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Dubai Trade Reports Significant Growth in 2019

Dubai

Dubai Trade Reports Significant Growth in 2019

Dubai trade represented significant growth and numbers throughout the first nine months of 2019, according to information released this week. Non-oil related trade volumes were reported with a 22 percent year-on-year increase compared to the same period the year before, resulting in a total of 83 million tons.

Additionally, the report highlighted export growth by 23 percent, re-exports growth by 4 percent, imports by 3 percent in regards to external trade. Volume for re-exports jumped 48 percent while export volumes jumped by 47 percent, at 12 million and 13 million tons overall for the period.

“The strong performance of Dubai’s foreign trade reflects the robust fundamentals of our economy and our ability to keep developing making ourselves ready for 2020 – the year of preparation for the next 50 years,” said Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed, Crown Prince of Dubai and Chairman of the Executive Council.

“We are confident our external trade sector will keep the momentum. Government teams are going above and beyond to develop new initiatives that will improve our trade, including the Dubai Silk Road project, which will enhance Dubai leading position as a trade and logistics hub. We are working on a virtual trade zone, the first of its kind, which will help considerably in developing e-commerce regionally and globally. Different achievements are contributing towards an exceptional hosting of EXPO 2020 and beyond.”

The report also confirmed unwavering quarterly growth throughout 2019, with the third quarter representing the highest amount of growth (seven percent) for trade activity. Supported by the region’s foreign free trade zones, there was growth reported indirect trade, customs warehouse trade, land trade (11 percent), sea trade (five percent), and air trade (four percent), further establishing Dubai as a region primed for trade growth, agility, and success in 2020.

“The strong growth delivered by non-oil foreign trade is a healthy sign of how resilient and appealing the Dubai economy is and its efforts in developing its manufacturing facilities and free zones. Jebel Ali Free Zone is a world model that delivers unique services and facilities to investors and help develop the quality of goods circulated worldwide,” added Sultan bin Sulayem, DP World Group Chairman & CEO and Chairman of Ports, Customs and Free Zone Corporation.

“Dubai trade is agile and has strong accessibility to new markets thanks to its reliability and transparency. This helps us with our upcoming projects which we are delivering in 2020- the year of preparation for the next 50 years, based on an advanced infrastructure and the best AI applications which are expected to immensely change and disrupt the nature and structure of trade in the coming few decades.”

“Dubai Customs has recently won the innovation platinum award, with a 6-star rating from EFQM Global Excellence Award scoring 700 points, the highest among all participating organizations. Dubai Customs has become the first organization in the world to win this reputable global award based on the new rating system in 2019. Winning the EFQM award is an international recognition of our leading achievements and the advanced level we reached in customs innovation. Dubai Customs has dedicated a customs clearance channel for EXPO 2020 exhibitors and participants. In conjunction with the World Government Summit and EXPO 2020, Dubai Customs is hosting the 5th WCO Global AEO Conference between 10-12 March 2020 in cooperation with the World Customs Organization and the Federal Customs Authority” Sulayem added.

pulp

U.S. Pulp Market – Exports to China Fell 9.4% in 2018, U.S Companies Lost $78M

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘U.S. Pulp Market. Analysis And Forecast to 2025’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the pulp market in the U.S. amounted to $4.8B in 2018, going up by 9% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +2.5% from 2013 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations throughout the analyzed period. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2014 with an increase of 19% against the previous year. In that year, the pulp market attained its peak level of $5.1B. From 2015 to 2018, the growth of the pulp market remained at a lower figure.

Pulp Production in the U.S.

In value terms, pulp production totaled $7.2B in 2018. Overall, pulp production, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2014 with an increase of 8.9% year-to-year. In that year, pulp production reached its peak level of $7.7B. From 2015 to 2018, pulp production growth failed to regain its momentum.

Exports from the U.S.

In 2018, approx. 6M tonnes of pulp were exported from the U.S.; going down by -4.7% against the previous year. Over the period under review, pulp exports continue to indicate a mild shrinkage. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2015 with an increase of 3.1% against the previous year. Exports peaked at 6.4M tonnes in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, exports remained at a lower figure.

In value terms, pulp exports amounted to $4.5B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total export value increased at an average annual rate of +1.7% from 2013 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being observed over the period under review. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2018 when exports increased by 11% against the previous year. In that year, pulp exports reached their peak and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

Exports by Country

China (1.6M tonnes) was the main destination for pulp exports from the U.S., with a 26% share of total exports. Moreover, pulp exports to China exceeded the volume sent to the second major destination, Japan (479K tonnes), threefold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Italy (391K tonnes), with a 6.6% share.

From 2013 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume to China stood at -3.2%. Exports to the other major destinations recorded the following average annual rates of exports growth: Japan (+3.1% per year) and Italy (-3.4% per year).

In value terms, China ($1.2B) remains the key foreign market for pulp exports from the U.S., comprising 26% of total pulp exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Japan ($410M), with a 9.1% share of total exports. It was followed by Italy, with a 6.3% share.

