar, Mr. Abdulrahman Essa Al-Mannai, President & CEO, MILAHA, Qatar, Mr. Lim Meng Hui, CEO, Qatar Free Zones Authority (QFZA), Mr. James Baker, Editor, Lloyd’s List Containers, UK, Mr. Glyn Hughes, Global Head of IATA Cargo, Switzerland, Mr. Turhan Özen, Chief Cargo Officer, Turkish Airlines, Mr. Amadou Diallo, CEO, DHL Global Forwarding, Middle East & Africa, Mr. Bertrand Maltaverne, Solutions Consultant, Ivalua, Austria, Mr. Fikret Ersoy, MD, BDP International, Middle East, Turkey & Africa from Qatar and across the globe who will be presenting at the conference and the summit will also host some of the world’s best solution providers and also invite attendees from leading government and private entities from Qatar. 

The Qatar Trade Summit will also feature one of the most exhaustive and inclusive knowledge sessions seen at a national summit. The conference will include 19 topics spread across 4 sessions, and two key workshops all scheduled over 3 days of high level networking and interaction. Qatar Trade Summit will assist in realising Qatar’s ambitions to become the logistics and trade leader in the Middle East. 

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About Organizer: © Qatar Trade Summit | Allan Martin | Email: info@qatartradesummit.com | allan@qatartradesummit.com | UK Tel: +44 20 3807 8492 | India Mobile: +91 96061 70760 Qatar Contact: Saf | Tel: +974 33834548 | +974 66947607 | saf@apexqatar.com LinkedIn: Qatar Trade Summit | twitter: @tradeqatar 

airfreight

Airfreight vs. Sea Freight – Which Works Better

Airfreight vs. sea freight has become a burning dilemma for all those in need of this type of services. While both solutions come with a set of advantages and disadvantages, the final choice one makes will depend on a variety of factors. We are willing to share our knowledge and findings with you so that you can make the best possible decision regarding your shipment in the given circumstances. 

Airfreight vs sea freight – the costs can be a decisive factor

Undeniably, the amount of financial means necessary to afford airfreight services is considerably higher than that of sea freight. Moreover, the appearance of the largest cargo aircraft in the world announces great changes and improvements in this field. The Antonov An-225 could cause a further rise of the airfreight costs, but it will also guarantee higher quality. On the other hand, sea freight is much more affordable and, consequently, the number one choice of a vast majority of clients. Opting for sea freight provides clients with acceptable service but at a significantly lower price.

Time matters greatly!

Most often, clients want their shipment delivered as soon as possible, which can cause problems for those offering sea freight services. Not seldom do customs issues or hold-ups at ports cause serious delays. However, we must admit that a giant step forward is evident in this field. Firstly, high-quality, modern ships are much faster now than it was the case in the past. Secondly, there are some canal upgrades that can eliminate tedious and tiring delays on some routes. Finally, sea freight forwarders can guarantee delivery times, which is vital for business owners when it comes to organization.

The type of cargo affects the final choice on airfreight vs. sea freight dilemma

The type of cargo is one of the most important factors influencing the choice in the airfreight vs. sea fright dilemma. In this case, we must admit that sea fright seems like a much better solution since it has no limitations you have to be aware of. One of the crucial pros of the maritime shipping is that you can ship even the bulkiest and extremely heavy goods. Conversely, airfreight is limited in this discipline. Before you opt for this type of goods transportation, it is advisable to make sure that the type of your cargo is acceptable. In addition, there is a very long list of the items which are prohibited and those listed as hazardous materials. Depending on your final destination, the rules and laws may differ. Yet, getting sufficient information on the subject must still be the first step in the process.

Safety of your cargo is the top priority

Understandably, the safety of cargo is always the top priority. It is important to emphasize that air cargo has to be dealt with the utmost attention and in accordance with the regulations which are very strict and clear. All the crucial elements, including handling and securing your cargo as well as the proper storage, are defined by airport regulations. This is a great benefit and a guarantee that the safety of your goods will be at the maximal level. On the other hand, we cannot say that sea freight is a bad alternative either. In this case, the goods are transported in containers, but the human factor is crucial. Proper packing strategies are essential in order to decrease any chances of potential damage during transport. If this is not conducted appropriately, the chances are some of your goods might get seriously damaged or even cause further problems on the ship.

