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Despite the Name, the Refrigerated Container Market is Red Hot, Spurring Industry Moves

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Despite the Name, the Refrigerated Container Market is Red Hot, Spurring Industry Moves

The global shipping containers market is poised to experience significant market valuation and robust growth through 2025, according to industry research published last year. Sorry about the temperature mix you are about to withstand, but the hottest segment of that market in that study was refrigerated containers, a.k.a. reefer.

Be they 20-foot, 40-foot or even higher cubes, “reefer containers are projected to be the fastest-growing segment in the product type category during the forecast period,” which was 2017-2025 for Persistence Market Research. (See https://www.persistencemarketresearch.com/market-research/shipping-containers-market.asp.)

The Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) for the period is forecast by PMR to be 10.2 percent for the reefer segment, with the 20- and 40-foot sub segments expected to push the positive growth. It’s interesting to note that this factoid was part of a report that more prominently played up the predicted 8.6 percent CAGR for the dry container segment.

That said (or, more accurately, written), it is telling that PMR expects the overall container market to register a “robust” CAGR of 8.3 percent throughout the eight-year period, even with the forecast of a slowing global economy in 2020.

“The growth of the shipping containers at a global level is pushed by the growth in the economy, rising seaborne trade, increasing demand for highly efficient and superior capacity shipping containers, growth in sales of specialized shipping containers by department of defense and rising trend of increasing use of remote container management (RCM) solutions,” PMR finds.

There have been anecdotal indications of the reefer market’s continued growth. Universal Africa Lines (UAL), a conventional ocean transportation carrier that specializes in handling project cargo, breakbulk and containers, boasts a fleet of more than 4,000 containers including reefers, high cubes, open tops and flat racks with the ability to provide a multitude of shipping options including door-to-door service. Last summer, UAL announced its call at Port of Houston’s City Docks as part of its U.S. Gulf/Mexico to West Africa liner service.

Port of Houston was attractive to UAL due to the available dedicated laydown area for project cargoes and berth availability, both of which provided added flexibility to the carrier’s multipurpose fleet.

Cogoport, a leading digital freight logistics business in India, announced in July 2019 the launch of reefer cargo services to and from destinations around the globe. “We are meeting significant demand for reefer exports to North America, Europe, Asia and the Middle East, and to those importing refrigerated cargoes–enabling SME [small-to-medium enterprise] shippers all over India to deliver better productivity, service and profitability when moving their perishable cargoes,” said Cogoport CEO and founder Purnendu Shekhar at the time.

India has experienced “rapid and sustained growth in refrigerated exports during the past decade with commodities like fish, vegetables, fruit and nuts, meat, pharmaceuticals and chemicals driving demand for reefer import and export services,” explained Shekhar’s company in a press release.

“We have had a great experience working with Cogoport, moving onions to different corners of the world–saving us time and budget,” says Ankit Begwani, CEO and founder of BegwaniGlobal. “Like many other SMEs, we are also seeing huge demand for shipping of perishable cargoes, not least for fruit and vegetable exports to Malaysia and Dubai. This requires high operational output, optimization of shipments and customer satisfaction for delivering goods on time. Every cent matters to every SME business, and Cogoport has demonstrated that it can help deliver that value with better rates, better margins and better visibility.”

The reefer demand is not going one way in India, where the rise of the middle class has created a greater desire for refrigerated imports, particularly from Germany, South Korea and Russia, according to the advisory from Cogoport, which is headquartered in Mumbai and has offices in Hong Kong and the Netherlands.

Perhaps the greatest indication of reefer’s rise comes in the form of technological advances that different industry players seem to announce almost daily.

Miramar, Florida-based Wireless Maritime Services (WMS), the largest wireless network operator at sea, and Globe Tracker, the fastest growing provider of global supply chain IoT visibility for cold-chain, announced their partnership in November to bring real-time reefer monitoring to Seaboard Marine, the largest marine cargo shipping line in Central, South America and the Caribbean.

Under the multi-year, multi-ship agreement, Seaboard Marine becomes the world’s first container ocean line to implement a truly portable, fully 24/7 monitored, 4G LTE based private cellular and integrated satellite communication network for containers on vessels. The innovation and expertise from WMS and Denmark-based Globe Tracker—whose North American headquarters are in Sarasota, Florida—results in “a novel vessel network that is seamless, interoperable, and provides end-to-end enhanced visibility and real-time connectivity, both in the cloud and on the vessel at sea,” according to the companies.

They add that Seaboard Marine also becomes the world’s first ocean line to implement full IoT visibility across their fleet of intermodal assets, including reefers, gensets, chassis and vessels—all on a single integrated easy to use platform.

“By IoT equipping our Controlled Atmosphere (CA) reefer fleet and other critical assets, we are well-positioned to provide more responsive cold chain services for our trade lanes, which facilitates complex processes such as USDA cold treatment,” noted Seaboard Marine Vice President Piero Buitano in the announcement.

“The vessel system also provides real-time alerts to crew technicians, so problems can be quickly detected and corrected, if necessary, thereby increasing temperature compliance,” added Frederick Urbina, Seaboard’s Refrigerated Services manager.

Noted Pramod Arora, WMS president and CEO, of Seaboard Marine: “They have been a valuable partner in pushing us to innovate first-to-market solutions that we are now deploying within their fleet. We look forward to continuing to partner with Seaboard Marine for future innovations.”

Globe Tracker had already started the partnering mojo in September, when it announced having teamed with Woodcliff Lake, New Jersey-based SeaCube Containers, a global leader in refrigerated shipping containers and gensets, to provide IoT-enabled gensets for Ocean Network Express (ONE), the sixth-largest shipping line in the world.

The cutting-edge GT technology provides cellular communication of operational parameters from gensets, including fuel level, battery voltage, events and alarms and even remote shut-off capability for certain genset brands.

“The growing demand for greater tracking, transparency, security, diagnostics and asset fleet management using smart technology will continue to be a key driver for leased solutions,” said Greg Tuthill, chief commercial officer at SeaCube, in the joint announcement. “By partnering with Globe Tracker, we will continue to enhance our leading-edge technology solutions and expand our commitment to the intermodal industry by providing smart asset technology leased products.”

John Harnett, senior director Marine and Intermodal at Globe Tracker, added he was pleased to be working with SeaCube “in providing this best-in-class genset solution to ONE. In genset telematics, we are the only provider integrated into the micro-controller of two out of the three leading brands in North America. This provides ONE with the most robust amount of data and assists in setting maintenance intervals, reducing maintenance costs, extending asset life, monitoring fuel consumption and having full operational visibility of their genset assets.”

Palm Beach Gardens, Florida-based Carrier Transicold, which is under the umbrella of Farmington, Connecticut’s United Technologies Corp., used the Nov. 5-7  Intermodal Europe 2019 in Hamburg, Germany, to unveil its new TripLINK digital tool that is designed to make shipping perishables simple, transparent and reliable worldwide.

The tool digitally connects customers to updates on their assets, including vital cargo health information. TripLINK software securely gathers and analyzes machine and cargo-health data that it wirelessly obtains from telematics hardware in the refrigerated container and the micro controller.

“Our aim in unveiling these new digital solutions is to bring to our customers convenience, visibility and actionable intelligence, ultimately to derive more savings for them,” said Kartik Kumar, vice president & general manager, Carrier Global Container Refrigeration. “At Carrier, the future is now. Through leveraging the latest cutting-edge technology, especially on the digital front, we provide our customers practical solutions they only once dreamed possible.”

Also part of a new suite of digital solutions is the Container eCommerce portal, which began supporting customers in Southeast Asia in mid-November. The portal put on view Carrier Transicold’s full catalog of refrigerated container unit parts and allowed orders to be placed easily.

Also on display in Germany was Carrier’s new Micro-Link 5 controller, which is billed as the industry’s first wireless connectivity enabled refrigerated container unit controller that is also equipped with advanced diagnostics, allowing service technicians to save time and money by reducing container moves and the need to restack units to retrieve critical data or conduct troubleshooting. And a new DataLINE Connect mobile app allows customers to work directly with a refrigerated unit equipped to receive data via a smartphone or tablet.

Staying in Europe, but traveling back the previous month to October 2019, CEVA Logistics opened a new integrated, end-to-end cold chain facility at DP World London Gateway in Ashby-de-la-Zouch, UK.

More than 50 customers, including representatives of French container transportation and shipping company CMA CGM, attended the unveiling of The Chill Hub, which CEVA describes as a state-of-the-art facility with dedicated areas for handling pharmaceuticals, fresh and frozen produce, beverage products and flowers as well as other goods requiring temperature specific handling and storage.

The location is considered strategic because a deep-sea port is on the same site as the logistics park where The Chill Hub rests. London Gateway, which has links to more than 110 ports in 60 different countries, is considered the UK’s No. 1 reefer hub.

“With its excellent road and rail connections, our best in class warehouse management systems and direct port access, the Chill Hub is a powerful demonstration of the synergies between CEVA Logistics and CMA CGM,” said Nicolas Sartini, CEO of Baar, Switzerland-based CEVA Logistics, which has offices worldwide, including all over North America.

“This state-of-the-art facility will enable us to offer a unique value proposition to our shipper customers,” Sartini continued, “providing a faster delivery of goods through an energy-efficient building. We can also give full visibility and control of the entire inbound operation through The Chill Hub.”

CargoSmart Limited—which leverages technologies including artificial intelligence, Internet of Things (IoT) and blockchain, as well as a deep understanding of ocean shipping for its transportation and logistics clients—announced in November its new Connected Reefer Solution. The one-stop, AI and IoT-enabled reefer cargo management system for ocean carriers and shippers features end-to-end information transparency, including enhanced reefer container Pre-Trip Inspection (PTI) support, real-time container status monitoring updates, and predictive cargo arrival status.

“CargoSmart Connected Reefer Solution provides users with a one-stop, hassle-free solution that seamlessly integrates IoT-enabled containers with cloud-based monitoring software and APIs [application programming interfaces],” said Lionel Louie, CargoSmart’s chief commercial officer, in the announcement. “With the cutting-edge technologies and the vast volume of data collected, CargoSmart Connected Reefer Solution brings an unprecedented level of real-time cargo status visibility, empowers more accurate and responsive planning, and significantly drives down operation costs for carriers and shippers.”

Louie was not blowing smoke. CargoSmart reefer management was the winner of the Lloyd’s List 2019 “Excellence in Supply Chain Management” Asia Pacific and the 2019 TIBCO Trailblazer Visionary awards. And the solution received this praise from Li Dong, general manager of COSCO Shipping’s Equipment Management Center: “In addition to heightened visibility to reefer cargo status, COSCO Shipping replaced manual PTI with AI-enabled PTI, bringing significant enhancements in cost-efficiency savings as well as reefer management capabilities.”

cereal germ

Italy’s Cereal Germ Market Rose 2.9% to Reach $61M in 2018

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘Italy – Cereal Germ – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the cereal germ market in Italy amounted to $61M in 2018, rising by 2.9% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). In general, cereal germ consumption continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2011 with an increase of 96% y-o-y. In that year, the cereal germ market attained its peak level of $74M. From 2012 to 2018, the growth of the cereal germ market failed to regain its momentum.

Production in Italy

In 2018, the production of cereal germ in Italy amounted to 108K tonnes, rising by 2.6% against the previous year. Overall, cereal germ production, however, continues to indicate a temperate drop. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 when production volume increased by 88% y-o-y. Over the period under review, cereal germ production attained its maximum volume at 138K tonnes in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, production stood at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, cereal germ production totaled $29M in 2018 estimated in export prices. Overall, cereal germ production, however, continues to indicate a significant reduction. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2011 with an increase of 143% year-to-year. Over the period under review, cereal germ production reached its maximum level at $50M in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, production remained at a lower figure.

Exports from Italy

In 2018, the amount of cereal germ exported from Italy stood at 668 tonnes, declining by -6.2% against the previous year. Overall, cereal germ exports continue to indicate a drastic curtailment. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2014 with an increase of 93% against the previous year. Over the period under review, cereal germ exports attained their peak figure at 1.6K tonnes in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, exports remained at a lower figure.

In value terms, cereal germ exports totaled $548K (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. In general, cereal germ exports continue to indicate a drastic downturn. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2014 with an increase of 54% y-o-y. Exports peaked at $1.2M in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, exports remained at a lower figure.

Exports by Country

Spain (144 tonnes) was the main destination for cereal germ exports from Italy, accounting for a 22% share of total exports. Moreover, cereal germ exports to Spain exceeded the volume sent to the second major destination, Poland (61 tonnes), twofold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by France (17 tonnes), with a 2.6% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume to Spain totaled +7.3%. Exports to the other major destinations recorded the following average annual rates of exports growth: Poland (+18.2% per year) and France (-20.6% per year).

In value terms, the largest markets for cereal germ exported from Italy were Poland ($78K), Spain ($40K) and the U.S. ($22K), with a combined 25% share of total exports.

Among the main countries of destination, Poland recorded the highest rates of growth with regard to exports, over the last eleven years, while the other leaders experienced a decline.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the average cereal germ export price amounted to $821 per tonne, surging by 5.9% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the cereal germ export price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2011 when the average export price increased by 126% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the average export prices for cereal germ attained their maximum at $1,542 per tonne in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, export prices failed to regain their momentum.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was India ($1,470 per tonne), while the average price for exports to Spain ($275 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was recorded for supplies to France, while the prices for the other major destinations experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports into Italy

In 2018, the cereal germ imports into Italy amounted to 90K tonnes, growing by 11% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +3.8% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 with an increase of 40% y-o-y. Imports peaked in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, cereal germ imports amounted to $33M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Over the period under review, cereal germ imports continue to indicate tangible growth. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2011 with an increase of 114% y-o-y. In that year, cereal germ imports attained their peak of $50M. From 2012 to 2018, the growth of cereal germ imports remained at a somewhat lower figure.

Imports by Country

Austria (29K tonnes), Hungary (27K tonnes) and Spain (12K tonnes) were the main suppliers of cereal germ imports to Italy, with a combined 75% share of total imports. Slovakia, France, Serbia and Slovenia lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 23%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main suppliers, was attained by Serbia, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Austria ($8.6M), Hungary ($5.9M) and Spain ($3M) appeared to be the largest cereal germ suppliers to Italy, together accounting for 53% of total imports. These countries were followed by Slovakia, France, Slovenia and Serbia, which together accounted for a further 16%.

Serbia experienced the highest growth rate of imports, among the main suppliers over the last eleven years, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

The average cereal germ import price stood at $366 per tonne in 2018, going down by -6.8% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the cereal germ import price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2008 when the average import price increased by 76% year-to-year. In that year, the average import prices for cereal germ attained their peak level of $697 per tonne. From 2009 to 2018, the growth in terms of the average import prices for cereal germ remained at a somewhat lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major supplying countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Slovakia ($323 per tonne), while the price for Serbia ($91 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Spain, while the prices for the other major suppliers experienced a decline.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

mustard seed

U.S. Output of Mustard Seeds Indicated an Extraordinary Expansion over the Last Three Years

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘U.S. – Mustard Seed – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the mustard seed market in the U.S. amounted to $60M in 2018, going down by -6.3% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Overall, mustard seed consumption continues to indicate a temperate decline. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2017 with an increase of 0.8% year-to-year. In that year, the mustard seed market reached its peak level of $64M, and then declined slightly in the following year.

Production in the U.S.

In 2018, the mustard seed production in the U.S. amounted to 29K tonnes, surging by 5.7% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the total output indicated an extraordinary expansion from 2016 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +20.9% over the last two-year period. It was largely conditioned by skyrocketing growth of the harvested area and a strong expansion in yield figures.

Based on 2018 figures, mustard seed production increased by +46.1% against 2016 indices. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2017 with an increase of 38% y-o-y. Mustard seed production peaked in 2018 and is likely to continue its growth in the near future. Mustard seed output in the U.S. indicated an extraordinary increase, which

Harvested Area in the U.S.

In 2018, the harvested area of mustard seed in the U.S. amounted to 41K ha, jumping by 5.3% against the previous year. The harvested area increased at an average annual rate of +1.1% from 2016 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being observed in certain years. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2018 with an increase of 5.3% against the previous year. In that year, the mustard seed harvested area reached its peak level and is likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

Yield in the U.S.

In 2018, the average yield of mustard seed in the U.S. amounted to 711 kg per ha, leveling off at the previous year. Overall, the yield indicated buoyant growth from 2016 to 2018: its figure increased at an average annual rate of +19.5% over the last two-year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, mustard seed yield increased by +42.8% against 2016 indices. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2017 with an increase of 42% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the average mustard seed yield attained its maximum level in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

Exports from the U.S.

In 2018, the amount of mustard seed exported from the U.S. amounted to 14K tonnes, picking up by 24% against the previous year. Overall, mustard seed exports continue to indicate an extraordinary increase. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 with an increase of 58% year-to-year. Over the period under review, mustard seed exports reached their maximum in 2018 and are likely to continue its growth in the near future.

In value terms, mustard seed exports totaled $11M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. In general, mustard seed exports continue to indicate an outstanding expansion. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2017 with an increase of 82% y-o-y. Over the period under review, mustard seed exports reached their peak figure in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Exports by Country

Canada (7.7K tonnes) was the main destination for mustard seed exports from the U.S., with a 54% share of total exports. Moreover, mustard seed exports to Canada exceeded the volume sent to the second major destination, France (969 tonnes), eightfold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Thailand (829 tonnes), with a 5.8% share.

From 2016 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of volume to Canada stood at +47.1%. Exports to the other major destinations recorded the following average annual rates of exports growth: France (+5,488.6% per year) and Thailand (+540.8% per year).

In value terms, Canada ($4.8M) remains the key foreign market for mustard seed exports from the U.S., comprising 43% of total mustard seed exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Uruguay ($1.5M), with a 14% share of total exports. It was followed by France, with a 9.6% share.

From 2016 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of value to Canada totaled +62.8%. Exports to the other major destinations recorded the following average annual rates of exports growth: Uruguay (0.0% per year) and France (+3,460.2% per year).

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the average mustard seed export price amounted to $786 per tonne, going up by 14% against the previous year. Over the last two years, it increased at an average annual rate of +14.5%. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 when the average export price increased by 15% year-to-year. Over the period under review, the average export prices for mustard seed reached their peak figure in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future.

There were significant differences in the average prices for the major foreign markets. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Uruguay ($1,951 per tonne), while the average price for exports to Israel ($545 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2016 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was recorded for supplies to Belgium, while the prices for the other major destinations experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports into the U.S.

In 2018, the imports of mustard seed into the U.S. amounted to 63K tonnes, coming down by -8.2% against the previous year. Over the period under review, mustard seed imports continue to indicate a temperate downturn. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 with an increase of 2.9% against the previous year. In that year, mustard seed imports reached their peak of 68K tonnes, and then declined slightly in the following year.

In value terms, mustard seed imports amounted to $47M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Overall, mustard seed imports continue to indicate an abrupt contraction. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2018 with a decrease of -4.2% against the previous year. Over the period under review, mustard seed imports attained their maximum at $54M in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, imports remained at a lower figure.

Imports by Country

In 2018, Canada (62K tonnes) was the main supplier of mustard seed to the U.S., accounting for a approx. 99% share of total imports.

From 2016 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of volume from Canada amounted to -2.9%.

In value terms, Canada ($46M) constituted the largest supplier of mustard seed to the U.S..

From 2016 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of value from Canada totaled -6.8%.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the average mustard seed import price amounted to $746 per tonne, going up by 4.3% against the previous year. Overall, the mustard seed import price, however, continues to indicate a noticeable reduction. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2018 an increase of 4.3% against the previous year. The import price peaked at $807 per tonne in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, import prices remained at a lower figure.

As there is only one major supplying country, the average price level is determined by prices for Canada.

From 2016 to 2018, the rate of growth in terms of prices for Canada amounted to -4.0% per year.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

commercial

How to Reduce Commercial Warehousing Costs

With an unpredictable market, erratic economy, and huge competition, it can be quite difficult to get a warehouse business running smoothly. Your goal is to maximize profit while cutting down on production and operation costs. Well, that is not always easy. One of the biggest issues that create setbacks is spending money on things you don’t need to keep a business running. My goal is to show you how to reduce commercial warehousing costs, and increase your earnings while keeping the quality of the service on a satisfying level.

The Primary Goal

The primary goal of every professional warehouse must be to reduce commercial warehousing costs. Since all items must be in buy-ready condition, and in their proper place, you must have enough funding to keep this well-oiled machinery running smoothly. If you wish to improve the efficiency, speed, and accuracy in your warehouse, this strategy is a must. Let’s see how to achieve that.

Optimize Your Storage by Reducing Space

Optimizing your warehouse space is crucial for peak performance of your facilities. If we think about expenses, one of the major contributors is land cost. Since the productivity rate of the warehouse depends on the speed of locating the item and loading it onto the truck, you must think of the best system.

Optimize your aisles by carefully calculating the necessary length and width. Learn the dimensions of forklifts, and reduce extra space by moving the racks closer. Furthermore, sorting the packages on the racks makes everything easier.

When we think about square footage, it is crucial to go narrow and tall. That is the best way to reduce warehouse space, without losing productivity and effectiveness. Nevertheless, it is important to factor in the safety requirements of your workers, and provide enough space for them to work without constrictions.

Protecting the Inventory

Every warehouse has its own financial problems. Damaged inventory is most certainly one of the biggest culprits for the loss of money. Smart inventory management helps you keep your inventory protected.

One of the first approaches to take is to tightly stick to the packing and storage procedures. Extensive employee training is imperative for a smoothly-operated business without many losses.

Furthermore, it is not just the damage to the inventory that causes loss of money. It happens many times that a package is lost. That not only dries out your budget, but it is also bad customer service. Implementing proper control systems like RFID, VDP or RF is the best solution.

Finally, increasing overall security by installing top-of-the-art security systems will prevent theft, which is also a huge issue in many warehouses.

Cross-Docking

Cutting out the middleman and transferring a package directly to the customer is a great way to reduce commercial warehousing costs. This system is called cross-docking, and while many are aware of it, not everyone is using it. It is a great way to save both money and time, and improve store management, shipping, delivery, labor costs, etc.

Energy Cost Reduction

Reducing your utility bills is a great way to simultaneously reduce commercial warehousing costs. Better insulation, automatic lighting system, and water consumption reduction are just some of the ways to achieve this.

The more windows you have, the more natural light enters the warehouse. If you install hands-free faucets or automatic flush toilets with low flow, you will see great results.

All these changes require funding, but it is a long-term investment that always pays out in the end.

Used Containers vs. New Containers

Buying new containers for your warehouse seems appealing. Everyone likes to have new things straight out of the factory. However, that can be a costly investment. Instead, you should turn your focus towards used containers. You can find plenty in good condition, at a lower cost.

Believe it or not, you can save up to 40% on the smart purchase of used containers. All vendors keep them in superb condition, and all the containers are cleaned and inspected before selling. With such great savings, it really isn’t that difficult to see the benefits of used containers over new ones.

Cutting Down Labor-Related Expenses

When we talk about cutting down labor-related expenses, we are not referring to reducing employees’ salaries. That is not the way to go about this. However, it is important to properly manage your employees. Having idle workers is only draining your budget.

A great solution is to put everything you have into employee retention. If you keep your employees satisfied and give them an opportunity to develop, they will stay with you. Over time, they will turn into experienced employees that really have no cost. That strategy is much more affordable than hiring and training new employees.

Furthermore, the automation of warehouses is also an option. Machines can run as long as you need them. However, do not forget to factor in the installation and maintenance costs. Nevertheless, it is the main strategy of the future to reduce commercial warehousing costs.

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Joshua Collins is a business owner with a degree in economics, with over 10 years of experience. In his spare time, he runs a blog about startups and writes articles for multiple companies, like ccmover.com and many others. He is offering his advice both to young entrepreneurs looking to find a way into the small business industry and to experienced business owners looking for ways to increase earnings. Furthermore, his vast knowledge of marketing strategies provides a great foundation for any business and helps in reducing costs and increasing effectiveness and productivity.

shippers

Shippers Capitalize on Deep-Water Improvements

Shipping lines have responded to containerized trade growth by increasing vessel size, which has resulted in fewer port calls to move the same number of containers. And larger vessel sizes also limit which ports can be called due to insufficient access channel depths and air drafts as well as cranes to serve the biggest ships.

“A useful proxy is the average size of containerships transiting the Panama Canal—which increased by 13.1 percent during the canal’s most recent fiscal year (ended Sept. 30, 2018),” states Cushman & Wakefield’s 2019 North American Port Outlook. “The Panama Canal Authority reports that its Neopanamax Locks can now handle ships of almost 15,000 TEUs. Large ship visits are now increasingly common at East Coast ports that have the requisite water depths in channels and at berths. How large will vessels get? Orders have been placed for ships as large as 23,000 TEUs.”

The industry trend toward larger vessels has caused ports to literally dig deeper, particularly on the East Coast. Port of Miami last year completed $1 billion in infrastructure improvements that increased the channel depth to 50-52 feet and also included the addition of a fast access tunnel with direct access to the interstate, the modernization of the on-dock freight rail system and the installation of new Super Post-Panamax cranes that have an outreach of 22 containers wide. Among the projects at other East Coast ports that got underway in 2019 were:

*The $32.7 million deepenings of a second container berth to 50 feet at the Helen Delich Bentley Port of Baltimore’s Seagirt Marine Terminal, which should be done later this year.

*Port of Jacksonville’s Harbor Deepening, which will take the shipping channel to a depth of 47 feet, is expected to conclude in 2023, as is a coinciding project to construct a $238.7 million international container terminal at Blount Island. JAXPORT has already widened Mile Point Harbor (only mitigation work was outstanding at press time), and turning basins at Brills Cut, which is authorized and under review, and Blount Island, which is in the design phase, are also part of the deepening project.

*Port of Virginia increasing the channel depth to: 59 feet in the Atlantic Ocean Channel; 56 feet at Thimble Shoals; and
55 feet in the Norfolk Harbor and Newport News Channels. It also includes widening the channel in select areas to include Thimble Shoals over the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel.

Deepening the Port of Charleston’s Harbor Entrance Channel up to its busiest container terminal, the Wando Welch, is expected by early 2021 and will allow the port to handle 14,000 to 18,000 TEU vessels drawing 50 feet or more without significant depth and other navigational restrictions. Port Everglades’ widening and deepening of navigation channels from 42 feet to 48-50 feet is expected to be completed between 2021-2025. The Georgia Ports Authority’s deepening of Savannah Harbor and its shipping channel from an authorized depth of 44 feet to 47 feet is slated for completion by late 2021 or early 2022.

As ports scramble to accommodate the biggest ships, some shippers have already been taking advantage of their arrival. As the Georgia Ports Authority announced in December it was on track to exceed 4.6 million TEUs for the first time in a calendar year, GPA Board Chairman Will McKnight remarked, “Exciting new business opportunities such as the export of the Georgia-made Kia Telluride, and resins produced in Pennsylvania and the Gulf States, as well as the import of cold-treated fresh produce, are driving the increase in trade through our deepwater ports.”

In roll-on/roll-off cargo, Colonel’s Island Terminal at the GPA’s Port of Brunswick handled 500,512 units of cars, trucks and tractors from January through October 2019. Ocean Terminal in Savannah added another 37,476 for a total of 537,988 units. As of December, total Ro/Ro trade was up for the year by 3,300 units, helping to make Georgia is the second busiest U.S. hub for the import-export of Ro/Ro cargo behind only Baltimore.

Another milestone was the GPA’s decade of partnership with Kia Motors Manufacturing Georgia (KMMG), which has shipped nearly 350,000 TEU of parts and materials through the Port of Savannah to supply its manufacturing plant near the town of West Point, supporting thousands of jobs in Georgia’s transportation and logistics supply chain. Kia also sends shipments in the other direction with overseas exports of the American-made Kia SUV, the Telluride.

“From the first production equipment arriving at the Port of Savannah in 2008 to the first Kia Telluride exports that left the Port of Brunswick this past February (2019), KMMG, the Georgia Ports Authority and the State of Georgia have maintained a strong bond,” said KMMG President and CEO Jason Shin in a statement.

February 2019 was also momentous for Port Manatee, which is the closest U.S. deepwater seaport to the expanded Panama Canal. Then-new terminal operator Carver Maritime Manatee LLC on Feb. 6 brought nearly 50,000 tons of raw material to be used in Florida cement manufacturing. The 47,650 metric tons of the bulk material brought from Europe on the Osprey I to the Central-Southwest Florida Gulf Coast port was soon followed by other Carver shipments.

As part of an agreement with Port Manatee that could extend for as many as 20 years, Carver has extensively renovated a 10-acre cargo facility with deepwater access, including rehabilitating a 1,400-foot-long conveyor system on the leased site. “We are delighted to have Carver as an active participant in the expansion of our port,” said Carlos Buqueras, Port Manatee’s executive director, at the time. “Carver’s operations are a perfect complement to the increasingly diverse activity taking place at Manatee County’s seaport.”

Taking advantage of deepwater ports is not confined to the East Coast, however. In Washington state, the Port of Vancouver USA received the largest single shipment of wind turbine blades in the history blade manufacturer Vestas on June 24, 2019, breaking the previous record of 156 blades on a single ship.

The 198 blades, each measuring 161 feet long, were manufactured and shipped from Italy. Once unloaded from the ship, the blades were moved to the port’s Terminal 5, which boasts 86 acres of unobstructed laydown area with immediate proximity to the port’s deep-water berths. From there, the blades were transported by truck to the Marengo wind farm near Dayton, Washington, where they are now being used to re-power existing turbines.

“With our North American headquarters based in Portland, it is especially gratifying to be part of bringing the environmental and economic benefits of wind energy to the Pacific Northwest,” said Chris Brown, president of Vestas North America, which partnered with project owner PacifiCorp on the blade shipment. “The arrival of this shipment and its 198 blades, represent the significant supply chain industry and jobs created and supported by the wind energy economy.  We’re proud to partner with PacifiCorp and the Port to bring more wind energy benefits to Washington.”

Shrugged Vancouver USA’s Chief Commercial Officer Alex Strogen, “The port is uniquely qualified to handle these types of projects.”

 

career

Forget YouTube Fame; Social Responsibility is Key To Career Happiness.

American children and teens, when asked the age-old question of what they want to be as adults, lean toward careers that could bring personal fame or are just plain fun, rather than those that might contribute to the betterment of society or lead to scientific progress.

“While we’re focused on fame and fun, other countries are emphasizing discipline and a good work ethic,” says Dr. Steven Mintz (www.stevenmintzethics.com), author of Beyond Happiness and Meaning: Transforming Your Life Through Ethical Behavior.

The latest example came in a survey Harris Poll conducted on behalf of Lego, where American children ages 8 to 12 picked vlogger/YouTuber as their No. 1 career choice. Chinese children, in comparison, overwhelmingly chose astronaut.

The results are similar to a survey Chicago-based market-research company C+R conducted a couple of years ago. American teenagers were asked about career aspirations and the largest percentage, 20 percent, said they want to be an athlete, artist or entertainer.

Mintz says the emphasis on fame – combined with a trend of many employers trying to create a “fun” work environment for employees – is troubling.

“Is this really what success looks like in the U.S.?” he asks. “Can we reasonably be expected to compete with the Chinese in the 21st century by making the workplace fun when the Chinese, who will likely surpass the U.S. as the world’s largest economy within the next 10 years, have skyrocketed to the top through hard work and discipline?”

But eschewing fun for fun’s sake doesn’t mean employees can’t find happiness at work. Mintz says that is better accomplished by creating a socially responsible workplace, which he says meshes nicely with the passion millennials and Gen Z have for social causes.

Some ways to help employees find happiness and meaning on the job, he says, include:

Establish an ethical culture. Companies should strive to create an ethical workplace culture where employees are encouraged to serve the interests of the company’s stakeholders – customers, clients and suppliers – and to do so ethically, Mintz says. Creating an ethical workplace starts with ethical values: emphasize doing what is right not wrong; doing good things not harmful ones.

Coach employees on the workplace’s values. Company leaders should engage employees in regular discussions about workplace ethics and the procedures that are designed to uphold ethical practices, Mintz says. “Employers must coach employees so they do good by being good, which means commit to ethical values,” he says.

Tap into the social conscience many employees already have. A recent survey reports that nearly one in five business-school students would sacrifice more than 40 percent of their salary to work for a responsible employer. “Some will work for nonprofits where they are committed to the cause,” Mintz says. “Millennials especially seek out purpose in their employment. I believe that’s because each of us is searching for happiness and greater meaning in life and our jobs provide one of the best sources to enhance our well-being.”

“Although there are troubling signs in our society regarding attitudes about jobs,” Mintz says, “I am heartened by other surveys that show millennials and Gen Z really care about what a business does, whether its actions are ethical and trustworthy, and that a purpose-driven culture exists that puts benefitting society front and center in their mission statement.”

_____________________________________________________________

Dr. Steven Mintz (www.stevenmintzethics.com), author of Beyond Happiness and Meaning: Transforming Your Life Through Ethical Behavior, has frequently commented on ethical issues in society and business ethics. His Workplace Ethics Advice blog has been recognized as one of the top 30 in corporate social responsibility. He also has served as an expert witness on ethics matters. Dr. Mintz spent almost 40 years of his life in academia. He has held positions as a chair in Accounting at San Francisco State University and Texas State University. He was the Dean of the College of Business and Public Administration at Cal State University, San Bernardino. He recently retired as a Professor Emeritus from Cal Poly State University in San Luis Obispo.

6 Ways to Improve Efficiency, Speed, and Accuracy in Your Warehouse

Modern warehouses are already much faster and more efficient than those 20, even ten years ago. But you’re still feeling the budget crunch every quarter. And, if you’re like us, you know that there are always things we can do to make a warehouse a little better.

So, we crunched the numbers, talked to experts, and meditated in the back of the warehouse to come up with these six methods designed to improve your warehouse efficiency, speed, accuracy, and how much we like working in a warehouse.

Improve Your Operational Software

Your first step in improving your warehouse operations is having the right tools in place to measure, track, and understand what you’ve got. A modern warehouse management system (WMS) is your safest bet to start establishing baselines of your efficiency, waste, how quickly you fill orders, and how accurate everything you do is.

We’ve all heard it a thousand times, but it remains true: you can’t improve something you don’t measure. Choose and implement a capable WMS to gain a better understanding and give your team plenty of ways to use their time and your inventory better.

Enhance Your Metrics Choices

Metrics, especially key performance indicators (KPIs), build on that introduction of a smart WMS. They help you tell the story of your business and how it can do better — and sometimes communicating KPIs is just as important as choosing the right ones.

Review the metrics you track and how you define KPIs. Do they measure productivity? Can they respond to changes to your baseline? Do they match up with current targets and accurately track as performance changes?

Don’t get overly complicated.

You want KPIs that are easy to understand and measure. Glancing at your system and dashboards with these metrics should give you an idea of the health of your business. You and your warehouse team can understand five metrics much better than 20. So, find what easily tells the most important story.

Reorganize Your Inventory Locations

Once you know what to track and can start tracking it, it’s time to review your standard day’s orders and the routes people take to pick them. Look for high-volume products and see if they’re in a good or bad location.

Put your most popular products near they critical points in your warehouse that can speed up picking and packing efforts. Usually, this includes aisle ends and exit or transition areas. However, you might also have enough volume to give them their own space that’s closest to your packing areas, with a set team of pickers grabbing only these while others grab the secondary items to complete each order.

You can speed this up further with a WMS that support voice picking and wave or batch pick and pack methods. They’re faster, more accurate, and improve your efficiency for filling orders.

Try Custom Kitting

When you redo your inventory locations and start reviewing route changes, you’re collecting a lot of data along the way. Use it.

Productivity can see significant gains when you implement custom kitting in your warehouse. Kitting can occur with the packages you sell or how you manage your warehouse, both increasing efficiency by reducing pick points. Selling kits means you can control inventory better and generate higher-value orders more often.

However, you can kit within the warehouse simply by grouping products that are typically bought together. Some companies even bag select items together to give pickers an option to grab one thing instead of many. It can help you control your space and keep inventory counts more accurate, giving you a nice boost.

Give Receiving Its Due

The warehouse mantra is often about getting orders out the door as quickly and accurately as possible. Unfortunately, that leads to bottlenecks and procrastination in the receiving department. The faster and more efficient you become, the quicker you need to get your inventory ready for use.

Make every aspect of receiving, from putting away inventory to breaking down boxes and taking out the trash, important. It should be habit, and your systems should reinforce it. The better you do this, the more accurate and reliable your data, making all these other steps more efficient.

Besides, do you really want a bad inventory count because an empty box listed as full?

Talk to Your Team

And the final way we’ll think about running a better warehouse is by asking you to stop thinking about it. All of the steps above require data and activities from your warehouse team, IT, leadership, and more. Every group interacts with each change in a variety of ways, giving them varied perspectives.

Don’t let all that experience go to waste.

Talk to your team in the warehouse, in IT and sales, and leadership. Discuss what’s working, what isn’t, and their suggestions to change things regularly. You’ll get a two-prong benefit:

-People interacting with the systems and changes have excellent vantage points to find breaking points or see additional changes that can boost your performance.

-It helps your teams feel heard, which makes them happier to come into work and more likely to implement the changes you make.

Your company pays a lot to have different experts in and around the warehouse. They’re the most significant resource for maximizing your business. And, we all like feeling respected at work.

U.S. Poultry Market – Consumption Grows Over the Fourth Consecutive Year

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘U.S. – Poultry – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the poultry market in the U.S. amounted to $24.5B in 2018, remaining stable against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +3.0% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed over the period under review. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2008 when the market value increased by 19% y-o-y. Poultry consumption peaked at $24.8B in 2017, and then declined slightly in the following year.

Production in the U.S.

In 2018, the amount of poultry produced in the U.S. amounted to 22M tonnes, approximately reflecting the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.2% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations throughout the analyzed period.

Exports from the U.S.

In 2018, exports of poultry from the U.S. stood at 1.9M tonnes, lowering by -10.3% against the previous year. In general, poultry exports continue to indicate an abrupt decline. In value terms, poultry exports amounted to $2.2B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

Mexico (395K tonnes) was the main destination for poultry exports from the U.S., accounting for a 21% share of total exports. Moreover, poultry exports to Mexico exceeded the volume sent to the second major destination, China, Hong Kong SAR (128K tonnes), threefold. Angola (92K tonnes) ranked third in terms of total exports with a 4.9% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of volume to Mexico stood at +2.2%. Exports to the other major destinations recorded the following average annual rates of exports growth: China, Hong Kong SAR (+5.1% per year) and Angola (+1.2% per year).

In value terms, Mexico ($493M) remains the key foreign market for poultry exports from the U.S., comprising 22% of total poultry exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by China, Hong Kong SAR ($202M), with a 9.1% share of total exports. It was followed by Canada, with a 6.1% share.

Export Prices by Country

The average poultry export price stood at $1,181 per tonne in 2018, falling by -3.7% against the previous year. Over the last eleven years, it increased at an average annual rate of +1.5%. Export prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest export price was Canada ($2,458 per tonne), while the average price for exports to South Korea ($598 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of export prices was recorded for supplies to Russia, while the export prices for the other major destinations experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports into the U.S.

In 2018, approx. 114K tonnes of poultry were imported into the U.S.; growing by 5.4% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the total imports indicated a prominent expansion from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +4.0% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, the poultry imports decreased by -34.0% against 2015 indices. In value terms, poultry imports stood at $262M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

Chile (68K tonnes) and Canada (41K tonnes) were the main suppliers of poultry imports to the U.S., together accounting for 97% of total imports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main suppliers, was attained by Chile.

In value terms, the largest poultry suppliers to the U.S. were Chile ($137M) and Canada ($115M), with a combined 96% share of total imports.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the average poultry import price amounted to $2,303 per tonne, growing by 4.4% against the previous year. Over the period from 2007 to 2018, it increased at an average annual rate of +2.3%. Average import prices varied somewhat amongst the major supplying countries. In 2018, the country with the highest import price was Canada ($2,771 per tonne), while the price for Chile totaled $2,007 per tonne.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of import prices was attained by Canada.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

dates

Global Date Market 2019 – Egypt Continues to Dominate the Market

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘World – Dates – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The global date market revenue amounted to $13.8B in 2018, jumping by 9.7% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +1.8% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with only minor fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2018 when the market value increased by 9.7% year-to-year. In that year, the global date market attained its peak level and is likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

Consumption By Country

The countries with the highest volumes of date consumption in 2018 were Egypt (1.6M tonnes), Algeria (1.1M tonnes) and Iran (1M tonnes), together accounting for 44% of global consumption. These countries were followed by Saudi Arabia, Sudan, India, the United Arab Emirates, Pakistan, Iraq, Oman and Morocco, which together accounted for a further 39%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of date consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by India, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Egypt ($2.3B), Algeria ($2.1B) and Iran ($1.1B) were the countries with the highest levels of market value in 2018, together accounting for 40% of the global market. These countries were followed by Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Oman, Morocco, Pakistan, the United Arab Emirates and India, which together accounted for a further 38%.

In 2018, the highest levels of date per capita consumption was registered in Oman (79 kg per person), followed by the United Arab Emirates (39 kg per person), Algeria (26 kg per person) and Saudi Arabia (19 kg per person), while the world average per capita consumption of date was estimated at 1.09 kg per person.

In Oman, date per capita consumption plunged by an average annual rate of -1.8% over the period from 2007-2018. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: the United Arab Emirates (-10.1% per year) and Algeria (+5.1% per year).

Market Forecast 2019-2025

Driven by increasing demand for date worldwide, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven years. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +2.3% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 9.8M tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production 2007-2018

In 2018, approx. 8.4M tonnes of dates were produced worldwide; picking up by 2.3% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.7% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being observed over the period under review. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2015 with an increase of 6.4% against the previous year. The global date production peaked in 2018 and is likely to continue its growth in the near future. The general positive trend in terms of date output was largely conditioned by a modest increase of the harvested area and a relatively flat trend pattern in yield figures.

In value terms, date production totaled $13.2B in 2018 estimated in export prices. Overall, date production continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2012 when production volume increased by 25% against the previous year. Over the period under review, global date production attained its peak figure level at $14.4B in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, production failed to regain its momentum.

Production By Country

The countries with the highest volumes of date production in 2018 were Egypt (1.6M tonnes), Iran (1.2M tonnes) and Algeria (1.1M tonnes), with a combined 47% share of global production.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of date production, amongst the main producing countries, was attained by Algeria, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Harvested Area 2007-2018

In 2018, the total area harvested in terms of dates production worldwide amounted to 1.4M ha, jumping by 3.6% against the previous year. The harvested area increased at an average annual rate of +1.5% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with only minor fluctuations over the period under review. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2016 when harvested area increased by 6.9% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the harvested area dedicated to date production reached its peak figure in 2018 and is likely to continue its growth in the near future.

Yield 2007-2018

Global average date yield amounted to 6 tonne per ha in 2018, remaining constant against the previous year. Over the period under review, the date yield, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2015 when yield increased by 8.4% against the previous year. In that year, the average date yield attained its peak level of 6.6 tonne per ha. From 2016 to 2018, the growth of the average date yield remained at a somewhat lower figure.

Exports 2007-2018

In 2018, approx. 1.1M tonnes of dates were exported worldwide. In general, date exports continue to indicate a buoyant expansion. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2018 with an increase of 39% y-o-y. In that year, global date exports reached their peak and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, date exports amounted to $1.7B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. In general, date exports continue to indicate a buoyant expansion. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2018 with an increase of 39% against the previous year. In that year, global date exports reached their peak and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

Exports by Country

Iraq (263K tonnes), Iran (180K tonnes), Pakistan (136K tonnes), Tunisia (115K tonnes), Saudi Arabia (104K tonnes) and the United Arab Emirates (97K tonnes) represented roughly 79% of total exports of dates in 2018. It was distantly followed by Israel (58K tonnes), committing a 5.1% share of total exports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by the United Arab Emirates, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest date markets worldwide were Tunisia ($319M), Israel ($207M) and Iran ($176M), together accounting for 40% of global exports. Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, the United Arab Emirates and Iraq lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 31%.

The United Arab Emirates experienced the highest growth rate of exports, among the main exporting countries over the last eleven-year period, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

The average date export price stood at $1,530 per tonne in 2018, approximately reflecting the previous year. Over the period under review, the date export price continues to indicate a temperate downturn. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2012 when the average export price increased by 8.7% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the average export prices for dates reached their maximum at $2,031 per tonne in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, export prices remained at a lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Israel ($3,594 per tonne), while Iraq ($408 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Saudi Arabia, while the other global leaders experienced mixed trends in the export price figures.

Imports 2007-2018

Global imports amounted to 1.1M tonnes in 2018. Over the period under review, date imports continue to indicate a prominent expansion. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2009 with an increase of 32% against the previous year. The global imports peaked in 2018 and are likely to continue its growth in the near future.

In value terms, date imports stood at $1.6B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Overall, date imports continue to indicate a remarkable increase. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2010 with an increase of 26% against the previous year. Over the period under review, global date imports attained their maximum in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

Imports by Country

India was the largest importing country with an import of about 423K tonnes, which finished at 38% of total imports. The following importers – Morocco (45K tonnes), the United Arab Emirates (41K tonnes), Indonesia (40K tonnes), Turkey (39K tonnes), the U.S. (37K tonnes), France (35K tonnes), Malaysia (31K tonnes), Bangladesh (30K tonnes), the UK (24K tonnes), Germany (22K tonnes) and Yemen (21K tonnes) – together made up 33% of total imports.

India was also the fastest-growing in terms of the dates imports, with a CAGR of +22.9% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, Turkey (+22.9%), Bangladesh (+16.5%), the U.S. (+14.2%), the United Arab Emirates (+11.7%), Indonesia (+8.9%), Yemen (+7.0%), Malaysia (+6.6%), Germany (+6.5%), the UK (+4.7%) and France (+2.2%) displayed positive paces of growth. Morocco experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. India (+34 p.p.), Turkey (+3.2 p.p.), the United Arab Emirates (+2.6 p.p.), the U.S. (+2.6 p.p.), Bangladesh (+2.2 p.p.) and Indonesia (+2.2 p.p.) significantly strengthened its position in terms of the global imports, while the shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, India ($275M) constitutes the largest market for imported dates worldwide, comprising 18% of global imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the U.S. ($99M), with a 6.3% share of global imports. It was followed by France, with a 6.3% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of value in India totaled +12.7%. The remaining importing countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: the U.S. (+20.6% per year) and France (+3.6% per year).

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the average date import price amounted to $1,399 per tonne, stabilizing at the previous year. Overall, the date import price, however, continues to indicate a slight deduction. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2008 an increase of 16% against the previous year. In that year, the average import prices for dates attained their peak level of $1,862 per tonne. From 2009 to 2018, the growth in terms of the average import prices for dates remained at a somewhat lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Germany ($3,078 per tonne), while India ($651 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Indonesia, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

textile

Textile Hosepiping and Tubing Market in Poland Is Estimated at $9.1M in 2018

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘Poland – Textile Hosepiping And Similar Textile Tubing – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the textile tubing market in Poland amounted to $9.1M in 2018, declining by -11.2% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Over the period under review, textile tubing consumption, however, continues to indicate a pronounced decline. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2010 with an increase of 27% against the previous year. In that year, the textile tubing market attained its peak level of $14M. From 2011 to 2018, the growth of the textile tubing market remained at a somewhat lower figure.

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in Poland

Driven by increasing demand for textile tubing in Poland, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven-year period. Market performance is forecast to decelerate, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +1.7% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 2.4K tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in Poland

In 2018, the textile tubing production in Poland totaled 1.7K tonnes, approximately mirroring the previous year. Over the period under review, the total output indicated measured growth from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.7% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, textile tubing production decreased by -3.1% against 2015 indices. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2015 with an increase of 45% year-to-year. In that year, textile tubing production attained its peak volume of 1.7K tonnes. From 2016 to 2018, textile tubing production growth remained at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, textile tubing production amounted to $6.5M in 2018 estimated in export prices. Overall, textile tubing production continues to indicate a deep downturn. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2015 with an increase of 32% y-o-y. Over the period under review, textile tubing production reached its maximum level at $11M in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, production remained at a lower figure.

Exports from Poland

In 2018, the exports of textile hosepiping and similar textile tubing from Poland totaled 502 tonnes, going up by 75% against the previous year. Overall, textile tubing exports continue to indicate a buoyant increase. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2015 with an increase of 210% year-to-year. Exports peaked in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, textile tubing exports amounted to $3.3M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Over the period under review, textile tubing exports continue to indicate a prominent expansion. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2015 when exports increased by 140% y-o-y. Exports peaked in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Exports by Country

Italy (88 tonnes), Hungary (72 tonnes) and the Czech Republic (49 tonnes) were the main destinations of textile tubing exports from Poland, with a combined 42% share of total exports. Slovakia, Croatia, Germany, Slovenia, Romania, Ukraine, the UK, Bulgaria and Lithuania lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 42%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main countries of destination, was attained by Croatia (+78.2% per year), while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest markets for textile tubing exported from Poland were Hungary ($366K), the UK ($334K) and the Czech Republic ($332K), with a combined 32% share of total exports. These countries were followed by Ukraine, Slovakia, Italy, Croatia, Germany, Slovenia, Romania, Bulgaria and Lithuania, which together accounted for a further 46%.

Among the main countries of destination, Croatia (+66.1% per year) experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to exports, over the last eleven-year period, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the average textile tubing export price amounted to $6,527 per tonne, jumping by 23% against the previous year. Overall, the textile tubing export price, however, continues to indicate a slight shrinkage. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2018 an increase of 23% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the average export prices for textile hosepiping and similar textile tubing reached their maximum at $7,957 per tonne in 2011; however, from 2012 to 2018, export prices stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was the UK ($22,492 per tonne), while the average price for exports to Italy ($2,554 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was recorded for supplies to Slovakia, while the prices for the other major destinations experienced mixed trend patterns.

Imports into Poland

Textile tubing imports into Poland totaled 941 tonnes in 2018, increasing by 4.3% against the previous year. Overall, the total imports indicated a remarkable increase from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +4.3% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, textile tubing imports increased by +38.5% against 2016 indices. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2010 with an increase of 55% against the previous year. Imports peaked in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future.

In value terms, textile tubing imports stood at $3.8M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Over the period under review, textile tubing imports continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2017 when imports increased by 39% y-o-y. Over the period under review, textile tubing imports reached their peak figure in 2018 and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

Imports by Country

In 2018, China (631 tonnes) constituted the largest textile tubing supplier to Poland, with a 67% share of total imports. Moreover, textile tubing imports from China exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest supplier, Germany (152 tonnes), fourfold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Croatia (54 tonnes), with a 5.8% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume from China amounted to +5.3%. The remaining supplying countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: Germany (+3.3% per year) and Croatia (+7.8% per year).

In value terms, the largest textile tubing suppliers to Poland were China ($1.5M), Germany ($1.3M) and the Czech Republic ($302K), with a combined 81% share of total imports.

In terms of the main suppliers, the Czech Republic recorded the highest rates of growth with regard to imports, over the last eleven-year period, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

The average textile tubing import price stood at $4,046 per tonne in 2018, reducing by -3.6% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the textile tubing import price continues to indicate a significant slump. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 when the average import price increased by 32% year-to-year. Over the period under review, the average import prices for textile hosepiping and similar textile tubing reached their maximum at $7,512 per tonne in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, import prices failed to regain their momentum.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Germany ($8,598 per tonne), while the price for China ($2,355 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the Czech Republic, while the prices for the other major suppliers experienced a decline.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform