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Crispbread Market in Germany To Continue Moderate Growth

germany

Crispbread Market in Germany To Continue Moderate Growth

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘Germany – Crispbread – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the crispbread market in Germany amounted to $88M in 2018, surging by 6.4% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +2.5% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with only minor fluctuations being observed throughout the analyzed period.

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in Germany

Driven by increasing demand for crispbread in Germany, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven-year period. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +1.2% for the period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 30K tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in Germany

In 2018, the crispbread production in Germany totaled 49K tonnes, remaining constant against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.4% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being observed throughout the analyzed period. Over the period under review, crispbread production reached its peak figure volume in 2018 and is likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

Exports from Germany

Crispbread exports from Germany stood at 30K tonnes in 2018, remaining stable against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.9% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. In value terms, crispbread exports amounted to $100M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

The Netherlands (4.9K tonnes), Sweden (4K tonnes) and Italy (3.6K tonnes) were the main destinations of crispbread exports from Germany, together comprising 41% of total exports. The UK, France, Poland, the U.S., Austria, Denmark, Spain, Switzerland and the Czech Republic lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 49%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main countries of destination, was attained by France, while exports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest markets for crispbread exported from Germany were France ($15M), the Netherlands ($14M) and Sweden ($12M), with a combined 41% share of total exports.

Export Prices by Country

The average crispbread export price stood at $3,308 per tonne in 2018, growing by 7.9% against the previous year. Over the period from 2007 to 2018, it increased at an average annual rate of +2.7%.

There were significant differences in the average prices for the major foreign markets. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Switzerland ($6,863 per tonne), while the average price for exports to the Czech Republic ($2,589 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was recorded for supplies to Switzerland, while the prices for the other major destinations experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports into Germany

In 2018, the crispbread imports into Germany totaled 8K tonnes, growing by 5.5% against the previous year. In general, crispbread imports, however, continue to indicate a mild contraction. In value terms, crispbread imports amounted to $22M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

In 2018, Sweden (4.3K tonnes) constituted the largest crispbread supplier to Germany, with a 54% share of total imports. Moreover, crispbread imports from Sweden exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest supplier, Finland (1.6K tonnes), threefold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Italy (924 tonnes), with a 12% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume from Sweden amounted to -2.4%. The remaining supplying countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: Finland (-0.8% per year) and Italy (-2.1% per year).

In value terms, Sweden ($8.7M), Finland ($5.9M) and Italy ($2.5M) constituted the largest crispbread suppliers to Germany, together accounting for 77% of total imports. Switzerland, Poland and the Czech Republic lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 16%.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the average crispbread import price amounted to $2,772 per tonne, rising by 6.3% against the previous year. Over the period from 2007 to 2018, it increased at an average annual rate of +2.4%.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major supplying countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Switzerland ($6,047 per tonne), while the price for Sweden ($2,021 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Poland, while the prices for the other major suppliers experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

grape

Rising Demand in China Drives Grape Market in Asia-Pacific

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘Asia-Pacific – Grapes – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the grape market in Asia-Pacific amounted to $35.2B in 2018, going up by 5.9% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The total market indicated strong growth from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +5.9% over the last eleven-year period. The level of grape consumption peaked in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Consumption By Country in Asia-Pacific

The country with the largest volume of grape consumption was China (14M tonnes), accounting for 66% of total volume. Moreover, grape consumption in China exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest consumer, India (2.9M tonnes), fivefold. Australia (1.8M tonnes) ranked third in terms of total consumption with a 8.2% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume in China totaled +7.1%. The remaining consuming countries recorded the following average annual rates of consumption growth: India (+5.5% per year) and Australia (+1.5% per year).

In value terms, China ($21B) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by India ($4.7B). It was followed by Australia.

The countries with the highest levels of grape per capita consumption in 2018 were New Zealand (92 kg per person), Australia (71 kg per person) and Afghanistan (24 kg per person).

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in Asia-Pacific

Driven by increasing demand for grape in Asia-Pacific, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven years. Market performance is forecast to decelerate, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +4.2% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 29M tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in Asia-Pacific

In 2018, the amount of grapes produced in Asia-Pacific stood at 21M tonnes, jumping by 6.1% against the previous year. The total output indicated a buoyant increase from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +5.8% over the last eleven-year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, grape production increased by +86.7% against 2007 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2012 with an increase of 18% year-to-year. The general positive trend in terms of grape output is largely conditioned by a resilient increase of the harvested area and slight growth in yield figures.

Production By Country in Asia-Pacific

China (14M tonnes) remains the largest grape producing country in Asia-Pacific, comprising approx. 66% of total volume. Moreover, grape production in China exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest producer, India (3.1M tonnes), fivefold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Australia (1.9M tonnes), with a 8.8% share.

In China, grape production increased at an average annual rate of +6.9% over the period from 2007-2018. The remaining producing countries recorded the following average annual rates of production growth: India (+5.7% per year) and Australia (+1.8% per year).

Harvested Area in Asia-Pacific

In 2018, the total area harvested in terms of grapes production in Asia-Pacific amounted to 1.3M ha, increasing by 4.6% against the previous year. The harvested area increased at an average annual rate of +4.1% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years.

Yield in Asia-Pacific

The average grape yield totaled 16 tonne per ha in 2018, standing approx. at the previous year. The yield figure increased at an average annual rate of +1.7% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed over the period under review.

Exports in Asia-Pacific

In 2018, the amount of grapes exported in Asia-Pacific amounted to 773K tonnes, growing by 11% against the previous year. Overall, grape exports continue to indicate prominent growth. In value terms, grape exports amounted to $1.2B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

China, Hong Kong SAR (201K tonnes), Afghanistan (176K tonnes), India (172K tonnes), and Australia (124K tonnes)  represented roughly 87% of total exports of grapes in 2018.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Afghanistan, while exports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest grape supplying countries in Asia-Pacific were China, Hong Kong SAR ($369M), Australia ($286M) and India ($275M), with a combined 77% share of total exports.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the grape export price in Asia-Pacific amounted to $1,569 per tonne, coming down by -5.1% against the previous year. Overall, the grape export price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 an increase of 13% against the previous year. In that year, the export prices for grapes reached their peak level of $1,821 per tonne. From 2012 to 2018, the growth in terms of the export prices for grapes remained at a somewhat lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Australia ($2,306 per tonne), while Afghanistan ($595 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

Imports in Asia-Pacific

In 2018, the amount of grapes imported in Asia-Pacific stood at 1.2M tonnes, growing by 15% against the previous year. Overall, grape imports continue to indicate buoyant growth. Over the period under review, grape imports reached their maximum in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the immediate term. In value terms, grape imports totaled $2.6B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

In 2018, China (277K tonnes) and China, Hong Kong SAR (238K tonnes) represented the major importers of grapes in Asia-Pacific, together generating 44% of total imports. Thailand (158K tonnes) ranks next in terms of the total imports with a 13% share, followed by Indonesia (11%), South Korea (5.6%) and Pakistan (4.6%). Japan (41K tonnes), the Philippines (35K tonnes), Malaysia (34K tonnes), Australia (29K tonnes), Viet Nam (27K tonnes) and Taiwan, Chinese (26K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Pakistan, while imports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest grape importing markets in Asia-Pacific were China ($628M), China, Hong Kong SAR ($497M) and Thailand ($410M), with a combined 59% share of total imports. Indonesia, South Korea, Pakistan, Japan, Malaysia, Australia, Taiwan, Chinese, Viet Nam and the Philippines lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 36%.

Import Prices by Country

The grape import price in Asia-Pacific stood at $2,224 per tonne in 2018, going down by -2.7% against the previous year. Over the last eleven years, it increased at an average annual rate of +2.0%. The level of import price peaked at $2,366 per tonne in 2012; however, from 2013 to 2018, import prices remained at a lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Taiwan ($2,672 per tonne), while the Philippines ($1,625 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

outsourcing

Myths vs. Realities of Global Sourcing

Axia Sourcing released the following six telling myths and realities related to global sourcing, breaking down common misconceptions about language-barriers, outsourcing partnerships, quality control and more. Global businesses can apply this knowledge to successfully navigate the world of sourcing while expanding business operations with confidence, regardless of the industry.

Global Sourcing: Myth Versus Reality from Axia Sourcing
corruption

Corruption is a Costly “Hidden” Tariff

Hidden costs

Tariffs, quotas and sanctions are all overt hurdles to free trade that increase the costs of commercial exchanges or even prohibit them. But not all barriers to trade are written down in law or even apparent on the surface. Some lurk in the form of money changing hands under the table.

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) in a recent report identified corruption as one of the most costly non-tariff barriers in global trade, particularly for low and low-middle income countries. Acting as a “hidden tariff,” a lack of integrity in trade can be just as damaging to trade relations as any legalized restriction.