Do not forget about the accessibility of your goods

If we analyze the accessibility of your goods as one of the criteria, airfreight is a more favorable option by all means. The procedures are clear, cargo is in smaller volumes and there are no unnecessary waitings to receive your goods. Using sea freight for your cargo often results in additional costs due to heavy congestions in seaports. If your goods are not delivered at the arranged time, you are required to pay for detention and demurrage costs, which may be a heavy burden on your budget. However, we must not forget to mention an advantage sea freight offers comparing to airfreight. The accessibility to markets is much higher in case of sea freight. The reason is very simple. When unloaded from ships, containers can move further inland by using the services of intermodal shippers

Eco-friendly practices 

Finally, let us not forget about the environment when choosing between airfreight vs sea freight. Applying eco-friendly practices is becoming increasingly important, so it does not surprise this is one of the factors shippers base their decision on. According to this particular criterion, sea freight is a more reasonable option since it has a significantly better carbon footprint. Quite the opposite, airplanes are serious polluters and require special attention and measures to reduce their carbon footprint to minimal values.

Final words on airfreight vs sea freight dilemma

The decisions and choices you make concerning airfreight vs sea freight dilemma will depend on miscellaneous factors. It is of key importance to weigh the pros and cons of each of these options and then make your decision final.  A serious effort is required to negotiate the best shipping terms and only then can you expect to ship your goods completely fuss-free.

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Susan Daniels is a passionate copywriter who loves exploring home improvement ideas and real estate market. Lately, she has gained considerable knowledge in the types of moving services and the qualities of respectable moving companies such as DA Moving NYC, for example. She enjoys giving advice on the best places to live and exciting places to visit. Traveling makes her happy as well as reading good books.

hurricane dorian

Hurricane Dorian Leaves GT USA’s Canaveral Cargo Terminal Damage-Free

The only reported undamaged container terminal at Port Canaveral will once again begin operations on Friday morning. The Canaveral Cargo Terminal (CCT) was confirmed as “cleared” following an inspection revealing no damages left behind by Hurricane Dorian.

“Although Hurricane Dorian packed quite a punch in Port Canaveral, the hard work of the Emergency Response Team, Brevard County Sheriff’s Department, USCG, Canaveral Port Authority and GT USA personnel allowed GT USA to open the Canaveral Cargo Terminal and be fully operational less than 24 hours after the storm passed,” said Peter Richards, CEO, GT USA.

“I want to extend my thanks to all parties that assisted in getting the facility up and running so quickly.  Our thoughts and prayers are with all the Bahamian people who have been affected by the devastation that Dorian brought to the north of their country.”

The multi-purpose cargo terminal was confirmed for an “expedited reopening” during the arrival of the M/V OCEAN GIANT from its resupply voyage. Proactive storm preparations between Port Canaveral and GT USA are being attributed for minimizing the time between Dorian and the continuation of operations.

Hurricane Dorian is currently being reported as a Category 2 as it approaches the North Carolina coast with reports anticipating the strongest winds to impact the region. Additional reports confirm parts of Canada are under alert including Atlantic Canada, Novia Scotia.

SCPA’s Jim Newsome Recognized Among DC Velocity Logistics Rainmakers

South Carolina Ports Authority’s (SCPA) CEO Jim Newsome is known for accomplishing significant logistics and shipping milestones in his role the last nine years including transforming the Port of Charleston to become a top 10 U.S. container port, reaching record volumes in 2019, and overseeing the development of two South Carolina port operations. These are just a few of the successful efforts Newsome can credit for earning him the coveted  DC Velocity Logistics Rainmaker title,  one month before his tenth year with SCPA. He is among eight other U.S. -based logistics professionals aka “rainmakers.”

“Global businesses, both import and export businesses, want to locate near capable ports,” Newsome said in an interview with DC Velocity. “My vision of the Port is to be the preferred port among the top 10 U.S. container ports. We are doing this by providing required port infrastructure in time to handle both anticipated growth and the deployment of big container ships. We want to make sure our Port offers the highest possible reliability in terms of productivity and efficiency.”

Beyond overseeing operations, projects, and breaking records, Newsome’s focus on company culture and workforce development at SCPA was demonstrated earlier this year as the company earned a spot on the Best Places to Work in South Carolina list.

“I have had the good fortune to work for great enterprises that were experiencing significant challenges when I joined them — you might say ‘turnaround’ situations,” Newsome said in the DC Velocity interview. “Developing a committed team of people to successfully address those challenges is what I consider my greatest professional achievement and, along the way, playing the part in the professional development of many of those key people so they could fulfill their career aspirations.”

Newsome’s exemplary leadership to the 700-person team reiterates his knowledge and expertise in the industry and what it takes to create a successful, dynamic team boasting SCPA qualities from safety and security, to adaptability, decisiveness, and enthusiasm.

“Jim Newsome has overseen the most complete and thorough overhaul of an organization that I have ever seen,” University of Tennessee professor Ted Stank said in Newsome’s Rainmaker profile. “Key to this transformation has been Jim’s vision of ports as a critical value node in the integrated end-to-end supply chain.”
Stank has also referred to Newsome as a leader that “defines the term ‘rainmaker.'”

SCPA Picks “Name the Cranes” Contest Winners

South Carolina Ports Authority (SCPA) gave elementary students in the Greenville County and Spartanburg County school districts the opportunity to select the names for two of their RTG cranes at Inland Port Greer, in addition to earning $500 for their school if selected. Students anonymously submitted a total of 522 names for the contest.

“Our Name the Cranes contest engages students to think creatively and introduces them to Port operations and equipment,” said Mike Stresemann, SCPA’s senior director of crane and equipment maintenance. “It gives students an opportunity to impact port terminals in a real way.”

Adding to dozens of student-named RTG and ship-to-shore cranes, Little Miss Sunshine and South Craneolina were the contest winners submitted by students Haven Ebel and Jack Sibley-Jones of Blythe Academy of Languages in Greenville.

“South Carolina Ports Authority strives to have an innovative and diverse workforce that thinks outside the box. Our Name the Cranes contest creates a connection between the Port of Charleston and South Carolina students, helping them to envision a career in the maritime industry,” S.C. Ports Authority COO Barbara Melvin said. “We also really enjoy seeing the creative names that students suggest for our cranes.”
The 85-foot tall Little Miss Sunshine and South Craneolina both stand at 85 feet tall and join a family of named cranes including: Daddy Long Legs, Craneous Maximus, Cranebob Bluepants, Heavy Metal and Bluesaurus Rex . 

 

12 SHIPPING COMPANIES RECOGNIZED FOR PROTECTING BLUE WHALES AND BLUE SKIES

Representatives from the Port of Los Angeles, three regional air pollution control districts, two National Marine Sanctuaries and a member of Congress and the California State Senate gathered in Wilmington, CA, on March 6 to recognize 12 shipping companies that participated in the 2018 Protecting Blue Whales and Blue Skies program.

Those receiving awards for reducing speeds in the San Francisco Bay Area and the Santa Barbara Channel region were: Mediterranean Shipping Company (MSC), Great American Lines (GALI), K Line, Nippon Yusen Kaisha (NYK) Ro-Ro Division, Hyundai Glovis, COSCO, Evergreen, Hapag Lloyd, Maersk, CMA CGM, Ocean Network Express (ONE) and Yang Ming.

Leadership from participating and supporting agencies and organizations there to recognize the shipping companies included: Lisa Wunder, Marine Environmental manager at the Port of LA; Aeron Arlin Genet of the Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District; Mike Villegas of the Ventura County Air Pollution Control District; and Michael Murphy of the Bay Area Air Quality Management District.

Also, Chris Mobley of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary; Dan Howard, NOAA Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary; and representatives for U.S. Congressman Alan Lowenthal (D-Long Beach, CA) and State Senator Ben Allen (D-Redondo Beach, CA).

 

AMERICA’S TOP 50 POWER PORTS

Each year, America’s ports handle millions of twenty-foot equivalent (TEU) containers holding cargo that is worth billions of dollars to the United States economy. These ports serve not only as an entries and exits to the U.S. but as a gateways to the rest of the world. From tax revenue to jobs, our ports are a vital part of the national economy.

