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THESE COMPANIES KEEP CROSS-BORDER CARGO MOVING, EVEN WITH USMCA UP IN THE AIR

USMCA

THESE COMPANIES KEEP CROSS-BORDER CARGO MOVING, EVEN WITH USMCA UP IN THE AIR

Our trilateral trade bloc is in a sort of limbo, stuck between the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) that went into effect on Jan. 1, 1994, and the floundering United States Mexico Canada Agreement (USMCA), which the countries’ leaders signed on Nov. 30, 2018, but has only been ratified in Mexico.

According to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which has pushed for more ease of free trade among the three nations for years, about $1.7 billion worth of goods and services flow between the U.S. and Mexico borders every day. That’s about 2 percent of the GDP in America, where, according to the United Nations’ International Trade Center, Mexico and Canada are the two largest trading partners for U.S. manufacturers and shippers after China.

Despite these uncertain times, there are North American cross-border traders that continue to thrive. Consider the collection that follows. 

AVERITT EXPRESS

One of the nation’s leading freight transportation and supply chain management providers, Averitt is celebrating 50 years of service. The company cites customized, cross-border transportation solutions among its many, many specialties. Five years ago, Averitt slashed less-than-truckload (LTL) service times from the U.S. Midwest to Ontario, Canada, in recognition of the province’s rise as a manufacturing hub. Averitt’s strategically placed border service centers in Laredo, El Paso, Harlingen and Del Rio provide easy access to all points throughout Mexico, by rail, truck or expedited air. 

BNSF RAILWAY

One of North America’s leading freight transportation companies, BNSF boasts a.32,500 route-mile network covering 28 U.S. states and three Canadian provinces. The railway utilizes multiple strategies to make international shipments easier for customers. These include market experience, customs clearance know-how and participation in special North American rail service alliances. The BNSF network also includes five U.S.-Mexico gateways (San Diego, El Paso, Eagle Pass, Laredo and Brownsville) and operations in Fort Worth, Texas, and Mexico City, Guadalajara and Monterrey, Mexico. Service options include carload, transload and intermodal (Mexi-Modal) that allow for shipments of all major commodities into and out of Mexico.  

CG RAILWAY

Picture in your head a railroad line extending from the American South to southern Mexico. You can imagine the track snaking along the contour of the Gulf of Mexico, extending west from Alabama through Mississippi and Louisiana before reaching Texas and turning due south through the border and beyond. What you did not picture was a shift from rail at Alabama’s Port of Mobile to an ocean ferry making a direct route over water to Puerto Coatzacoalcos in Veracruz, Mexico. That’s what CG Railway (CGR) has been doing since 2000: providing a faster, more cost-effective route between the eastern U.S. and Canada to central and southern Mexico. CGR offers C-TPAT (Customs Trade Partnership Against Terrorism) certification, bilingual customer support, proactive port security, reduced mileage and wear and tear on equipment and direct interchanges with the CSX, Norfolk Southern, Canadian National and Kansas City Southern railroads, the Alabama & Gulf Coast Railway and Terminal Railway Alabama State Docks and their Mexican counterparts. 

CN NORTH AMERICA

Canadian National is based in Montreal, Quebec, and the Class I freight railway’s network is the largest in that country by physical size and revenue. Established in 1919 and formerly government-owned, Canada’s only transcontinental railway spans from the Atlantic coast in Nova Scotia to the Pacific coast in British Columbia, across about 20,400 route miles of track. But you’d be mistaken to think CN, as it has more commonly known since 1960, is strictly a Great White North concern. The railway also serves the U.S. South and Midwest and, having gone private in 1995, it now counts as its single largest shareholder Bill Gates. Through the ’90s and 2000s, CN North America has acquired multiple lines passing through several U.S. states.

CROWLEY

The private, Jacksonville, Florida-based corporation is the largest operator of tugboats and barges in the world. Crowley American Transport provides ocean liner cargo services between the U.S., Canada, Mexico, South America and the Caribbean. Its American Marine Transport unit delivers local, over-the-road, and commercial trucking services in the continental U.S. Crowley Marine Services provides worldwide contract and specialized marine transportation services, including petroleum product transportation and sales, tanker escort and ship assist, contract barge transportation and ocean towing, logistics and support services, marine salvage and emergency response services, spill-response services on the West Coast and all-terrain transportation services.

CSX TRANSPORTATION

The subsidiary of CSX Corp., a Fortune 500 company headquartered in Jacksonville, Florida, CSX Transportation is a Class I freight railroad operating in the eastern United States and the Canadian provinces of Ontario and Quebec. The railroad operates around 21,000 route miles of track. While its lines blanket the east coasts of Canada and the U.S., you don’t have to be located on railroad track for CSX to help you, as it has access to 70 ports and nationwide transloading and warehousing services.

DB SCHENKER 

The global logistics and supply chain management giant has 93 branches in every U.S. state, Mexico and Canada. Schenker of Canada Ltd. provides logistics services, airfreight, custom brokerage, custom consulting, sports events, land transport and courier services. DB Schenker Mexico celebrated its 40th anniversary in 2017, having begun down there with a single location and 40 associates and now boasting of 500 employees in its corporate office in Mexico City as well as in Guadalajara, Monterrey, Queretaro, Puebla, Cancun, Ciudad Juarez and various other branches. DB Schenker Mexico offers air freight, ocean freight, land freight, customs brokerage, over-dimensioned projects, warehousing and contract logistics.

KANSAS CITY SOUTHERN

The KCS North American rail holdings and strategic alliances are primary components of a NAFTA railway system linking the commercial and industrial centers of the U.S., Mexico and Canada. “KCS is just one interchange away from every major market in North America,” boasts the railroad. KC Southern de Mexico offers unique rail access to the Port of Lazaro Cardenas on Mexico’s Pacific coast, which is an ideal spot to avoid congestion in U.S. West Coast ports. KCS also has access to Gulf of Mexico ports, including Altamira, Tampico and Veracruz in Mexico and Brownsville, New Orleans, Corpus Christi, Houston, Gulfport, Lake Charles, Mobile and Port Arthur in the U.S. 

LIVINGSTON INTERNATIONAL

Billed as North America’s No. 1 company focused on customs brokerage and compliance, Livingston International also offers international trade consulting and freight forwarding across the continent and around the globe. Headquartered in Chicago, Livingston operates along the U.S.-Canada border, with regional air/sea hubs in Los Angeles, New York and Norfolk. Livingston employs more than 3,200 employees at more than 125 key border points, seaports, airports and other strategic locations in North America, Europe and the Far East. Livingston is a customs brokerage leader in Canada, and the company also promises to move goods seamlessly into Mexico.

LOGISTICS PLUS

Whether it is working as a 3PL or 4PL partner, the Erie, Pennsylvania-based company specializes in total logistics management, LTL and truckload transportation, rail and intermodal services, project cargo and project management, import/export services, air and ocean freight forwarding, warehousing and distribution, global trade compliance services and logistics and technology solutions. Logistics Plus serves small and large businesses throughout the Greater Toronto Area, with an office in the zone that has access to the Port of Toronto and expertise in shipping in and out of Canada though the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario. Bilingual logistics experts help customers with intra-Mexico, cross-border, or international shipping using air, ocean, ground or rail transportation. 

LYNDEN

Seattle-based Lynden not only delivers to, from and within Canada, the company does business there. Its long-established Canadian presence allows it to provide complete coverage for any transportation need. They can help with warehousing and distribution or 3PL in Canada, where Lynden boasts of knowing “the ins and outs of customs brokerage, duties and taxes, imports and exports.” From its offices in Edmonton and Calgary, Alberta, and Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, Lynden offers scheduled less-than-truckload (LTL) and truckload (TL) service to points in Alaska and the Lower 48.

LYNNCO

The Tulsa, Oklahoma-based company optimizes customers’ supply chains coast-to-coast in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. LynnCo manages businesses and determines how and when ground, international air/ocean, spot/capacity, procurement and expedited services are the best options. For instance, LynnCo helped a U.S. manufacturer determine if shifting units to Mexico was profitable. The answer was no after factoring in the risks of moving, poor facilities, added shipping costs and product quality. 

POLARIS TRANSPORTATION GROUP

Billing itself as “an American company headquartered in Toronto,” Polaris has a quarter century of experience in scheduled LTL service between the U.S. and Canada. The company knows both countries’ customs rules and participates in every border security program, including C-TPAT, PIP (Partners in Protection), CSA (Customs Self- Assessment) and FAST (Free and Secure Trade). The company’s scheduled service connects Ontario and Quebec markets with the U.S. through a combination of its fleet and facilities along with those of its long-established partner carriers.

PUROLATOR INTERNATIONAL

The U.S. subsidiary of Canada’s leading provider of integrated freight and parcel delivery services, Jericho, New York-based Purolator International seamlessly transports shipments between the U.S. and Canada and manages the respective countries’ customs processes with aplomb. They pick up/drop off at every point in the U.S. and boast of a distribution network that extends to every Canadian province and territory. What truly takes Purolator International over the top is a commitment to continue improving, as evidenced by a recent $1 billion growth investment that includes two new hubs that will allow for faster fulfillment for both courier and e-commerce shipments from the U.S. throughout Canada, where consumers also will be seeing more access points, including upgraded retail pickup locations.