Corruption wreaks direct costs such as skimmed revenue and outright theft, but can also create health and safety risks as officials look the other way on dangerous cargo. At the firm level, the OECD estimates informal payments and corruption add a “tax” of anywhere from five to ten percent of the value of company sales in markets where corruption is normalized. Combined, these effects will damage countries’ economic welfare over the long run.

corruption adds tax

Trading in bribes

Burdensome regulations and opaque bureaucracy often go hand in hand. The more complex regulation is, the greater the cost of compliance, and the more attractive bribery becomes as an end run around the bureaucracy and the easier corruption is to hide. When governments maintain quotas and other quantitative restrictions, administrative procedures to allocate them also create opportunities for mischief.

Corruption in trade is damaging to business in a number of ways. The added costs consume resources that could be spent bringing down prices or improving quality. Corruption also distorts private sector competition – firms that do best are the ones that can best work the corrupt system, not necessarily the ones that provide the most value. Companies unwilling or unable to engage in corruption are limited or barred from providing their goods and services in that economy.

High levels of corruption also make international firms unwilling to invest due to the added risks. Local citizens, particularly those in emerging economies, feel this damage through a lack of access to affordable, quality products, reduced job opportunities, and insufficient allocation of government resources to public services due to missing tax revenue.

World Bank lost revenue at customs borders

Greasing wheels at the borders

The World Bank estimates that corruption generates losses of about $2 billion each year in lost revenue collection at customs borders.

Complicated rules, a lack of oversight, and the discretionary power characteristic of many customs administrations provide opportunities for corruption at all levels. Whether it takes the form of slipping an agent money at a customs check to let goods through or fudge some paperwork, or large-scale fraud involving officials all the way to the top, corruption can be widespread and corrosive. As former Secretary General of the World Customs Organization, J. W. Shaver, once put it: “There are few public agencies in which the classic pre-conditions for institutional corruption are so conveniently presented as in a customs administration.

In one high profile example, a 2015 investigation in Guatemala uncovered systemic corruption in their customs authority. In return for bribes, importers were allowed to under-report shipments to avoid import taxes on a large scale, costing the country millions. Mass protests with citizens calling for transparency and accountability led to the vice president’s resignation.

Sometimes corruption is less bold but equally systemic. Superstore giant Walmart has recently come under fire for looking past bribery within its supply chain. In 2019, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) investigated Walmart under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act for deliberately ignoring corruption risks and red flags in its dealings in India, China, Brazil and Mexico. In India, many payments were less than $200, but together totaled millions. Walmart is paying $238 million to settle the investigation.

WCO quote about customs

Dangers of turning a blind eye

Beyond lost revenue, when customs officials turn a blind eye to nefarious shippers, human lives are put at risk. In 2015, chemicals that were falsely declared in China’s Tianjin port exploded, resulting in over 150 deaths. Investigations found that bribes were paid to sidestep safety regulations. The incident worsened when firefighters used water on the fire, unaware (due to deliberate mislabelling) that the type of chemicals involved would detonate upon reaction with the water.

Solutions that could pay off

There is an argument that, in some cases, so-called “informal payments” may actually facilitate trade in situations where government regulatory hurdles and inefficiencies are hard to overcome. However, greasing the wheels in this manner fails to remove systemic incentives to engage in corrupt behavior.

The trouble is, there is no one-size-fits-all solution to the problem of corruption in international trade. The most pressing risks must be targeted to ensure safety and integrity while avoiding over-burdensome rules and red tape that hamper trade and economic growth.

The OECD suggests a mix of approaches. Broad, high-level government support is needed to tackle corruption within customs administrations and border control. The penalties for bribery offenses must be stiffened and applied. The private sector must be engaged to monitor practices in their global supply chains. And, the OECD suggests writing transparency and anti-corruption provisions into trade agreements.

Beyond business and borders

Corruption is a quantifiable hidden tariff on individual commercial transactions. What’s harder is to measure the extent to which corruption, perpetrated in drips over the course of years, damages broader economic prosperity.

If open markets and greater trade benefit ordinary people, as we know they do, then tackling corruption to promote legitimate trade would have positive impacts on the well-being of millions around the world.

______________________________________________________________________

Alice Calder

Alice Calder received her MA in Applied Economics at GMU. Originally from the UK, where she received her BA in Philosophy and Political Economy from the University of Exeter, living and working internationally sparked her interest in trade issues as well as the intersection of economics and culture.