From 2013 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of value to China amounted to +1.0%. Exports to the other major destinations recorded the following average annual rates of exports growth: Japan (+6.9% per year) and Italy (-1.5% per year).

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the average pulp export price amounted to $759 per tonne, going up by 16% against the previous year. Over the period from 2013 to 2018, it increased at an average annual rate of +3.1%. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2018 an increase of 16% against the previous year. In that year, the average export prices for pulp reached their peak level and is likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Japan ($855 per tonne), while the average price for exports to Germany ($554 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was recorded for supplies to South Korea, while the prices for the other major destinations experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports into the U.S.

In 2018, the amount of pulp imported into the U.S. totaled 2.5M tonnes, increasing by 4.2% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +3.5% from 2013 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2018 when imports increased by 4.2% year-to-year. In that year, pulp imports reached their peak and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, pulp imports totaled $1.5B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total import value increased at an average annual rate of +4.8% over the period from 2013 to 2018; the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2018 with an increase of 23% year-to-year. In that year, pulp imports attained their peak and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

Imports by Country

In 2018, Brazil (2.1M tonnes) constituted the largest pulp supplier to the U.S., accounting for a 85% share of total imports. Moreover, pulp imports from Brazil exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest supplier, Chile (248K tonnes), ninefold.

From 2013 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume from Brazil amounted to +1.7%. The remaining supplying countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: Chile (+20.8% per year) and Sweden (+19.7% per year).

In value terms, Brazil ($1.4B) constituted the largest supplier of pulp to the U.S., comprising 90% of total pulp imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Chile ($75M), with a 4.8% share of total imports.

From 2013 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of value from Brazil totaled +4.0%. The remaining supplying countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: Chile (+16.9% per year) and Sweden (+14.9% per year).

Import Prices by Country

The average pulp import price stood at $619 per tonne in 2018, growing by 18% against the previous year. Over the period from 2013 to 2018, it increased at an average annual rate of +1.2%. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2018 an increase of 18% y-o-y. In that year, the average import prices for pulp reached their peak level and is likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major supplying countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Brazil ($655 per tonne), while the price for Chile ($300 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Brazil, while the prices for the other major suppliers experienced a decline.

Companies Mentioned in the Report

Profile Products, Domtar Industries, Georgia-Pacific Brewton, Woodland Pulp, Cascade Pacific Pulp, Northwest Capital Appreciation, Forest Resolute Products, American Paper Recycling, Cascades Tissue Group-Oregon, A Division of Cascades Holding US, Parsons & Whittemore, St Paper, Alabama River Cellulose, Buckeye Technologies, Brunswick Cellulose, Parsons & Whittemore Enterprises, Fibrek Inc., Port Townsend Holdings Company, Buckeye Mt. Holly, Lest Distributors, Southern Cellulose Products, DOMTAR A.W., Alabama River Group, GP Cellulose, Buckeye Florida Limited Partnership, Pratt Paper (ny), Fibrek Recycling U.S. , Cosmo Specialty Fibers, Ox Paperboard

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

2020

Dates You Don’t Want to Forget in 2020

Midwest Association of Rail Shippers (MARS) Winter Meeting

Jan. 14–16

Westin Lombard Yorktown Center, Lombard, Illinois

mwrailshippers.com

“Rail’s 2020 Crossroads: Market Share vs. Operating Ratio” is the theme as the impacts of the declining freight market are discussed.

National Retail Federation’s 2020 Vision

Jan. 12-14

Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, New York, New York

nrfbigshow.nrf.com

“Retail’s Big Show,” as it is known, includes more than 38,000 retailers, vendors and expert participants.

Nulogy Presents: xChange 19

Jan. 19-21

Westin Phoenix Downtown, Phoenix, Arizona

xchange.nulogy.com

This is the preeminent conference for consumer packaged goods (CPG) brands and co-pack suppliers.

Southern Motor Carriers’ Jump Start 20

Jan. 27-29

The Renaissance Atlanta Waverly, Atlanta, Georgia

smc3jumpstart.com

This event covers all things supply chain, such as industry disruption predictions, ethical AI, cross-border logistics, freight profitability analysis, blockchain strategies and much more.

Cargo Logistics Canada

Feb. 4-6

Vancouver Convention Centre West, Vancouver, Canada

cargologisticscanada.com

The global impacts of China’s $1 trillion One Belt One Road and the massive global e-commerce surge are among the expo topics.

17th Annual RLA Conference and Expo

Feb. 4-6

Mirage Hotel and Casino, Las Vegas, Nevada

rla.org

Reverse Logistics Magazine’s annual event focuses on solutions and technologies surrounding reverse logistics and the circular economy.

38th Annual Mississippi Valley Trade and Transport Conference

Feb. 19-20

Omni Royal Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana

mvttc.com

One of the longest-running river-related logistics events features expert panelists speaking on a range of important topics, including river statistics, port updates and commodities.

