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How Customized Shipping Solutions Benefit Your Supply Chain

solutions

How Customized Shipping Solutions Benefit Your Supply Chain

Gone are the days when the one-size-fits-all approach to logistics is good enough to meet the exacting standards of every shipment. In fact, maybe those days were never really here.

Though they may seem like a good bargain, many of the out-of-the-box logistics services of today lack the flexibility to accommodate specialized loads like artwork, delicate medical equipment, and other sensitive or rush items. Seemingly innocuous errors with such shipments can cost thousands of dollars, or possibly more. 

SPECIALISTS IN FREIGHT FORWARD THINKING 

Today’s shippers and shipments demand more from their 3PL provider, but unfortunately, some providers still cannot rise to the challenge. Thankfully, there’s a solution for supply chains looking for individualized services. Nimble, more personalized 3PL’s operate with the specific goal of handling sensitive cargo. The Magnate Worldwide family of companies – comprised of TrumpCard and Masterpiece International – serves supply chains with a variety of customizable solutions for businesses big and small. They offer a boutique approach to logistics not possible with larger, more generic providers. 

Founded in 1995, TrumpCard specializes in domestic air and ground expedited shipments that are handling-sensitive and time-definite in nature – from medical equipment to aerospace parts to entertainment industry equipment. “We focus on domestic shipments routed by air and ground that have special handling requirements or rapid deadlines,” said Chris Zingrebe, President of TrumpCard, “The industries we serve typically have sensitive cargo that may require elevated service levels, such as White Glove or next day delivery.” TrumpCard offers a premier white-glove service for special deliveries into sensitive environments like hospitals or data centers. The company’s expertise in this type of mission-critical shipment has made them masters of proactive communication and efficiency when it comes to handling sensitive shipments and time-definite services. 

Founded in 1989, Masterpiece International specializes in logistics, freight forwarding, and customs brokerage of fine art for museums, galleries, and art fairs as well as offering services to private clients, and the entertainment and events industry. “Masterpiece has a rich history in providing premier logistics services to the fine art industry,” said Thomas Gilgen, President of Masterpiece, “…we’ve taken that and expanded across many other industries with specialized requirements.” Over the years, Masterpiece has developed an International Logistics Solutions Division which focuses on shipments for technology, life sciences, energy, marine, aerospace, retail, trade show, and household goods industries. Due to the highly specialized nature of their shipments, Masterpiece International has developed expertise in handling sensitive shipments and provides that high level of service across all cargo, whether they’re shipping priceless works of art, mission-critical aerospace equipment, concert, and event cargo, or temperature-controlled life sciences materials.

MINIMIZING RISK, MAKING DEADLINES, AND ADDING VALUE 

No matter what the cargo is, shippers are inherently taking a risk when transporting goods. Unfortunately, that risk only increases as the value of the cargo increases. Not only are you risking merchandise becoming lost or damaged, even the risk of delay can throw off an entire supply chain. The key to eliminating risk and guaranteeing a successful delivery is working with a 3PL partner that you trust to get your shipment where it needs to go, when it needs to be there. But nobody has a crystal ball, so how do you know you can trust your 3PL? It pays to do your homework. 

In logistics, time is money, especially when one delay can cost thousands of dollars and set off a domino effect of even more problems. That’s why it pays to select a provider that has the expertise to get your shipment where it needs to go on time, every time. When selecting a 3PL, a provider’s on-time rate is an excellent indicator of what you can expect for your own merchandise deliveries. TrumpCard, for example, boasts an impressive 99% on-time rate, in addition to a 24/7 team managing shipments. TrumpCard’s state-of-the-art tracking software ensures that all shipments are accounted for at all times, so there is no room for delay or loss, and you can always keep tabs on your merchandise no matter where it is in the supply chain. 

One optional service a business may want to consider is additional security measures for the supply chain. Though not necessary for all shipments, when shipping valuable or sensitive material, additional security services can offer peace of mind by minimizing security risks and blind spots. At Masterpiece International, teams specialize in minimizing risks when planning, routing and executing and have access to an in-house security and supervision team for protection of high-value goods. That team, the Masterpiece Security Group, is a licensed security organization with tarmac access at many major U.S. airports, their own dedicated vehicles, and a partner network of highly vetted agents and carriers. 

Ultimately, when it comes to selecting a logistics provider, added values like built-in security and customizable solutions only matter if your 3PL has the visibility and customer service skills to back them up. Both TrumpCard and Masterpiece believe that visibility and customer service are key from the moment they take possession of your merchandise to its final delivery at the end-user. Both companies offer online track and trace, shipment imaging, and supervision all designed to keep tabs on your merchandise and give you peace of mind. At Magnate, customer service is more than just a pleasantry, it means that experienced agents are problem solving, customizing solutions, and providing timely and important information to the client with a personalized touch that suits the individual needs of your business. 

In the end, a combination of many factors create value, not just a big name or a low price. Customizable solutions with additional features like an excellent on-time rate, added security, transparency, and expertise in sensitive and high-value shipments are all part of what adds value to a specialized supply chain. TrumpCard and Masterpiece International have been trusted to handle sensitive, mission-critical, and high-value shipments for over 50 years of combined service – continuously getting the job done right for your business. 

blockchain

German-Austrian Trade Transaction Successful on Marco Polo’s Blockchain Platform

The S-Servicepartner, Sparkasse Bielefeld and the Austrian Raiffeisen Bank International, together with Dr. August Wolff GmbH & Co. KG Arzneimittel and its business partner, the pharmaceutical company s.a.m. Pharma Handel GmbH successfully completed a digital trade transaction with a receivables-based financing component on the Marco Polo platform. A special feature: the S-Servicepartner, currently the only back-office service provider worldwide within the Marco Polo consortium, the largest and fastest-growing trade finance network, was able to process a blockchain-based trade transaction for the first time together with a savings bank and its customer. Another highlight: Raiffeisen Bank International was the first Austrian bank to carry out a pilot transaction on the Marco Polo platform.

The Marco Polo network connects banks, corporates and technology-partners to streamline their working capital and trade finance activities through direct data exchange. It provides digital solutions for international trade and supply chain as well as receivables-based financing using R3 Corda Blockchain technology. Companies will be able to access the platform’s offerings via web portals, local and cloud-based platforms, and ERP-integrated applications.

The settlement and financing of trade transactions via a Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT)-based platform is of equal interest to companies of all sizes active in foreign trade. The S-Servicepartner participates in the development of the Marco Polo platform, representing all savings banks in Germany, and pursues the goal of providing the savings banks with access to the Marco Polo product offering. The service provider is, therefore, testing the functionality and experience of the products on the Marco Polo platform together with selected savings banks and their medium-sized corporate customers. “This is the first transaction in a pilot series with savings banks with which we want to make an important contribution towards production maturity,” says Jürgen Nagel, a member of the Management Board of S-Servicepartner Berlin. “The insights gained by all participants will be directly incorporated into the further development of the modules”.

Ralf Hüpel, Head of International Business at Sparkasse Bielefeld, states: “We are very happy and satisfied to be able to contribute the view of a savings bank at such an early stage in the development of this platform. As the first savings bank in Germany, we were able, together with our customer, to give important impulses for the further development of this international project”.

“The Wolff Group, which is always interested in cutting edge innovations, sees an opportunity for the future to raise considerable efficiency potentials and significantly improve transparency in the entire process, from ordering to payment”, confirms Tanja Niedenführ, Head of Finance and Accounting Department at the pharmaceutical manufacturer.

Raiffeisen Bank International (RBI) began looking at the existing blockchain-based trade finance solutions in 2017. Of all the available platforms, RBI ultimately opted for Marco Polo. “Marco Polo best suited our strategy as the platform combines traditional trade finance products with new blockchain-based solutions such as Payment Commitment,” says Stefan Andjelic, RBI Blockchain Hub Lead. The cooperation with S-Servicepartner and the two companies gave a good impression of the marketability of the Marco Polo platform. “The transaction showed how Marco Polo can make trade finance more transparent and efficient through automation,” says Andreas Zietz, RBI Teamlead Trade Finance.

Also for Michael Stanzig, Managing Director of s.a.m. Pharma Handel GmbH, the pilot has shown that the Marco Polo platform provides transparency and security to all sides. “The usability of the platform is relatively easy for our part and operated without any problems,” Michael Stanzig continues.

“This pilot demonstrates the benefits of leveraging blockchain technology for open account trade finance transactions. By using the Marco Polo Platform, we create a safe and digital environment, which provides the foundation for a global trade finance marketplace,” said Rob Barnes, CEO of TradeIX.

The parties to the transaction agree that the cooperative partnership not only provided a deeper insight into the innovative technology but also brought the conviction that the underlying visions can be put into practice in the near future.

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The S-Servicepartner is the largest back office service provider for the savings banks in Germany. As a process industrialiser, the S-Servicepartner supports the savings banks with standardization and automation solutions using modern technologies such as Robotic Process Automation (RPA) and Business Intelligence (BI). Today, the corporate group employs more than 2,350 people at 11 locations throughout Germany and generates annual sales of around 200 million euros.

Sparkasse Bielefeld is the market leader in its area of business for medium-sized corporate customers and the most important financing partner for medium-sized companies in Bielefeld. The bank handles more than 20,000 commercial customer relationships in Bielefeld and has provided around 550 million Euros in new commercial loans in 2018.

The Dr. Wolff Group, with brands such as Alpecin, Plantur and Alcina, as well as Linola, Vagisan, Biorepair and Karex, is a family business from Bielefeld, now in its fourth generation, with 675 employees and expanding worldwide. Since its foundation in 1905, the company has focused on research and the scientifically proven benefits of its products in order to find a solution for hair and skin problems. With its own developments, the company achieved a turnover of 309 million Euros (2018). Dr. Wolff is operating in more than 60 countries.

RBI regards Austria, where it is a leading corporate and investment bank, as well as Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) as its home market. 13 markets of the region are covered by subsidiary banks. Additionally, the RBI Group comprises numerous other financial service providers, for instance in leasing, asset management or M&A. 

Around 47,000 employees service 16.5 million customers through approx. 2,100 business outlets, the by far largest part thereof in CEE. RBI’s shares are listed on the Vienna Stock Exchange. The Austrian Regional Raiffeisen Banks own around 58.8 percent of the shares, the remainder is in free float. Within the Austrian Raiffeisen Banking Group, RBI is the central institute of the Regional Raiffeisen Banks and other affiliated credit institutions.

s.a.m. Pharma Handel is a small successful company founded in 2003 in the OTC pharmaceutical sector with the aim of marketing European pharmaceutical companies that are not independently represented in Austria.

trade

Trade and the Impact on Imports and Exports in 2020

Significant and sustained increases in the world trade index (an index measuring the number of times the word uncertainty or its variants are mentioned in Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) reports at a country level) should be a worry for many as “the increase in trade uncertainty observed in the first quarter could be enough to reduce global growth by up to 0.75 percentage points in 2019”[1]

In August, the US Institute for supply management[2] latest report shows a contraction in production, purchasing, and employment indices.