This article originally appeared on TradeVistas.org. Republished with permission.

the EU

Sweet Biscuit, Waffle And Wafer Market in the EU Reached $5.5B

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Sweet Biscuits, Waffles And Wafers – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the market for sweet biscuits, waffles and wafers in the European Union amounted to $5.5B in 2018, surging by 3.2% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Overall, consumption of sweet biscuits, waffles and wafers continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

Consumption By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of consumption of sweet biscuits, waffles and wafers in 2018 were the UK (278K tonnes), Italy (269K tonnes) and France (224K tonnes), with a combined 50% share of total consumption. These countries were followed by Germany, Spain, Ireland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Hungary and Belgium, which together accounted for a further 39%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of consumption of sweet biscuits, waffles and wafers, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Romania, while consumption of sweet biscuits, waffles and wafers for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest sweet biscuit, waffle and wafer markets in the European Union were Italy ($1.4B), the UK ($1B) and France ($697M), together accounting for 56% of the total market. These countries were followed by Germany, Spain, Ireland, Romania, Portugal, Bulgaria, Slovakia, Hungary and Belgium, which together accounted for a further 35%.

The countries with the highest levels of sweet biscuit, waffle and wafer per capita consumption in 2018 were Ireland (11,206 kg per 1000 persons), Slovakia (6,497 kg per 1000 persons) and Portugal (4,933 kg per 1000 persons).

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in the EU

Driven by rising demand for sweet biscuit, waffle and wafer in the European Union, the market is expected to start an upward consumption trend over the next seven-year period. The performance of the market is forecast to increase slightly, with an anticipated CAGR of +0.6% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 1.6M tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in the EU

In 2018, approx. 1.8M tonnes of sweet biscuits, waffles and wafers were produced in the European Union; lowering by -3.6% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.2% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations over the period under review. The volume of production of sweet biscuits, waffles and wafers peaked at 1.9M tonnes in 2017, and then declined slightly in the following year.

Production By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of production of sweet biscuits, waffles and wafers in 2018 were Italy (281K tonnes), Germany (270K tonnes) and the UK (215K tonnes), together comprising 43% of total production. These countries were followed by Poland, the Netherlands, Spain, Belgium, France, the Czech Republic, Bulgaria and Denmark, which together accounted for a further 50%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of production of sweet biscuits, waffles and wafers, amongst the main producing countries, was attained by the Czech Republic, while production of sweet biscuits, waffles and wafers for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, the exports of sweet biscuits, waffles and wafers in the European Union totaled 2M tonnes, going up by 2.3% against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +4.1% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Over the period under review, exports of sweet biscuits, waffles and wafers reached their maximum in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future. In value terms, exports of sweet biscuits, waffles and wafers amounted to $7.1B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

The exports of the four major exporters of sweet biscuits, waffles and wafers, namely Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium and Poland, represented more than half of total export. Italy (142K tonnes) occupied a 7.2% share (based on tonnes) of total exports, which put it in second place, followed by the UK (6.8%), Spain (6%), the Czech Republic (5.4%) and France (5.4%).

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by the Czech Republic, while exports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest sweet biscuit, waffle and wafer supplying countries in the European Union were Germany ($1.2B), the Netherlands ($936M) and Poland ($889M), together comprising 42% of total exports. Belgium, Italy, the UK, France, Spain and the Czech Republic lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 43%.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the export price for sweet biscuits, waffles and wafers in the European Union amounted to $3,641 per tonne, going up by 4.8% against the previous year. Overall, the export price for sweet biscuits, waffles and wafers continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Italy ($5,039 per tonne), while Spain ($2,375 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, the imports of sweet biscuits, waffles and wafers in the European Union stood at 1.7M tonnes, jumping by 4.7% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.5% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being observed throughout the analyzed period. In value terms, imports of sweet biscuits, waffles and wafers totaled $5.3B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

France (258K tonnes), Germany (216K tonnes) and the UK (197K tonnes) represented roughly 40% of total imports of sweet biscuits, waffles and wafers in 2018. Italy (129K tonnes) took the next position in the ranking, followed by Belgium (120K tonnes) and the Netherlands (115K tonnes). All these countries together held approx. 22% share of total imports. Spain (73K tonnes), Austria (65K tonnes), Portugal (62K tonnes), Ireland (61K tonnes), Romania (57K tonnes) and Poland (55K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Romania, while imports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest sweet biscuit, waffle and wafer importing markets in the European Union were France ($794M), Germany ($750M) and the UK ($735M), together comprising 43% of total imports. These countries were followed by the Netherlands, Belgium, Italy, Spain, Austria, Poland, Ireland, Portugal and Romania, which together accounted for a further 41%.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the import price for sweet biscuits, waffles and wafers in the European Union amounted to $3,154 per tonne, rising by 2.8% against the previous year. In general, the import price for sweet biscuits, waffles and wafers continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was the UK ($3,741 per tonne), while Portugal ($2,437 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the UK, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

company

Are Growing Pains Afflicting Your Business? How To Successfully Scale Your Company.