Food Shippers of America 65th Annual Logistics Conference

Feb. 23-25

J.W. Marriott Grand Lakes, Orlando, Florida

foodshippersofamerica.org.

This invitation-only conference is aimed at the food shipment field.

LINK2020: The Retail Supply Chain Conference

February 23-26, 2020

Dallas, TX

Gaylord Texan

Rila.org/supplychain

RILA LINK2020: The Retail Supply Chain Conference is the best way to network, learn, and explore hot trends in retail supply chain management.  Hundreds of executives from the top retailers will gather at LINK2020 to discover new, innovative strategies, find new solutions to their challenges, and position themselves as leaders in the field.

Automotive Logistics Mexico

Feb. 25-27

Marquis Reforma, Mexico City, Mexico

automotivelogistics.media/automotive-logistics-mexico

C-Level execs, directors and managers responsible for all areas of logistics and supply chain strategy for vehicle makers, parts suppliers, government, LSPs, tech providers and start-ups gather to learn the latest industry developments.

3rd Cold Chain Global Forum West Coast .20

Feb. 25-27

San Diego Convention Center, San Diego, California

pharma-iq.com

Senior supply chain, logistics, transportation, packaging, quality and operations stakeholders from both large and small pharma West Coast-based companies get a holistic temperature-controlled blueprint that goes from clinical supply chain to commercial supply chain.

AFFI Con 2020

Feb. 29-March 3

Cosmopolitan, Las Vegas, Nevada

affi.com

This is the American Frozen Food Institute’s premier event for frozen food and beverage makers, industry suppliers and logistical partners.

82nd TCA Annual Convention

March 1-3

Gaylord Palms Resort & Convention Center, Kissimmee, Florida

Truckload.org

The premier networking and education event in the truckload industry features diverse speakers, workshops and an insightful keynote.

TPM 20

March 1-4

Long Beach Convention Center, Long Beach, California

joc-tpm.com

Among the largest logistics, business and transportation events includes a variety of industry roundtables, workshops and mixers.

Elevate Annual Users Conference

March 2-5

Orlando World Center Marriott, Orlando, Florida

elevate.highjump.com

A diverse group of HighJump users, experts and industry leaders and partners discuss Warehouse Management Systems (WMS), 3PL software and Direct Store Delivery (DSD).

MODEX 2020

March 9-12

Georgia World Congress Center, Atlanta, Georgia

modexshow.com

The possibilities are endless thanks to 950+ exhibits and 100+ education sessions tailored to help you discover equipment and system solutions for your material handling and supply chain needs. With keynotes, networking, education and product booths, MODEX is where manufacturing and supply chain innovation come to life.

warehousing

Insource or Outsource? That’s the Question Facing Companies When it Comes to Warehousing.

To insource or outsource your warehouse: That is the question.

Companies face many considerations when it comes to deciding whether to own or lease a warehouse filled with their own employees or hire a third party with warehousing expertise and their own workers.

Exploration of the latter has often caused the phone to ring—or the computer inbox to fill—for Todd Alloway, vice president, Contract Logistics at ODW Logistics. Since 1971—and including the 16 years Alloway has been with the company—the Columbus, Ohio, concern has been providing warehousing, distribution and transportation solutions for hundreds of brands.

Of course, ODW will take all the new business it can get, but Alloway concedes in a phone interview that outsourcing usually makes the least sense to a company that has “a team of logistics people inside the business.”

“They might have a vice president of supply chain who has 10 people under that person and a lot of other staff that are part of the business,” he says. “They may understand more about what they are doing” than a third party could coming in cold.

Alloway says he and his team must understand that before making a pitch to outsource to such a company, admitting it can get delicate if you are talking with someone who may lose his or her job or has buddies in positions that could disappear with outsourcing. “We have to walk that fine line,” he says.

It also might make sense to keep things in house if a company’s services or products are complex or highly specialized, something that can come up with those who are big in the manufacturing world, according to Alloway.

Typically, before partnering with a potential client, Alloway will meet with their leadership “face to face to ensure they are a good fit.” During that initial interview, he will gather information about the business. “I can’t go on and say why ODW will be better until I truly understand your business,” he says. “Upfront research is the first thing we have to do.”

“I tell folks that all the time that you can’t just hand me a price sheet and have me give you a price. There is no blanket pricing or one size fits all for businesses. We find out a lot of times that they don’t even know what they need. We have to find out what is valuable on both ends, we’ve got to find out what’s important.”

In today’s ever-changing modern warehousing, outsourcing may be what’s important. It allows a company to leverage someone else’s expertise in transportation, warehousing, distribution, setting up supply chains and maintaining compliance standards, so the original client can focus again on its core competency.

“A lot of our customers started out doing it themselves,” Alloway notes, but as those companies grew, so did their capital investments in staffing, equipping and maintaining warehouses. Suddenly confronted with the need to consolidate operations and/or become technologically viable, many such companies turn to third-party experts like ODW Logistics.