While all ports work hard to process cargo quickly and efficiently, some excel above the rest. Whether they have modern equipment, green initiatives or strategic locations, these ports set the bar higher for all others.

1. Port of Los Angeles. With more than 5 million TEUs processed in 2018, the Port of Los Angeles is the No. 1 container port in the country. After breaking its own cargo record in 2017, Los Angeles again increased its TEUs in 2018, going from 4.7 million to 5 million. The port also holds the honor of being the No. 18 port in the world and the top-ranking U.S.-based port on the global list.

2. Port of Long Beach. The second port in the countdown and the second port located in California, the 3,200-acre Port of Long Beach processed more than 4.3 million TEUs in 2018. With nearly 90 percent of the port’s traffic coming from Asia, the Port of Long Beach is one of the top trade gateways with the continent.

3. The Port of New York and New Jersey. The Port of New York and New Jersey earned the No. 3 spot on the list for the second year in a row. Having been operated together by the New York Port Authority since 1948, the unified, bi-state ports comprise the third-largest port in the nation, and the busiest port on the East Coast. In 2018, their TEUs rose from 3.7 million to 4.1 million.

4. Port of Savannah. In 2018, the Port of Savannah grew its TEUs from 2.0 million to 2.2 million. It remains home to the single largest container port in North America and is the overall second-busiest container port in the United States.

5. Port of Houston. In a state where everything is bigger, the Port of Houston is the biggest port in Texas as well as the largest on the Gulf Coast. In 2018, the Port of Houston increased its TEUs from 1.7 million in 2017 to 1.8 million in 2018. This 25-mile port is also the leading breakbulk port in the U.S., processing 52 percent of project cargo on the Gulf Coast.

6. Port of Seattle. The Port of Seattle includes both the marine port, which boasts one of the largest container terminals along the entire West Coast, and Sea-Tac International Airport, which is one of the largest airports in the West as well. Part of the Northwest Seaport Alliance, the Port of Seattle helps generate $4.3 billion a year in business revenues. In 2018, the port raised its TEUs from 1.2 million to 1.5 million.

7. Port of Norfolk. The 567-acre Port of Norfolk, which is the largest terminal in the Virginia Port Authority, processed 1.3 million TEUs in 2018, increasing from 2017’s 1.2 million TEUs.

8. Port of Richmond. Just nine miles from the Golden Gate Bridge, the Port of Richmond is ranked No. 1 in San Francisco Bay for both liquid bulk and automobile tonnage. Spanning 32 miles along the spectacular bay front, Richmond benefits from the vast network of Bay Area highways that surround the port.

9. Port of Cleveland. The third-largest port in the Great Lakes region, the Port of Cleveland is also the first major port of call for ships moving along to the St. Lawrence Seaway, a 2,300 mile span that provides access from the East Coast to more than 100 inland ports. The Port of Cleveland is within an eight-hour drive to half of all American households, businesses and manufacturers.

10. Port of Tacoma. Part of the Northwest Seaport Alliance with the Port of Seattle, the Port of Tacoma has become the fourth-largest container gateway in North America. The port increased its TEUs from 1.2 million to 1.3 million in 2018, and April 2019 was their busiest April ever.

11. Port of Charleston. South Carolina’s Port of Charleston grew from 1.1 million to 1.2 million TEUs in 2018. The port, which already contributes $53 billion in economic impact to the Palmetto State, will soon have the deepest channel on the entire East Coast.

12. Port of Oakland. The fifth-busiest container port in the U.S. still advocates for small business with their Social Responsibility Division (SRD). Founded in 2001, the SRD advocates for small, local businesses as well as any local or new businesses seeking to participate in port opportunities. Oakland’s port grew in TEUs from 978,597 in 2017 to more than 1 million in 2018.

13. Port of St. Louis/Illinois. The Port of St. Louis, which spans 70 miles along both sides of the Mississippi River, is strategically positioned within 500 miles of one-third of the U.S. population. The 17th largest port in the nation includes the Municipal River Terminal, which is the only public general purpose dock in the region west of the Mississippi.

14. Port of Miami. The closest deep-water port to the Panama Canal, PortMiami increased from more than 621,000 TEUs in 2017 to over 750,000 in 2018. The port also hosts 5.5 million cruise passengers each year and is the only port south of the Port of Virginia that can handle fully laden, 14,000-TEU vessels.

15. Port Everglades. Port Everglades remains one of the busiest cruise ports in the world, welcoming 3.8 million cruise and ferry passengers each year. But it’s also the 11th busiest container cargo port in America, having moved 1.1 million TEUs in 2018.

16. The Port of Philadelphia. The 300-year-old PhilaPort is expanding with the addition of two new super Post-Panamax cranes this past March and a fifth new crane scheduled to arrive by this summer’s end. The new additions come as part of the port’s $300 million terminal improvement projects. In an effort to be greener, PhilaPort plans to switch all operations to electricity and end all diesel emissions.

17. Plaquemines Port. Located just 20 miles south of the Port of New Orleans, Plaquemines is the closest port to open water along the Mississippi River. It provides water access to 33 inland states, all in a business friendly environment.

18. Port of Baltimore. The Port of Baltimore is now the No. 1 port on the entire East Coast for roll-on/roll-off cargo (ro/ro), as well as for forestry products. The port supports more than 37,000 direct jobs, with 101,880 other jobs directly related to port activities within the state of Maryland. The port is responsible for $3.3 billion in personal income and $2.6 billion in business revenues.

19. The Port of New Orleans. The fourth-largest port in the country, Port NOLA now generates one-in-five jobs in the state of Louisiana. Meanwhile, Port NOLA businesses pay an average of 41 percent more than the average local salary. Port NOLA also generates more than $100 million in annual revenue across its cargo, industrial real estate, rail and cruise businesses—all without the assistance of tax dollars.

20. Port of San Juan. The Port of San Juan operates of 16 piers in San Juan Bay in Puerto Rico: eight for cruise passengers, eight for cargo. The port includes the only bay on the northern coast of Puerto Rico, which is surrounded by land and used as a safe harbor for ships during hurricane season. The port is home to 6.9 kilometers of berthing space, with 10.2 hectares of storage space.

21. Port of Jacksonville. The Port of Jacksonville is Florida’s largest container port and one of the busiest vehicle-handling ports in the United States. Currently undergoing a harbor deepening project, the port is preparing for the future with brand new state-of-the-art cranes, terminal upgrades and many more improvements.

22. Port of Beaumont. Never heard of the Southeast Texas port? You should have, as it’s the fifth-largest port in the U.S. based on tonnage and the No. 1 strategic military outload port in the world. Beaumont benefits from being in the heart of crude oil country.

23. Port of South Louisiana. The Port of South Louisiana is the largest port in the U.S. in total throughput tonnage. It is also top ranked for both import and total tonnage in the country, as well as being the largest port in the Western Hemisphere, handling nearly 15 percent of all total U.S. exports.

24. The Port of Port Arthur. Located in Port Arthur, Texas, the Port of Port Arthur boasts of being prepared to process any type of breakbulk cargo and can handle any commodity west of the Mississippi River. The port, which underwent a major expansion in 2000, now features updated, in-demand equipment and features.

25. Port of Wilmington. A major produce port, the Port of Wilmington is home to the largest dockside cold storage facility in the U.S. and is the top fresh fruit and juice concentrate port on the continent. It is also the top port for bananas, and the No. 1 port of entry for Moroccan clementines.

26. The Port of Mobile. Dedicated in 1928, the Port of Mobile is the only deep-water port in the state of Alabama and the largest breakbulk forest products port in America. The port contributes $486.9 million in direct and indirect tax impact to Alabama each year and has a total economic value of $22.4 billion.

27. Port of Boston. The largest port in Massachusetts, the port of Boston broke records in 2018 with more than 298,000 TEUs shipped through its Conley Container Terminal. Also known as Massport, the port is responsible for nearly 120,000 jobs both directly and indirectly.

28. Port of Palm Beach. The 18th busiest container port in America, the Port of Palm Beach sees 80 percent of its cargo being exports to the Caribbean Islands. Each year, the port exports 900,000 tons or 100 percent of the sugar produced in the area.

29. Port of Wilmington. The North Carolina port, which is not to be confused with the Port of Wilmington in Delaware, spans 284 acres of land and nine berths. The port boasts more than 1 million square feet of covered storage and is located within 700 miles of more than 70 percent of the U.S. industrial base.

30. Port of Duluth-Superior. The “Bulk Cargo Capital” of the Great Lakes, the Port of Duluth-Superior is the farthest inland freshwater seaport in the U.S., serving as a major connection to Canada. With 49 miles of waterfront space and 20 privately owned docks, the port processes almost 900 vessels each year and 35 million tons of cargo.

31. Port of Detroit. The largest seaport in Michigan, the 80-acre Port of Detroit is the third-largest, steel-handling port in America. The port is home to 29 terminal facilities.

32. Port of Texas City. Situated in the Bay of Galveston, the Port of Texas City is the ninth-largest deepwater port in America—and it will soon be deeper as it is dropping to a 45-foot depth. The Port of Texas City is the fourth-largest port in Texas and is popular for shipping crude oil, chemicals and petroleum.

33. Port of Chicago. The Port of Chicago is an inland port positioned along the Calumet River. The 8,930,000-square-foot port offers 3,000 linear feet of ship berthing. Spanning 1,600 acres, the port also has storage along Lake Calumet and Lake Michigan.

34. Port of Two Harbors. Located along Lake Superior’s northern shore, Minnesota’s Port of Two Harbors is a deep draft commercial harbor. Initially developed as an iron ore processing establishment, today Two Harbors still deals primarily in iron ore and taconite, though they have added timber to their exports.

35. Port of Chester. Located on the west bank of the Delaware River, Pennsylvania’s Port of Chester is situated between PhilaPort and the Port of Wilmington. Privately owned by Penn Terminals, the Port of Chester prides itself on customer service and hard-working employees. The 80-scre port has 300,000 square feet of dry space and 2.85 million cubic feet of reefer space.

36. Port of Gulfport. For more than 300 years, the Port of Gulfport has been a popular spot for vessels in the Gulf of Mexico. Today, the port is the third-largest container port in the Gulf and the second largest importer of green fruit in the U.S. In addition to 6,000 feet of berthing space, the 300-acre deepwater port has 110 acres of open storage, and an additional 400,000 square feet of covered warehouse space.

37. Port of San Diego. The Port of San Diego is home to two terminals that span across 231 acres of land. Equipped to handle everything from temperature-controlled goods and perishables to produce and frozen goods, the port prides itself on specializing in handling high volumes of cold storage. With their streamlined processes, the port moves quickly and efficiently to eliminate waste and keep perishables fresher, longer.

38. Port of Hueneme. California’s Port of Hueneme may not be a household name, but it is earning a name for itself as a faster, less-congested alternative to the two nearest major ports in San Francisco and Los Angeles. Hueneme processes more than $9 billion in cargo annually and produces more than 13,000 jobs for the greater Ventura County area.

39. Port of Tampa Bay. The Port of Tampa Bay is the largest cargo tonnage port in Florida, processing more than 37 million tons of cargo annually. The port specializes in bulk, containerized and general cargo. Tampa Bay is also one of the top fertilizer export ports in the world, and the largest steel handling port in the Sunshine State.

40. Port Freeport. Located in Freeport, Texas, Port Freeport is one of the nation’s fastest growing ports. It specializes in breakbulk and project cargo and recently installed a 110 MT Gottwald Mobile Harbor Crane to help speed processing of project cargo. The port plans to begin construction on a depth expansion this year that would drop it from 46 feet to 51-56 feet deep, making it the deepest port in the Lone Star State.

41. Port of Honolulu. The Port of Honolulu is both a tourist attraction and commercial harbor facility in one. The main Hawaiian island’s main port, Honolulu processes 11 million tons of cargo annually, part of which accounts for 80 percent of the state’s required goods.

42. Port of Everett. Washington state’s third-largest port handles much of Washington’s aerospace cargo. In fact, the port accommodates 100 percent of the oversized parts for five aerospace tanker programs. The port is the No. 2 export customs district in the state and No. 5 on the entire West Coast.

43. Port of Valdez. The northernmost ice-free port in the U.S. serves as the base of the trans-Alaska pipeline (TAPS). The Port of Valdez provides easy access to the interior of Alaska, Canada, the Pacific Rim and the U.S. Pacific Northwest.

44. Port of Corpus Christi. The port’s straight, 47-foot deep channel serves as a gateway to the Gulf of Mexico and the rest of the United States. It also boasts the strongest open wharf on the Gulf, making the Port of Corpus Christi ideal for a variety of cargo. Due to its location, the port handles large quantities of energy products.

45. Port of Portland. Portland, Oregon’s port generates 27,000 local jobs and $1.8 billion in wages for workers in the state. The only deep-draft container port in Oregon has five berths and eight intermodal tracks within its 419-acre span.

46. Port of Kalama. The port in Southwest Washington employs more than 1,000 workers and is home to more than 30 companies. With a 43-foot deep draft navigation channel, the port sprawls for five miles along the Columbia River. The port has both shovel-ready and move in-ready facilities as well as an office park and easy access to a variety of transportation modes, including rail, highway and river.

47. Port of Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky. The 136-year-old Port of Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky was recently expanded from 26 miles to 226.5 miles. With 129 active docks and terminals between Ohio and Kentucky, the new and improved port is now ranked 15th in the nation and is the busiest inland port in America.

48. Port of Huntington Tri-State. West Virginia’s largest river port—and the largest inland river port in the country—has a presence on the Scioto River, Big Sandy River and the Kanawha Rivers respectively.

49. Port of Pittsburgh. Port Pitt is the fourth-busiest inland port in America and the 23rd busiest port overall, handling around 9,000 barges annually. Port Pitt spans 12 counties and more than 200 miles of commercial waterways in Pennsylvania.

50. Port of Lake Charles. The Louisiana port was recently named the seventh-fastest growing port in the country by Forbes as well as the 12th busiest seaport in America. Comprised of two marine terminals and two industrial parks, the Port of Lake Charles is known for processing a wide variety of cargo including bagged rice and other food products, project cargoes, barite, metals and petroleum products.

A port’s success at increasing TEUs over previous years is a promising sign for our economy. More TEUs means faster processing times, saving money (and hopefully, raising profits) for everyone from the shipping company to the end user. As you have seen, these 50 ports have either raised their TEUs dramatically or worked hard to improve their facilities or equipment to make cargo processing more efficient for everyone.

Global Ports: Balancing Cargo Capacity Demands

Beyond proactivity and preparation, global ports focus on redefining infrastructure while evaluating opportunities for significant increases in cargo intake. But what about the ports that aren’t seeing the results they want? Let’s take a look at the European Ports and the challenges and proposed solutions featured in an article from Port Strategy. Of all the solutions presented and discussed, the first was the need of infrastructure evaluation.

“The challenge ports everywhere face now, is to implement projects which often are financially unattractive to the port authority and even less attractive to external investors, but which are essential for wider societal and economic reasons. Some ports are financially strong enough to finance such projects and accept the low financial returns. Other ports are challenged to implement projects which are essential but are entirely beyond their means,” details a report shared by the ESPO.

Another challenge is the demand for increased cargo but a limit in capacity, as many ports claim they are close to reaching max capacity, but want to avoid providing an opportunity for competitors to swoop up what they can’t make room for. Gauging these issues requires a carefully thought out and strategic approach to ensure shippers evaluate next steps for 2019. In the theme of modernization, Port of Oakland shared insight into their 2018-2022 strategic plan, which is inclusive of growing net revenue, modernizing and maintaining infrastructure, care for the environment and improving customer service.

The use of technology to streamline operations was one of the highlighted objectives and strategies (impacting almost every area of the business) the report emphasized on. In the age of information technology, automation and technology solutions, this goal would provide more than just a seamless flow of information, but supply owners, customers and employees improved efficiencies and reduced room for error. There seems to be a trend among these ports.

“Each of our businesses has specific modernization and maintenance objectives to meet, notably development of long-term asset management plans. Moreover, those objectives require careful attention to environmental, social responsibility and human resources issues,” the report says.

The key to implementing strong logistics solution can be found in an all-in-one approach that is inclusive of your company goals and vision, the well being and safety of your employees, customer satisfaction, competitive advantage as well as cost-effectiveness and proactivity. The common denominator is found in digitization through advanced technology solutions, fully integrated within the service platforms, touching on all bases of the operations and supply chain.