R+L GLOBAL

“Shipping to Mexico is facil,” according to Ocala, Florida-based R+L Global Logistics. Its qualified network of premium carriers in Mexico provide secure door-to-door Less than Truckload (LTL) and Full Truckload (FTL) services. They cover the entire Mexican territory and move cargo across all major U.S./Mexico border gateways. They also move intra-Mexico shipments. 

SCHNEIDER

The Green Bay, Wisconsin-based giant specializes in regional trucking, long-haul, bulk, intermodal, supply chain management, brokerage, warehousing, port logistics and transloading. Decades of cross-border freight experience means customer cargo moves without question or delay. Once goods move across the border, Schneider has the assets and personnel in place to deliver it safely and securely. “Here’s the simple fact: No one makes shipping to Canada and Mexico easier or more efficient than Schneider,” the company boasts. “By road or by rail, your freight is in the best hands possible.”

SENKO 

The Japanese logistics giant has offices in the U.S., where their own trucks and warehouses work with a network of vendors. The 3PL/4PL supply chain solutions provider uses its own IT technology developed in Japan to help arrange liquid tank transportation, flatbed, drayage, refrigerated, dry, expedited shipping and freight broker services. Senko Logistics Mexico is the company unit south of the border.

SUNSET TRANSPORTATION

The St. Louis-based company has offices and agents across the country, and customers whose shipments are moved around the globe. Sunset arranges freight for a wide range of industries, from wholesale food distribution to specialized construction equipment. “Cross-border solutions” include customs clearance for land, rail, air and ocean, LTL, TL, intermodal, rail, air, expedited and specialized freight, contracted lane and spot market, C-TPAT compliance, multimodal programs, a Laredo, Texas, warehouse and distribution facility and 24/7 bilingual, bicultural support.

SURGERE 

Headquartered in North Canton, Ohio, Surgere is a leader in linking OEMs, tier suppliers and logistics providers through an automotive data system that provides visibility on returnable containers at every stage of their movement between supplier and vehicle maker. The supply chain innovators, whose clients include Nissan and CEVA Logistics, recently opened Technologias Avanzadas Surgere de Mexico in Aguascalientes, Mexico, which has more than 1,300 suppliers and automotive plants within 200 kilometers of the location. “Central Mexico is the automotive hub for Latin America—making it a natural progression—and a welcomed challenge for us,” explained David Hampton, Surgere’s vice president for International Operations, in announcing the move. Surgere hopes to have the Mexico office fully staffed before the end of this year.

TQL

Cincinnati, Ohio-based Total Quality Logistics (TQL) was founded in 1997 and is now the second-largest freight brokerage firm in the nation, with more than 5,500 employees in 57 offices across the county. Known for combining industry-leading technology and unmatched customer service, TQL boasts of providing competitive pricing, continuous communication and “a commitment to do it right every time.” They move more than 1.6 million loads across the U.S., Canada and Mexico annually through a broad portfolio of logistics services and a network of more than 75,000 carriers.

USA TRUCK

The Van Buren, Arkansas-based company provides customized truckload, dedicated contract carriage, intermodal and third-party logistics freight management services throughout North America. USA Truck has nearly two decades of experience servicing Mexico, which has allowed the company to expand its presence south of the border and partner with many Mexican carriers. USA Truck’s Capacity Solutions coordinates transportation into and out of Mexico with a vast carrier network, and they service most major Mexican markets and consistently maintain C-TPAT certification. USA Truck also has a select fleet of third-party carriers providing service into the provinces of Ontario and Quebec, Canada.

UTXL

Launched in 1997 by four founders with more than 100 years of combined asset-based trucking experience, UTXL started with this goal: to be the safest, most reliable and cost effective niche capacity resource to customers in support of their core carrier programs. UTXL has served thousands of shippers across the U.S., Canada and Mexico, including some of the largest shippers in the world. One of their mottos is: “Any point in the U.S., Canada or Mexico … any length of haul.”

WERNER ENTERPRISES

“We keep America moving” is the motto of this Omaha, Nebraska-based company that has one of the largest transportation services to and from Mexico and is a premiere long-haul carrier to and from Canada and throughout North America. Werner has offices in Mexico and Canada as well as experienced and knowledgeable staff engineer solutions. PAR documentation allows for quicker access through customs into Canada, and their network of alliance carriers can manage entire supply chains within Canada and Mexico regardless of equipment needs.

WW SOLUTIONS

The unit of Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics participates in Mexico’s automotive industry not only as a carrier and logistics provider. WW Solutions specializes in processing solutions at ports and at OEM plants, providing services that include pre-delivery inspections, accessory fittings, repairs, storage, washing, vehicle preparation, quality control, inventory management and the procurement of technical services.

YRC FREIGHT

Yellow Transportation (founded in 1924 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma) merged with Roadway (founded in 1930 in Akron, Ohio) to create YRC Freight, which is the largest subsidiary of YRC Worldwide Inc. based in Overland Park, Kansas. A leading transporter of industrial, commercial and retail goods, YRC Freight offers solutions for businesses across North America and is the only carrier with on-site, bilingual representatives at border crossing points in Mexico to expedite customs clearance.

Shipping

Five Important Ways to Negotiate Better Shipping Terms

The final price of your product or service depends on a wide range of factors. Shrewd people in business know there is more to making profits than keeping your buying price low and selling price high. Additional business expenses can reduce your final margin. These include shipping, marketing, storage, and a range of legal expenses.

Negotiating a low price from your manufacturers is just the beginning. Supply chain negotiation training seminars can teach you several ways to gain value before your products reach your customers.

The shipping industry can offer you notable savings opportunities. To identify these, you have to have a keen eye. In this article, we look at five ways you can apply negotiation training skills to obtain better shipping rates.

Understand the Shipping Terms

Global trade has thrived on the back of shipping and logistics companies for hundreds of years. As a result, the shipping industry has developed a unique culture and language. Whether you are dealing with local or multinational shipping companies, there is a range of terms that you should know.

Terms such as CIF (Cost, Insurance, and Freight) and FOB (Free on Board) are used freely in the shipping industry. If you are new to the business, you can learn shipping terms by attending a seminar on the essentials. If you don’t understand the industry’s regular terms, you risk making a deal that can be negative for your business. 

Negotiation training seminars can teach you how to prepare before sitting down to make a deal. You can improve your position by researching the industry before meeting companies. Also, you can carry out mock discussions with shipping company agents. This can give you a feel of the language and questions that may come up during a real negotiation.

Research Possible Hidden Costs

One of the things that can diminish your profits is hidden logistics costs. The final price for your products should factor in all the costs you expect to incur before delivery. Talking to the different authorities that can come into contact with your products in transit can clarify your overall costs. Knowing the factors affecting your shipping rates can help you negotiate to reduce hidden costs.

By working closely with your shipping company, you can identify smart ways to cut down your costs. Many companies have different shipping rates based on weight as well as box dimensions. If you use the standard boxes the shipping company provides, you can save a few dollars on each load.

Develop Your Negotiation Strategy

Once you have understood the market and options available, negotiation training can help you plan your strategy. Writing down your strategy and goals can give you an overview of the entire process. The points listed below are some of the elements taught in negotiations seminars that can help to strengthen your strategy.

Budget

Based on your business model, you should have a price you are not willing to go above. Your strategy should include the ideal and maximum price you are willing to offer for the shipping service.

BATNA

A BATNA is your Best Alternative to a Negotiated Agreement. It refers to a set of alternative options you can take if you cannot reach a viable deal in your negotiations. A well-planned BATNA can help you to recognize a bad deal and give you the confidence to walk away.

Timelines

Time constraints can have a significant impact on your negotiations strategy. The earlier you start discussions with shipping companies, the less pressure you will have to close a deal. Beginning your negotiations early can give you more time to reach a mutually beneficial agreement.

The Urgency of Delivery

Your strategy should state how fast you need the products to be delivered once ordered. Same day deliveries often cost more than two or three days of delivery. The delivery time constraints depend on the nature of your products and promises made to your customers.

Payment Terms

Although one-off payment offers come with attractive discounts, they can also be quite risky. Making payments in installments is safer and keeps the shipping company committed until the final payment. Offer well-balanced payment terms that enable your shipping company to deliver your products on time while limiting your financial risk.

Concessions

Well-trained negotiators plan the concessions they are willing to give before discussions begin. In your research, find concessions that can create value for the shipping company and present them in your meeting. The negotiation process can become very challenging if you are too rigid.

Use Third Party Logistics Providers (3PL)

According to the World Shipping Council, the intermodal shipping network plays a significant role in the cost and rate of service delivery. An intermodal network is made up of ships, airplanes, trucks, and trains. The connection points where cargo is transferred between modes of transport are also part of the network. Many companies depend on intermodal networks for the inland dispersal of cargo from harbors and airports.

Third Party Logistics Providers (3PL) provide a useful service by shipping your cargo via their own intermodal networks. A trusted 3PL provider can save you time and money while allowing you to focus on your core business.

3PLs allow you to negotiate with one service provider who can manage all the regulatory and intermodal networking issues you may face. Further, your 3PL can help you connect and share shipping costs with other dealers in your vicinity.

Negotiate with Other Shipping Companies

Before signing off on a deal, make sure you have exhausted your other options. If you only deal with one shipping company, you may miss a better option. In a comprehensive negotiation seminar, you can learn how to leverage competitive bids to secure better deals.

Additionally, training to negotiate with multiple companies feeds into your research. It teaches you more about the existing challenges in the shipping industry. The knowledge you acquire can help you create value as you deal with the shipping companies.

Round-Up

The shipping industry presents smart people in business with a wide array of chances to negotiate better deals. The techniques in this article are not exhaustive. However, they can set you on the right track and feed into your strategy.

Negotiation training seminars are designed to maximize your potential and spur you into action. However, there is no strict rule book that is applicable in every case. As you grow in business, you can develop your own strategies based on your training and personal preferences.

global

GLOBAL FORWARDING: BIGGEST, FASTEST SAVINGS FOR GLOBAL SUPPLY CHAINS

Increasingly complex omnichannel business models are resulting
in correspondingly complicated global supply chains. Maximizing
efficiencies for time and cost in moving freight around the world
is mission critical. This paper takes a high-level look at three
opportunities for optimization: cargo consolidation, cargo risk
management, and customs management.

The multichannel retail business model, along with increasing levels of global sourcing, have created staggering opportunities for importers and exporters around the world, whether huge multinationals or small companies shipping globally for the first time.

Global supply chains are becoming longer and more fragmented,
presenting significant new issues for logistics professionals. In one
survey, 104 global supply chain executives reported that visibility
(21.1%), fluctuating consumer demand (19.1%), and inventory
management (13.2%) were their biggest challenges (1).

Many factors add complexity to global supply chains, including longer lead times and lead-time variability and an increasing number of suppliers, partners, carriers, customers, countries, and logistics channels. Contrary to what you might think, global freight forwarding can offer relief for these concerns and when people, processes, and technology are leveraged, can even offer competitive advantages.

10 Approaches to Savings in the Global
Forwarding Supply Chain

EASY

1. Align shipping activities to leverage benefits of consolidation
services.

2. Minimize financial impact of cargo loss and damage by
purchasing marine cargo insurance.

3. Take advantage of transportation providers’ TMS to create
visibility and take control of the supply chain.

MODERATE

4. Develop strategies to match service modes with inventory
planning and sales forecasting.

5. Create a risk management strategy—identify and understand
risk types, probabilities, and potential costs.

6. Integrate with a single transportation provider’s TMS and
connect with suppliers and carriers globally.

DIFFICULT

7. Effectively use Incoterms® when negotiating with suppliers to
impact unit price, cash flow, inventory levels, and logistics costs.8. Actively engage with a customs professional to deploy best
practices in customs management.

9. Leverage transportation provider’s business intelligence
reporting and analytics to improve supply chain performance.

10. Utilize PO management to control the purchase order lifecycle;
go upstream to supplier order fulfillment logistics activities.

CARGO CONSOLIDATION

What it is
Few companies can fill an entire ocean or air container with their
own freight. Both ocean and air carriers require shippers to work
with freight consolidation services to accommodate small volume
shipping needs. These freight consolidators accept complementary
freight from multiple shippers, and consolidate freight all kinds
(FAK) containers for ocean shipping or unit load devices (ULD) for
air. This results in better freight rates and cargo security measures.

Why it’s important
One of the biggest areas for savings in a global supply chain is
taking advantage of space. Companies of any size can use freight
consolidation services, but it’s particularly useful if you have a lean
supply chain or operate in a just in time environment. Using logistics
efficiencies from freight forwarders, consolidators, and third party
logistics providers (3PLs), you can choose to move smaller quantities
of material more frequently. In doing so, you make a strategic
decision to spend more on consolidation shipping services and less
on inventory, storage, returns, and other costs.

Ocean versus air
Whether air or ocean consolidation is the right choice for you
depends on the required service level and transit time. Globally,
ocean is the less expensive transportation method. That cost
advantage must be carefully weighed against longer transit times, as
well as potential delays caused by adverse weather conditions, port
strikes, or other issues.

In addition, there are faster and slower ocean options. Some ocean
freight goes directly to the port of call. Other shipments can stop at
multiple ports of call, which is less expensive, but takes longer and
is more prone to unexpected disruption. Working with a reputable
freight forwarder can help reduce unexpected supply chain failures
and delays, and provide options if disruptions occur.

Air freight consolidation service is a faster, more expensive option
than ocean, but here, too, there are faster and slower options that
determine the cost. For example, if you don’t need direct service
(next flight out), choose a slower transit time at more favorable
pricing.

Best Practices for Cargo Consolidation

Choose a forwarder with:

-Sufficient freight volumes to effectively consolidate without delays and to aggressively negotiate rates with ocean and air carriers.

-Dedicated space allocations for capabilities when they are needed.

– Work in major markets with high flight capacity.

Generally, in any type of transportation, the more time there is between pickup and delivery, the less you pay. In air, for instance, use providers with gateways (vs. a hub and spoke approach)
to get cost-efficient options that meet your deadlines. Use consolidation schedules if you can for more savings.

CARGO RISK MANAGEMENT

What it is
Global shipments are exposed to risk from a wide range of human
and natural forces. Yet, global shipments are subject to a unique set
of international laws and/or treaties that limit the liability of carriers. Whether you import or export, you should understand the various types of risks that cargo could face and how you can help protect the value of the goods shipped globally.

Why it’s important
Even with proper packing, stowage, and securing of containers on
a container ship, severe weather and rough seas can cause rare but
catastrophic events like ship groundings, structural failures, even
collisions, any of which can result in loss of cargo. On average, the
World Shipping Council estimates that there were 1,582 containers
lost at sea per year between 2008 and 2016; 1,012 of these
containers (64 percent) were lost due to a catastrophic event.2 Theft, counterfeiting, hurricanes, floods, political unrest, labor disputes, documentation errors, or mechanical problems can also delay or ruin delivery of the most perfectly planned global shipment. Protecting the value of products while they are in transit across the globe can have a significant impact in protecting the bottom line.

Air and Ocean Carrier Liability

When events occur, companies are often dismayed to find that not
all risks or damages are covered by carrier liability.

Air carriers are not liable if damage was caused by:
-An inherent defect, quality, or vice of the cargo
-Defective or insufficient packing of the cargo
-An act of war or armed conflict
-An act of a public authority carried out in connection with the
entry, exit, or transit of the cargo

Even if an air carrier is held legally liable for damages, they pay the
value of the goods or 19 SDRs3 per kilogram, whichever is less.
If a ship experiences an extraordinary sacrifice or expenditure at sea,ship owners may declare general average. The concept of general average hearkens back to the days when a crew tossed cargo overboard to lighten the ship in a storm. During the emergency, there wasn’t time to figure out whose cargo should be jettisoned. After the fact, to avoid quarreling, merchants whose cargo landed safely would be called upon to contribute a share or percentage to the merchants whose goods were tossed overboard to avoid imminent peril. Today, general average declarations still mean that all the merchants with freight on the vessel are required to share in the cost of the expenditure before the goods are released.

General average is a growing risk and concern for many risk
managers and insurance experts. In recent times, there has been a
rise in the frequency and severity of extreme weather events that
have led many vessels to become grounded, causing container loss
and/or vessel damage. In addition, fires on container vessels are
more common now than in the past.

Today, when these events occur and general average is declared:

1. Ship owners have a lien on the ship’s cargo. At the time
the voyage is completed, the level of sacrificial losses will not
normally be known. Ship owners will usually call for security
from cargo interests, against which the assessed contributions
can be enforced. The amount of the claim is usually calculated
by average adjusters, appointed by ship owners. Each cargo
owner’s contribution is calculated on a percentage of the cargo
owner’s interest or commercial invoice value, ranging from
1 to 100 percent.

Ship owners have a lien on the cargo until each cargo owner’s
contribution or security is satisfied. Unless a shipment is secured
with all-risk marine cargo insurance, the cargo owner will be
required to post their contribution or security in cash before
their cargo will be released. As the frequency of general average
declarations has increased, so has the amount of the required
securities—from about 12% a year ago to about 50% today.

2. Ocean carriers are not automatically liable for loss or
damage to your cargo. The U.S. accepted the Hague Rules in
1936 through the passage of the Carriage of Goods by Sea Act
(COGSA). The rules expressly remove the ocean carrier’s liability
for loss or damage to cargo that arises from one of the 17 stated
liability exclusions. Legal liability claims are often met with
resistance by carriers.

Even if the ocean carrier is found liable at the end of a legal
process that can take months to settle, their limit of liability
under COGSA is $500 per package or customary shipping
unit, or the actual value of the goods, whichever is less. In other
words, the onus is on you to assess and minimize your
risk exposure.

Best Practices for Cargo Risk Management

-Buy the appropriate amount of marine cargo insurance for ocean or air shipments.

-Ensure the valuation clause for a given shipment defines the maximum amount an insurance company will pay for a loss. Most valuation clauses include the commercial invoice value and any prepaid charges associated with the shipment, such as freight, customs clearance, or duty. This clause can be modified to include other charges or profit margin—if requested and approved by underwriters.

-Choose an insurance intermediary with experience or specific training in international logistics and transportation insurance.

Calculating Costs to Determine Risk Exposure

The risk of lost cargo is real. Yet, without a crisis to motivate
action, most companies place risk management at the bottom of
the priority scale. The most common method used to protect the
value of goods from physical damage, theft, or other calamity is the
purchase of marine cargo insurance.

The first step you can take is to understand your risk exposure
by tying dollar values to varying types of risk. The challenge is
quantifying the potential cost. You can brainstorm to gather that
information, or can work with a logistics provider that has in-house
risk management professionals to help uncover potential liabilities
in the supply chain.

You can apply subjective probability to calculate possible losses. In
other words, you can estimate the chances of a risk event happening
and multiply it by the cost if it did happen (see below). Once the
dollar amount is calculated, the next step is to reduce the expected
loss by reducing the probability of the occurrence, or the cost of the
occurrence.

Armed with subjective probability estimates, you can effectively
buy the appropriate amount of insurance. While insurance is readily
available, it is your responsibility or the consignee’s to ensure the
coverage purchased best fits the unique exposure.

CUSTOMS MANAGEMENT

What it is
Most companies choose their customs broker for the long term.
That’s because the customs broker must truly understand your
company and products. They must also know how to navigate each
country’s compliance requirements with their own specific set of
customs rules, governmental regulations, VAT, duty rate calculations, and payment plans.

Why it’s important
Even simple trade-related mistakes, such as an incorrect spelling on
a declaration, can result in fines, penalties, or even cargo seizure.
Penalties for transgressions can be severe, depending on the
seriousness of the infraction.

For example, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) imposes
fines of up to $10,000 per entry for recordkeeping infractions.
Non-financial costs, such a shipment delays, the diversion of staff
resources to correct problems, and in rare instances, the loss of
trade privileges, can be detrimental to an importer’s business.
When you work with Trusted Advisor® experts in customs, you can
learn where the most common mistakes occur and implement best
practices to avoid them. In addition, CBP can conduct a customs
focused assessment—essentially, an audit—with any U.S. importer. A
customs expert can help your company prepare before, during, and
after a focused assessment to minimize risk exposure.

Compliance programs and options that are worth investigating
Not every compliance option will fit or resonate with every business.
Discuss specific issues with an attorney or Trusted Advisor® expert
in customs compliance and learn which elements might be the most
useful. Always seek out an expert opinion.

-Customs bond sufficiency. If you import into the U.S., you must
have a customs bond, generally 10% of the duties and taxes
you expect to pay to CBP for import transactions throughout
the year. CBP can shut down all imports if they discover you
have an insufficient customs bond. Since tariffs (and duties)
are increasing substantially, existing bonds may no longer
be sufficient. Bond insufficiency will lead to additional costs
and delays if not monitored or addressed in a timely manner.

Consider the increased duty amounts well before the bond
renewal period comes up. If the customs bond will need to be
significantly higher, the surety company may require additional
documentation—including financial statements and possibly
letters of credit—before they issue a new customs bond, all of
which will take time to get into place.

-Duty drawback programs. Duty drawback programs refund
99% of certain import duties, taxes, and fees for goods that are
subsequently exported; this supports both U.S. manufacturing
and foreign export sales. Before 2018, duties might only have
been in the 1% to 2% range, and since there is paperwork to file
to get the refund, many companies did not bother with it. Today,
those 1.2% duties have jumped up to 25% in some instances,
making duty drawback programs a potential game-changer for
your business. The downside: duties must be paid up front; your
company may wait for 1 to 2 years to receive the refund under
the current drawback environment, which can become a cash
flow issue for some companies.

-Foreign trade zones (FTZs). Foreign Trade Zones (FTZ) are
secure areas located in or near CBP ports of entry, and are under
CBP supervision. Unlike duty drawback programs, companies
don’t have to pay duties when goods enter an FTZ. Instead, FTZs
enable duty deferment; the duties are paid when the goods
enter CBP territory for domestic consumption. At that point, the
importer pays the duties at the rate of either the original foreign
materials or the finished product.

-Exclusion requests. If a company thinks their product should
be excluded from Section 232 and Section 301 tariffs, they can
request an exclusion. When filing an exclusion, make certain that
the classification used is the best classification for the product.
Also, work with a trade attorney; they can help you navigate
the law and apply it to a specific product so the exclusion isn’t
rejected on a technicality.

-Changing sourcing locations. It’s not always easy to change
suppliers, but some companies are looking at it in a new era of
tariffs. Yet, suppliers for some materials are only found in China,
and even if you locate a source in another country, there can be
issues. Can they supply at the necessary level? How long will it
take to test the new supplier against specifications? The more complicated the product, the more challenging a switch will be.
Also, keep in mind that if the cargo ships from Singapore but its
origin is China, U.S. tariffs may still apply.

-Incoterms®. Incoterms®, or International Commercial Terms,
are published by the International Chamber of Commerce.
They are the rules that define the responsibilities of sellers and
buyers for the delivery of goods under sales contracts, and
they establish where the transfer of risk takes place. However,
they vary from situation to situation. For example, if a container
being moved across the ocean from Shanghai to the United
States falls overboard, who is at risk? The Incoterms® tell the
story. If the U.S. buyer purchased the product FOB (free on
board), the importer took responsibility for the risk as soon as
the freight was loaded on the vessel in Shanghai. If the same
product was purchased DDP (delivered duty paid), the shipper
would be responsible until the product reached the purchaser’s
door in the United States. You can save money if you ensure
your purchasing team understands how Incoterms® rules will be
applied to freight.

Best practices in Customs Management

-Buyers are not transportation and compliance professionals who understand Incoterms®—they choose suppliers based on favorable pricing. You can establish internal structures or education to help buyers understand how Incoterms® impact risk management and pricing.

-Rely on a customs professional to leverage U.S. Customs data. They can combine a company’s unwieldy historical shipping data into usable trade reports to reveal whether an organization is taking proper advantage of free trade agreements around the world.

GLOBAL TECHNOLOGY CAN TIE IT ALL TOGETHER

As companies large and small continue to expand internationally,
they can no longer afford to single-handedly manage the countless
details and nuances of global freight forwarding. Shortened lead
times, the use of multiple transportation modes and carriers to
deliver product efficiently across continents, and an environment
fraught with risk requires both worldwide and regional management
of cargo flows.

Many companies rely on a transportation management system
(TMS), hoping to keep their fingers on the pulse of their global
supply chain providers. However, TMS products were developed
initially to track domestic or regional truck shipments and to
automate tedious, low-value processes performed by an enterprise’s
transportation staff. Today, few TMSs can enable global visibility to
every shipment, or can interconnect disparate systems on multiple
continents to provide the level of visibility to show where products
are at any given point in time.

A truly global supply chain network has a single TMS architecture
that spans all continents. Global visibility enables your organization
to clearly see the entire supply chain. Utilization reports for multiple
services and modes (air, ocean, rail, and road) on all continents
confers specific strategic advantages:

-Continuous improvement to supply chain logistics in real time

-Access to business intelligence, crossing all freight and spend.categories to strategically understand the impact of decisions

-Access to a centralized network of multiple providers–without
integrating individually with each provider

Work with a logistics provider that offers a full suite of services,
manages service performance, consistently communicates
performance metrics, and offers strategic optimization to gain
distinct advantages in the marketplace.

A case in point: purchase order management

-Purchase order management (POM) within a TMS delivers end to end visibility throughout the purchase order (PO) life cycle. POM enables you or your provider to manage shipment windows, work
with overseas vendors to coordinate bookings, manage exceptions,
collect and distribute documents, and provide reporting at the shipment and PO/line item level.

-POM options include PO tracking and visibility, reporting, online booking, document management, check and verification process, vendor self-service, vendor management, exception management,
and PO and shipment analytics.

5 Questions to Ask a Potential Global Freight Forwarder

IS YOUR TMS TRULY GLOBAL? There should be one system architecture that works across regions and covers all types of transportation.

CAN YOU PROVIDE CAPACITY OPTIONS?
They should ship goods by ocean, air, rail, and truck,
choosing the option that best aligns with the business
need. Ask about their consolidation programs to
optimize spend, routings, and transit time performance.

DO YOU HAVE “BOOTS ON THE GROUND” IN KEY
GEOGRAPHIC REGIONS?
Your global freight forwarder should think globally, act locally.
That is, they should know global transportation, but also
have deep knowledge of the local population, infrastructure,
languages, politics, economy, customs, currencies, tax laws,
and tariffs for each country your shipping routes touch.

CAN YOU HELP ASSESS CARGO RISK?
They must adequately help you assess and mitigate cargo
risk to help protect your bottom line.

DO YOU OFFER CUSTOMS ADVICE?
They should be experts in leveraging customs information
and programs to your company’s advantage.

 

_________________________________________________

1. “What is the biggest challenge you are facing in your supply
chain?” eft Supply Chain & Logistics Business Intelligence,
April 2018. Accessed at https://www.statista.com/
statistics/829634/biggest-challenges-supply-chain/.

2. “Containers Lost at Sea-2017 Update,” World Shipping
Council, 2017.

3. SDRs, or Special Drawing Rights, refers to a basket
of currencies designed to iron out currency exchange
fluctuations in International valuations, now used to express
the limitation under the Hague-Visby Rules and the MSA
Limitation Convention.

4. “Global Trade, Trade Statistics,” World Shipping Council,
2018. Accessed at http://www.worldshipping.org/about-theindustry/global-trade.

5. “Containers Lost at Sea-2017 Update,” World Shipping
Council, 2017.

6. Larry Kivett and Mark Pearson, “Understanding risk
management in the supply chain: Using supply chain data
analytics to drive performance,” Deloitte, 2018.

logistics strategy

10 Experts Share Tips on How to Develop a Winning Logistics Strategy

Effective transition of resources cuts production costs, which in turn gives you more maneuvering space to improve other aspects of your business. However, choosing the optimal strategy is demanding, especially for startups. Less experienced business owners can easily fall into a trap and focus their attention on expensive solutions that never show results and live to see their business crumble.

Therefore, we’ve decided to share some of the most constructive pieces of advice from people who mastered logistics strategy development.

Shawn Casemore

Founder and the president of Casemore & Co, Inc. wrote a book on operational management, focusing mainly on sales but most of his ideas are universally applicable. Shawn states that the distribution network holds significant savings potential if properly handled. Leveraging predicted sales volume to negotiate a lower price is one of the key components in logistics. 

Providing long-term cooperation to a courier service often leads to reduced freight costs, meaning more money stays in your pocket. It’s the same as it’s with professional writing services, the more work you need the better terms you get in return. 

Danny Yunes

Coyote Logistics’ Manager of Supply Chain Strategy is a veteran in the industry, with an immense experience that provided him with an important takeaway. Danny Yunes claims that logistics should be calibrated according to the needs of your customers. If your core consumers expect quality service rather than speed because their priority is to receive undamaged goods and according to specifications, your target strategy is clear.

Samuel Levin

SaaS transport management and outsourcing are what MavenWire‘s Managing Director has to say to startups that can’t afford substantial investments in logistics during the first few years. He argues that these options are affordable and easy to keep up with, allowing less experienced managers to stay on top of the process.

Steve Murray

Experienced Chief Researcher at Chain Supply Visions claims that implementation of Sales and Operation planning is the most effective way to build up the performance of each company department to its full potential. This strategy includes cooperation among departments, synchronization of each operational process to reduce loses, avoid penalties, keep data updated, and keeping this harmony in place through constant process auditing and dealing with every issue as a team.

Imagine running an assignment service and your writers sit idle because the orders are not coming through. The whole team should work on finding the solution that will allow seamless workflow and keep the customers happy with the turnaround time. 

Nick Martin

Founder of RiskLogic says that logistics strategy should be resilient. His thoughts are that Just-in-Time strategy seems perfect in the short run but it is fragile because minor setbacks can put your entire operation to a halt. A resilient strategy is one where you are prepared for every eventuality and there’s not much that can disrupt your flow.

Rick Blasgen

Council of Supply Chain Management President and CEO, Rick Blasgen, keeps it simple. His advice is to hire a logistics expert with a proven track record and let that person analyze your options and start working on your strategy. You could start your hunt on LinkedIn and carefully pick top candidates. You could also visit professional conferences for potential hires. Think of it like googling to decide would you hire AssignmentMasters, Assignment Geek, or Grademiners review service to develop marketing content for you.

Clay Gentry

Transportation Insight’s VP of Logistic Operations says that one should develop a strategy according to its impact on your business goals and customers’ operations. His advice is to focus on fulfilling service level goals while implementing the most cost-effective method of resource distribution. Moreover, Clay suggests that outsourcing is sometimes more effective than investing in the development of logistics infrastructure.

Mark Broussard 

CEO of SAMI emphasizes the importance to keep investments in logistics rational, especially in the early days of conducting business. His idea is to be clear that each action you take makes perfect sense for your business at the time that action is taken. Mr. Broussard thinks that every investment and step forward in the development of your strategy needs to support your entire process. 

Kenneth B. Ackerman

Mr. Ackerman devoted his entire professional life to logistics and warehousing management, eventually founding Warehousing Forum, a vault of industry wisdom. His advice is to follow the corporate strategy. Let’s say you decide to start a business and write custom papers for college students and your goal is to provide the fastest service on the internet to take over the market from bestessays.com.au and myassignmenthelp review because they are your main competitors. From the moment you pick up an order to the moment of delivery, the process efficiency depends on flawless logistics. 

Tim Garcia

As it’s to be expected from one of the leaders in the chain management software development industry, Mr. Garcia suggests you should invest in digital solutions to enhance your logistics. His arguments include commonly understaffed supply-chain which makes people work faster and make more mistakes, ability to keep track of each item and financial leverage against a team of experts that would do the same job for much more money.

Conclusion

Enhancing your logistics doesn’t necessarily mean you should pour money into expensive infrastructure or state of the art management software. In most cases, it’s all about organizing that which you already have to serve your purpose the best. However, working with limited resources makes planning and organizing the chain that binds the production somewhat of a challenge. We hope these words of wisdom will help you in achieving your goals.

____________________________________________________________

This guest post is contributed by Kurt Walker who is a blogger and college paper writer. In the course of his studies, he developed an interest in innovative technology and likes to keep business owners informed about the latest technology to use to transform their operations. He writes for companies such as Edu BirdieXpertWriters and uk.bestessays.com on various academic and business topics.

logistics professionals

5 Tips for Supply Chain & Logistics Professionals

How can supply chain and logistics professionals continue to survive in the business now and in the future?

As technology continues to evolve, the business environment is also changing. To stay in business, supply chain and logistics professionals need to adapt fast, invent, and solve problems in order to survive in today’s competitive business world.

In this article, uk.superiorpapers.com shares five tips to help supply chain and logistics professionals survive in business now and in the days to come.

Let’s get started.

 

Get a Serious Partner

It is said that no man is an island and that no man can stand alone. Similarly, in business, a company that works with a serious logistics partner will have high odds of withstanding lows and taking up opportunities when they arise.

According to Nerdywriters, these days’ customer needs are not easy to predict, and companies need to find a great logistics partner who can offer solutions to customer problems.

Working with a great logistics partner, companies will be able to get guidance when joining new global markets, predict any business dangers before they can hurt the business, and find solutions to problems before they get out of hands.

It is, therefore, important for businesses to find logistics partners who are friendly, guarantee the quality of service, easy to partner with, and can provide extensive solutions to problems.

Be Proactive, Not Reactive

With the competitiveness in the business environment, it’s not enough to take on challenges as they occur. As a supply chain and logistics professional, you need to understand that change must happen before it is triggered.

As you will see in velvetjobs, changes in the logistics have happened and are going to be happening every day even in the future. Therefore, companies need a strong partner who can guarantee sustainability today and in the future no matter what challenges occur.

As James Longman, the author of academized reviews and papers owl reviews puts it, working collaboratively and innovatively can help companies develop new and more efficient approaches to lower costs and add value. In addition, a strong partner will help their clients to stay ready for future changes in the sector.

Create a Strong Relationship with Colleagues outside Your Industry

It doesn’t matter whether you’re in supplier quality, logistics, procurement or whichever field you are; supply chain is aimed at making a product accessible by customers.

For that reason, creating and sustaining a strong personal and professional relationship with colleagues in other sectors such as manufacturing, product development, finance, and engineering will boost the effectiveness of a supply chain team.

Find time to build a close relationship even if it means having short discussions once a week.

Mentor Others

As aussiessay.com puts it no one can master a skill by learning and reading but you can become an expert by teaching others. Identify your exceptional supply chain, knowledge, abilities, and tools you have that can be helpful to others in your team and start mentoring them. 

They say if you want to go fast, go alone if you want to go far, go together. Unless you want to go alone, the best thing to raise your team’s collective performance is to train and encourage them in something you know.

Don’t Stop Reading

Learning never stops, it stops when we die and who knows there could be learning after death but this is something that cannot be established. However, if you want to continue to survive in business today and days to come, you must read and expand your knowledge.

According to best paper writing services when it comes to reading, don’t limit yourself to books only, there are plenty of audio materials out there you can listen to even when on the go. Just make sure you read every day even if just for 10 minutes.

Get Certified

Attaining an industry certification is also a great way to invest in your professional education. Getting certified does not only open you to greater opportunities in the workplace but also helps to drive value to companies.

Besides being industry certified, keep learning. Explore every possible avenue that puts you and your company up for success.

Write down Your Goals and Revisit Them Every time

Supply chain and logistics professionals at Assignment helper, a firm that offers assignment help to students argue that to make sure you are working toward achieving your goals, write them and keep them in a visible place (your desk is the best place to write down your goals so that you can see them every time you are working).

Life is busy and for supply chain professionals, it can’t be better and accomplishing sizable strategic initiatives that aren’t laid down can be tricky.

Set goals for the first 60 to 90 days of the year and revisit them regularly. This way, you will not wander when working on achieving your goals and in the end, you will celebrate the results.

Final Thoughts

There you have it. And the list is not comprehensive. These are just a few of the effective tips for supply chain and logistics professionals. Since the industry is extremely dynamic and evolving fast, every key player needs to stay updated on the latest trends and development.

couscous

EU Couscous Market 2019 – France is the Undisputed Leader in Consumption, Production, and Imports

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Couscous – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the couscous market in the European Union amounted to $538M in 2018, approximately equating the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +2.2% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 with an increase of 13% y-o-y. The level of couscous consumption peaked in 2018 and is likely to see steady growth in the near future.

Consumption By Country in the EU

France (143K tonnes) remains the largest couscous consuming country in the European Union, comprising approx. 43% of total consumption. Moreover, couscous consumption in France exceeded the figures recorded by the region’s second-largest consumer, Germany (53K tonnes), threefold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Italy (25K tonnes), with a 7.5% share.

In France, couscous consumption remained relatively stable over the period from 2007-2018. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: Germany (+7.7% per year) and Italy (+4.1% per year).

In value terms, France ($238M) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the UK ($79M). It was followed by Germany.

In 2018, the highest levels of couscous per capita consumption was registered in France (2,198 kg per 1000 persons), followed by the Netherlands (690 kg per 1000 persons), Belgium (669 kg per 1000 persons) and Germany (640 kg per 1000 persons), while the world average per capita consumption of couscous was estimated at 654 kg per 1000 persons.

In France, couscous per capita consumption remained relatively stable over the period from 2007-2018. The remaining consuming countries recorded the following average annual rates of per capita consumption growth: the Netherlands (+5.7% per year) and Belgium (+5.3% per year).

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in the EU

Driven by increasing demand for couscous in the European Union, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven years. Market performance is forecast to decelerate, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +1.1% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 361K tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in the EU

In 2018, the amount of couscous produced in the European Union stood at 333K tonnes, growing by 3.6% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.8% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2016 with an increase of 8.3% against the previous year. Over the period under review, couscous production attained its peak figure volume in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future.

In value terms, couscous production stood at $509M in 2018 estimated in export prices. The total output value increased at an average annual rate of +1.5% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern remained consistent, with only minor fluctuations in certain years. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2011 with an increase of 9% against the previous year. The level of couscous production peaked in 2018 and is likely to continue its growth in the near future.

Production By Country in the EU

France (140K tonnes) remains the largest couscous producing country in the European Union, accounting for 42% of total production. Moreover, couscous production in France exceeded the figures recorded by the region’s second-largest producer, Italy (67K tonnes), twofold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Germany (46K tonnes), with a 14% share.

In France, couscous production remained relatively stable over the period from 2007-2018. The remaining producing countries recorded the following average annual rates of production growth: Italy (+6.4% per year) and Germany (+6.8% per year).

Exports in the EU

The exports stood at 77K tonnes in 2018, lowering by -8.1% against the previous year. The total exports indicated a remarkable expansion from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +4.0% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2010 with an increase of 18% against the previous year. The volume of exports peaked at 84K tonnes in 2017, and then declined slightly in the following year.

In value terms, couscous exports totaled $107M in 2018. The total export value increased at an average annual rate of +3.7% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2008 with an increase of 29% y-o-y. The level of exports peaked in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Exports by Country

Italy represented the largest exporter of couscous in the European Union, with the volume of exports resulting at 44K tonnes, which was approx. 57% of total exports in 2018. It was distantly followed by France (23K tonnes), making up a 30% share of total exports. The following exporters – Belgium (2.8K tonnes), the UK (1.8K tonnes), the Netherlands (1.5K tonnes) and Germany (1.2K tonnes) – together made up 9.5% of total exports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest couscous markets in the European Union were Italy ($47M), France ($39M) and Belgium ($6.1M), together accounting for 86% of total exports. These countries were followed by the UK, the Netherlands and Germany, which together accounted for a further 9.2%.

In terms of the main exporting countries, the Netherlands experienced the highest growth rate of exports, over the last eleven-year period, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

The couscous export price in the European Union stood at $1,381 per tonne in 2018, surging by 12% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the couscous export price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2008 an increase of 28% against the previous year. In that year, the export prices for couscous reached their peak level of $1,825 per tonne. From 2009 to 2018, the growth in terms of the export prices for couscous failed to regain its momentum.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Germany ($2,524 per tonne), while Italy ($1,058 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, couscous imports in the European Union amounted to 77K tonnes, reducing by -12.7% against the previous year. Overall, couscous imports, however, continue to indicate resilient growth. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 with an increase of 19% against the previous year. Over the period under review, couscous imports attained their maximum at 89K tonnes in 2017, and then declined slightly in the following year.

In value terms, couscous imports stood at $106M in 2018. The total imports indicated a buoyant increase from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +5.9% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, couscous imports increased by +84.0% against 2010 indices. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 with an increase of 27% year-to-year. Over the period under review, couscous imports attained their peak figure at $108M in 2017, and then declined slightly in the following year.

Imports by Country

France was the key importer of couscous in the European Union, with the volume of imports reaching 26K tonnes, which was near 34% of total imports in 2018. It was distantly followed by the UK (11K tonnes), Belgium (8.7K tonnes), Germany (7.8K tonnes), Spain (5.1K tonnes) and the Netherlands (3.5K tonnes), together comprising a 47% share of total imports. The Czech Republic (2.8K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2018, average annual rates of growth with regard to couscous imports into France stood at +2.8%. At the same time, the Czech Republic (+17.9%), Germany (+14.8%), the UK (+8.9%), Spain (+6.6%), Belgium (+5.5%) and the Netherlands (+4.7%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, the Czech Republic emerged as the fastest-growing importer in the European Union, with a CAGR of +17.9% from 2007-2018. While the share of the UK (+8.7 p.p.), France (+8.7 p.p.), Germany (+7.9 p.p.), Belgium (+5 p.p.), Spain (+3.3 p.p.), the Czech Republic (+3 p.p.) and the Netherlands (+1.8 p.p.) increased significantly, the shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, France ($35M) constitutes the largest market for imported couscous in the European Union, comprising 33% of total couscous imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Belgium ($15M), with a 14% share of total imports. It was followed by the UK, with a 12% share.

In France, couscous imports increased at an average annual rate of +5.3% over the period from 2007-2018. The remaining importing countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: Belgium (+6.0% per year) and the UK (+8.7% per year).

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the couscous import price in the European Union amounted to $1,369 per tonne, rising by 13% against the previous year. Over the last eleven years, it increased at an average annual rate of +1.2%. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2008 when the import price increased by 30% y-o-y. In that year, the import prices for couscous reached their peak level of $1,572 per tonne. From 2009 to 2018, the growth in terms of the import prices for couscous remained at a somewhat lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was the Netherlands ($1,837 per tonne), while the Czech Republic ($1,109 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

FedEx

FEDEX, UPS, & AMAZON SCRAMBLING IN THE AIR FOR FAST, FREE SHIPPING

Christmas came in May for Amazon Prime subscribers, who were informed the platform’s tens of millions of items would be available for free same-day delivery and two-day shipping. 

“Prime Free One-Day is possible because we’ve been building our network for over 20 years,” reads a company statement. “This allows Amazon to work smarter based on decades of process improvement and innovation, and to deliver orders faster and more efficiently.” 

Customers reap the benefits as Rakuten Intelligence research shows that over the past two years, the time from purchase to delivery has been slashed from 5.2 days to 4.3 days on average. And yet, Amazon is faster still, at 3.2 days.

Other retailers took the Amazon news like a lump of coal, with Walmart scrambling to unveil free one-day shipping without a membership fee. Target already had such a program for card-carrying loyalty shoppers. FedEx revealed it was parting ways with Amazon for “strategic reasons.”

Meanwhile, industry watchers caution about the hidden baggage that comes with rapidly delivered packages.

Competition is Fierce

Despite the cheery one-day news, Amazon still faces competition from Walmart, which boasts more than 4,700 store locations and an extensive network of warehouses from which it can deliver packages. Another worthy contender is XPO Logistics, which is among the largest third-party logistics providers with 90 facilities across the country. 

During his December earnings call, FedEx CEO and founder Fred Smith said his company views Amazon “as a wonderful company and service and they’re a good customer of ours. We don’t see them as a peer competitor at this point in time.” 

Mere months later, FedEx severed ties with Amazon and partnered with Dollar General on package delivery services, with expectations to offer the service in more than 1,500 stores by late in the summer, building to over 8,000 stores by 2020. 

“We believe this move is an attempt to increase delivery density in lower population areas,” states the Morgan Stanley Research on the move. “… The Dollar General partnership follows a series of headlines including FDX’s AMZN customer loss, move to seven-day ground delivery, and incentive compensation modification ahead of their June 25th fourth quarter earnings release.

So much for not seeing Amazon as competition. FedEx’s annual report, which was released on July 16, mentioned Amazon six times and included this context: “We face intense competition.”

“[I]f customers, such as Amazon.com, further develop or expand internal capabilities for the services we provide, it will reduce our revenue and could negatively impact our financial condition and results of operations,” the FedEx report states. “News regarding such developments or expansions could also negatively impact the price of our common stock.”

And how is this for sounding completely opposite to what Smith had said just seven months prior? “[S]ome high volume package shippers, such as Amazon.com, are developing and implementing in-house delivery capabilities and utilizing independent contractors for deliveries, and may be considered competitors.”

Look! Up in the Sky!!

“Amazon.com is investing significant capital to establish a network of hubs, aircraft and vehicles,” the FedEx annual report notes.

That’s striking when you consider the far fewer times FedEx rival UPS is mentioned in the same report. Keep in mind that UPS currently has 564 cargo jets and thousands of facilities and fulfillment centers around the world, while Amazon has one air hub and options on 100 planes—by 2021, according to a June announcement. 

Ditching Amazon as an air customer led to FedEx slashing prices to fill its planes, according to numerous reports.

As the shipping giants fight for the skies, benefits are being reaped on the ground. Hillwood, developer of the 26,000-acre master-planned AllianceTexas development near Fort Worth, announced in June it has acquired control of 600 acres of additional contiguous land. Strategically located between Fort Worth Alliance Airport and the BNSF Railway Alliance Intermodal Facility, the new Alliance Westport property increases Hillwood’s potential for more manufacturing, large-scale logistics facilities and aviation sites adjacent to the airport’s recently expanded runways.

Alliance Westport is already home to more than 8 million square feet of industrial and aviation development, including key logistics facilities for UPS, FedEx and Amazon Air. When combined with BNSF Railway’s intermodal facility volumes, these three hubs will offer Alliance Westport customers unparalleled access to rail, highway and air shipping options, all within a one-mile radius. The railway and roads have direct routes to Mexico and expedited transit times to the West Coast ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach.

“This is one of the most significant land acquisitions in the history of AllianceTexas,” says Tony Creme, senior vice president of Hillwood. “As Alliance Airport and the BNSF Railway Alliance Intermodal Facility continue to expand and strengthen the foundation for AllianceTexas’ commercial growth, this new property in Alliance Westport will serve as a strategic link between these two pieces of critical logistics infrastructure and offer unparalleled connectivity to our customers.”

 But What About the Planet?

As efforts intensify to move products faster, speedy deliveries are taking a toll on the environment, according to Patrick Browne, director of Global Sustainability at UPS

“The time in transit has a direct relationship to the environmental impact,” Browne told CNN Business on July 15. “I don’t think the average consumer understands the environmental impact of having something tomorrow versus two days from now. The more time you give me, the more efficient I can be.”

A van schlepping goods to e-commerce customer doors does remove from the road the vehicles of those who would otherwise be driving to brick and mortar stores, but a 2012 University of Washington story found that advantage is erased if the delivery route begins far away and items are coming immediately, because the ability to lump orders together is diminished. 

Last-mile services such as Amazon Flex and Walmart’s Spark Delivery often deliver only a few items at once in personal vehicles or small vans. A new option called Amazon Day, which offers discounts and rewards to customers who choose “no-rush shipping,” does allow for the consolidation of orders, however.

Amazon’s competition can take solace in the fact that Amazon was already absorbing added costs for fast deliveries before the Prime one-day announcement, which included news of an additional $800 million investment in logistics infrastructure.

TMS

Signs You’re Ready for a Transportation Management System and What to Look For in Finding the Right One

The transportation management system (TMS) market is growing globally, and for good reason. Common objectives like controlling costs, establishing internal efficiencies and managing capacity restrictions have established the need for technology that provides uninterrupted visibility across the supply chain and helps streamline operations.

In fact, in Gartner’s first Market Guide for Real-Time Visibility Providers, published November 2018, supply chain leaders surveyed for the report ranked visibility as the highest priority in the supply chain.

But it’s not simply a given.

Especially in today’s volatile global trade climate, having a TMS in place can ease the burden on transportation leaders to ensure goods get to their destination on time without crippling costs. The modern supply chain requires the flexibility and scalability provided by transportation management systems.

Knowing when a TMS is right for your business

A growing business means more robust transportation needs. Being equipped to manage the increased volume and complexity is crucial, especially as you onboard new customers, some of which likely have strict retail compliance policies that can result in fines and penalties for not following suit.

Greater complexity in your transportation needs also means the need for greater visibility. If you can’t confidently say you know where all of your shipments are at a given time, it’s time to consider a TMS. Implementing a TMS arms your business with visibility and provides the real-time information needed to also keep customers informed. That access to real time data and insight is not merely a nice to have, as it was in the past. With trade volatility on the rise, the ability to stay informed and to make quick pivots is imperative. Those who can accurately see the whole picture at the click of a button will surpass the competition as they rush to make less informed decisions.

In addition to business growth and the complexity that comes with it, a TMS is an especially crucial tool to have in place if your business is considering M&A activity. As shippers are suddenly faced with the myriad challenges that comes with integrating disparate systems, having a TMS in place serves as a binding source for systems and data.

I know I need a solution. What now?

TMS solutions have become more robust and powerful over time while also decreasing in price. This has made them more accessible to companies of all sizes, especially given the ability to get them up and running quickly thanks to cloud-based software.

A few questions to consider as you think about which kind of TMS to purchase are: What key pain points am I hoping to address? Do I want a standalone TMS solution or a TMS and a 3PL that can I partner with to manage my logistics needs? And how do I ensure disparate systems are cohesively integrated?

Businesses will commonly implement a TMS to increase supply chain visibility and operational efficiency, integrate disparate and/or legacy systems, optimize costs and have access to detailed analytics and reporting. To achieve these goals, you’ll want a solution that includes the following:

-End-to-end automation and dynamic collaboration so you can seamlessly manage your entire supply network, across all modes;

-Detailed shipment visibility providing insight around pricing and load management to ensure your shipments are delivered on time and on budget;

-Actionable business intelligence and analytics that can provide the immediate insight needed to make better shipping decisions;

-A healthy carrier network of local, regional, and national multimodal carriers to provide services on a shipment-by-shipment basis or dedicated lane opportunities. If you opt for a managed TMS, your provider can help you pinpoint more efficient routes, cost reductions and opportunities to explore new markets versus needing to do that work internally.

As transportation management technology has advanced in recent years, the price of transportation management systems has dropped, offering businesses of all sizes the opportunity to take advantage of the myriad benefits. From providing an unprecedented level of visibility to compelling opportunities for cost savings and increasing operational efficiency, the decision to adopt a TMS in today’s uncertain global trade environment should be an easy one.

Ross Spanier is senior vice president of operations at GlobalTranz, a leading technology and third-party logistics solutions company providing award-winning Transportation Management System (TMS) products to shippers, logistics service providers and carriers.

New Times Call for Fulfillment Companies to Become More Than Just Order Fillers

For years, third party fulfillment warehouses have been viewed as simply ‘warehousing and shipping centers’, tasked with the straightforward duty of making sure customer orders are shipped on-time and accurately. The pressure to change and adapt wasn’t present until recently, so the warehousing industry as a whole remained static – and largely does even today.

Lately, however, the importance of on-time and accurate deliveries has become amplified due to consumers’ growing expectations, causing outsourced warehousing providers to become more ‘nimble and flexible’ or face the prospect of losing business. Furthermore, with outside pressures such as Amazon’s growing dominance and a new injection of technology into a largely archaic industry, fulfillment centers are being faced with a challenge – will they expand locations, differentiate, broaden service offerings and become valuable assets to their customers by adding value or will they choose to serve as a traditional cost center and risk extinction? The pressure to become a more strategic partner to customers is so great now that many industry insiders believe that they must either adapt quickly or they won’t survive.

Fortunately, there are a select group of third-party warehouses that are expanding their presence into new markets to offer multi-location shipping, growing their service offerings to provide a suite of valuable capabilities rather than just filling orders, broadening their technological capabilities, and even collaborating with customers in their corporate and marketing processes in ways that would have been unthinkable in the past.

Companies that employ outsourced logistics services companies will need to make sure that their choice of provider meets all of these requirements in order to remain competitive in the omni-channel landscape.

How Many Locations Does the Fulfillment Center Have?

Many customers want their package delivered within at least a two-day ground window throughout the US. Despite Amazon’s push to create same-day deliveries and dominate the outsourced fulfillment market, multi-location fulfillment centers have carved out a niche by focusing on not only offering a substitute for Amazon’s FBA service (via merchant fulfilled service), but also capitalizing on multi-channel fulfillment of orders through customers’ websites and other online marketplaces, such as eBay, Jet.com, etc. In order to meet Amazon’s Prime fulfillment status, a third-party warehouse must be able to operate on a 2-day ground basis throughout the country. This means they must have, in most cases, three or more facilities spread strategically throughout the United States. Only a very small fraction of companies can meet this requirement. Other online marketplaces aren’t quite as strict in terms of ground shipping requirements, but the expectations will most certainly evolve over time.

Amazon isn’t the only factor applying pressure to the multi-location demands. Because consumers are flat out demanding quicker delivery of goods, a new breed of technology driven warehouse marketplaces are popping up, helping companies strategically locate goods using multiple partner warehouses tied together by one overarching technology and warehouse management system. But these new warehouse marketplaces don’t offer the same advantages of using a single company with multiple locations. First, the online marketplaces add a layer of commission in an otherwise very tight margin industry, driving up overall costs for users of outsourcing. Second, pressures to conform to additional third-party software distract from the focus of the fulfillment center, which lead to differences in service levels. At the end of the day, if profitability is higher for internally generated customers, more time will likely be spent servicing them rather than less profitable marketplace customers. Speaking directly with multi-location warehouses or using a fulfillment services matching service to find a single company is imperative to not only save money but ensure the highest level of service.

How Innovative is the Fulfillment Center’s Technology?

Most e-commerce fulfillment companies offer quick and easy integration between Web Stores and their in-house WMS (warehouse management system). This has become the norm, as more WMS programs have expanded to include integration with most of the popular online shopping carts. However, fulfillment centers that are on the cutting edge of technology have taken things a step further – not only offering a more customized experience but also allowing for integration above and beyond the cookie cutter order and shipping tracking levels.

Through the use of API (application programming interface) and web services, e-commerce fulfillment companies can be more flexible with the information that they send back and forth between their company and customers. Most importantly, real-time inventory information can be more easily synced, allowing for a more robust set of data viewed online by end consumers. But the expanded exchange of data doesn’t end there – some fulfillment providers are even sending information to ERP and accounting software programs (such as QuickBooks), eliminating the frustration of manual entry.

Is the Fulfillment Center Able to Provide Packaging Consulting?

How companies package their products is becoming more important than it was in years past. Providing a unique and memorable “unboxing experience” is a way that some sellers are differentiating themselves from competitions especially in very competitive markets. Contract packaging and custom packaging production are two major areas a fulfillment center can have a measurable impact on end customer satisfaction and brand loyalty. By assisting sellers with the design and production of creative and cost-effective packaging solutions, fulfillment companies can add measurable impact.

Because fulfillment centers have purchasing leverage by aggregating carton, box and other packaging materials purchases among their overall customer base, offering packaging consulting services would appear to be a “no brainer”.  However, very few fulfillment warehouses offer this service. Usually outsourced warehouses have a set of standard boxes that they offer customers, but nothing more.

Another way that packaging consulting can be valuable is by helping sellers design or implement carton and packaging solutions that will reduce shipping costs or damage. Warehouses with significant experience in carton selection are best positioned to act as a strategic consultant.

Are Returns Management Services Available with the Fulfillment Center?

Customers are inevitably going to return products. In fact, it’s almost as if the perfect storm for increased returns has struck the online retail marketplace – increasing consumer purchases online combined with major retailers offering almost unheard-of returns policies to increase the likelihood of purchasing. Some companies, such as Amazon, have made returns so easy that other smaller competitors are almost forced to follow suit or else they will lose the sale.

But again, many traditional fulfillment services companies haven’t built internal capabilities to truly serve as a returns processing center for their fulfillment clients. Returns processing is quite challenging and requires not only thorough knowledge of the product, but also oftentimes requires specialized equipment or processes. For example, in order to handle returns processing for an apparel company, a fulfillment provider must be able to inspect the goods for damage and prepare it for resale, which could include additional services such as re-tagging or ironing.

Furthermore, technology plays a major role in being able to effectively manage returns. When done formally, consumers must obtain a returns authorization, which needs to be communicated to the fulfillment provider in order to process the approved return. Once the return hits the docks, the fulfillment center must have a robust process in place to quickly receive, inspect and return the product to inventory or it will be stuck in an obscure receiving bin for an unknown period of time. Fulfillment houses that track this process manually simply aren’t prepared to handle the stringent needs of fulfilling returns – which is why many “pass” on the opportunity.

Does the Fulfillment Provider Offer Accounting Support, Call Center and Creative Services?

While it is extremely rare, some fulfillment companies offer additional back-end business services to client, such as invoicing, billing, accounting, call center services and even other creative services so smaller businesses can focus more on selling and marketing their products. While not necessarily related, these services are easily outsourced without much risk, making a one-stop shop especially intriguing.

A lot more of them offer this now because they know startups and growing companies need extra help in a more competitive business climate. Offering additional services also makes the fulfillment center more competitive compared to ones only capable of shipping expertise.

The most well-known of these services spans from accounting to call center support services but can include such wide-ranging support services such as web development, online marketing support, photography for e-commerce, video production. Outsourcing web development, marketing, and e-commerce photography is very valuable for e-commerce companies, and benefits the fulfillment company if the work results in more orders to process.

The list of fulfillment providers that offers all of these services and capabilities under one roof is extremely limited. Over time, however, more and more companies will be forced to adapt and expand – or cease to exist. As an online retailer, it’s extremely important to align with an outsourced provider that is well positioned for the future. Taking a long look at the breadth of capabilities offered is critical in forging a partnership that will last and grow and that will serve as a vehicle of additional value.

5 Tips on Obtaining the Right Logistics Company

In whatever industry you are in, whether you sell products in a brick and mortar shop or you deal in e-commerce, you do need a logistics company at some point.

Some logistics companies are not reliable at all times and may deceive you into a contract and not deliver afterward. How can you fork out the bad weeds and choose amongst the good logistics companies?

Logistics company capability

Check for the coverage of each freight company by going through each service area listed on their site or catalogs. If a logistics company has knowledge in your specific target area, you will get faster service and efficient transportation of goods.

Above a large service area, a freight company should be able to handle all your needs. You should set out all your requirements before you commit to a contract with any freight company no matter how reputable it is.

Confirm the maximum load capacity if you will be shipping and transporting heavy weighing goods and if there are any extra costs for that service.

Customer Service

The key to finding a reputable freight company is ensuring on how they treat their customers. Checking whether companies respond swiftly will help you know how fast your shipping related queries will be resolved.

Checking online for customer reviews and checking the estimated response time on Facebook, if the company has a Facebook page is a great start. Take for example, online writing service companies, when hiring a one you often read reviews about top companies like EssayGeeks, Rush-my-essay.com, https://www.ninjaessays.com or a-writer.com. You easily come to know about the quality of the services they offer.

Be careful when doing an online check, some companies may fake testimonials on their site, so try to delve deeper into that research. You can also tackle this problem by asking for references of companies that use that freight company.

If a company is clear and responds to your queries, that may be an indication of good customer service. If there is no good communication from the onset, you will likely face major problems in the future.

It doesn’t matter how affordable a company may seem because if that company compromises on customer service, you will face bigger financial woes in the future. Consider the money you will lose if your orders are late by weeks with no sound explanation and how much that will cost you.

Safety and protection offered

The safety and protection of your goods are paramount when it comes to choosing the perfect logistics company. The safety and protection of your goods include insurance that covers damage and theft of your goods even when caused by third parties.

Checking all the documentation of that insurance and doing your own background check of the underwriters will tell you a lot about that insurance company.

For example, it will tell you if a company will really pay out, how reliable it is and how long it usually takes for the cover to take care of all losses incurred. Read all the fine print and terms and conditions before you sign to avoid nasty surprises later on when you claim.

Make sure that the logistics company you choose has goods-in-transit insurance. Other added value services you should look out for are GPS trackers dashboard cameras and advanced driver assistance systems.

Check if the company is also registered with Truck Associations in your State to ensure its authenticity as there will be some level of accountability for that company.

Suiting your needs

This is again something similar to hiring an online writing service. You first check which one will be good for college essays and which one will more be suited for dissertation or thesis. It is then that you decide from services like EssaysOnTime.com, edugeeksclub.com, bestessays.com or Australianwritings.

If you have large shipment requirements, you need to look for freight companies that have warehouses and storage facilities in the areas you wish to ship to. It should also be able to suit your needs of any transportation mode you will require to ship to your destination.

At this point, you also should not compromise your quality of service with affordability because low-cost companies are not always reliable and offer less visibility, which are two factors that are an enemy of progress. However, you also should not pay exorbitant prices, so try to balance out the services offered and the pricing.

If you have a smaller company that needs fast courier services, you can opt for express courier services offered by various companies. Some courier companies offer next day delivery services and these are great because of several reasons.

Some of those reasons are that even if your delivery does fall short, it won’t be delayed for long. Another reason is that your package stays for only a short while at the hands of the courier company, which minimizes the risk of theft and damage.

Real-time data and tracking

Hiring a freight company that offers real-time data and live tracking services for your goods is a valuable factor in your decision-making process. You should go for a courier company that will let you know where you package in real time and get an accurate estimated time of arrival.

Many companies claim to have this feature only to find out later that they actually don’t, so ask for each company to subject you to a sample. Automated systems are taking this industry to higher levels and if a company is not willing to change, it may be an indicator unreliable service.

The importance of this feature is seen when your freight company has unavoidable delays. With that feature, you can tell your customers exactly where their products are and when they can expect them. So, another feature that is important in your decision-making is the accuracy of the data you receive.

Choosing the best logistics company is a hard and tedious task to do but with these points outlined above, you can make the best use of your resources. Saving your time and costs is always good for business.

To save your time in businesses reliant on logistical support, you should aim at getting swift delivery services. Keep a close eye on the customer service you receive and if it starts to change, consider converting to another company before it starts crippling your business. Lastly, always ensure the safety and security of your goods as the damage might prove to more than a monetary loss.

This guest post is contributed by Kurt Walker who is a blogger and college paper writer. In the course of his studies he developed an interest in innovative technology and likes to keep business owners informed about the latest technology to use to transform their operations. He writes for companies such as Edu BirdieXpertWriters and uk.bestessays.comon various academic and business topics.