Another challenge with keeping a modern warehouse in-house is staffing, according to Alloway, who cites as an example his company’s Columbus base, where the unemployment rate currently hovers around 3 percent. Companies with warehouses, he says, must develop strategies when it comes to seeking, training and retaining skilled workers among an ever more competitive labor pool. Faced with the time, effort and cost of staying in the hiring game, many conclude it would be better to farm all that out so they can, again, concentrate on their company’s service or product.

When it comes to logistics, companies that ship to big box retailers also have to know the differing compliance, ordering and fulfillment processes of, say, Walmart, Target and Kohl’s. Concerns like ODW Logistics already thrive in that atmosphere because of experience already gleaned on behalf of existing customers, Alloway points out.

As a for instance, ODW’s Director of Marketing John Meier mentions a health and beauty customer that knew going in that the logistics company already worked with others in the same industry.

“One key differentiator” when it came to snagging that account “was our expertise with Ulta, Sephora, different salons and big box retailers,” Alloway recalls. “Word of mouth is still very big in the industry.”

Wanting to know whether ODW has experience in a potential customer’s industry is often the first question Alloway gets. Another, obviously, is price, “especially from someone new to the market that has done it themselves the entire time,” he says. “They want the new technology and whatever the latest and greatest inventory management system is, but they don’t understand the cost that gets that. A lot of time it is education on our part” that is imparted to the potential client.

Likewise, a company like Alloway’s can figure out the overall savings that will ultimately come from outsourcing, but the one thing he and his colleagues will not do is quote a price until they have completed research of the potential client and its industry.

Today’s “I want it now” shipping culture has challenged companies like ODW Logistics, concedes Alloway, who adds that he approaches a delivery schedule less on speed than on the best optimization of his trucks. “Next day and two day are still important,” he says, “but in a direct consumer market it’s more important how you handle returns.”

After pausing to think more about today’s expected speedy deliveries, he adds, “We have had to put in a valiant effort that last few years.”

However, Alloway also offers that with a new client, landing the account does not always come down to speed, price or even experience. He brings up Handgards, a provider of high quality food safety, food protection, protective wear and food service products. The El Paso, Texas-based company managed its distribution network for half a century before partnering with ODW Logistics a decade ago.

“One of the most important attributes they sought was a cultural fit,” says Alloway. “They are a family-oriented business and when we first went to visit them we quickly understood that, and we were able to help them see how ODW has the business values that would match theirs.”

You read that right: Choosing whether to stay in house or go with a third party can come down to whether you get your new partner and are convinced your new partner gets you. What was most important to Handgards was someone, as Alloway put it, “with a similar feel.” ODW now handles the food safety company’s logistics and warehouse support in a 300,000-square-foot facility.

“The people that I have worked with in the ODW organization have been excellent partners to our business and work diligently on our behalf,” said an executive with Handgards.

“Like with most companies outsourcing for the first time, there can be a fear of change, a fear of how a new one is going to handle a product,” Alloway says. “‘Will they do it like we do? Will they talk with customers like we do?’ We went and visited them, made some research and it did not come down to price. It came down to did they like us and did they think we would be a good business fit together.

“… Sometimes we are not the best fit, somebody else is or they should keep doing it themselves. You just do not know that until you do the research.”

knit fabric

U.S. Knit Fabric Market Rose 2.6% and Reached $2B

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘U.S. Knit Fabric Market. Analysis And Forecast to 2025’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

In 2018, the revenue of the U.S. knit fabric market rose 2.6% and reached $2B, due to accelerated growth of imports. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price).

Over the period under review, knit fabric consumption, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2014 with an increase of 19% year-to-year. In that year, the knit fabric market reached its peak level of $2.3B. From 2015 to 2018, the growth of the knit fabric market remained at a somewhat lower figure.

Knit Fabric Production in the U.S.

U.S. knit fabric production amounted to 144K tonnes in 2018,  -2.4% against the previous year. Overall, knit fabric production continues to indicate an abrupt downturn. Over the period under review, knit fabric production attained its maximum volume at 206K tonnes in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, production stood at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, knit fabric production totaled $1.2B in 2018.

Exports from the U.S.

In 2018, approx. 9.3K tonnes of knit fabrics were exported from the U.S.; declining by -5.9% against the previous year. In general, knit fabric exports continue to indicate a dramatic slump. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2018 when exports decreased by -5.9% year-to-year. Over the period under review, knit fabric exports reached their maximum at 42K tonnes in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, exports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, knit fabric exports stood at $93M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. In general, knit fabric exports continue to indicate a drastic decrease. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2018 when exports decreased by -5.6% y-o-y. Exports peaked at $276M in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, exports failed to regain their momentum.

Exports by Country

Nicaragua (2K tonnes), Honduras (1.5K tonnes) and Guatemala (1.1K tonnes) were the main destinations of knit fabric exports from the U.S., together accounting for 50% of total exports. Mexico, France, El Salvador, the Dominican Republic, Colombia, Australia, Chile and China lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 33%.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main countries of destination, was attained by Australia, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Honduras ($18M), Nicaragua ($13M) and Mexico ($8M) were the largest markets for knit fabric exported from the U.S. worldwide, with a combined 43% share of total exports. These countries were followed by Guatemala, El Salvador, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Australia, France, China and Chile, which together accounted for a further 35%.

Among the main countries of destination, Australia experienced the highest growth rate of exports, over the last five-year period, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

The average knit fabric export price stood at $9,974 per tonne in 2018, remaining constant against the previous year. Over the last five years, it increased at an average annual rate of +8.8%. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2014 when the average export price increased by 22% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the average export prices for knit fabrics reached their peak figure in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future.

There were significant differences in the average prices for the major foreign markets. In 2018, the country with the highest price was China ($16,066 per tonne), while the average price for exports to France ($5,365 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was recorded for supplies to El Salvador, while the prices for the other major destinations experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports into the U.S.

In 2018, approx. 108K tonnes of knit fabrics were imported into the U.S.; increasing by 9.1% against the previous year. Over the period under review, knit fabric imports, however, continue to indicate a mild decline. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2014 when imports increased by 14% year-to-year. Over the period under review, knit fabric imports attained their peak figure at 130K tonnes in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, imports failed to regain their momentum.

In value terms, knit fabric imports totaled $501M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Overall, knit fabric imports, however, continue to indicate a temperate deduction. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2014 with an increase of 11% year-to-year. Imports peaked at $647M in 2015; however, from 2016 to 2018, imports failed to regain their momentum.

Imports by Country

China (46K tonnes), India (25K tonnes) and Israel (14K tonnes) were the main suppliers of knit fabric imports to the U.S., together accounting for 79% of total imports.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main suppliers, was attained by India, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, China ($195M) constituted the largest supplier of knit fabric to the U.S., comprising 39% of total knit fabric imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Israel ($80M), with a 16% share of total imports. It was followed by India, with a 15% share.

From 2013 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of value from China totaled -6.6%. The remaining supplying countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: Israel (+6.0% per year) and India (+25.0% per year).

Import Prices by Country

The average knit fabric import price stood at $4,631 per tonne in 2018, dropping by -1.9% against the previous year. Overall, the knit fabric import price continues to indicate a mild curtailment. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2015 when the average import price increased by 2.4% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the average import prices for knit fabrics attained their maximum at $5,073 per tonne in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, import prices remained at a lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major supplying countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Taiwan, Chinese ($7,981 per tonne), while the price for India ($2,979 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Taiwan, Chinese, while the prices for the other major suppliers experienced more modest paces of growth.

Companies Mentioned in the Report

Guilford Mills, Siny Corp., McMurray Fabrics, Ssm Industries, Fisher Textiles, Hornwood, Jif-Pak Manufacturing, Adele Knits, Commonwealth Home Fashion, Fab Industries Corp., Metritek Corporation, The Tenenblatt Corporation, Gehring Tricot Corporation, Rebtex, Westchester Lace & Textiles, Mocaro Industries, Albahealth, McComb Mill Manufacturing Company, Lace Lastics Company, Clover Knits, Mohican Mills, Sas Textiles, Somerset Industries, Charbert, Hampton Industries

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

airfeight

Airfreight vs. Sea Freight – Which Works Better?

Airfreight vs. sea freight has become a burning dilemma for all those in need of this type of services. While both solutions come with a set of advantages and disadvantages, the final choice one makes will depend on a variety of factors. We are willing to share our knowledge and findings with you so that you can make the best possible decision regarding your shipment in the given circumstances. 

Airfreight vs sea freight – the costs can be a decisive factor

Undeniably, the amount of financial means necessary to afford airfreight services is considerably higher than that of sea freight. Moreover, the appearance of the largest cargo aircraft in the world announces great changes and improvements in this field. The Antonov An-225 could cause a further rise of the airfreight costs, but it will also guarantee higher quality. On the other hand, sea freight is much more affordable and, consequently, the number one choice of a vast majority of clients. Opting for sea freight provides clients with acceptable service but at a significantly lower price.

Time matters greatly!

Most often, clients want their shipment delivered as soon as possible, which can cause problems for those offering sea freight services. Not seldom do customs issues or hold-ups at ports cause serious delays. However, we must admit that a giant step forward is evident in this field. Firstly, high-quality, modern ships are much faster now than it was the case in the past. Secondly, there are some canal upgrades that can eliminate tedious and tiring delays on some routes. Finally, sea freight forwarders can guarantee delivery times, which is vital for business owners when it comes to organization.

The type of cargo affects the final choice on airfreight vs. sea freight dilemma

The type of cargo is one of the most important factors influencing the choice in the airfreight vs. sea fright dilemma. In this case, we must admit that sea fright seems like a much better solution since it has no limitations you have to be aware of. One of the crucial pros of the maritime shipping is that you can ship even the bulkiest and extremely heavy goods. Conversely, airfreight is limited in this discipline. Before you opt for this type of goods transportation, it is advisable to make sure that the type of your cargo is acceptable. In addition, there is a very long list of the items which are prohibited and those listed as hazardous materials. Depending on your final destination, the rules and laws may differ. Yet, getting sufficient information on the subject must still be the first step in the process.

Safety of your cargo is the top priority

Understandably, the safety of cargo is always the top priority. It is important to emphasize that air cargo has to be dealt with the utmost attention and in accordance with the regulations which are very strict and clear. All the crucial elements, including handling and securing your cargo as well as the proper storage, are defined by airport regulations. This is a great benefit and a guarantee that the safety of your goods will be at the maximal level. On the other hand, we cannot say that sea freight is a bad alternative either. In this case, the goods are transported in containers, but the human factor is crucial. Proper packing strategies are essential in order to decrease any chances of potential damage during transport. If this is not conducted appropriately, the chances are some of your goods might get seriously damaged or even cause further problems on the ship.

Do not forget about the accessibility of your goods

If we analyze the accessibility of your goods as one of the criteria, airfreight is a more favorable option by all means. The procedures are clear, cargo is in smaller volumes and there are no unnecessary waitings to receive your goods. Using sea freight for your cargo often results in additional costs due to heavy congestions in seaports. If your goods are not delivered at the arranged time, you are required to pay for detention and demurrage costs, which may be a heavy burden on your budget. However, we must not forget to mention an advantage sea freight offers comparing to airfreight. The accessibility to markets is much higher in case of sea freight. The reason is very simple. When unloaded from ships, containers can move further inland by using the services of intermodal shippers

Eco-friendly practices 

Finally, let us not forget about the environment when choosing between airfreight vs sea freight. Applying eco-friendly practices is becoming increasingly important, so it does not surprise this is one of the factors shippers base their decision on. According to this particular criterion, sea freight is a more reasonable option since it has a significantly better carbon footprint. Quite the opposite, airplanes are serious polluters and require special attention and measures to reduce their carbon footprint to minimal values.

Final words on airfreight vs sea freight dilemma

The decisions and choices you make concerning airfreight vs sea freight dilemma will depend on miscellaneous factors. It is of key importance to weigh the pros and cons of each of these options and then make your decision final.  A serious effort is required to negotiate the best shipping terms and only then can you expect to ship your goods completely fuss-free.

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Susan Daniels is a passionate copywriter who loves exploring home improvement ideas and real estate market. Lately, she has gained considerable knowledge in the types of moving services and the qualities of respectable moving companies such as DA Moving NYC, for example. She enjoys giving advice on the best places to live and exciting places to visit. Traveling makes her happy as well as reading good books.

fuel cell

Nuvera Breaks Ground on Automated Fuel Cell Production Facility in China

Nuvera Fuel Cells, LLC, a provider of fuel cell power solutions for motive applications, is pleased to announce construction of a fuel cell stack production line in the Hangzhou district government of Fuyang, China. A ground-breaking ceremony was held on Dec. 17, 2019 attended by Lucien Robroek, CEO and Jon Taylor, President of Nuvera, along with Fuyang government officials.

In December 2018, Nuvera signed a cooperation agreement with the Fuyang government, located in Zhejiang province, to enable the local manufacture of Nuvera® fuel cell stacks. The agreement provided incentives to Nuvera for the establishment of its production facility. The fuel cells will power zero-emissions, heavy-duty vehicles such as delivery vans and transit buses.

“China is leading the world in the adoption of fuel cell electric vehicles, and we are excited to be at ground zero of this transformation,” said Lucien Robroek. “The new manufacturing site establishes Nuvera as a major fuel cell provider both in China and in the entire Asian region.”

The combined market for fuel cell forklifts, passenger vehicles and commercial vehicles in China is expected to reach nearly 50,000 units per year in 2025 and 400,000 units per year by 2030, according to information provided by customers in China. The Nuvera site incorporates equipment for the automated manufacture of up to 5,000 fuel cell stacks per year for vehicle applications. Additional capacity can be added as demand requires.

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ABOUT NUVERA FUEL CELLS, LLC

Nuvera Fuel Cells, LLC is a manufacturer of heavy-duty, zero-emission engines for mobility applications. With facilities located in the U.S. and Europe, Nuvera provides clean, safe, and efficient products designed to meet the rigorous needs of industrial vehicles and other transportation markets.

Nuvera is a subsidiary of Hyster-Yale Group, Inc., which designs, engineers, manufactures, sells, and services a comprehensive line of lift trucks and aftermarket parts marketed globally primarily under the Hyster® and Yale® brand names. Hyster-Yale Group is a wholly owned subsidiary of Hyster-Yale Materials Handling, Inc. (NYSE:HY). Hyster-Yale Materials Handling, Inc. and its subsidiaries, headquartered in Cleveland, Ohio, employ approximately 7,800 people worldwide.

The Pros and Cons of Hiring and Buying Equipment

You may have a potentially big project in the pipeline or too many demands to meet. You may want to choose to change to a flexible working style, or want more structure when you plan your work. Deciding on whether to hire or to buy equipment will depend on the nature of your business. Here are the pros and cons of hiring and buying equipment for the industrial, manufacturing and construction industries.

The Pros:

-Depending on the length of your project, hiring equipment can be a cost-effective option, especially if you only need to hire for a short period of time.

-If you have a small working environment, hiring equipment can be a great way to help you with your project, yet free up space when it’s not needed. This will allow you to work with a flexible approach.

-When it comes to the manufacturing industry, one size doesn’t necessarily fit all. Buying your own equipment means you have the opportunity to customise what you buy to ensure it’s exactly what you need to suit your business. Airblast Eurospray for example, not only gives you the opportunity to hire facilities but they can also custom build blast rooms and supply equipment to suit the requirements of your business.

-Buying equipment means you’ll know exactly how to use it and its capabilities. When you hire, you have a limited amount of time to work out how to best use the equipment.

-When you hire you’re open to trying out new technologies without investing too much of your resources if the equipment doesn’t meet your requirements.

The cons

-Buying equipment outright is simple enough if you have the funds to do so. If you’re a small company, or just starting out you may not know what projects are around the corner. Because of this, buying expensive construction, manufacturing or industrial equipment could be a big risk to take.

Hiring equipment means you have to be organised. You’ll have to plan and factor in the time it takes to source the right equipment. You should also have back up retailers that you can use if you find your first option has sold out.

-Buying your own equipment will also mean you’re responsible for transporting and the cost of transportation to different sites. This is an extra cost and one you may not have thought of at the time of purchase.

-When you buy equipment, you could be stuck with the same technologies for quite some time before you see a return on investment. This could mean that you unintentionally put yourself behind new advances in technology, which may impact how well you perform against your competitors.

-When buying equipment, you’ll need to factor in any costs for maintenance and repairs. This can be less or more than repeatedly hiring new machinery throughout the year. You’ll have to look at its purpose, how many times you require it and the cost for security deposits or collateral if you were to accidentally break the equipment during a hire. From this, you can discover the best option for your company.

China market

Success in China: Market Opportunities & How to Get Started

Are you an ambitious entrepreneur from the west seeking to expand to China? Or are you interested in opening a new business in China? If yes, this article is for you. We will explain the 5 most viable business openings in China today and the 5 most reliable tips on how to get started in this highly-competitive market. Please be our guest.

Which Viable Market Opportunities Can You Pursue in China?

As the affluent middle class continues to expand in China, solid economic transformations in the country are being realized day by day. The biggest beneficiaries of these transformations are multinational companies who have set up or are planning to open a shop in China. There are now bigger and better market opportunities to pursue, more advanced industries to invest in, and more tech-intensive manufacturing opportunities to consider. As a matter of fact, China now boasts of a 50% bigger manufacturing economy as compared to the USA.

If you are looking to tap into the continued increase in high value-added production, increased globalization of the service sector, as well as the increased outbound investment in China, these 5 market opportunities would be lucrative enough for you:

Healthcare

Rising wealth often comes with an increase in lifestyle diseases. An increase in manufacturing, on the other hand, brings forth many environmental concerns. These two factors have made the healthcare industry very lucrative in China. You will create a reliable cash cow if you could invest in a business that deals with herbal supplements or small health products- or a mainstream pharmaceutical company, so to speak. Also, the use of skincare products is on the rise in China. It’s best to set up a wholly foreign-owned enterprise for such operations.

Import and export trade

China is currently the largest exporter of tech goods and importer of processed foods globally. That means you can build a profitable importing and exporting business here in a heartbeat. 

Supplementary education

Many middle-class Chinese are keen on improving their English and expanding their knowledge of different aspects of business and politics. If you can offer them after-school private tutoring services, you will be making impressive annual returns on a consistent basis. Moreover, online tutorage is on the rise in China, which enables you to tutor more people in a more cost-effective way.

Food production

This goes without saying: Everyone needs food, everyone loves good food. And now that the middle-class in China is welcoming new entrants in huge numbers, there is a significant supply gap within this class for as long as the food is concerned. A rise in class obviously comes with a change in lifestyle, and food is at the center of every lifestyle. 

Mobile phones and accessories

The whole world has in the recent past turned to China for all its tech needs. The nation is the largest producer and importer of affordable mobile phones and accessories, meaning that a business in this industry would be extremely profitable.

What kind of structure to choose when expanding to China

IF you are considering expanding your business to China, establishing the right business structure is crucial. There are several types of business structures:

-Representative Office – allows foreign companies to open their offices in China and hire staff under their own legal entity. However, the offices are not allowed to perform any business, rather it is done by the parent company which is abroad. 

-Sales Office- this business structure enables foreign businesses to rent an office with a Chinese address for conducting business, without the necessity to establish a separate legal entity. All the activities and costs incurred in this office, are paid by the parent company.

-Foreign Invested Partnership- For this business entity, there is no need for minimum capital requirements. Depending on agreements, two or more investors can be joined and form this type of structure. 

-Wholly Foreign-Owned Enterprise- Through a wholly foreign-owned enterprise, two or more foreign partners can come together and establish the company which has the same liability as domestic companies. Moreover, it provides the owner with autonomous control and ownership. 

How to Get Started In China

As lucrative as China could be, many investors from the west talk about it with fear. Some of these foreign entrants tried and failed, or struggled to find their footing in this Asian economic giant. But what would render you unable to compete and survive here? For starters, the business environment here is too unforgiving and the competition too stiff for the faint-hearted. Also, cases of language barriers, cultural differences, and bureaucratic government regulations have led to the peril of many. 

In the middle of all these, how do you defy the odds and succeed in China? Here are 5 actionable tips on how to get started in China:

Don’t just translate your content for China; ensure that everything about your business is localized for China. 

It is important to understand and comply with all business regulations in China. The hiring process can be tricky to a new entrant, which necessitates the services of a Chinese recruitment agency. Such an agency will help you with all employment laws, privileges, and remuneration. 

Ensure that you understand and respect the cultural differences that exist between the west and the east. 

Never underestimate the power of customer opinion in China. Let the customer tell what their experience with your product is, respect their opinion, learn from your mistakes, and ensure that you find lasting solutions to all their concerns. 

As much as possible, try to work with a local partner in order to benefit from the many favors local entrepreneurs get from the government.

trade

Trade and the Impact on Imports and Exports in 2020

Significant and sustained increases in the world trade index (an index measuring the number of times the word uncertainty or its variants are mentioned in Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) reports at a country level) should be a worry for many as “the increase in trade uncertainty observed in the first quarter could be enough to reduce global growth by up to 0.75 percentage points in 2019”[1]

In August, the US Institute for supply management[2] latest report shows a contraction in production, purchasing, and employment indices.

Ahir, H, N Bloom, and D Furceri (2019), “The global economy hit by higher uncertainty”, VoxEU.org. https://voxeu.org/article/trade-uncertainty-rising-and-can-harm-global-economy

 

Uncertainty generated from Brexit, the US-China trade war, Japan – South Korea trade wars, and general discontentment with global trend towards widening income inequality is creating a toxic mix for politicians to deal with. The irony is the conventional approach of blaming your trading partners for your problems is only likely to exacerbate a general lack of confidence and increase further uncertainty.

The current round of the G7 summit in Biarritz concluded with support “to overhaul the WTO to improve effectiveness with regard to intellectual property protection, to settle disputes more swiftly and to eliminate unfair trade practices.” In essence, it’s signaling a need to strengthen the capabilities of the WTO to act faster and more decisively in resolving disputes that are even more political than structural in nature, requiring a more multi-faceted engagement approach. Whilst this may help in the long-run, in reality, companies will have to contend with uncertainty in global trade for some time to come as well as the impacts on the real economy from these disputes.

And all of this is happening as IMO 2020 approaches, the January 1, 2020, date by which the International Maritime Organization mandates a switch to lower sulfur fuels in order to achieve an 80% reduction in sulfur emissions leading to significant cost increases in the shipping goods via ocean freight (initial estimates between 180USD – 420 USD per TEU dependent on routing, base fuel costs, carrier).

So given the significant uncertainty around global trade agreements, the increasing use of trade as a political football, the increasing costs to trade and the shortening of product lifecycles as customers want faster, newer more differentiated offerings. Is it still worth it?

Of course this is very much dependent on what industry you are in. Whether you’re a global manufacturer or a wholesaler sourcing goods, your perspectives may be different based on investments made, sensitivity to current trade/tariff measures, customer demands, your markets, and the degree to which you are exposed to political debate and targeting.

However, I would offer that the benefits of specialization, economies of scale and unique factors of production that have underpinned global trade still exist as Adam Smith put it in 1776:

“By means of glasses, hotbeds, and hot walls, very good grapes can be raised in Scotland, and very good wine too can be made of them at about thirty times the expense for which at least equally good can be brought from foreign countries. Would it be a reasonable law to prohibit the importation of all foreign wines, merely to encourage the making of claret and burgundy in Scotland?”[1]

Today this simple analogy still holds true in skills, competences, capabilities, and access to markets and insights so that over time the expectation is that trade will prevail.

While the recent outlook has been gloomy, opportunities for 2020 include a resolution to a number of ongoing disputes and a final settlement on Brexit (we hope). Additionally, the maturation in technologies such as blockchain, process automation, forecasting and demand management solutions can also offset costs associated with IMO and support greater agility in the uncertain supply-chain world that we currently live in.

Indeed, if 2019 was the year of trade uncertainty, 2020 could be a restorative year in our ability to execute global trade.

Partnering with an experienced supply chain leader will be essential to minimizing cost increases while ensuring the efficient flow of your company’s goods and services.

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[1] World Economic Forum:https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2019/07/how-trade-uncertainty-is-impacting-the-global-economy/

[2]https://www.instituteforsupplymanagement.org/ismreport/mfgrob.cfm?SSO=1

[3]Adam Smith: Wealth of nations 1776

Neil Wheeldon is the Vice Presidents Solutions, BDP International.