Ambitious entrepreneurs often are determined to grow their businesses by expanding into new areas, adding new products, and increasing the size of their workforce.

But growth comes with potential hazards, which is why one of the leading causes of business failure is overexpansion – growing too much too fast.

“There are so many complexities involved with growing a company” says Shawn Burcham (www.shawnburcham.com), author of Keeping Score with GRITT: Straight Talk Strategies for Success, and founder and CEO of PFSbrands, the parent company of Champs ChickenCooper’s Express and BluTaco.

“If you’ve been a parent and raised kids, you can relate it to the various ages of kids. Much like your kids need different things at different ages, your business has different needs at different stages of growth.”

To stay on track with those needs, Burcham says business leaders need to:

Constantly evaluate employees. When a company is growing and improving, employees need to do the same, Burcham says. He’s an advocate of lifelong learning and expects employees to commit to continual personal improvement through reading, seminars or other educational efforts. In addition, while Burcham likes to promote from within, he will look elsewhere when necessary. “Scaling requires your team to evolve, but it also requires new blood,” he says. “As a company is growing, sometimes you have to go out and recruit the talent to help you get to that next level.”

Protect the brand. As the business grows, it’s crucial to adhere to standards and have quality controls in place. Otherwise, the business won’t build brand loyalty. “If you go into McDonald’s and you get a Big Mac or a Quarter Pounder, you want that Big Mac or Quarter Pounder to taste the same in every location,” Burcham says. “That’s ultimately what every national brand is working toward.” In his own business, he has seen competitors of PFSbrands locate in supermarkets and convenience stores with loose standards.  “In some cases, we lose business to these competitors who are lenient and have lower standards,” Burcham says.

Embrace the future. Scaling is all about embracing the future, and that includes understanding millennials who will make up 75 percent of the workforce by 2025, Burcham says. “Younger generations want to know why they’re doing something, and that makes a lot of sense when you think about how they grew up with their electronic devices,” he says. “They have been able to get answers anytime they want them.” Burcham’s company uses an open-book management approach that fits well with the transparency younger workers desire, he says. “Personal growth, education, and continuous learning are also things they are looking for. If companies today want to scale, then they need to embrace millennials and work to create an environment where they are engaged.”

Take their time back.“To be an effective leader as your business grows, you need to consistently work on time management,” Burcham says. He has five steps for doing this. 1. Decide what’s important and focus on two or three top priorities each day. 2. Stop doing some tasks. Instead, delegate or automate them. 3. Start on the most important thing first. 4. Learn to say no. 5. Block out time for self-improvement and life needs.

“Scaling is a process, not a destination,” Burcham says. “If you really want your business to grow, you need to be constantly moving, constantly evaluating and constantly improving.”

________________________________________________________________

Shawn Burcham (www.shawnburcham.com), author of Keeping Score with GRITT: Straight Talk Strategies for Success, is the founder & CEO of PFSbrands, which he and his wife, Julie, started out of their home in 1998. The company has over 1,500 branded foodservice locations across 40 states and is best known for their Champs Chicken franchise brand which was started in 1999. Prior to starting PFSbrands, Burcham spent five years with a Fortune 100 company, Mid-America Dairymen (now Dairy Farmers of America). He also worked for three years as a Regional Sales Manager for a midwest Chester’s Fried chicken distributor.

rule of law

Rule of Law is the Bedrock of Trade Agreements

Trade agreements promote rule of law

One could argue that the fundamental goal of any trade agreement is to promote and undergird government adherence to rule of law, which in turn enables private economic activity to thrive. When coupled with commitments to market access, individuals and companies are free to do business anywhere in the world.

Trade agreements such as the newly congressionally approved U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement contain provisions designed to directly combat corruption and promote good regulatory practices. They also contain myriad requirements that support best administrative practices including publishing changes to regulations, allowing for public comment, and adhering to transparent processes for government tenders, for example.

What is rule of law where trade is concerned?

No country gets it perfectly right. Supporting rule of law requires vigilance, upkeep and continual improvement.

Impartial review and scrutiny can be a powerful incentive for self-reflection. In 2013, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce launched an effort to measure the qualities that companies look for “to make good investment and operating decisions..in any given market.”

Its resulting Global Rule of Law and Business Dashboard identified five broad factors to assess rule of law: transparency, predictability, stability, accountability and due process. Are the laws and regulations applied to businesses operating in the market readily accessible, easily understood, and applied in a logical and consistent manner? Do governing institutions operate consistently across administrations or are decisions arbitrary and easily reversed? Can investors be confident that the law will be upheld and applied without discrimination? Does the judicial system allow for disputes to be resolved through fair, transparent, and pre-determined processes?

That’s so “meta”

The Chamber didn’t recreate the analytical wheel – it developed a “meta measure” of rule of law for business by combining underlying indicators from several established indices.

The list includes the World Economic Forum’s annual Global Competitiveness Report, the World Justice Project’s Rule of Law Index, Transparency International’s Global Corruption Barometer, the Heritage Foundation’s Index of Economic Freedom, and several World Bank survey and index products including the Doing Business reports that have been long used by governments as roadmaps for reforms. By pulling relevant pieces of these indices, the Chamber computes a composite score to rank 90 markets.

Sunshine is the best disinfectant

Rating and publishing information about the operating conditions in the marketplace can be one of the best ways to shine light on corruption and poor governance, sometimes prompting a healthy competition among governments to show improvements that will attract more businesses.

Increasing all forms of private investment, including foreign direct investment, is critical to sustaining economic growth for most countries. Over the last few years, however, multinational companies have been reducing their foreign direct investments. In 2018, FDI flows dropped 19 percent from to $1.47 trillion to $1.2 trillion.

Companies consider many criteria when evaluating where to do business. Respect for rule of law is often a decisive factor over whether companies can or will participate in an overseas market. Without sufficient rule of the law, the risks are too great and the return on investment jeopardized. Having a high degree of confidence in rule of law is clearly correlated with where FDI flows. Other than the large emerging markets of China, Brazil, Russia, Mexico and India, the top recipients of net inflows of FDI between 2000 and 2017 are the same countries that ranked highly on the Global Rule of Law and Business Dashboard.

Room for improvement

Unsurprisingly, Singapore, Sweden, New Zealand, Netherlands, Australia, Germany, United Kingdom, the United States, Japan and Canada comprise the economies held the top ten slots on the Rule of Law and Business Dashboard released in July 2019. (China fell from 19th in 2017 to 26th in 2019.)

Bottom 10 smaller framed

And, unsurprisingly, countries beset by political instability and civil strife remain stuck at the bottom of the index. Here in the Americas neighborhood, Guatemala and Honduras, Nicaragua, El Salvador and Mexico are all perilously close to bottom of the list, something we should be concerned with and engage these countries on as important trading partners.

Importantly, the Chamber report points out that, “income is not necessarily a predetermining factor in terms of the strength of the rule of law and business environment.” Senegal and Kenya, with a per capita GDP of just around $3,458 and $3,292 respectively, score similarly to South Africa with its per capita income that is almost four times higher.

In producing the study, the Chamber seeks to induce positive changes across the board over the long run. Although the Global Rule of Law and Business Dashboard hasn’t been conducted long enough with a full complement of countries to tout a concrete impact just yet, the Chamber reports that the aggregate score does seem to be moving in right direction, increasing from 51.63 percent in 2015 to 56.77 percent in 2019. Even the United States pulled its score up more than four percentage points from 2017.

The best kind of competition

Benchmarking is a valuable approach, not merely to expose flaws but as a way for governments to identify and adopt reforms yielding proven results for other countries. Governments can even market an improved ranking to potential investors.

While we often measure the outcomes of trade agreements by the volume of trade, the biggest victory may be the least appreciated: the subtle but important improvements to the way our trading partners respect the rule of law as applied to their own citizenry – and to ours.

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Andrea Durkin is the Editor-in-Chief of TradeVistas and Founder of Sparkplug, LLC. Ms. Durkin previously served as a U.S. Government trade negotiator and has proudly taught international trade policy and negotiations for the last fourteen years as an Adjunct Professor at Georgetown University’s Master of Science in Foreign Service program.

This article originally appeared on TradeVistas.org. Republished with permission.

 

gum

France Remains the Largest Chewing Gum Supplier to Germany

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘Germany – Chewing Gum – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

Exports from Germany

In 2018, the chewing gum exports from Germany amounted to 2.2K tonnes, increasing by 2.1% against the previous year. In general, chewing gum exports, however, continue to indicate a mild curtailment. In value terms, chewing gum exports stood at $16M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total export value increased at an average annual rate of +2.2% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period.