Ahir, H, N Bloom, and D Furceri (2019), “The global economy hit by higher uncertainty”, VoxEU.org. https://voxeu.org/article/trade-uncertainty-rising-and-can-harm-global-economy

 

Uncertainty generated from Brexit, the US-China trade war, Japan – South Korea trade wars, and general discontentment with global trend towards widening income inequality is creating a toxic mix for politicians to deal with. The irony is the conventional approach of blaming your trading partners for your problems is only likely to exacerbate a general lack of confidence and increase further uncertainty.

The current round of the G7 summit in Biarritz concluded with support “to overhaul the WTO to improve effectiveness with regard to intellectual property protection, to settle disputes more swiftly and to eliminate unfair trade practices.” In essence, it’s signaling a need to strengthen the capabilities of the WTO to act faster and more decisively in resolving disputes that are even more political than structural in nature, requiring a more multi-faceted engagement approach. Whilst this may help in the long-run, in reality, companies will have to contend with uncertainty in global trade for some time to come as well as the impacts on the real economy from these disputes.

And all of this is happening as IMO 2020 approaches, the January 1, 2020, date by which the International Maritime Organization mandates a switch to lower sulfur fuels in order to achieve an 80% reduction in sulfur emissions leading to significant cost increases in the shipping goods via ocean freight (initial estimates between 180USD – 420 USD per TEU dependent on routing, base fuel costs, carrier).

So given the significant uncertainty around global trade agreements, the increasing use of trade as a political football, the increasing costs to trade and the shortening of product lifecycles as customers want faster, newer more differentiated offerings. Is it still worth it?

Of course this is very much dependent on what industry you are in. Whether you’re a global manufacturer or a wholesaler sourcing goods, your perspectives may be different based on investments made, sensitivity to current trade/tariff measures, customer demands, your markets, and the degree to which you are exposed to political debate and targeting.

However, I would offer that the benefits of specialization, economies of scale and unique factors of production that have underpinned global trade still exist as Adam Smith put it in 1776:

“By means of glasses, hotbeds, and hot walls, very good grapes can be raised in Scotland, and very good wine too can be made of them at about thirty times the expense for which at least equally good can be brought from foreign countries. Would it be a reasonable law to prohibit the importation of all foreign wines, merely to encourage the making of claret and burgundy in Scotland?”[1]

Today this simple analogy still holds true in skills, competences, capabilities, and access to markets and insights so that over time the expectation is that trade will prevail.

While the recent outlook has been gloomy, opportunities for 2020 include a resolution to a number of ongoing disputes and a final settlement on Brexit (we hope). Additionally, the maturation in technologies such as blockchain, process automation, forecasting and demand management solutions can also offset costs associated with IMO and support greater agility in the uncertain supply-chain world that we currently live in.

Indeed, if 2019 was the year of trade uncertainty, 2020 could be a restorative year in our ability to execute global trade.

Partnering with an experienced supply chain leader will be essential to minimizing cost increases while ensuring the efficient flow of your company’s goods and services.

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[1] World Economic Forum:https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2019/07/how-trade-uncertainty-is-impacting-the-global-economy/

[2]https://www.instituteforsupplymanagement.org/ismreport/mfgrob.cfm?SSO=1

[3]Adam Smith: Wealth of nations 1776

Neil Wheeldon is the Vice Presidents Solutions, BDP International.

demand

Adapting Supply Chains for Increased Consumer Demand and Same Day Shipping

Same-day and next-day shipping options are increasing, and consumers are beginning to desire expedited shipping options with minimal delay. Through new technologies, space optimization, and supply chain auditing, there are various ways companies can adapt to this demand.

There used to be a tattered cartoon taped to every dry cleaner’s cash register. There’s a man laughing — holding his stomach, actually, as the joke is so funny — with a bold face caption that reads: “YOU WANT IT WHEN?!”

Faced with minimal competition, it was a time when companies held production and delivery control, with consumers at their mercy to indeed receive their press garments at a time of the dry cleaner’s choosing.

Those days are long gone. Armed with just a digital device, consumers have numerous options in finding suppliers who can provide things whenever they desire. As such, they expect — rather, demand —products and services on their terms.

As a result, companies must either adapt their supply chains to accommodate these expectations or find themselves with diminished market share. Below are key areas that companies must address to compete in today’s on-demand environment.

Take inventory of your inventory

As a first step, perform a comprehensive audit of your entire supply chain, even hiring a third-party specialist to develop the critical assessment. Such a deep-dive look will measure delivery accuracy, on-time performance, worker productivity and even call center effectiveness, all significant contributors to the overall efficiency of your suppliers and their impact on your supply chain.

Find a better mousetrap

Once the audit is complete, it’s time to take action, which may mean making fundamental changes to your supply chain. If you’re currently operating with a hub-and-spoke distribution model, for instance, the feedback may point to achieving greater efficiencies by adopting a decentralized distribution model (and vice versa). Especially when it comes to last-mile delivery, partnering with a third-party provider can also help, providing you with the fast turnaround that your customers expect without straining your existing operations.

Get your house in order

Any fundamental change to the supply chain must include enhancements to warehouses, adopting technological advances that deliver greater efficiencies. For some, this may mean incorporating a short-interval waving warehouse management system (WMS), which allows orders to be dispatched in clusters or waves. Other advances automate the sizing and selection of cartons, which makes packing more efficient while streamlining costs.

Taking things personnel-ly

Until supply chain logistics can all be outsourced to robots, bottom-line performance ultimately depends on the availability and performance of your employees. To those ends, leverage technology to minimize labor supply disruptions, especially during holiday seasons when demand peaks. (This is increasingly important as unemployment reaches record lows, further diminishing the labor pool.) Technology should also be used for scheduling and training, which delivers greater efficiencies and even job retention, as greater scheduling flexibility leads to increased employee satisfaction and loyalty.

Consumer demand for ever-shrinking delivery timelines makes ongoing supply chain refinements no longer optional, but mandatory. Your long-term success depends on it.

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Neil Wheeldon is vice president — solutions at BDP International in The Hague, Netherlands.

humanitarian

Amazon, Total Quality Logistics Among 2019 Humanitarian Logistics Award Honorees

Amazon and Total Quality Logistics (TQL) are among the 2019 winners of the American Logistics Aid Network’s Humanitarian Logistics Awards.

Disaster Relief by Amazon earned the Outstanding Contribution Award for leveraging its extensive services, operations and logistics technology to help advance the cause of effective and large-scale disaster relief. For instance, in the wake of Hurricane Dorian, the Disaster Relief by Amazon team mobilized two Amazon Air flights, full of tens of thousands of donated relief items such as tarps, buckets and water containers.

Total Quality Logistics also received an Outstanding Contribution Award for Moves that Matter, a program that provides funding to help nonprofits and businesses defray the cost of humanitarian shipments, as well as for TQL Cares, an in-house initiative that raises millions of dollars and contributes thousands of volunteer hours to various compassionate causes each year.

Nezih Altay of DePaul University received the Research and Academic Contributions Award for being one of the first U.S. academics to recognize the importance of applying operations research and supply chain management to the challenge of disaster relief. His 2006 paper, OR/MS Research in Disaster Operations Management, was one of the first papers to spark research in humanitarian logistics and remains the most cited article in its field.

Author and supply chain resilience expert Phil Palin received the Lifetime Achievement Award for his ongoing work to help government and businesses develop greater alignment when providing disaster relief. Over the years, he has worked closely with federal, state, local and private sector leaders to prepare for and respond to complex wide-area catastrophic events and served in a variety of capacities, most recently as the FEMA team leader for the supply chain Ecosystem Assessment. He has also authored numerous books and articles about supply chain resilience, including Out of the Whirlwind: Supply and Demand after Hurricane Maria.

“Each of these recipients is living proof that humanitarianism isn’t just a one-time event–and that true service extends well beyond a single disaster,” says Mark Richards, board chairman of the American Logistics Aid Network. “It truly is part of their corporate DNA and personal passion. We’re grateful to them for the many contributions they have made, and we are proud to recognize them.”

herring

The Growth of Canned Herring Market in the EU Loses Momentum

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Herrings (Prepared Or Preserved) – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the herring market in the European Union amounted to $1.5B in 2018, remaining relatively stable against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). From 2016-2017, the market grew rapidly, recovering from a noticeable slump observed in 2015. In 2018, however, the market growth lost its momentum, and the market volume stays within its relatively flat long-term trend pattern.

Consumption By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of canned herring consumption in 2018 were Germany (81K tonnes), Poland (80K tonnes) and the UK (68K tonnes), with a combined 55% share of total consumption. These countries were followed by Italy, Spain, the Netherlands and Hungary, which together accounted for a further 31%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of herring consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest herring markets in the European Union were Germany ($420M), Poland ($222M) and the UK ($212M), together accounting for 58% of the total market.

The countries with the highest levels of herring per capita consumption in 2018 were Poland (2,1 kg per person), Italy (1,1 kg per person) and Hungary (1,0 kg per person).

Production in the EU

In 2018, approx. 423K tonnes of herrings (prepared or preserved) were produced in the European Union; approximately equating the previous year. In general, herring production, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2017 when production volume increased by 2.9% against the previous year. In value terms, herring production totaled $1.9B in 2018 estimated in export prices.

Production By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of herring production in 2018 were Poland (109K tonnes), Italy (66K tonnes) and the UK (65K tonnes), with a combined 57% share of total production. These countries were followed by Germany, Spain, Denmark and Lithuania, which together accounted for a further 32%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of herring production, amongst the main producing countries, was attained by Lithuania, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, the exports of herrings (prepared or preserved) in the European Union totaled 121K tonnes, increasing by 6.9% against the previous year. Over the period under review, herring exports, however, continue to indicate a mild reduction. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2011 with an increase of 13% year-to-year. In value terms, herring exports stood at $399M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

Poland was the main exporter of herrings (prepared or preserved) in the European Union, with the volume of exports accounting for 52K tonnes, which was approx. 43% of total exports in 2018. Denmark (27K tonnes) ranks second in terms of the total exports with a 22% share, followed by Germany (20%) and Lithuania (5.2%). The following exporters – Sweden (4,143 tonnes) and the Netherlands (3,077 tonnes) – each accounted for a 6% share of total exports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Germany, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Poland ($165M) remains the largest herring supplier in the European Union, comprising 41% of total herring exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Denmark ($82M), with a 21% share of total exports. It was followed by Germany, with a 19% share.

Export Prices by Country

The herring export price in the European Union stood at $3,295 per tonne in 2018, reducing by -1.5% against the previous year. Over the period from 2007 to 2018, it increased at an average annual rate of +1.5%.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was the Netherlands ($6,046 per tonne), while Denmark ($3,072 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

The imports stood at 115K tonnes in 2018, increasing by 3.9% against the previous year. Overall, herring imports, however, continue to indicate a slight contraction. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2008 with an increase of 4.1% against the previous year. In that year, herring imports reached their peak of 137K tonnes. From 2009 to 2018, the growth of herring imports remained at a somewhat lower figure. In value terms, herring imports totaled $327M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

Germany was the key importer of herrings (prepared or preserved) in the European Union, with the volume of imports finishing at 45K tonnes, which was approx. 39% of total imports in 2018. Poland (23K tonnes) occupied the second position in the ranking, distantly followed by the Netherlands (7,378 tonnes), Sweden (5,846 tonnes) and Denmark (5,698 tonnes). All these countries together occupied approx. 36% share of total imports. The UK (3,262 tonnes), Finland (3,251 tonnes), Austria (3,246 tonnes), Romania (2,774 tonnes), the Czech Republic (2,359 tonnes), France (2,216 tonnes) and Estonia (2,026 tonnes) took a relatively small share of total imports.

Imports into Germany decreased at an average annual rate of -2.3% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, the Netherlands (+13.8%), Romania (+12.9%) and the UK (+3.2%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, the Netherlands emerged as the fastest-growing importer in the European Union, with a CAGR of +13.8% from 2007-2018. Poland and France experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. By contrast, the Czech Republic (-2.1%), Denmark (-2.3%), Austria (-2.6%), Estonia (-4.8%), Sweden (-5.0%) and Finland (-5.4%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period. From 2007 to 2018, the share of the Netherlands, Romania and Poland increased by +4.9%, +1.8% and +1.6% percentage points, while Finland (-2.4 p.p.), Sweden (-3.8 p.p.) and Germany (-11.3 p.p.) saw their share reduced. The shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

Import Prices by Country

The herring import price in the European Union stood at $2,840 per tonne in 2018, waning by -4.4% against the previous year. In general, the herring import price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Austria ($4,240 per tonne), while Sweden ($1,781 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Finland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

EU Mixed Fruit and Vegetable Juice Market – France Is the Largest and Fastest-Growing Consumer

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Mixtures Of Fruit And Vegetable Juices – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the mixed juices market in the European Union amounted to $3B in 2018, flattening at the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). In general, mixed juices consumption continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 with an increase of 11% against the previous year. The level of mixed juices consumption peaked at $3.2B in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, consumption stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Consumption By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of mixed juices consumption in 2018 were Germany (539K tonnes), France (496K tonnes) and the UK (413K tonnes), together comprising 63% of total consumption.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of mixed juices consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by France, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, France ($670M), the UK ($648M) and Germany ($578M) were the countries with the highest levels of market value in 2018, with a combined 64% share of the total market.

The countries with the highest levels of mixed juices per capita consumption in 2018 were France (7,591 kg per 1000 persons), Germany (6,555 kg per 1000 persons) and the UK (6,188 kg per 1000 persons).

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of mixed juices per capita consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by France, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Production in the EU

In 2018, the amount of mixtures of fruit and vegetable juices produced in the European Union amounted to 2.2M tonnes, reducing by -7.6% against the previous year. In general, mixed juices production continues to indicate a mild deduction. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2016 when production volume increased by 6% y-o-y. Over the period under review, mixed juices production reached its peak figure volume at 2.5M tonnes in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, production stood at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, mixed juices production totaled $2.5B in 2018 estimated in export prices. In general, mixed juices production continues to indicate a temperate downturn. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 with an increase of 14% against the previous year. Over the period under review, mixed juices production attained its peak figure level at $3.1B in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, production failed to regain its momentum.

Production By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of mixed juices production in 2018 were Germany (631K tonnes), the Netherlands (349K tonnes) and France (245K tonnes), together accounting for 55% of total production.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of mixed juices production, amongst the main producing countries, was attained by France, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, the mixed juices exports in the European Union stood at 960K tonnes, picking up by 7.6% against the previous year. The total exports indicated a strong increase from 2008 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +4.8% over the last decade. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, mixed juices exports increased by +72.2% against 2015 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 with an increase of 33% against the previous year. Over the period under review, mixed juices exports reached their peak figure in 2018 and are likely to continue its growth in the near future.

In value terms, mixed juices exports stood at $1.2B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total exports indicated conspicuous growth from 2008 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +4.8% over the last decade. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, mixed juices exports increased by +86.4% against 2015 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 with an increase of 30% against the previous year. The level of exports peaked in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Exports by Country

The Netherlands (334K tonnes) and Germany (243K tonnes) represented the main exporters of mixtures of fruit and vegetable juices in 2018, amounting to approx. 35% and 25% of total exports, respectively. It was distantly followed by Spain (110K tonnes), Belgium (67K tonnes) and the UK (58K tonnes), together making up a 24% share of total exports. France (38K tonnes) and Poland (24K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by the UK, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the Netherlands ($420M), Germany ($262M) and Spain ($136M) were the countries with the highest levels of exports in 2018, together accounting for 69% of total exports. These countries were followed by the UK, Belgium, France and Poland, which together accounted for a further 21%.

In terms of the main exporting countries, the UK recorded the highest rates of growth with regard to exports, over the last decade, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

The mixed juices export price in the European Union stood at $1,233 per tonne in 2018, surging by 12% against the previous year. Overall, the mixed juices export price, however, continues to indicate a mild descent. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 when the export price increased by 14% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the export prices for mixtures of fruit and vegetable juices reached their maximum at $1,436 per tonne in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, export prices remained at a lower figure.

Average prices varied somewhat amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, major exporting countries recorded the following prices: in the UK ($1,568 per tonne) and France ($1,284 per tonne), while Germany ($1,076 per tonne) and Poland ($1,103 per tonne) were amongst the lowest.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Spain, while the other leaders experienced mixed trends in the export price figures.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, the amount of mixtures of fruit and vegetable juices imported in the European Union stood at 1.1M tonnes, surging by 9.8% against the previous year. The total imports indicated a resilient increase from 2008 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +6.6% over the last decade. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, mixed juices imports increased by +86.8% against 2012 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 with an increase of 46% against the previous year. The volume of imports peaked in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, mixed juices imports totaled $1.1B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total imports indicated a strong expansion from 2008 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +6.6% over the last decade. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, mixed juices imports increased by +60.7% against 2015 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 with an increase of 44% year-to-year. The level of imports peaked in 2018 and are likely to continue its growth in the near future.

Imports by Country

The UK (292K tonnes) and France (289K tonnes) represented roughly 55% of total imports of mixtures of fruit and vegetable juices in 2018. Germany (151K tonnes) ranks next in terms of the total imports with a 14% share, followed by the Netherlands (5.5%) and Belgium (4.9%). Sweden (30K tonnes), Austria (24K tonnes), Denmark (21K tonnes), Portugal (19K tonnes), Spain (17K tonnes) and Poland (16K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by the UK, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest mixed juices importing markets in the European Union were France ($277M), the UK ($252M) and Germany ($202M), with a combined 65% share of total imports.

The UK recorded the highest rates of growth with regard to imports, among the main importing countries over the last decade, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the mixed juices import price in the European Union amounted to $1,071 per tonne, remaining stable against the previous year. In general, the mixed juices import price, however, continues to indicate a moderate reduction. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 when the import price increased by 9.3% year-to-year. The level of import price peaked at $1,365 per tonne in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, import prices failed to regain their momentum.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Poland ($1,575 per tonne), while Portugal ($715 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Denmark, while the other leaders experienced mixed trends in the import price figures.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

e-commerce

5 Must-Have Features of Enterprise E-Commerce

E-commerce is everywhere — unless, of course, you look in the B2B space. Unfortunately, one segment lags behind all the rest when it comes to online sales: manufacturers. Just 38% of manufacturers have e-commerce websites, and only 6% of all manufacturer sales come through this particular channel. 

Part of the reason manufacturers are so slow to adopt e-commerce can be traced back to the old adage “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” The traditional ways of doing business largely haven’t posed a problem yet, so many manufacturers don’t feel a real sense of urgency to explore the increasingly relevant direct-to-consumer model. 

It also has a lot to do with technical hurdles. For many manufacturers, moving to e-commerce involves taking on yet one more system to master — that or an expensive integration with their current enterprise resource planning (ERP) software. It’s nearly impossible to get an e-commerce platform to talk to an old “closed” mainframe, so plans to upgrade often involve a two-year timeframe or longer to get everything up and running. They might also involve a million-dollar price tag. Not surprisingly, this tends to put e-commerce on the back burner pretty quickly. 

And it’s important to note, too, that most manufacturers work through distributors and dealers, making e-commerce seem like nothing more than a mere alternative to their current traditional sales channels. 

A Missed Opportunity

What many manufacturers seem to be missing, though, is that B2B customers are also B2C customers. Chances are that they’re already shopping online for their personal needs, and not having a way to buy their business products and services online can have a hefty negative impact on the customer experience. If you’re manufacturing a commodity product and your sales process lacks the convenience of shopping for that product online, your customers might begin to look elsewhere. 

Remaining passive about e-commerce is simply the wrong approach, especially with B2B buyers moving more of their purchases online all the time. As it stands, nearly half of all companies utilize online channels for 50% to 74% of all their corporate purchases. Not being online just means you’ve missed out on an opportunity — not only to secure additional sales, but also to broaden your reach to a global level

Also, remember that it’s easier than ever for competition and new players in the market to get in front of your customers via Google, Facebook, and email. Not having an e-commerce site could easily cost you market share, even if the competition’s product isn’t as good as yours.

Beyond the Basics

Knowing that it isn’t enough to conduct all business offline, know, too, that it isn’t enough to just invest in getting an e-commerce platform, leave it there, and call it good. Your site has to offer the functionalities necessary to run an online business. If your system doesn’t support multiple pricing tiers, it probably also doesn’t mimic your current sales process. Clearly, that’s not a good thing. 

Your site needs to be able to support multiple buying options, such as “requests for quotes” as opposed to a shopping cart model. It can take time to arrive at a number in a complex B2B transaction, and the last thing you want is for a customer to have to take the interaction offline just to finalize scope and nail down specifics. 

This naturally leads to my next point. Assuming your e-commerce site comes equipped with all the basics like browse, add to cart, checkout, email confirmation, etc., there are a few features to look out for at the enterprise level. Those often include the following:

System integration options

In e-commerce, a certain amount of coordination is necessary between the website itself and your back-end system that you use for inventory and accounting purposes. Without proper integration, order fulfillment can easily get problematic. Focus on maintenance, data input, and offering a seamless user experience. Most of all, understand all the system integration options of your marketplace website before going with one provider over another.

Proper data to support search

Product information is important. It’s what consumers see prior to making a purchase decision. But it can sometimes pale in comparison to the product data used behind the scenes. A number of data fields and HTML tags enable your products and website to rank in both Google and on-site search results. Make sure your platform accommodates these options. Also, inquire about the tracking capabilities of your on-site search function. It can be useful to monitor what users found — and didn’t find — during a visit.

Customer tiers

At the enterprise level, you’ll likely run across different types of customers. Being able to segment these customers into various tiers can come in handy. Based on their purchase history, for example, you might determine that one tier would respond well to a certain promotion while another’s browsing behavior could inform subsequent product recommendations. In other words, segmenting tiers allows you to personalize your messaging, pricing, and other marketing efforts to fit the needs of your customers. So look into this functionality while reviewing your e-commerce options.

Analytics integration

Whether you’re looking at an off-the-shelf platform or a custom solution, reporting is very important. At a bare minimum, make sure a standard tool like Google Analytics can be integrated with your e-commerce system. You’ll also want to inquire about the setup of advanced features like e-commerce tracking.

Merchandising

Generally, any platform you go with will provide the functionality of assigning products to categories. This can help with on-site search and make it easier for visitors to browse your product line. Beyond that, you might wish to feature certain products. The question, then, is what ability do you have in the platform to create banner ads, highlight related products on a product page, create landing pages around a spotlight topic for the month, and feature products in other ways? 

Providing a good online experience naturally makes customers feel good about doing business with you. It also increases the likelihood of driving new customers to your business without needing to invest in additional resources. 

Ultimately, you can handle more transactions with an e-commerce site in your corner. Just make sure your site provides you with all of the functionalities you need to keep your business running smoothly and your customers happy. 

____________________________________________________________

Michael Bird is the CEO of Spindustry, a digital agency focused on e-commerce, SharePoint portals, and enterprise websites. He has almost 30 years of experience in interactive development, user behavior, and business solutions. His successful agency, Spindustry, puts these strategies into practice to help businesses grow.

plantain

Africa’s Plantain Market to Reach Over 30M Tonnes by 2025

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘Africa – Plantains – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

Consumption By Country in Africa

The countries with the highest volumes of plantain consumption in 2018 were Democratic Republic of the Congo (5.5M tonnes), Cameroon (4.8M tonnes) and Ghana (4.1M tonnes), together comprising 59% of total consumption.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of plantain consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Democratic Republic of the Congo, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

The countries with the highest levels of plantain per capita consumption in 2018 were Cameroon (197 kg per person), Ghana (141 kg per person) and Uganda (68 kg per person).

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of plantain per capita consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Democratic Republic of the Congo, while the other leaders experienced mixed trends in the per capita consumption figures.

Market Forecast 2019-2025

Driven by increasing demand for plantain in Africa, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven years. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +2.9% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 30M tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in Africa

The plantain production stood at 25M tonnes in 2018, picking up by 3.6% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +3.0% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2010 when production volume increased by 12% against the previous year. Over the period under review, plantain production attained its peak figure volume in 2018 and is likely to see steady growth in the near future. The general positive trend in terms of plantain output was largely conditioned by a conspicuous increase of the harvested area and a relatively flat trend pattern in yield figures.

Production By Country in Africa

The countries with the highest volumes of plantain production in 2018 were Democratic Republic of the Congo (5.5M tonnes), Cameroon (4.8M tonnes) and Ghana (4.1M tonnes), together comprising 59% of total production.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of plantain production, amongst the main producing countries, was attained by Democratic Republic of the Congo, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Harvested Area in Africa

The plantain harvested area amounted to 4.2M ha in 2018, growing by 3.7% against the previous year. The harvested area increased at an average annual rate of +2.9% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2010 with an increase of 14% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the harvested area dedicated to plantain production reached its peak figure at 4.3M ha in 2015; however, from 2016 to 2018, harvested area stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Yield in Africa

The average plantain yield amounted to 5.8 tonne per ha in 2018, approximately equating the previous year. In general, the plantain yield, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2016 when yield increased by 1.6% y-o-y. The level of plantain yield peaked at 5.8 tonne per ha in 2009; however, from 2010 to 2018, yield stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Exports in Africa

The exports totaled 99K tonnes in 2018, dropping by -5.8% against the previous year. Overall, plantain exports continue to indicate an abrupt decrease. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2013 when exports increased by 27% year-to-year. The volume of exports peaked at 181K tonnes in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, exports remained at a lower figure.

In value terms, plantain exports amounted to $45M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Over the period under review, plantain exports continue to indicate a drastic descent. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2014 when exports increased by 13% year-to-year. The level of exports peaked at $85M in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, exports failed to regain their momentum.

Exports by Country

In 2018, Mozambique (38K tonnes) and Cote d’Ivoire (26K tonnes) were the main exporters of plantains in Africa, together making up 65% of total exports. It was distantly followed by Sudan (14K tonnes) and South Africa (12K tonnes), together committing a 27% share of total exports. The following exporters – Cameroon (3.2K tonnes) and Ghana (2.9K tonnes) – each accounted for a 6.1% share of total exports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Cote d’Ivoire, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest plantain markets in Africa were Cote d’Ivoire ($12M), Sudan ($11M) and Mozambique ($11M), together accounting for 76% of total exports.

Sudan experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to exports, among the main exporting countries over the last eleven-year period, while the other leaders experienced mixed trends in the exports figures.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the plantain export price in Africa amounted to $454 per tonne, growing by 4.8% against the previous year. Overall, the plantain export price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2015 an increase of 11% year-to-year. Over the period under review, the export prices for plantains attained their maximum at $485 per tonne in 2012; however, from 2013 to 2018, export prices failed to regain their momentum.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Cameroon ($850 per tonne), while Ghana ($203 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Cameroon, while the other leaders experienced mixed trends in the export price figures.

Imports in Africa

The imports totaled 179K tonnes in 2018, picking up by 11% against the previous year. The total imports indicated a prominent expansion from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +5.5% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, plantain imports increased by +20.7% against 2014 indices. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2013 with an increase of 19% year-to-year. Over the period under review, plantain imports reached their peak figure in 2018 and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, plantain imports totaled $51M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total import value increased at an average annual rate of +1.8% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2017 with an increase of 11% y-o-y. Over the period under review, plantain imports reached their maximum in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Imports by Country

South Africa was the key importing country with an import of about 119K tonnes, which resulted at 66% of total imports. Senegal (29K tonnes) held the second position in the ranking, followed by Mali (17K tonnes). All these countries together took approx. 26% share of total imports. Botswana (5.1K tonnes) and Algeria (3.1K tonnes) occupied a little share of total imports.

Imports into South Africa increased at an average annual rate of +11.5% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, Senegal (+19.5%) and Mali (+6.1%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Senegal emerged as the fastest-growing importer in Africa, with a CAGR of +19.5% from 2007-2018. By contrast, Botswana (-2.5%) and Algeria (-16.8%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period. From 2007 to 2018, the share of South Africa, Senegal and Mali increased by +46%, +14% and +4.6% percentage points, while Algeria (-11.4 p.p.) saw their share reduced. The shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, South Africa ($27M) constitutes the largest market for imported plantains in Africa, comprising 53% of total plantain imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Senegal ($13M), with a 25% share of total imports. It was followed by Botswana, with a 6.4% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of value in South Africa totaled +9.2%. The remaining importing countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: Senegal (+22.9% per year) and Botswana (-3.2% per year).

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the plantain import price in Africa amounted to $284 per tonne, coming down by -1.9% against the previous year. Overall, the plantain import price continues to indicate a perceptible setback. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2015 when the import price increased by 12% year-to-year. The level of import price peaked at $421 per tonne in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, import prices failed to regain their momentum.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Algeria ($1,017 per tonne), while Mali ($64 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Algeria, while the other leaders experienced mixed trends in the import price figures.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

vinegar

Germany’s Vinegar Market to Continue Moderate But Robust Growth

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘Germany – Vinegar – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the vinegar market in Germany amounted to $137M in 2018, remaining relatively unchanged against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Over the period under review, the market revenue continues to indicate a slight decline. However, the volume of consumption in physical terms continues to increase robustly. The volume of the vinegar market in Germany amounted to 232M liters in 2018, rising by +5.6% against the previous year.

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in Germany

Driven by increasing demand for vinegar in Germany, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend in the medium term. The market volume is forecast to continue moderate growth, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +0.9% for the period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 247M liters by the end of 2025.

Production in Germany

Vinegar production in Germany totaled 211M litres in 2018, rising by 5.4% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.1% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed in certain years. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2009 with an increase of 9% y-o-y. Over the period under review, vinegar production attained its maximum volume in 2018 and is likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

Imports into Germany

In 2018, the amount of vinegar imported into Germany stood at 60M litres, growing by 4.9% against the previous year. In value terms, vinegar imports amounted to $86M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Overall, the total imports indicated a prominent increase from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +4.9% over the last eleven-year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, vinegar imports increased by +43.9% against 2015 indices. Thus, vinegar imports attained their maximum in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Imports by Country

In 2018, Italy (38M litres) constituted the largest vinegar supplier to Germany, with a 63% share of total imports. Moreover, vinegar imports from Italy exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest supplier, Austria (6.8M litres), sixfold. Greece (3.6M litres) ranked third in terms of total imports with a 6% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of volume from Italy amounted to +2.4%. The remaining supplying countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: Austria (+15.2% per year) and Greece (+13.1% per year).

In value terms, Italy ($65M) also constituted the largest supplier of vinegar to Germany, comprising 76% of total vinegar imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Austria ($7.4M), with a 8.6% share of total imports. It was followed by the Netherlands, with a 2.8% share.

Import Prices by Country

The average vinegar import price stood at $1.4 per litre in 2018, surging by 7.9% against the previous year. In general, the vinegar import price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2009 when the average import price increased by 14% against the previous year. The import price peaked at $1.8 per litre in 2012; however, from 2013 to 2018, import prices remained at a lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Italy ($1.7 per litre), while the price for Greece ($0.4 per litre) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Italy, while the prices for the other major suppliers experienced a decline.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform