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France Remains the Largest Chewing Gum Supplier to Germany

gum

France Remains the Largest Chewing Gum Supplier to Germany

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘Germany – Chewing Gum – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

Exports from Germany

In 2018, the chewing gum exports from Germany amounted to 2.2K tonnes, increasing by 2.1% against the previous year. In general, chewing gum exports, however, continue to indicate a mild curtailment. In value terms, chewing gum exports stood at $16M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total export value increased at an average annual rate of +2.2% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period.

Exports by Country

The Netherlands (403 tonnes), Belgium (217 tonnes) and Poland (188 tonnes) were the main destinations of chewing gum exports from Germany, with a combined 37% share of total exports. Italy, Ecuador, Denmark, Austria, Slovakia, the UK, the Czech Republic, Luxembourg and Switzerland lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 44%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main countries of destination, was attained by Ecuador, while exports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the Netherlands ($3.4M) remains the key foreign market for chewing gum exports from Germany, comprising 21% of total chewing gum exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Austria ($1.4M), with a 8.7% share of total exports. It was followed by Italy, with a 8.6% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of value to the Netherlands totaled +16.3%. Exports to the other major destinations recorded the following average annual rates of exports growth: Austria (-6.2% per year) and Italy (+2.0% per year).

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the average chewing gum export price amounted to $7,369 per tonne, surging by 7.7% against the previous year. Over the period from 2007 to 2018, it increased at an average annual rate of +3.5%. Over the period under review, the average export prices for chewing gum reached their peak figure in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

There were significant differences in the average prices for the major foreign markets. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Luxembourg ($11,776 per tonne), while the average price for exports to Slovakia ($2,927 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was recorded for supplies to the Netherlands, while the prices for the other major destinations experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports into Germany

In 2018, the amount of chewing gum imported into Germany amounted to 8.1K tonnes, surging by 4.3% against the previous year. Overall, chewing gum imports, however, continue to indicate a mild deduction. In value terms, chewing gum imports amounted to $38M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

In 2018, France (2.3K tonnes) constituted the largest supplier of chewing gum to Germany, accounting for a 29% share of total imports. Moreover, chewing gum imports from France exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest supplier, Denmark (1.1K tonnes), twofold. The UK (992 tonnes) ranked third in terms of total imports with a 12% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume from France amounted to -4.6%. The remaining supplying countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: Denmark (+73.6% per year) and the UK (+1.9% per year).

In value terms, France ($11M), the UK ($6.2M) and Denmark ($5.3M) were the largest chewing gum suppliers to Germany, with a combined 58% share of total imports.

Import Prices by Country

The average chewing gum import price stood at $4,705 per tonne in 2018, shrinking by -4.3% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the chewing gum import price continues to indicate a mild downturn.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major supplying countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was the UK ($6,240 per tonne), while the price for the Netherlands ($3,421 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by China, while the prices for the other major suppliers experienced a decline.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

vaccines

Report: Global Vaccines Market

The U.S. vaccine market is anticipated to experience growth of 8.9% CAGR during the forecast timeframe. The high adoption rate of vaccines to reduce the incidence of infectious diseases along with several initiatives undertaken by government by increasing immunization rates and recommendations should stimulate business growth.

Japan’s vaccine market will grow significantly over the coming years to reach over USD 6.0 billion by 2025. Introduction of the routine vaccination program in October 2016 leading to the introduction of numerous important and routine vaccines having a higher rate of administration as compared to voluntary vaccines should drive the Japan vaccine market.

Increasing demand for preventive vaccines, the rising number of people suffering from infectious as well as non-infectious diseases globally will drive the vaccine market over the forecast timeframe. Increasing government funding for vaccine development will further boost industry growth.

Widespread routine vaccination programs and numerous initiatives undertaken by governments to encourage vaccine administration especially in developing and underdeveloped countries will positively impact industry growth. Growing awareness about reduced mortality due to immunization should propel vaccines industry growth over the forecast period.

High adoption of new vaccines coupled with technological advancements should stimulate business growth. Moreover, a strong product pipeline of leading companies such as Merck, Novavax, Emergent BioSolutions will lead to industry expansion over the coming years. However, high costs associated with transportation and storage of vaccines will limit the vaccines market growth to a certain extent over the foreseeable future.

Each time a nation is hit by an epidemic wave, children are one of the groups that take the deadliest hit. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 or 2 of every 1,000 children who are diagnosed with measles die. During the nation’s recently witnessed measles outbreak, around 92 percent of children received a combination vaccine that prevents measles, rubella, and mumps. Immunization programs prevent and protect toddlers and infants from dangerous complications and failing to vaccinate may certainly put them at risk for fatal diseases. This has escalated the demand for vaccines for kids, which has subsequently influenced the growth curve of the vaccines market from the pediatric populace.

As per estimates, vaccines industry size from the pediatric age group is set to witness a CAGR of 9.1% over 2019-2025, given the high vulnerability of kids to infectious diseases along with the increasing implementation of pediatric immunization programs.

Driven by the ongoing pace of urbanization and the rising awareness regarding the potential dangers a pandemic can inculcate, the global vaccines industry is gaining increased attention. According to a new research report by Global Market Insights, Inc., the overall vaccines market size is anticipated to surpass $70 billion by 2025.

Some of the major market players involved in the global vaccines market are Merck, AstraZeneca, Johnson & Johnson, Novartis, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Abbott, Sanofi Pasteur, GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer, Emergent BioSolutions, CSL, Astellas Pharma and Novavax. Firms are focusing on product launch to fortify their product base and market reach over the coming years.

Source: Global Market Insights, Inc.

wildfires

10 Steps Businesses Can Take to Manage the Risk of Wildfires

As prolonged drought, heat, other climate factors, and population growth trends intensify wildfire risks in the Western U.S., parts of Australia, Europe, South America, Africa and several other industrialized areas of the world, many governments have expanded their precautions to reduce the likelihood or severity of these devastating events, including massive temporary electrical power shutdowns and large-scale evacuations of at-risk residential populations.

The combination of actual wildfires and government preventative measures have made it critical for businesses with operations, suppliers and customers in vulnerable areas to develop comprehensive plans to prepare for and manage power outages and operational shutdowns that can be implemented safely and quickly – especially during seasonal periods when wildfire risks are most severe.

From developing, adjusting and testing a business continuity plan to preparing for and evaluating the impact of potential wildfires, related government-mandated power outages, evacuations and highway closures, business leaders and managers need to assess their potential vulnerabilities to wildfire risk and develop and implement appropriate measures to mitigate them.

Accordingly, here are 10 steps for managing exposures related to wildfires. Note that many of these measures apply to areas where scheduled power outages may occur, but facilities may continue to be occupied and can be operational using alternative or back-up power sources.   

1. Review and update your company’s emergency plan. This includes developing any contingencies that might need to be added to account for the evacuation or residential areas where employees with emergency responsibilities may be located. Ensure that personnel with assigned responsibilities will be able to get to the facility in the event of a power outage. Plan for the possibility that some employees with emergency duties may reside in areas being evacuated and won’t be available for work. If possible, choose back-ups who reside in different areas. Double-check that your communication plan is established and that you have up-to-date call trees so employees can be contacted on a timely basis when emergency situations arise.

2. Assess power-down procedures. Make sure they are up to date with respect to any new equipment or recent facility expansions or modifications. At the same time, be sure your managers understand the steps for restoring your plant or facility to full operation once power is restored.

3. Check emergency power resources. Start by testing and securing any generators available. In addition, make sure your company has adequate fuel to withstand multiple power outages within certain time periods.

4. Evaluate lighting and equipment. Ensure emergency lighting is operational and that computer systems are backed up and current. During periods of high wildfire threats, such as during extended drought conditions, employees with laptops should be instructed to back-up data on a daily basis and make sure they are fully up to date in the event they need to work off-site for extended periods. In the event of an outage, make sure desktop computers, mainframes, servers, and other critical electrical equipment is switched off, so it will not be adversely impacted when the power is restored. If the facility is to be vacated and time permits, consider removing valuable equipment.

5. Check perishable products and vulnerable inventory. Consider offsite warehousing for any products that may be affected by the loss of temperature or humidity controls. Alternatively, consider using reefer trucks and/or dry ice for maintaining appropriate temperature control to protect inventory and equipment during an outage.

6. Revisit facility security measures. Make sure all doors and windows are secure and consider restricting access to the entire property through the use of perimeter fencing. Keep in mind standard security alarm and access control systems may not be functioning in the event of power outages.

7. Request assistance from law enforcement. Notify local police authorities to request additional patrols and increase internal security rounds (as installed CCTV systems may be inoperable during any power outages that result from mandated, preventive shutdowns or those arising from the spread of wildfires).

8. Establish planned fire watches. Whether for preventive purposes or as a result of damage related to wildfires, any electrical power outage may result in impaired fire protection systems. As practical, businesses should designate a safety team member to conduct an ongoing fire watch during any area of power outages to spot signs of potential exposures as well as other system impairments. In areas where wildfires may be expanding, personnel should also continually monitor the news media for civil instructions regarding potential evacuations.

9. Consider options for reporting fires. Designate a safety, maintenance, security or operations team member to contact the local fire department in the event of a fire as a fire alarm system, transmission and notification may be interrupted during any electrical power outage.

10. Check premises for fire hazards. Trim foliage on property and evaluate risks of any combustibles on premises, including any being stored away from the building; if appropriate, consider relocating to indoors or other locations to minimize potential fire hazards. Eliminate any hot work or hazardous operations.

During the past several months, wildfires in various areas of the world have resulted in the loss of life, devastation of wildlife, caused several billions of dollars in damage and had a significant impact on business and industry. By taking steps to prepare for these exposures, businesses can help reduce their risks and speed their recoveries from these perils.

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Jeff Borre, a director in Aon’s Property Risk Control Practice, manages the firm’s Field Services group, which provides a wide range of consulting services, including property risk control site surveys, to meet the property risk management needs of commercial and public sector clients. He joined Aon in 2001, after serving with Ahern Fire Protection and Nexus Technical Services Corporation where his responsibilities included designing fire protection systems. He earned a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville and holds the Associate in Risk Management (ARM) designation. A Professional Engineer (PE) licensed in Illinois and Wisconsin, he is a member of the National Fire Protection Association, Society of Fire Protection Engineers, American Society of Safety Professionals, and American Society of Civil Engineers. He can be reached at jeff.borre@aon.com

 

Christian Ford, a managing director of Aon, serves as chief operating officer – Property Claims Advocacy within Aon’s Global Risk Consulting group. In addition to various leadership responsibilities for the group, he works directly with numerous clients on complex property claims advocacy and resolution. Earlier in his career, Ford served as a multi-line claims adjuster at two large commercial insurance companies. He earned a B.S. degree in business administration from John Carroll University and also holds the Senior Claim Law Associate (SCLA) designation. He can be reached at christian.ford@aon.com.
TradeGala

Online Wholesale B2B Marketplace TradeGala Makes Buying Even Easier

Chances are you’re already a regular online marketplace customer. With popular sites such as Amazon, eBay and Etsy conveniently bringing together a range of sellers, buying goods through the wholesale fashion marketplace is now as common as popping to the supermarket.

Just as we now think nothing of picking up our groceries alongside a new dress in Sainsbury’s, the majority of us also want to order what we need in one fell swoop online. The popularity of marketplace sites is hard to ignore: Amazon first launched its version 20 years ago and it now makes up over 50 percent of its overall sales – that’s $118.57 billion in 2018 alone. Many shoppers today use it as their first port of call when searching for goods to buy – even before Google.

Over in the independent fashion sector, small brands and retailers selling through such marketplaces is also becoming increasingly popular – particularly with the likes of Farfetch and Trouva gaining household name status. These sites offer access to all the best brands in one place, meaning you don’t have to venture far to find the sort of pieces that were once only available in brick-and-mortar boutiques.

However, when it comes to B2B marketplaces, there’s been a distinct lack of places where boutique buyers can make their in-season and forward order selections. That is, until now.

Step forward TradeGala, the fashion marketplace that connects independent retailers with international brands. Much like visiting a trade show or showroom, the site makes it easy for fashion buyers to source global labels in the same place online. Some of the labels on its roster are also exclusive and can’t be bought as wholesale elsewhere.

Ordering through TradeGala means buying professionals can save time and money. With a simple order process, buyers can make their store selections with just a few clicks, completely eliminating the need for complicated line sheets. It also offers centralized customer service and payment protection – meaning retailers can rest assured that they’re in safe hands. Plus, because the site is in operation 24/7, you can research and choose products whenever it suits you.

For brands, TradeGala offers greater visibility and access to new international markets and the latest technologies with minimal commitment. Smaller, independent brands are able to take their first steps into the wholesale market, which may have previously seemed too daunting. The site launched with 24 brands across accessories, active wear, casual dress, evening wear, and footwear, including Goddiva, City Goddess, Marc Angelo, KDK London, Gypsy Clothing, Gold Lunar, Haus of Deck, Hugz Jeans, Lindy Bop, Looking Glam, Geniris Paris, Glitz Shoes, Paradox London, and VILDNIS.

So, is this the future of fashion buying? It looks highly likely. Marketplaces won’t necessarily replace the more traditional methods of sourcing and purchasing, however, they’re a valuable tool in an ever more competitive industry. The most forward-thinking brands and retailers are already taking advantage of the opportunities on offer – perhaps now is the time for you to consider joining them.
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Visit TradeGala’s official website: https://www.tradegala.com for more information

mango

Long-Term Growth of Mango And Mangosteen Market in the U.S. Is Losing Momentum

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘U.S. – Mangoes, Mangosteens And Guavas – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the mango and mangosteen market in the U.S. amounted to $558M in 2018. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Over the period under review, mango and mangosteen consumption continues to indicate a strong increase. Over the period under review, the mango and mangosteen market attained its peak figure level in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in the U.S.

Driven by increasing demand for mango and mangosteen in the U.S., largely supported by rising Hispanic population, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven years. Market performance is forecast to decelerate, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +2.9% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 579K tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in the U.S.

Mango and mangosteen production in the U.S. amounted to 930 tonnes in 2018, declining by -7.5% against the previous year. Overall, mango and mangosteen production continues to indicate an abrupt contraction, as mangoes are not cultivated largely across the U.S., and mango imports are widely available.

Harvested Area And Yield in the U.S.

In 2018, the total area harvested in terms of mangoes, mangosteens and guavas production in the U.S. stood at 53 ha, falling by -18.5% against the previous year. Average yield of mangoes, mangosteens and guavas in the U.S. amounted to 18 tonne per ha in 2018, jumping by 13% against the previous year.

Exports from the U.S.

In 2018, the mango and mangosteen exports from the U.S. stood at 27K tonnes, declining by -4.7% against the previous year. Overall, mango and mangosteen exports, however, continue to indicate a buoyant expansion. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 when exports increased by 35% y-o-y. Exports peaked at 31K tonnes in 2015; however, from 2016 to 2018, exports failed to regain their momentum. In value terms, mango and mangosteen exports totaled $40M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

Canada (15K tonnes) was the main destination for mango and mangosteen exports from the U.S., accounting for a 55% share of total exports. Moreover, mango and mangosteen exports to Canada exceeded the volume sent to the second major destination, the UK (2.4K tonnes), sixfold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Germany (2.4K tonnes), with a 8.8% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of volume to Canada amounted to +7.4%. Exports to the other major destinations recorded the following average annual rates of exports growth: the UK (+2.4% per year) and Germany (+11.3% per year).

In value terms, Canada ($21M) remains the key foreign market for mango and mangosteen exports from the U.S., comprising 53% of total mango and mangosteen exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Germany ($5.3M), with a 13% share of total exports. It was followed by Mexico, with a 7.6% share.

Export Prices by Country

The average mango and mangosteen export price stood at $1,502 per tonne in 2018, increasing by 2.5% against the previous year. Over the last eleven years, it increased at an average annual rate of +2.1%. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2017 an increase of 14% year-to-year. The export price peaked in 2018 and is likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

There were significant differences in the average prices for the major foreign markets. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Germany ($2,259 per tonne), while the average price for exports to the UK ($1,140 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was recorded for supplies to Germany, while the prices for the other major destinations experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports into the U.S.

In 2018, the mango and mangosteen imports into the U.S. stood at 500K tonnes, stabilizing at the previous year. Over the period under review, the total imports indicated a prominent increase from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +4.6% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Imports peaked in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future. In value terms, mango and mangosteen imports amounted to $637M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

In 2018, Mexico (311K tonnes) constituted the largest mango and mangosteen supplier to the U.S., with a 62% share of total imports. Moreover, mango and mangosteen imports from Mexico exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest supplier, Peru (50K tonnes), sixfold. Ecuador (49K tonnes) ranked third in terms of total imports with a 9.7% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume from Mexico stood at +5.4%. The remaining supplying countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: Peru (+5.6% per year) and Ecuador (+4.7% per year).

In value terms, Mexico ($380M) constituted the largest supplier of mango and mangosteen to the U.S., comprising 60% of total mango and mangosteen imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Peru ($61M), with a 9.5% share of total imports. It was followed by the Philippines, with a 7% share.

Import Prices by Country

The average mango and mangosteen import price stood at $1,273 per tonne in 2018, going up by 17% against the previous year. In general, the mango and mangosteen import price continues to indicate perceptible growth.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major supplying countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Thailand ($2,892 per tonne), while the price for Ecuador ($862 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Mexico, while the prices for the other major suppliers experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

figs

France and Germany Remain The Largest Markets for Imported Figs in the EU

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Figs – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the fig market in the European Union amounted to $431M in 2018, rising by 5.6% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +1.9% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations in certain years. Over the period under review, the fig market attained its peak figure level in 2018 and is likely to continue its growth in the near future.

Consumption By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of fig consumption in 2018 were Spain (32K tonnes), France (18K tonnes) and Germany (13K tonnes), together accounting for 55% of total consumption. Italy, Greece, the UK, Austria, Portugal and Cyprus lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 35%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of fig consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Austria, while fig consumption for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Spain ($111M), France ($61M) and Germany ($51M) appeared to be the countries with the highest levels of market value in 2018, together accounting for 51% of the total market. These countries were followed by Italy, Greece, the UK, Cyprus, Austria and Portugal, which together accounted for a further 38%.

In 2018, the highest levels of fig per capita consumption was registered in Cyprus (3,009 kg per 1000 persons), followed by Greece (751 kg per 1000 persons), Spain (684 kg per 1000 persons) and Austria (568 kg per 1000 persons), while the world average per capita consumption of fig was estimated at 228 kg per 1000 persons.

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in the EU

Driven by increasing demand for fig in the European Union, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven years. Market performance is forecast to accelerate, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +1.5% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 129K tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in the EU

The fig production stood at 73K tonnes in 2018, stabilizing at the previous year. Over the period under review, fig production, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

Production By Country in the EU

Spain (38K tonnes) constituted the country with the largest volume of fig production, accounting for 52% of total volume. Moreover, fig production in Spain exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest producer, Greece (13K tonnes), threefold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Italy (11K tonnes), with a 15% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume in Spain stood at +3.5%. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: Greece (-3.9% per year) and Italy (-4.0% per year).

Harvested Area and Yield in the EU

In 2018, the fig harvested area in the European Union stood at 24K ha, approximately equating the previous year. Overall, the fig harvested area continues to indicate a slight decrease.

In 2018, the average yield of figs in the European Union amounted to 3 tonne per ha, rising by 1.7% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the fig yield continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

Exports in the EU

The exports amounted to 28K tonnes in 2018, approximately mirroring the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +4.4% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The volume of exports peaked in 2018 and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term. In value terms, fig exports amounted to $117M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

The exports of the five major exporters of figs, namely Spain, Greece, the Netherlands, Germany and Italy, represented more than two-thirds of total export. It was distantly followed by France (1,995 tonnes), constituting a 7.1% share of total exports. Belgium (1,247 tonnes) occupied a minor share of total exports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Greece, while exports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest fig markets in the European Union were Spain ($26M), the Netherlands ($21M) and Germany ($18M), with a combined 55% share of total exports.

Export Prices by Country

The figs export price in the European Union stood at $4,194 per tonne in 2018, picking up by 7.4% against the previous year. Over the period from 2007 to 2018, it increased at an average annual rate of +1.1%.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was the Netherlands ($5,523 per tonne), while Italy ($3,137 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Spain, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, approx. 71K tonnes of figs were imported in the European Union; remaining constant against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.6% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The volume of imports peaked at 75K tonnes in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, imports remained at a lower figure. In value terms, fig imports amounted to $277M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

France (17K tonnes) and Germany (17K tonnes) represented roughly 47% of total imports of figs in 2018. The UK (7,521 tonnes) occupied an 11% share (based on tonnes) of total imports, which put it in second place, followed by Austria (7.3%), the Netherlands (6.4%) and Italy (6.1%). Belgium (2,932 tonnes), Poland (1,568 tonnes), Sweden (1,523 tonnes), Spain (1,423 tonnes), Portugal (1,246 tonnes) and Denmark (1,076 tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Austria, while imports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Germany ($64M), France ($56M) and the UK ($29M) constituted the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2018, with a combined 54% share of total imports. Austria, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium, Sweden, Poland, Spain, Denmark and Portugal lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 37%.

Import Prices by Country

The fig import price in the European Union stood at $3,875 per tonne in 2018, rising by 1.8% against the previous year. In general, the figs import price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Italy ($4,903 per tonne), while Portugal ($3,073 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Belgium, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

climate change

Businesses Must Adjust To Climate Change; 5 Ways Toward Sustainability

As climate change causes worldwide concern and prompts calls for governmental action, consumers are putting the onus on businesses to step up their sustainability standards and practices.

A Nielsen survey, for example, showed that 81 percent of global consumers feel companies should help improve the environment. And with governments across the globe struggling to reach an international consensus on climate change, close observers of business and the environment, along with a high number of CEOs, agree: Private industry should take the lead in driving sustainability.

“Some forward-looking companies are seeing it’s an issue they can no longer ignore, morally and economically, and that you can go green and succeed in business,” says Hitendra Chaturvedi (www.hitendrachaturvedi.com), a professor at the Supply Chain Department of W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University and expert on global supply chain sustainability and strategy.

“Business strategies must include sustainability in their core beliefs and practices. Part of the problem is that they are missing the simple, sensible ways that can drive sustainability and bring a return on investment at the same time.”

Chaturvedi suggests the following ways businesses can exercise sustainability practices to help fight climate change and connect with consumers:

Find the facts. “When a package gets delivered to you by an online commerce company, most people see the packaging as mainly contributing to the pollution, but that is not the case,” Chaturvedi says. “The packaging contributes less than 5%, but the main culprit is the returned/defective item which accounts for close to 50% of the pollution because it is not properly disposed of. I call it sensible sustainability. Identify and focus on low-hanging fruits.”

Seek education. “Finding the facts brings an important issue – education of consumers,” Chaturvedi says. “I see too many data points floating around that are put forth to create hysteria and are flat-out wrong, causing well-intentioned people to be waylaid in unproductive directions. Too many times this causes even a well-wisher of the environment to lose interest. We need a proper way to educate consumers about what is real and what is fake news.”

Implement business model changes. “Look at your business model holistically,” Chaturvedi says. “I propose a 5R model that simply, sensibly, and holistically integrates forward and reverses supply chain within any organization to ensure reduction in waste – and without sacrificing profits or competitiveness.”

Embrace technology. “It will lead to quick solutions to many vexing sustainability problems,” Chaturvedi says. “For example, advancement in technology has given us economically viable micro-factories to processing plastic waste, something that was not possible a few years ago. Now we can package it into a business model and scale it. Technologies like blockchain and dendrites will have far-reaching effects on sustainability as they will drive tracking and accountability.”

Find sensible solutions. “Sustainability needs sensible solutions, not a panacea, not motherhood and apple pie solutions,” Chaturvedi says. “We need solutions that are practical and profitable. We see many solutions that promise to solve the world’s pollution problem but are either one-off, or do not make money or both. We need businesses to step in and partner with scientists, universities, and government so a practical/viable perspective can be applied to sustainability solutions. A business will bring that perspective along with what can scale and what can not.”

“Businesses can see significant benefits, both economically and socially, from incorporating sustainable practices,” Chaturvedi says. “Some of the steps you incorporate can seem small at first, but day by day those efforts will produce great results.”

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Hitendra Chaturvedi spent over 30 years in progressive technology leadership positions with Microsoft, Newgistics, E&Y e-Business and A.T. Kearney. Chaturvedi also built a $100 million software company in India, GreenDust, where he implemented proprietary reverse logistics software at Amazon, Flipkart (Walmart), Samsung, Panasonic and Whirlpool. A computer engineer with a master’s degree from Louisiana State University and an MBA from Southern Methodist University, Chaturvedi has been widely covered in the media and is a subject matter expert on global supply chain strategy, sustainability in supply chain, reverse logistics, ecommerce, artificial intelligence and machine learning. Now a professor at Arizona State University, Chaturvedi has been a visiting professor at Southern Methodist University, University of Texas-Dallas, Penn State and Purdue.

U.S.-China

U.S.-China Trade War of 2019 Spills into 2020 for Ports, Shippers and Manufacturers

The Jan. 15 signing of a U.S.-China Phase One agreement did spawn a sigh of relief among those troubled by the trade tensions between the two nations. But six days later, a warning came from a couple experts closely watching the unfolding events on behalf of ports, shipping lines and manufacturers. The crux of that warning? Stay tuned.

“This is a truce,” said Phil Levy, chief economist at Flexport, a San Francisco-based freight forwarding and custom brokerage company. “This is not the end of the trade war.”

Levy shared that opinion as he joined his company’s CEO Ryan Peterson in leading a webinar on Jan. 21 that was listened in on electronically by some of their 10,000 clients in more than 200 countries. Those who rely on the company’s expertise in ocean, air, truck and rail freight, drayage & cartage, warehousing, customs brokerage, financing and insurance–all informed and powered by Flexport’s unique software platform—heard Levy say of the U.S.-China trade war: “We haven’t seen a retaliatory escalation of this magnitude in the post-World War II era. … This really was a 2019 story that worsened throughout the year.”

He pointed to a graphic that showed trade between the world’s two biggest economies fell markedly last year, and that no one overseeing trans-Pacific supply chains were immune from economic harm. Many webinar participants could relate as 64 percent of Flexport’s customers rely on the trans-Pacific trade routes, according to Peterson.

Yes, the Phase One deal was a positive first step, but Levy pointed to some examples of lasting victims from the trade war. It exposed the continued “decay,” as the economist put it, of the World Trade Organization (WTO), which is supposed to prevent the escalation of trade disputes. The “keeper of peace” amid trade tensions was largely frozen out of U.S.-China talks and, therefore, silent as events transpired.

A second heavy blow came in December 2019, when the WTO’s appellate body ceased to function, according to Levy, who noted that the formation of the “WTO system was one of core achievements since World War II.”

Peterson found equally worrisome the first-ever disappearance of peak season when it comes to shipping. As many known, imports grow during the fall and really heat up by November’s holiday shopping season. That not happening in 2019, couple with a steady decline is U.S. imports from China after years of solid growth, is a reason for concern, according to the CEO, who maintained, “global trade is down due to tariffs.”

For one thing, not having a peak season to rely on, coupled with steadily declining trade, “from our perspective makes life very hard to plan for,” Peterson said.

He did see on the horizon what many may view as a green lining: lower freight fees and consumer prices. “Lower prices do sound good,” Peterson conceded, “until someone goes bankrupt. We want stability, predictability. Things getting too cheap is unpredictable. You are playing with fire.”

Feel the burn? Peterson called our current “degree of uncertainty relatively unprecedented. We learn about things in a tweet. Was that really implemented or not?” As an example, he cited France proposing a digital tax and President Donald Trump striking back with threats of tariffs on cheese and wine. “Is that policy or not?” Peterson asked rhetorically. “Right now it’s a tweet. It makes it very hard to plan for.”

Levy warned “there is no safe play.” You can withstand the brunt of the tariffs and see what that does to your bottom line, or you can figure out a way to work around them and then have a trade deal come along with no way to return to normal operations quickly enough.

As Peterson pointed out, it’s not just the sting of the tariffs but the amount of paperwork and other adjustments one must handle while trying to remain agile. That time takes away from other things you need to be doing with your business.

Speaking of time away, Levy believes there will be no further movement in deescalating trade tensions between the U.S. and China until after America’s November presidential election. He suspects that China agreed to the Phase One conditions, which were much more weighted against that country than the U.S., “to buy a year of peace.” He added that China could be playing it coy in the weeks ahead as Beijing awaits the outcome that determines whether they will continue to deal with Trump or a new White House occupant. “If Trump loses, it’s likely the trade agreement will change anyway,” Levy said.

In the meantime … uncertainty. Peterson noted that one Flexport client had to close a manufacturing plant due to the tariffs. Levy held onto the hope that an eventual U.S.-China trade deal will be beneficial economically, pointing to markets that opened up with the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement replacing the North American Free Trade Agreement. But you never know, as evidenced by USMCA having also resulted in some restricted trade, particularly in the automobile sector. “That was disappointing,” he admitted.

Don’t be surprised if the pain ultimately spreads, as Levy predicted what will happen after the U.S.-China trade war comes to a head. “There are a lot of signs the president will turn his trade policy focus away from China and toward Europe,” said Levy, who later noted Trump has also begun accusing Vietnam of cheating when it comes to trade.

So what to do about all this?

“My stance is there is nothing more important than agility, the ability to adapt,” Peterson said of dealing with tariffs, real or threatened. “It can mean restructuring a supply chain or seeking exemptions.” Companies that foster a culture with an ability to adapt can look at these challenges, Peterson says, and respond: “Bring it on, bring on the change.”

ETW Energietechnik

ETW Energietechnik Reports CHP Units with SCR catalysts Overall Efficiency 85 percent+

The Rems-Murr waste management company in Backnang-Neuschöntal in Baden-Württemberg has two new energy-efficient combined heat and power plants in which methane from biogas plants is co-incinerated. From 2023 onwards, they will emit five times less nitrogen oxide than today.

On 23 October 2019, two new combined heat and power (CHP) plants of the municipal waste management company Rems-Murr (AWRM) went into operation in Backnang-Neuschöntal. They were built by the company ETW Energietechnik GmbH from Moers in North Rhine-Westphalia. For the renewal, the two old gas engines of the waste management company were replaced after 65,000 operating hours and more than eight years of operation. This resulted in a leap in efficiency, which is essentially based on the installation of the larger, more powerful gas engines as well as the further developed gas engine technology. In addition, fuel savings are achieved by using the residual methane content in the fermentation residue exhaust air.

ETW Energietechnik took a step-by-step approach to this: First, the used CHP engines with 800 kilowatts (kW) each were dismantled. At the same place, the company installed two new larger gas engines with an electrical output of 1560 and 1200 kilowatts. These are each container CHP units, i.e. the power plants fit into a special container measuring 14 by 3.2 by 3 metres.

First, there is the container CHP “ETW 1560 BG” with a gas genset MWM TCG 2020 V16 (electrical output: 1560 kW, thermal output: 1528 kW, fuel input: 3683 kW). The second is the container CHP “ETW 1200 BG” with a gas aggregate MWM TCG 2020 V12 (electrical output: 1200 kW, thermal output: 1153 kW, fuel input: 2804 kW).

Compared with the old gensets, the changeover increases the electrical efficiency by almost 1.6 percentage points: Whereas the used CHP units had an electrical efficiency of 40.4 percent, this now amounts to 42 percent. The overall efficiency of the plant increases slightly to 85 percent.

The heat utilization concept contributes significantly to this high figure. The waste heat from the block-type thermal power stations is used to heat the fermenters and the operating building. The excess waste heat is then made available to the city of Backnang for drying sewage sludge.

A further leap in efficiency is achieved by a special feature of the plant: fermentation residue exhaust air is added to the combustion air of the gas engines. Although this exhaust air has too low a methane content (less than 1.75 percent) for it to be used directly in a gas engine, the plant is able to use it in a gas engine. However, by mixing it into the combustion air, the low methane content is made usable. This has a further advantage: This methane content in the combustion air does not have to be supplied via the biogas pipe and can, therefore, be saved on the biogas side.

“This was the first time that we have equipped an ETW plant in this way,” reports Alexander Szabo. The engineer is the responsible sales manager at ETW Energietechnik.

The municipal waste management company hopes that this exchange will enable it to make CHP operation more variable in the future due to the higher engine output while maintaining the same gas quantities during the day. In addition, the waste management company is expecting an increase in the amount of electricity fed into the public grid.

For the pilot project, the fermentation residue exhaust air extracted from the liquid fertilizer storage tanks and the sedimentation tank of the biogas plant is cleaned by a gas washer-dryer and then fed into the combustion air supply of the gas engines. To avoid an ignitable mixture in the combustion air, the fermentation residue exhaust air freed from hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is continuously monitored by means of gas analysis.

The system update is sustainable in that two expected changes in legislation in Germany are already being fulfilled:

-One is the use of residual methane in the fermentation residue exhaust air to prevent greenhouse gas from escaping. This system was designed by the planning company Ingenieurgruppe RUK GmbH from Stuttgart.

-It has already been decided that CHP plants from 2023 may not emit more than 100 milligrams of nitrogen oxides (NOx) per cubic meter. Currently, this upper limit is 500 mg/m³. These values apply in each case at a residual oxygen content of five percent. This is stated in the Ordinance on Medium-Sized Combustion, Gas Turbine, and Internal Combustion Engine Installations, the 44th Federal Immission Control Ordinance (44th BImSchV), which was updated in June 2019.

In order to avoid later, costly retrofitting of the exhaust system, both cogeneration plants have therefore already been equipped with modern nitrogen oxide catalytic converters. The catalytic elements are mounted on a ceramic carrier. This SCR technology – SCR stands for “Selected Catalytic Reduction” – is the only technology for reducing the amount of sick oxides (NOx) in the exhaust gas of the gas engine. The nitrogen oxides in the exhaust gas are composed of nitrogen monoxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2).

To reduce nitrogen oxides, Adblue must be injected into the exhaust system – this mixture has a urea content of 32.5 percent. The high exhaust gas temperature converts Adblue into ammonia. The ammonia reacts with the nitrogen oxides on the catalytic surface of the catalyst elements with the following reaction formula: 4NO + 4NH3 + O2 4N2 + 6H2O

ETW Energietechnik has already installed some of the SCR catalytic converter elements. These reduce – even without urea injection – formaldehyde in the exhaust gas. Formaldehyde (CH2O) is converted into water and CO2. The complete SCR catalytic converter system including urea injection will not go into operation until 2023. In order to comply with the stricter limits, only minor retrofitting is then required due to the modern exhaust gas cleaning system (see below).

Following the award of the contract for the new CHP plants, ETW Energietechnik GmbH was also awarded the contract for the extension of the waste fermentation plant. This includes the entire process, measurement, and control technology. The scope of supply also includes the gas wash drying plant for the fermentation residue exhaust air.

Retrofitting for NOx reduction
In 2022, ETW Energietechnik will retrofit the two combined heat and power plants so that they can comply with the limit value for nitrogen oxides of 100 mg/m³ from 2023 onwards:

A urea tank, the stainless steel piping between urea tank and injection, a suction line into the gas engine and a urea dosing device are still needed. This requires an air compressor, pressure and temperature sensors, nitrogen oxide and oxygen sensors upstream and downstream of the catalytic converter. For this purpose, the catalyst housing is completely equipped with catalyst elements.

A container CHP in side view with biological
desulfurization.
The insulated SCR-catalytic converter
housing with demountable insulation elements to replace the catalytic converter
elements.

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ETW Energietechnik GmbH has been developing and producing energy plants in Moers, Germany, since 1997. The company‘s core business comprises the construction and maintenance of combined heat and power (CHP) plants in the output range of 400 to 4,600 kWel. as well as highly efficient Biogas Upgrading plants that produce pure Biomethane out of raw Biogas using a high-end PSA technology.

The company is a one-stop provider: From the transfer of biogas to the feed- in of power into the grid and the provision of heat, ETW also takes care of the construction, commissioning, and maintenance of CHP and Biogas Upgrading plants.

The clientele of ETW Energietechnik GmbH includes large energy suppliers, agricultural plants, municipalities, and industrial businesses of various types and sizes, all of which attach importance to eco-friendly, economic energy generation.

One of the strategic highlights is the implementation of economic, sustainable plant concepts that are planned individually and adapted to the respective requirements. A qualified service team ensures operational reliability and maximum availability of the plants.

The medium-sized, family-owned enterprise employs a staff of nearly 100 and is managed by its founder Helmut Weiss and his two sons Marco and Carsten.

skills

Lifelong Learning: Enhancing Your Supply Chain Skill Set at Any Age

Even the most seasoned supply chain professional will tell you they can always learn a little bit more about their field. Whether it’s mastering a new software program or simply brushing up on your business skills, the more you learn the better you can invest that education into growing your business.

Work experience will only get you so far. That’s where supply chain education programs come into the picture. From degree programs at top-tier universities to certificates at trade schools and distance learning facilities, today there are more continuing education options than ever before.

If you are considering returning to school to brush up on or better hone your supply chain education skills, or even looking to recruit new employees with the most cutting-edge education, check out these programs, and get some ideas about what to look for when searching for a supply chain education program.

TRAINING AND CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS

A training or certificate program can boost your skills and resume without the heavy investment in a degree program. They also generally take less time to complete than degree programs, but they may not carry as much weight as degree programs would, either. Still, they provide valuable education and insight into many specific aspects of supply chain, and those skills can still be very useful to your business. Check out:

Northwestern University-Kellogg Executive Education. This program at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management runs just three days and offers executive training on transportation, outsourcing, facilities management, inventory and more. It gives students a further peek into the latest supply chain technologies and techniques to help them keep running their businesses in a way that works for today and the future.

American Production and Inventory Control Society (APICS). A professional supply chain organization with its own certification program, APICS is open to Association of Supply Chain Management (ASCM) members as well as non-members. The program offers students strategies to level up their skills, earn the APICS certification and do so without the time investment of a major degree.

DEGREE PROGRAMS

Though they require significant time and often a significant financial investment, degree programs not only provide valuable education, but they also pad your resume so you can carry the education with you should you ever transfer jobs. Degree programs can also help improve your salary and position at your current job. Here are some of the top supply chain higher education programs in the country.

Michigan State University. Ranked No. 1 in supply chain and logistics management programs by U.S. News & World Report for three years running, Michigan State’s full-time MBA program covers everything from supply-chain management to logistics systems and technology. The program offers certificates ranging from Master to Advanced Master in topics such as global supply chain management and integrated supply chain management. Many other MSU-specific certificate options are also available.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The supply chain management program at MIT in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is the No. 2 ranked program by U.S. News & World Report, which also places MIT’s business school at No. 3 overall. Meanwhile, Eduniversal ranks MIT’s supply-chain program the No. 1 program of its kind in the world. The MIT program will earn you your master’s in supply-chain management in just 10 months. The program covers all aspects of supply-chain management, and the school is the founding member of the MIT Global Supply Chain and Logistics Excellence Network (SCALE), an organization that allows for collaboration between students, faculty, researchers and industry experts. The SCALE program was designed to promote new research, processes and technologies for the betterment of the industry.

UNDERGRAD AND HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAMS

Whether you’re in a professional setting and never got a complete supply-chain education, you’re looking for programs for someone else, or you’re trying to recruit new supply chain graduates, undergraduate and high school or vocational supply chain programs are excellent resources. These programs are often taught by industry insiders and have access to some of the newest technology and techniques, giving program graduates an up-to-date education in the supply-chain industry. Also, because they are focused on supply chain and generally nothing else, these programs can be completed faster than traditional college degree programs, which means less time waiting for the right candidate.

Rutgers University. The Supply Chain Education Partnership at Rutgers in Newark, New Jersey, is a comprehensive program for high school students who would like a career in supply-chain management. Though the program is just one week long, it covers a great deal of information, including business logistics, global procurement and sourcing as well as information technology systems and systems, applications and products (SAP). Open to local students, the program is designed to introduce students to the world of supply-chain management and hopefully attract them to the field as a university major and future professional.

Other vocational/high school programs. Many high school programs offer hands-on training through classes, vocational school and internships to help train the younger generation in all facets of supply-chain management. For some, these programs may be enough of a baseline education to be hired straight out of school without needing a degree; for others the classes may pique an interest in the field and help students determine their college major. Check your local school district for schools that may offer these programs.

ONLINE CLASSES

Online classes allow students to attend a supply chain education program from anywhere in the world, which is especially helpful when no such program exists at your local university. Many prestigious universities offer online classes, so there is no need to miss out on a top-quality education simply due to geography.

University of Texas, Dallas. The university boasts of a distance learning master’s program that includes supply chain management courses at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. However, the distance learning program also makes it easy for busy professionals to get a world-class education without having to live in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. The comprehensive program covers every facet of the supply-chain industry, including management, operations and quality of service and goods.

With so much changing in the supply-chain industry, there’s only so much you can learn by doing things one way, whether it be reading textbooks, attending webinars and lectures, or simply working in the field. Both education and hands-on experience in the supply-chain industry are necessary for comprehensive mastery. From the highest person at the executive level to middle management or the newest worker on the warehouse floor, a combination of skills from all ends of the spectrum are invaluable keys to your supply-chain education—and to the success of your business.