Exports by Country

The Netherlands (403 tonnes), Belgium (217 tonnes) and Poland (188 tonnes) were the main destinations of chewing gum exports from Germany, with a combined 37% share of total exports. Italy, Ecuador, Denmark, Austria, Slovakia, the UK, the Czech Republic, Luxembourg and Switzerland lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 44%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main countries of destination, was attained by Ecuador, while exports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the Netherlands ($3.4M) remains the key foreign market for chewing gum exports from Germany, comprising 21% of total chewing gum exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Austria ($1.4M), with a 8.7% share of total exports. It was followed by Italy, with a 8.6% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of value to the Netherlands totaled +16.3%. Exports to the other major destinations recorded the following average annual rates of exports growth: Austria (-6.2% per year) and Italy (+2.0% per year).

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the average chewing gum export price amounted to $7,369 per tonne, surging by 7.7% against the previous year. Over the period from 2007 to 2018, it increased at an average annual rate of +3.5%. Over the period under review, the average export prices for chewing gum reached their peak figure in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

There were significant differences in the average prices for the major foreign markets. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Luxembourg ($11,776 per tonne), while the average price for exports to Slovakia ($2,927 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was recorded for supplies to the Netherlands, while the prices for the other major destinations experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports into Germany

In 2018, the amount of chewing gum imported into Germany amounted to 8.1K tonnes, surging by 4.3% against the previous year. Overall, chewing gum imports, however, continue to indicate a mild deduction. In value terms, chewing gum imports amounted to $38M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

In 2018, France (2.3K tonnes) constituted the largest supplier of chewing gum to Germany, accounting for a 29% share of total imports. Moreover, chewing gum imports from France exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest supplier, Denmark (1.1K tonnes), twofold. The UK (992 tonnes) ranked third in terms of total imports with a 12% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume from France amounted to -4.6%. The remaining supplying countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: Denmark (+73.6% per year) and the UK (+1.9% per year).

In value terms, France ($11M), the UK ($6.2M) and Denmark ($5.3M) were the largest chewing gum suppliers to Germany, with a combined 58% share of total imports.

Import Prices by Country

The average chewing gum import price stood at $4,705 per tonne in 2018, shrinking by -4.3% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the chewing gum import price continues to indicate a mild downturn.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major supplying countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was the UK ($6,240 per tonne), while the price for the Netherlands ($3,421 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by China, while the prices for the other major suppliers experienced a decline.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

TradeGala

Online Wholesale B2B Marketplace TradeGala Makes Buying Even Easier

Chances are you’re already a regular online marketplace customer. With popular sites such as Amazon, eBay and Etsy conveniently bringing together a range of sellers, buying goods through the wholesale fashion marketplace is now as common as popping to the supermarket.

Just as we now think nothing of picking up our groceries alongside a new dress in Sainsbury’s, the majority of us also want to order what we need in one fell swoop online. The popularity of marketplace sites is hard to ignore: Amazon first launched its version 20 years ago and it now makes up over 50 percent of its overall sales – that’s $118.57 billion in 2018 alone. Many shoppers today use it as their first port of call when searching for goods to buy – even before Google.

Over in the independent fashion sector, small brands and retailers selling through such marketplaces is also becoming increasingly popular – particularly with the likes of Farfetch and Trouva gaining household name status. These sites offer access to all the best brands in one place, meaning you don’t have to venture far to find the sort of pieces that were once only available in brick-and-mortar boutiques.

However, when it comes to B2B marketplaces, there’s been a distinct lack of places where boutique buyers can make their in-season and forward order selections. That is, until now.

Step forward TradeGala, the fashion marketplace that connects independent retailers with international brands. Much like visiting a trade show or showroom, the site makes it easy for fashion buyers to source global labels in the same place online. Some of the labels on its roster are also exclusive and can’t be bought as wholesale elsewhere.

Ordering through TradeGala means buying professionals can save time and money. With a simple order process, buyers can make their store selections with just a few clicks, completely eliminating the need for complicated line sheets. It also offers centralized customer service and payment protection – meaning retailers can rest assured that they’re in safe hands. Plus, because the site is in operation 24/7, you can research and choose products whenever it suits you.

For brands, TradeGala offers greater visibility and access to new international markets and the latest technologies with minimal commitment. Smaller, independent brands are able to take their first steps into the wholesale market, which may have previously seemed too daunting. The site launched with 24 brands across accessories, active wear, casual dress, evening wear, and footwear, including Goddiva, City Goddess, Marc Angelo, KDK London, Gypsy Clothing, Gold Lunar, Haus of Deck, Hugz Jeans, Lindy Bop, Looking Glam, Geniris Paris, Glitz Shoes, Paradox London, and VILDNIS.

So, is this the future of fashion buying? It looks highly likely. Marketplaces won’t necessarily replace the more traditional methods of sourcing and purchasing, however, they’re a valuable tool in an ever more competitive industry. The most forward-thinking brands and retailers are already taking advantage of the opportunities on offer – perhaps now is the time for you to consider joining them.
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Visit TradeGala’s official website: https://www.tradegala.com for more information

mango

Long-Term Growth of Mango And Mangosteen Market in the U.S. Is Losing Momentum

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘U.S. – Mangoes, Mangosteens And Guavas – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the mango and mangosteen market in the U.S. amounted to $558M in 2018. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Over the period under review, mango and mangosteen consumption continues to indicate a strong increase. Over the period under review, the mango and mangosteen market attained its peak figure level in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in the U.S.

Driven by increasing demand for mango and mangosteen in the U.S., largely supported by rising Hispanic population, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven years. Market performance is forecast to decelerate, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +2.9% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 579K tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in the U.S.

Mango and mangosteen production in the U.S. amounted to 930 tonnes in 2018, declining by -7.5% against the previous year. Overall, mango and mangosteen production continues to indicate an abrupt contraction, as mangoes are not cultivated largely across the U.S., and mango imports are widely available.

Harvested Area And Yield in the U.S.

In 2018, the total area harvested in terms of mangoes, mangosteens and guavas production in the U.S. stood at 53 ha, falling by -18.5% against the previous year. Average yield of mangoes, mangosteens and guavas in the U.S. amounted to 18 tonne per ha in 2018, jumping by 13% against the previous year.

Exports from the U.S.

In 2018, the mango and mangosteen exports from the U.S. stood at 27K tonnes, declining by -4.7% against the previous year. Overall, mango and mangosteen exports, however, continue to indicate a buoyant expansion. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 when exports increased by 35% y-o-y. Exports peaked at 31K tonnes in 2015; however, from 2016 to 2018, exports failed to regain their momentum. In value terms, mango and mangosteen exports totaled $40M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

Canada (15K tonnes) was the main destination for mango and mangosteen exports from the U.S., accounting for a 55% share of total exports. Moreover, mango and mangosteen exports to Canada exceeded the volume sent to the second major destination, the UK (2.4K tonnes), sixfold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Germany (2.4K tonnes), with a 8.8% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of volume to Canada amounted to +7.4%. Exports to the other major destinations recorded the following average annual rates of exports growth: the UK (+2.4% per year) and Germany (+11.3% per year).

In value terms, Canada ($21M) remains the key foreign market for mango and mangosteen exports from the U.S., comprising 53% of total mango and mangosteen exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Germany ($5.3M), with a 13% share of total exports. It was followed by Mexico, with a 7.6% share.

Export Prices by Country

The average mango and mangosteen export price stood at $1,502 per tonne in 2018, increasing by 2.5% against the previous year. Over the last eleven years, it increased at an average annual rate of +2.1%. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2017 an increase of 14% year-to-year. The export price peaked in 2018 and is likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

There were significant differences in the average prices for the major foreign markets. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Germany ($2,259 per tonne), while the average price for exports to the UK ($1,140 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was recorded for supplies to Germany, while the prices for the other major destinations experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports into the U.S.

In 2018, the mango and mangosteen imports into the U.S. stood at 500K tonnes, stabilizing at the previous year. Over the period under review, the total imports indicated a prominent increase from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +4.6% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Imports peaked in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future. In value terms, mango and mangosteen imports amounted to $637M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

In 2018, Mexico (311K tonnes) constituted the largest mango and mangosteen supplier to the U.S., with a 62% share of total imports. Moreover, mango and mangosteen imports from Mexico exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest supplier, Peru (50K tonnes), sixfold. Ecuador (49K tonnes) ranked third in terms of total imports with a 9.7% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume from Mexico stood at +5.4%. The remaining supplying countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: Peru (+5.6% per year) and Ecuador (+4.7% per year).

In value terms, Mexico ($380M) constituted the largest supplier of mango and mangosteen to the U.S., comprising 60% of total mango and mangosteen imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Peru ($61M), with a 9.5% share of total imports. It was followed by the Philippines, with a 7% share.

Import Prices by Country

The average mango and mangosteen import price stood at $1,273 per tonne in 2018, going up by 17% against the previous year. In general, the mango and mangosteen import price continues to indicate perceptible growth.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major supplying countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Thailand ($2,892 per tonne), while the price for Ecuador ($862 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Mexico, while the prices for the other major suppliers experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform