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Hurricane Dorian Leaves GT USA’s Canaveral Cargo Terminal Damage-Free

hurricane dorian

Hurricane Dorian Leaves GT USA’s Canaveral Cargo Terminal Damage-Free

The only reported undamaged container terminal at Port Canaveral will once again begin operations on Friday morning. The Canaveral Cargo Terminal (CCT) was confirmed as “cleared” following an inspection revealing no damages left behind by Hurricane Dorian.

“Although Hurricane Dorian packed quite a punch in Port Canaveral, the hard work of the Emergency Response Team, Brevard County Sheriff’s Department, USCG, Canaveral Port Authority and GT USA personnel allowed GT USA to open the Canaveral Cargo Terminal and be fully operational less than 24 hours after the storm passed,” said Peter Richards, CEO, GT USA.

“I want to extend my thanks to all parties that assisted in getting the facility up and running so quickly.  Our thoughts and prayers are with all the Bahamian people who have been affected by the devastation that Dorian brought to the north of their country.”

The multi-purpose cargo terminal was confirmed for an “expedited reopening” during the arrival of the M/V OCEAN GIANT from its resupply voyage. Proactive storm preparations between Port Canaveral and GT USA are being attributed for minimizing the time between Dorian and the continuation of operations.

Hurricane Dorian is currently being reported as a Category 2 as it approaches the North Carolina coast with reports anticipating the strongest winds to impact the region. Additional reports confirm parts of Canada are under alert including Atlantic Canada, Novia Scotia.

SCPA’s Jim Newsome Recognized Among DC Velocity Logistics Rainmakers

South Carolina Ports Authority’s (SCPA) CEO Jim Newsome is known for accomplishing significant logistics and shipping milestones in his role the last nine years including transforming the Port of Charleston to become a top 10 U.S. container port, reaching record volumes in 2019, and overseeing the development of two South Carolina port operations. These are just a few of the successful efforts Newsome can credit for earning him the coveted  DC Velocity Logistics Rainmaker title,  one month before his tenth year with SCPA. He is among eight other U.S. -based logistics professionals aka “rainmakers.”

“Global businesses, both import and export businesses, want to locate near capable ports,” Newsome said in an interview with DC Velocity. “My vision of the Port is to be the preferred port among the top 10 U.S. container ports. We are doing this by providing required port infrastructure in time to handle both anticipated growth and the deployment of big container ships. We want to make sure our Port offers the highest possible reliability in terms of productivity and efficiency.”

Beyond overseeing operations, projects, and breaking records, Newsome’s focus on company culture and workforce development at SCPA was demonstrated earlier this year as the company earned a spot on the Best Places to Work in South Carolina list.

“I have had the good fortune to work for great enterprises that were experiencing significant challenges when I joined them — you might say ‘turnaround’ situations,” Newsome said in the DC Velocity interview. “Developing a committed team of people to successfully address those challenges is what I consider my greatest professional achievement and, along the way, playing the part in the professional development of many of those key people so they could fulfill their career aspirations.”

Newsome’s exemplary leadership to the 700-person team reiterates his knowledge and expertise in the industry and what it takes to create a successful, dynamic team boasting SCPA qualities from safety and security, to adaptability, decisiveness, and enthusiasm.

“Jim Newsome has overseen the most complete and thorough overhaul of an organization that I have ever seen,” University of Tennessee professor Ted Stank said in Newsome’s Rainmaker profile. “Key to this transformation has been Jim’s vision of ports as a critical value node in the integrated end-to-end supply chain.”
Stank has also referred to Newsome as a leader that “defines the term ‘rainmaker.'”

SCPA Picks “Name the Cranes” Contest Winners

South Carolina Ports Authority (SCPA) gave elementary students in the Greenville County and Spartanburg County school districts the opportunity to select the names for two of their RTG cranes at Inland Port Greer, in addition to earning $500 for their school if selected. Students anonymously submitted a total of 522 names for the contest.

“Our Name the Cranes contest engages students to think creatively and introduces them to Port operations and equipment,” said Mike Stresemann, SCPA’s senior director of crane and equipment maintenance. “It gives students an opportunity to impact port terminals in a real way.”

Adding to dozens of student-named RTG and ship-to-shore cranes, Little Miss Sunshine and South Craneolina were the contest winners submitted by students Haven Ebel and Jack Sibley-Jones of Blythe Academy of Languages in Greenville.

“South Carolina Ports Authority strives to have an innovative and diverse workforce that thinks outside the box. Our Name the Cranes contest creates a connection between the Port of Charleston and South Carolina students, helping them to envision a career in the maritime industry,” S.C. Ports Authority COO Barbara Melvin said. “We also really enjoy seeing the creative names that students suggest for our cranes.”
The 85-foot tall Little Miss Sunshine and South Craneolina both stand at 85 feet tall and join a family of named cranes including: Daddy Long Legs, Craneous Maximus, Cranebob Bluepants, Heavy Metal and Bluesaurus Rex . 

 

12 SHIPPING COMPANIES RECOGNIZED FOR PROTECTING BLUE WHALES AND BLUE SKIES

Representatives from the Port of Los Angeles, three regional air pollution control districts, two National Marine Sanctuaries and a member of Congress and the California State Senate gathered in Wilmington, CA, on March 6 to recognize 12 shipping companies that participated in the 2018 Protecting Blue Whales and Blue Skies program.

Those receiving awards for reducing speeds in the San Francisco Bay Area and the Santa Barbara Channel region were: Mediterranean Shipping Company (MSC), Great American Lines (GALI), K Line, Nippon Yusen Kaisha (NYK) Ro-Ro Division, Hyundai Glovis, COSCO, Evergreen, Hapag Lloyd, Maersk, CMA CGM, Ocean Network Express (ONE) and Yang Ming.

Leadership from participating and supporting agencies and organizations there to recognize the shipping companies included: Lisa Wunder, Marine Environmental manager at the Port of LA; Aeron Arlin Genet of the Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District; Mike Villegas of the Ventura County Air Pollution Control District; and Michael Murphy of the Bay Area Air Quality Management District.

Also, Chris Mobley of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary; Dan Howard, NOAA Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary; and representatives for U.S. Congressman Alan Lowenthal (D-Long Beach, CA) and State Senator Ben Allen (D-Redondo Beach, CA).

 

AMERICA’S TOP 50 POWER PORTS

Each year, America’s ports handle millions of twenty-foot equivalent (TEU) containers holding cargo that is worth billions of dollars to the United States economy. These ports serve not only as an entries and exits to the U.S. but as a gateways to the rest of the world. From tax revenue to jobs, our ports are a vital part of the national economy.

While all ports work hard to process cargo quickly and efficiently, some excel above the rest. Whether they have modern equipment, green initiatives or strategic locations, these ports set the bar higher for all others.

1. Port of Los Angeles. With more than 5 million TEUs processed in 2018, the Port of Los Angeles is the No. 1 container port in the country. After breaking its own cargo record in 2017, Los Angeles again increased its TEUs in 2018, going from 4.7 million to 5 million. The port also holds the honor of being the No. 18 port in the world and the top-ranking U.S.-based port on the global list.

2. Port of Long Beach. The second port in the countdown and the second port located in California, the 3,200-acre Port of Long Beach processed more than 4.3 million TEUs in 2018. With nearly 90 percent of the port’s traffic coming from Asia, the Port of Long Beach is one of the top trade gateways with the continent.

3. The Port of New York and New Jersey. The Port of New York and New Jersey earned the No. 3 spot on the list for the second year in a row. Having been operated together by the New York Port Authority since 1948, the unified, bi-state ports comprise the third-largest port in the nation, and the busiest port on the East Coast. In 2018, their TEUs rose from 3.7 million to 4.1 million.

4. Port of Savannah. In 2018, the Port of Savannah grew its TEUs from 2.0 million to 2.2 million. It remains home to the single largest container port in North America and is the overall second-busiest container port in the United States.

5. Port of Houston. In a state where everything is bigger, the Port of Houston is the biggest port in Texas as well as the largest on the Gulf Coast. In 2018, the Port of Houston increased its TEUs from 1.7 million in 2017 to 1.8 million in 2018. This 25-mile port is also the leading breakbulk port in the U.S., processing 52 percent of project cargo on the Gulf Coast.

6. Port of Seattle. The Port of Seattle includes both the marine port, which boasts one of the largest container terminals along the entire West Coast, and Sea-Tac International Airport, which is one of the largest airports in the West as well. Part of the Northwest Seaport Alliance, the Port of Seattle helps generate $4.3 billion a year in business revenues. In 2018, the port raised its TEUs from 1.2 million to 1.5 million.

7. Port of Norfolk. The 567-acre Port of Norfolk, which is the largest terminal in the Virginia Port Authority, processed 1.3 million TEUs in 2018, increasing from 2017’s 1.2 million TEUs.

8. Port of Richmond. Just nine miles from the Golden Gate Bridge, the Port of Richmond is ranked No. 1 in San Francisco Bay for both liquid bulk and automobile tonnage. Spanning 32 miles along the spectacular bay front, Richmond benefits from the vast network of Bay Area highways that surround the port.

9. Port of Cleveland. The third-largest port in the Great Lakes region, the Port of Cleveland is also the first major port of call for ships moving along to the St. Lawrence Seaway, a 2,300 mile span that provides access from the East Coast to more than 100 inland ports. The Port of Cleveland is within an eight-hour drive to half of all American households, businesses and manufacturers.

10. Port of Tacoma. Part of the Northwest Seaport Alliance with the Port of Seattle, the Port of Tacoma has become the fourth-largest container gateway in North America. The port increased its TEUs from 1.2 million to 1.3 million in 2018, and April 2019 was their busiest April ever.

11. Port of Charleston. South Carolina’s Port of Charleston grew from 1.1 million to 1.2 million TEUs in 2018. The port, which already contributes $53 billion in economic impact to the Palmetto State, will soon have the deepest channel on the entire East Coast.

12. Port of Oakland. The fifth-busiest container port in the U.S. still advocates for small business with their Social Responsibility Division (SRD). Founded in 2001, the SRD advocates for small, local businesses as well as any local or new businesses seeking to participate in port opportunities. Oakland’s port grew in TEUs from 978,597 in 2017 to more than 1 million in 2018.

13. Port of St. Louis/Illinois. The Port of St. Louis, which spans 70 miles along both sides of the Mississippi River, is strategically positioned within 500 miles of one-third of the U.S. population. The 17th largest port in the nation includes the Municipal River Terminal, which is the only public general purpose dock in the region west of the Mississippi.

14. Port of Miami. The closest deep-water port to the Panama Canal, PortMiami increased from more than 621,000 TEUs in 2017 to over 750,000 in 2018. The port also hosts 5.5 million cruise passengers each year and is the only port south of the Port of Virginia that can handle fully laden, 14,000-TEU vessels.

15. Port Everglades. Port Everglades remains one of the busiest cruise ports in the world, welcoming 3.8 million cruise and ferry passengers each year. But it’s also the 11th busiest container cargo port in America, having moved 1.1 million TEUs in 2018.

16. The Port of Philadelphia. The 300-year-old PhilaPort is expanding with the addition of two new super Post-Panamax cranes this past March and a fifth new crane scheduled to arrive by this summer’s end. The new additions come as part of the port’s $300 million terminal improvement projects. In an effort to be greener, PhilaPort plans to switch all operations to electricity and end all diesel emissions.

17. Plaquemines Port. Located just 20 miles south of the Port of New Orleans, Plaquemines is the closest port to open water along the Mississippi River. It provides water access to 33 inland states, all in a business friendly environment.

18. Port of Baltimore. The Port of Baltimore is now the No. 1 port on the entire East Coast for roll-on/roll-off cargo (ro/ro), as well as for forestry products. The port supports more than 37,000 direct jobs, with 101,880 other jobs directly related to port activities within the state of Maryland. The port is responsible for $3.3 billion in personal income and $2.6 billion in business revenues.

19. The Port of New Orleans. The fourth-largest port in the country, Port NOLA now generates one-in-five jobs in the state of Louisiana. Meanwhile, Port NOLA businesses pay an average of 41 percent more than the average local salary. Port NOLA also generates more than $100 million in annual revenue across its cargo, industrial real estate, rail and cruise businesses—all without the assistance of tax dollars.

20. Port of San Juan. The Port of San Juan operates of 16 piers in San Juan Bay in Puerto Rico: eight for cruise passengers, eight for cargo. The port includes the only bay on the northern coast of Puerto Rico, which is surrounded by land and used as a safe harbor for ships during hurricane season. The port is home to 6.9 kilometers of berthing space, with 10.2 hectares of storage space.

21. Port of Jacksonville. The Port of Jacksonville is Florida’s largest container port and one of the busiest vehicle-handling ports in the United States. Currently undergoing a harbor deepening project, the port is preparing for the future with brand new state-of-the-art cranes, terminal upgrades and many more improvements.

22. Port of Beaumont. Never heard of the Southeast Texas port? You should have, as it’s the fifth-largest port in the U.S. based on tonnage and the No. 1 strategic military outload port in the world. Beaumont benefits from being in the heart of crude oil country.

23. Port of South Louisiana. The Port of South Louisiana is the largest port in the U.S. in total throughput tonnage. It is also top ranked for both import and total tonnage in the country, as well as being the largest port in the Western Hemisphere, handling nearly 15 percent of all total U.S. exports.

24. The Port of Port Arthur. Located in Port Arthur, Texas, the Port of Port Arthur boasts of being prepared to process any type of breakbulk cargo and can handle any commodity west of the Mississippi River. The port, which underwent a major expansion in 2000, now features updated, in-demand equipment and features.

25. Port of Wilmington. A major produce port, the Port of Wilmington is home to the largest dockside cold storage facility in the U.S. and is the top fresh fruit and juice concentrate port on the continent. It is also the top port for bananas, and the No. 1 port of entry for Moroccan clementines.

26. The Port of Mobile. Dedicated in 1928, the Port of Mobile is the only deep-water port in the state of Alabama and the largest breakbulk forest products port in America. The port contributes $486.9 million in direct and indirect tax impact to Alabama each year and has a total economic value of $22.4 billion.

27. Port of Boston. The largest port in Massachusetts, the port of Boston broke records in 2018 with more than 298,000 TEUs shipped through its Conley Container Terminal. Also known as Massport, the port is responsible for nearly 120,000 jobs both directly and indirectly.

28. Port of Palm Beach. The 18th busiest container port in America, the Port of Palm Beach sees 80 percent of its cargo being exports to the Caribbean Islands. Each year, the port exports 900,000 tons or 100 percent of the sugar produced in the area.

29. Port of Wilmington. The North Carolina port, which is not to be confused with the Port of Wilmington in Delaware, spans 284 acres of land and nine berths. The port boasts more than 1 million square feet of covered storage and is located within 700 miles of more than 70 percent of the U.S. industrial base.

30. Port of Duluth-Superior. The “Bulk Cargo Capital” of the Great Lakes, the Port of Duluth-Superior is the farthest inland freshwater seaport in the U.S., serving as a major connection to Canada. With 49 miles of waterfront space and 20 privately owned docks, the port processes almost 900 vessels each year and 35 million tons of cargo.

31. Port of Detroit. The largest seaport in Michigan, the 80-acre Port of Detroit is the third-largest, steel-handling port in America. The port is home to 29 terminal facilities.

32. Port of Texas City. Situated in the Bay of Galveston, the Port of Texas City is the ninth-largest deepwater port in America—and it will soon be deeper as it is dropping to a 45-foot depth. The Port of Texas City is the fourth-largest port in Texas and is popular for shipping crude oil, chemicals and petroleum.

33. Port of Chicago. The Port of Chicago is an inland port positioned along the Calumet River. The 8,930,000-square-foot port offers 3,000 linear feet of ship berthing. Spanning 1,600 acres, the port also has storage along Lake Calumet and Lake Michigan.

34. Port of Two Harbors. Located along Lake Superior’s northern shore, Minnesota’s Port of Two Harbors is a deep draft commercial harbor. Initially developed as an iron ore processing establishment, today Two Harbors still deals primarily in iron ore and taconite, though they have added timber to their exports.

35. Port of Chester. Located on the west bank of the Delaware River, Pennsylvania’s Port of Chester is situated between PhilaPort and the Port of Wilmington. Privately owned by Penn Terminals, the Port of Chester prides itself on customer service and hard-working employees. The 80-scre port has 300,000 square feet of dry space and 2.85 million cubic feet of reefer space.

36. Port of Gulfport. For more than 300 years, the Port of Gulfport has been a popular spot for vessels in the Gulf of Mexico. Today, the port is the third-largest container port in the Gulf and the second largest importer of green fruit in the U.S. In addition to 6,000 feet of berthing space, the 300-acre deepwater port has 110 acres of open storage, and an additional 400,000 square feet of covered warehouse space.

37. Port of San Diego. The Port of San Diego is home to two terminals that span across 231 acres of land. Equipped to handle everything from temperature-controlled goods and perishables to produce and frozen goods, the port prides itself on specializing in handling high volumes of cold storage. With their streamlined processes, the port moves quickly and efficiently to eliminate waste and keep perishables fresher, longer.

38. Port of Hueneme. California’s Port of Hueneme may not be a household name, but it is earning a name for itself as a faster, less-congested alternative to the two nearest major ports in San Francisco and Los Angeles. Hueneme processes more than $9 billion in cargo annually and produces more than 13,000 jobs for the greater Ventura County area.

39. Port of Tampa Bay. The Port of Tampa Bay is the largest cargo tonnage port in Florida, processing more than 37 million tons of cargo annually. The port specializes in bulk, containerized and general cargo. Tampa Bay is also one of the top fertilizer export ports in the world, and the largest steel handling port in the Sunshine State.

40. Port Freeport. Located in Freeport, Texas, Port Freeport is one of the nation’s fastest growing ports. It specializes in breakbulk and project cargo and recently installed a 110 MT Gottwald Mobile Harbor Crane to help speed processing of project cargo. The port plans to begin construction on a depth expansion this year that would drop it from 46 feet to 51-56 feet deep, making it the deepest port in the Lone Star State.

41. Port of Honolulu. The Port of Honolulu is both a tourist attraction and commercial harbor facility in one. The main Hawaiian island’s main port, Honolulu processes 11 million tons of cargo annually, part of which accounts for 80 percent of the state’s required goods.

42. Port of Everett. Washington state’s third-largest port handles much of Washington’s aerospace cargo. In fact, the port accommodates 100 percent of the oversized parts for five aerospace tanker programs. The port is the No. 2 export customs district in the state and No. 5 on the entire West Coast.

43. Port of Valdez. The northernmost ice-free port in the U.S. serves as the base of the trans-Alaska pipeline (TAPS). The Port of Valdez provides easy access to the interior of Alaska, Canada, the Pacific Rim and the U.S. Pacific Northwest.

44. Port of Corpus Christi. The port’s straight, 47-foot deep channel serves as a gateway to the Gulf of Mexico and the rest of the United States. It also boasts the strongest open wharf on the Gulf, making the Port of Corpus Christi ideal for a variety of cargo. Due to its location, the port handles large quantities of energy products.

45. Port of Portland. Portland, Oregon’s port generates 27,000 local jobs and $1.8 billion in wages for workers in the state. The only deep-draft container port in Oregon has five berths and eight intermodal tracks within its 419-acre span.

46. Port of Kalama. The port in Southwest Washington employs more than 1,000 workers and is home to more than 30 companies. With a 43-foot deep draft navigation channel, the port sprawls for five miles along the Columbia River. The port has both shovel-ready and move in-ready facilities as well as an office park and easy access to a variety of transportation modes, including rail, highway and river.

47. Port of Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky. The 136-year-old Port of Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky was recently expanded from 26 miles to 226.5 miles. With 129 active docks and terminals between Ohio and Kentucky, the new and improved port is now ranked 15th in the nation and is the busiest inland port in America.

48. Port of Huntington Tri-State. West Virginia’s largest river port—and the largest inland river port in the country—has a presence on the Scioto River, Big Sandy River and the Kanawha Rivers respectively.

49. Port of Pittsburgh. Port Pitt is the fourth-busiest inland port in America and the 23rd busiest port overall, handling around 9,000 barges annually. Port Pitt spans 12 counties and more than 200 miles of commercial waterways in Pennsylvania.

50. Port of Lake Charles. The Louisiana port was recently named the seventh-fastest growing port in the country by Forbes as well as the 12th busiest seaport in America. Comprised of two marine terminals and two industrial parks, the Port of Lake Charles is known for processing a wide variety of cargo including bagged rice and other food products, project cargoes, barite, metals and petroleum products.

A port’s success at increasing TEUs over previous years is a promising sign for our economy. More TEUs means faster processing times, saving money (and hopefully, raising profits) for everyone from the shipping company to the end user. As you have seen, these 50 ports have either raised their TEUs dramatically or worked hard to improve their facilities or equipment to make cargo processing more efficient for everyone.

Global Ports: Balancing Cargo Capacity Demands

Beyond proactivity and preparation, global ports focus on redefining infrastructure while evaluating opportunities for significant increases in cargo intake. But what about the ports that aren’t seeing the results they want? Let’s take a look at the European Ports and the challenges and proposed solutions featured in an article from Port Strategy. Of all the solutions presented and discussed, the first was the need of infrastructure evaluation.

“The challenge ports everywhere face now, is to implement projects which often are financially unattractive to the port authority and even less attractive to external investors, but which are essential for wider societal and economic reasons. Some ports are financially strong enough to finance such projects and accept the low financial returns. Other ports are challenged to implement projects which are essential but are entirely beyond their means,” details a report shared by the ESPO.

Another challenge is the demand for increased cargo but a limit in capacity, as many ports claim they are close to reaching max capacity, but want to avoid providing an opportunity for competitors to swoop up what they can’t make room for. Gauging these issues requires a carefully thought out and strategic approach to ensure shippers evaluate next steps for 2019. In the theme of modernization, Port of Oakland shared insight into their 2018-2022 strategic plan, which is inclusive of growing net revenue, modernizing and maintaining infrastructure, care for the environment and improving customer service.

The use of technology to streamline operations was one of the highlighted objectives and strategies (impacting almost every area of the business) the report emphasized on. In the age of information technology, automation and technology solutions, this goal would provide more than just a seamless flow of information, but supply owners, customers and employees improved efficiencies and reduced room for error. There seems to be a trend among these ports.

“Each of our businesses has specific modernization and maintenance objectives to meet, notably development of long-term asset management plans. Moreover, those objectives require careful attention to environmental, social responsibility and human resources issues,” the report says.

The key to implementing strong logistics solution can be found in an all-in-one approach that is inclusive of your company goals and vision, the well being and safety of your employees, customer satisfaction, competitive advantage as well as cost-effectiveness and proactivity. The common denominator is found in digitization through advanced technology solutions, fully integrated within the service platforms, touching on all bases of the operations and supply chain.

Breakbulk Europe Opens Today

21 MAY 2019, BREMEN, Germany—Breakbulk Europe, the world’s largest event for the project cargo and breakbulk industry, opens its doors at Messe Bremen to an expected crowd of 11,000 from 120 countries today. The Welcome Reception will be held from 17:00 – 20:00, followed by two days of exhibition, conference programming and networking activities.

Breakbulk Europe 2019 returned to Bremen for a second year and will be held in the same location in 2020. With unwavering support from its host city, the event will officially be opened by Mayor Dr. Carsten Sieling, president of the Senate of the Federal State of Bremen, along with Senator Martin Günthner, Minister of Economic Affairs, Labour and Ports for the Federal State of Bremen, and Robert Howe, managing director of bremenports, the host port for the event, and Nick Davison, portfolio director for the event organizer ITE Group.

While being the biggest provides a competitive edge, size is not enough for an industry that is constantly evolving with the global market. “We listened to our customers feedback from last year’s event and have made every effort to deliver an experience that will meet, and hopefully exceed their expectations,” Davison said. “Breakbulk Europe will have a better VIP experience, a stronger and more diverse content offering, more areas for our community to network and have fun, free transport for all attendees across the city, new ports, a new hall … I could go on and on!”

The value for companies in this specialized market to exhibit at Breakbulk Europe has spread and is evidenced by 80 new exhibitors among the more than 550 participating in the show. “Breakbulk Europe will see its first Russian, Danish and Croatian ports,” the event’s director Maleha Khan said. “It’s not just about more exhibitors, it’s about encouraging the right exhibitors to participate. “

“This year’s show will have stronger representation from key sectors such as ports in regions where project cargo is being shipped in greater volumes. In fact, as new areas of opportunity open around the world, you’ll see them reflected in the mix of new exhibitors on the show floor.”

Extensive market research was conducted to identify the topics that will be discussed over the two-day conference in two themed areas: the Main Stage in hall 4 will focus on business strategy, case studies and sector-specific issues, while the new Tech & Innovation Hub in Hall 6 will tackle tools for change and a how-to approach on implementation. More than 70 experts, most of whom are working industry professionals, will welcome audience input, so conversation is sure to be lively and offer practical takeaways for all those involved in the industry.

Tickets are available at the door for €200, and include the exhibition, all sessions on the Main Stage and in the new Tech & Innovation Hub, along with free transportation by tram, bus and train via the badge, thanks to the City of Bremen.

For details, see the Breakbulk Europe 2019 Preview at https://www.europe.breakbulk.com/page/preview.

About Breakbulk Europe 2019

Breakbulk Europe has become the global hub for the entire industrial project supply chain, including the world’s foremost manufacturers, oil & gas companies, EPCs, carriers, ports, logistics firms, specialized transporters and related service providers. This year’s event is expected to bring together around 11,000 professionals from more than 120 countries. To request exhibiting and sponsorship information and to register for the event, visit europe.breakbulk.com.

Breakbulk Europe is one of four Breakbulk global events, along with Breakbulk Americas in Houston (8- 10 October 2019), Breakbulk Middle East in Dubai (25-26 February 2020), and Breakbulk Asia in Shanghai (18-19 March 2020).

About ITE Group

ITE Group is one of the world’s leading organizers of international trade exhibitions and conferences and specialize in organizing events that help to connect your business to the world. We organize over 240 exhibitions and conferences each year worldwide with many market leading events and well-known brands in key industry sectors.

Press contact:

Leslie Meredith

Marketing Director

Breakbulk Events & Media

E: Leslie.Meredith@breakbulk.com

T: +1 801 201 5971

South Carolina Ports Authority Continues Growth Pattern

The month of April proved to be another success according to reported numbers released from South Carolina Ports Authority confirming a 4.2 percent increase in volumes moved across the Wando Welch and North Charleston container terminals compared to last April.

Inland Port Greer reached its second highest volume month in history with
112,952 moves as well as Inland Port Dillon with 3,411 rail moves – one year after its opening. Inland Port Dillon reported a total of 24,423 rail moves  since the start of SCPA’s fiscal year.

SCPA’s fiscal year-to-date container volume growth has increased by 10.4 percent with roughly 2 million TEUs handled nine months.

“April was strong for SCPA’s container business, supporting volumes well above planned levels with only two months remaining in the fiscal year,” said Jim Newsome, SCPA president and CEO. “Our continued growth is testament to the commitment and skills of our employees and maritime community, and we look forward to a very positive FY2019 finish in June.”

Beyond substantial growth patterns in container volumes, SCPA’s breakbulk operations reported robust numbers in non-containerized cargo in the month of April. A total of 65,778 pier tons were reported in April of which includes 19,415 vehicles. Additionally, SCPA confirmed 116,443 pier containers were handled in April, totaling 1.1 million containers for fiscal year to date.

The Breakbulk, RoRo and Heavy Lift Industries Gear Up for AntwerpXL 2019

Thousands of industry professionals will gather at the Antwerp Expo in the Port of Antwerp next week when AntwerpXL 2019, the highly-anticipated inaugural event for the breakbulk, RoRo and heavy lift industries, opens its doors. The event, which takes place from 7-9 May 2019, will attract the sector’s top industry names, who recognise the unrivalled business, networking and knowledge sharing opportunities the show has to offer. 

Exhibitors on Show

Over 100 companies, including major names such as Boeckmans, Wallenius Wilhelmsen (WW), Fast Lines Belgium and MSC Belgium, will use the event’s platform to showcase market-leading products and services, launch new technologies and make major announcements to a captive international audience.

WW Solutions will highlight its global terminal network and demonstrate its terminal handling capacities for breakbulk cargo, including storage, loading and discharge capabilities via rail, barge, RoRo and LoLo. Also on show, WW Ocean will highlight its deep-sea solutions for breakbulk and project cargo; a fleet of 120 vessels, all able to accommodate cargo stretching up to 6.5 metres tall and weighing up to 400 tonnes.

Both Central Oceans and Rollit CARGO will demonstrate a complete range of services offered to facilitate the transport of oversized, complicated and project related cargoes. Atlas Shipping Services is also exhibiting at the event, along with its three business partners, United Cargo Management, Vision Log – Centaurea Group and Peter Rathmann & Co. GmbH. All four organisations will demonstrate how they handle projects, heavy lift shipments, breakbulk and full charters in different types of machineries. In addition, Caribbean Line & Soreidom will showcase its expertise in logistics and the transport of dry-bulk products, project cargo, heavy-lift and transports for exporters and industrial companies.

Furthermore, MSC Belgium will showcase the results of its recent investment into project cargo and RoRo shipments. The world leading container shipping company now owns two large ConRo vessels as part of its fleet. At AntwerpXL, it will discuss how these vessels, which are more environmentally friendly than others operating between Antwerp and West Africa, have a ramp capacity of 350 tonnes and a deck height of up to six metres.

AntwerpXL will also host a range of entirely service-led industry organisations, including a new legal flat monthly service from LMA Legal, whereby clients can obtain legal advice on any matter related to their daily breakbulk business. 

An Engaging Conference Programme

The highly-anticipated conference programme will provide a cutting-edge educational agenda. Over 40 major names will deliver in-depth presentations, Q&A sessions and debates on the Main Deck Stage, covering innovation, digitisation and lessons from disruptors in the breakbulk, maritime and project cargo industry.  

Bob Delbecque, an internationally-renowned company energiser and business coach, will open the conference with his keynote, ‘A vision of the future’. The presentation will investigate the main drivers of the breakbulk industry, their likely impacts, and what changes the sector could be looking at across international markets.

Day two begins with a keynote session from Paul Birch, Owner of Visionjuice and former Head of Business Planning at British Airways, on developing an adaptable business which thrives on innovation. On the same day, Stephanie Hare, an analyst, strategist and broadcaster in technology, politics and world business, will chair a panel discussion about the impact of trade wars on different parts of the supply chain, and on the challenges and opportunities presented to the industry by Brexit. 

AntwerpXL will also focus on NextGen when it hosts a discussion on how the industry will adapt to new market conditions and new technologies. Chaired by Sue Terpilowski OBE, Managing Director, Image Line Communications, and President, WISTA UK, and Chair, Maritime UK’s Women’s Taskforce, the working lunch session will explore new ways of thinking, working and collaborating for those starting a career in the industry, the conclusions of which will be presented in a session afterwards.

The conference will gather the most innovative and forward-thinking minds in the breakbulk industry, all of whom will be sharing knowledge, best practices and ideas.

A Gathering of Thought-Leaders

Numerous networking opportunities will be on offer at AntwerpXL. Key industry figureheads will be amongst those keen to make new connections and learn from the brightest industry minds.

The event kicks off with a port tour starting at 1pm on Tuesday 7 May. Attendees of this free-to-join experience will see and learn about the port’s multipurpose terminals, Kieldrecht Lock, Deurganckdok, Zuidnatie, Churchill Dock and the Antwerp Railhouse.

AntwerpXL’s Welcome Reception at the Antwerp Expo marks the official launch of the show and gives guests the opportunity to meet the industry-leading organisations exhibiting their latest innovations and developments at the event.

On Wednesday 8 May, Bart Timperman, the Chief Editor at Flows Magazine, will moderate a breakfast seminar, where thought-leaders will discuss the question, ‘Breakbulk in Flanders: Crucial or Marginal?.’ Invaluable industry insights from those who believe breakbulk remains an important engine of volumes and employment, and those who believe it is doomed to become a marginal activity on the fringes of the shipping landscape, will be shared.

As the sun goes down, guests can enjoy the official AntwerpXL Networking Party, hosted at the historic Felix Archive. Visitors will raise a toast to the event and enjoy an evening relaxing with colleagues before heading to Den Engels in the Square to continue the party.

AntwerpXL Connect is the official one-to-one networking platform for this year’s event. The online service provides users with the opportunity to set up meetings with suppliers and prospects and manage their schedule during the event. Meetings will take place onsite in the AntwerpXL Connect Lounge.

The Networking Lounge, VIP Lounge and Antwerp Business Point, on the show floor, are also areas where visitors can congregate and meet with industry peers.

Fueling Innovation

Sponsored by Bulkchain by NxtPort, the Innovation Start-up Zone will feature some of the industry most groundbreaking new companies and showcase the innovative new technologies and products they have developed.

Along with a range of demos, two panel debates exploring the future of the industry will be delivered by leading industry experts. Cees-Willem Koorneef, Director at Port XL Antwerp, and Dominic Sun, Director of Trade Development, Port of Houston, will host each session on bringing a new customer experience to the industry on each day of the show.

Mark Rimmer, StocExpo & Tank Storage Portfolio Divisional Director, comments: “We are thrilled to see so many industry leading organisations recognising the opportunities available at AntwerpXL. There is no better place for companies to exhibit their products and services in front of industry peers, discuss the latest industry trends and demonstrate the value they can provide in order to support the future needs of customers and their global commitments.” 

AntwerpXL takes place on 7-9 May 2019 at the Antwerp Expo in the Port of Antwerp in Belgium. For more information on visiting the exhibition, booking as a delegate for the conference or exhibiting, please visit https://www.easyfairs.com/antwerp-xl-2019/    

About AntwerpXL

AntwerpXL is a new three-day exhibition and conference for the breakbulk, maritime, and project cargo industry, hosted by the Port of Antwerp. Industry leaders from across the supply chain will meet to discover, innovate, and connect at Antwerp Expo, Belgium, from the 7th to the 9th of May 2019.

Freight forwarders, cargo owners, and equipment handlers, as well as terminal operators, EPCs, manufacturers, and project owners will attend to network and learn from the experts.

AntwerpXL – shaping the future of breakbulk.

www.antwerpxl.com  

About Easyfairs

Easyfairs enables communities to “visit the future” at must-attend events that anticipate their needs and present solutions in the ideal format.

The group currently organises over 218 events in 17 countries (Algeria, Belgium, China, Denmark, Emirates, Finland, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States). Easyfairs also manages 10 event venues in Belgium, the Netherlands and Sweden (Antwerp, Ghent, Mechelen-Brussels North, Namur, Gorinchem, Hardenberg, Venray, Gothenburg, Malmö and Stockholm).

The group employs more than 750 people and generated revenues exceeding € 157 million for its financial year 2017-2018.

Easyfairs strives to be the most adaptable, agile and effective player in the events industry by employing committed individuals, deploying the best marketing and technology tools and developing strong brands. Visit the future with Easyfairs.

Find out more on www.easyfairs.com  

PORT TAMPA BAY GROWS BY LEVERAGING ITS REAL ESTATE AND CARGO DIVERSITY

Diversity among seaports is a concept not only understood but exemplified with Port Tampa Bay. Known as Florida’s largest seaport in both acreage and tonnage, with more than 34 million tons of cargo handled annually, Port Tampa Bay demonstrates industry breadth through its cargo diversification, cruise passengers and real estate strategies to keep pace with the central part of the Sunshine State’s blistering growth.

Through its purposeful investment and master planning approach, the management team has made great strides in recent years connecting transportation methods, logistics, warehousing and even manufacturing to support and grow the region’s largest economic engine. As its 2018 fiscal year saw an unprecedented number of major announcements related to growth, Port Tampa Bay is already seeing more growth in fiscal year 2019.

Cargo diversity, real estate and proximity to growth are the major differentiators that have enabled Port Tampa Bay to leverage itself and grow. 

“I found a tremendous convergence of opportunity when I arrived,” said Paul Anderson, Port Tampa Bay’s president and CEO. “I knew I wanted to maintain and expand a diverse portfolio, capitalizing on our land assets and building the infrastructure to serve more customers and Florida’s growth more efficiently.”

As a result, officials understood that Port Tampa Bay’s most valuable position within the market could only be achieved through analyzing industry benchmarks, investing in infrastructure and capitalizing on opportunities by listening to the perspectives of carriers and beneficial cargo owners before implementing strategic initiatives. By gaining a thorough understanding of market conditions on a domestic and international level, Port Tampa Bay has successfully become the largest economic influencer in the Western Florida region, responsible for a more than $17 billion in economic impact while generating more than 85,000 jobs.

Port Tampa Bay’s cargo portfolio includes all major categories, from liquid bulk and dry bulk to containers, automobiles, break-bulk and more. Additionally, the port serves as one of the largest shipbuilding and repair handlers in the Southeast United States. It is also a top 10 cruise homeport, and last year the 1 million mark was surpassed for passengers sailing from Port Tampa Bay.

One of the world’s premier fertilizer export ports continues leading in both the liquid and dry-bulk arenas, thanks to the likes of global exporters Amalie Oil and Mosaic. Through these connections, Port Tampa Bay supports the reach of more than 100 countries and helps to feed the world.

On the break-bulk side, Tampa Tank/Florida Structural Steel helps to anchor several steel fabricators and related businesses, making the port a significant mover in this business segment. Furthermore, the port has developed about 290 acres of land to help continue its efforts handling steel, dry bulk and other commodities. 

Furthering its diversity and strategic master planning approach, the port developed a new on-dock cold storage facility and a dedicated automobile terminal fully equipped to process the anticipated expansion of vehicle production in Mexico and the Southeast.

Looking to the future, Port Tampa Bay has major plans in the works to expand overall capacity and infrastructure from docks and terminals to land tracts and parcels supportive of increased containers and break-bulk cargos. A total of $380 million is projected to support the port’s expansion efforts over the next five years. Through this budgeting and robust development planning, the port projects expanding its container terminal capacity to 160 acres–essentially quadrupling current capacity and attracting new services.

All of this vision, planning and investment has already paid off in a couple of very big ways. COSCO Shipping in December announced Port Tampa Bay’s first direct Asia weekly call service, followed by a second announcement in February by CMA CGM to expand its global container reach. Secondly, in April, Port Tampa Bay completed a major navigational improvement on its Big Bend channel, deepening and widening to accommodate larger ships.

More accomplished was how the project was pulled off: by first assembling a public-private partnership that included five stakeholders and maintaining its cohesiveness for several years. The improved channel can now service the approximately 290 acres of new terminal operations and capacity among port tenants.

Throughout all of Port Tampa Bay’s projects and new business expansion are the common themes of vision, strategic planning, investment and expertise. “That and listening to what our customers need to increase their efficiency and/or speed to market is what it is all about,” Anderson says.

These elements continue to provide Port Tampa Bay with ideas that increase economic impact, import/export efficiencies, and just as importantly, sustainable growth.