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Surviving and Thriving in Quarantine: 3 Ways Businesses Can Turn Time into Opportunity

quarantine

Surviving and Thriving in Quarantine: 3 Ways Businesses Can Turn Time into Opportunity

At this point, the story is global – businesses in communities around our country and world have shuttered, many at the direction of local, state or national governments as we battle the COVID-19 pandemic.

But grim as the picture may be today, millions of small business owners around the country need to grapple not just with the challenge of what to do while their operations are closed, but how to prepare for what lies on the other side of this crisis as the world emerges from quarantine and returns to the business.

In pursuit of a silver lining during this trying time, below are three opportunities to turn a quarantine shutdown on its head and help build businesses stronger than ever before.

Explore creative new ways to deliver your product or service – I’ve watched with fascination as many creative businesses have found ways to continue operating through a quarantine. Novel ways to deliver everything from orchestral music to personal training and therapy/addiction treatment have made the rounds as viral social media videos or popular articles. A similar solution may not be realistic for all businesses, but particularly if you deliver personal services (as opposed to hard goods and products that require in-person consumption), taking the time to invest in and perfect your digital delivery right now could pay benefits down the road.

Imagine a local personal trainer that works via in-person training sessions exclusively. These weeks (or months) may force their training sessions with existing clientele to video-conference, but if that trainer is intentional about streamlining their online offering they’ll be able to tap into a national (or international!) new customer base during and even after the quarantine ends.

Embrace any opportunity to explore an alternative delivery method for your businesses’ product or service, and you may reap benefits down the road.

-Take the time to complete bigger tasks you’ve been pushing off – there are some projects that are just hard to do when you are engaged in the full-time business of helping customers and producing a product each day. Large manufacturing facilities at companies like GE, Ford, Boeing, and more understand this as a fact of life – they proactively schedule dedicated plant-shutdown weeks where assembly lines stop completely to create space for large projects that wouldn’t be possible during normal operation.

Businesses of all sizes suddenly have this opportunity. What can you accomplish during your ‘plant shutdown’? Well, for ideas – there are physical changes (rearranging a showroom, gym, or restaurant seating arrangement to allow more functional usage), periodic maintenance (steam your carpets, paint your walls, organize your warehouse) and business tooling/service improvements you can make. Are you paying too much for your website, your payment solution, or your inventory management tools? Not all of these projects require significant investment, and it’s likely that some leg work today could save you money down the road.

Time and elbow grease could upgrade your physical space. Building a beautiful, more flexible site on Squarespace or Wix could reap benefits as customers experience your online storefront for months or years. Explore whether you’re using the best payments solution. What other tools do you use to run your business that you could evaluate right now?

Most businesses get one chance to make these decisions as you start operation, and the switching cost is very high once you’re locked in -mostly because change requires closing your business for some period. The quarantine might have forced the closure – take advantage!

-Build your skills – In my decade of experience working with small businesses (small ecommerce merchants with eBay, cash-flow solutions with Kabbage, and I currently work with Drum, focusing on providing new ways for businesses to market themselves), I’ve learned people start and operate businesses because they believe in their core mission, not because they’re a magical jack-of-all-trades superhuman.

Retailers sell things they love to produce and curate. Restaurateurs create amazing dining experiences. Contractors are able to bring remodels and renovations to life. In an ideal world, entrepreneurs should spend as much of their mental and physical energy on the thing they’re really good at and leave the other elements of a business to others.

Unfortunately, this isn’t the reality that most business owners live with. There’s always more work to be done than there are hands to do it, and any business owner wears multiple hats – you can’t offload everything. I’m sure there’s a hat every business owner wears that doesn’t fit so well.

If your poorly-fitting hat is marketing-related, maybe a few weeks of couch time is great for pouring over free marketing tutorials (courtesy of LinkedIn Learning/Lynda.com). If you struggle with keeping your financials straight and organized, maybe this is a great time to dive headfirst into QuickBooks resources. Even better – leverage the collective power of the internet (particularly Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook) to find a subject matter expert. You may find a similarly stir-crazy professional with knowledge you’re looking to develop that’s willing to provide some free/low-cost advice or trade some consulting hours for business services or products.

There are no easy answers – we’re all going to muddle through the next weeks and months together. But business owners are resilient, and they’re resourceful – I’m sure there is no shortage of brilliant ideas floating around. See what these suggestions could do for you, then pay it forward – share your own ideas, whether on social media or directly with your contacts.

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Eric Nalbone is the Head of Marketing for Drum, a company building new ways for businesses to leverage the power of customer and community referrals. He has previously led Marketing for Bellhops, a tech-enabled moving company headquartered in Chattanooga, TN, and held a variety of roles with Kabbage, eBay, and General Electric. Eric resides in Atlanta, GA with his wife and three dogs.

ecommerce business

How Coronavirus Impacts Ecommerce Business and Beyond

There is no vaccine to prevent the spreading Coronavirus, yet, and that holds lessons for ecommerce businesses and the people who work at them. Today, we’re facing a time to prepare and hopefully limit exposure and risks at work.

For businesses, preparation and the possibility of illness are going to reshape the day-to-day. After reviewing scenarios and government guidance (here’s your list of cleaners that can take out COVID-19), we’ve put together some thoughts on the most significant impacts we’ll see soon and how companies can respond to protect their people best.

Sending people home is best but expensive

Many ecommerce businesses are small shops, though we’ve been impressed to see some grow significantly in recent years. It’s always a fantastic thing to witness, but their scrappy nature usually means staff are perpetually busy and wearing multiple hats.

Unfortunately, that might mean the COVID-19 threat will hit you especially hard.

Your best bet to keep everyone at work safe is to let anyone go home when they feel even the slightest bit sick. If that happens, document the person arrived and left, plus who they came into contact with at work — employees and anyone who might’ve visited — and how they got to work. This can help medical professionals who are already going to be stretched thin.

The best practice here is going to cost you, but it could also save your team from significant harm, and that is to pay your team to stay home. Help people use their sick days and vacation time if they have it. If someone doesn’t, review your budget to see what you can offer.

If people can’t afford to stay home, they come into work even when sick. That’s a danger none of us can afford right now.

Wash your hands and everything else

There is a little bit of a silver lining in the ecommerce world: most of the products moving through your warehouse are going to be safe. You’re watching for people above all else.

This is because most coronaviruses, including COVID-19, struggle to live on surfaces. So far, we haven’t seen evidence of contaminated food products, which is generally where you’ll first see illnesses spread by products/goods.

For products, the risk is a “smear infection” where someone coughs or sneezes onto a product or package, and a new person touches that and then their face. The virus is believed to have a short lifespan in smear cases, so your team should be relatively safe. Maximize their safety by prioritizing handwashing. Have your team wear gloves at all times, but still make them wash up after unloading a truck.

What ecommerce and other businesses will want to be aware of is the route their goods are taking to get to warehouses. If something is passing through areas where there’s been an outbreak or if you learn that a delivery person for a specific company has fallen ill, pay extra close attention to cleaning these products and packages.

For goods that have been traveling to your company for days or weeks by ocean, there’s minimal product risk from that leg of the trip, but local infections may be possible. Air travel is fast enough that you could have higher smear risks.

So, wash hands, wear gloves, and clean everything as you go.

Alternatives may become scarce

Some impacts are already rippling through the global supply chain. One significant shift is that companies are scrambling to find alternative sources for products and raw materials. Not only are prices for some materials already rising, but there’s growing lane congestion.

This will be a double hit for businesses.

If you’re not manufacturing your own goods, then you need someone to do it for you. New partners can be expensive to source. At the same time, your competition will be turning to them as well. Also happening concurrently, manufacturers will be looking to secure new sources of raw materials. Shifts, such as nearshoring production and buying local, all come with increased costs and supply chain changes.

The other impact is that it could generate more congestion for local delivery and fulfillment options. Companies may face the cost of shipping their goods rise, as well as see delays in fulfillment times. Those delays are already happening in areas where there have been cases of the virus.

Your business will pay more, but you might not be able to pass on additional expenses to customers. Delays in fulfillment times will hit the ecommerce sector hard because customers already expect two-day shipping options. Now, you’ll have to tell them it could be longer and cost more, which may see them take their business elsewhere.

Outsourcing will increase

Expect companies to start diversifying the way they get goods to customers. One particular method is going to be outsourcing fulfillment to companies that have multiple warehouses. It’s a smart way to avoid supply chain bottlenecks because it minimizes the chances that a local outbreak will impact your entire fulfillment operations.

For some ecommerce companies, this outsourcing may come with a small benefit of reaching customers more quickly (once they get stock to third-party logistics providers), while also protecting some workers. If we see sustained infections and spreading of the virus, there’s a potential that many small ecommerce businesses will start outsourcing their entire fulfillment operations.

In the short-term, that could cause some issues with warehouse space and fulfillment staff. In the long run, it might cause cost reductions and lead to greater product availability.

Companies who can figure out how to avoid delivery slowdowns — such as large ones able to own and use their own delivery fleet — will dominate the market. The U.S. has faced a truck driver shortage for years, and growth in outsourcing may help curb some of that, but it would come with higher wages for those who have a greater potential risk of being exposed to the Coronavirus and other health concerns.

Our world will look different tomorrow

We’ve fully embraced the gig economy and home delivery, and there’s a potential it all comes crashing down. Whether these employees continue work amid growing exposure (and even after becoming sick) or if services start slowing down, it’ll impact the daily lives of many Americans.

Businesses will also face changes in the way we bring people to the office, help staff pay for healthcare, and what processes we no longer choose to do to protect ourselves. The global, interconnected supply chain is already changing, and nothing but time will tell us how profound and varied this impact is.

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Jake Rheude is the Director of Marketing for Red Stag Fulfillment, an ecommerce fulfillment warehouse that was born out of ecommerce. He has years of experience in ecommerce and business development. In his free time, Jake enjoys reading about business and sharing his own experience with others.

modex

MODEX Day Three: Robotics & Automation Continue Maturing

In typical Modex fashion, robotics and automation were among the hot topics discussed by keynote speakers, exhibitors, and attendees. A vast array of capabilities, sizes, and industry-specific robotics could be found throughout the show floor, each showing off a new capability. It’s clear that robotics continue to evolve and show no signs of slowing down progress in meeting demand within warehouses and distribution centers.

Mike Futch, President of Tompkins Robotics made this point very clear during his session on Wednesday afternoon titled, “The Lights Out DC/FC: How Close Can We Get?”

Futch addressed the use of various technologies to address workforce constraints while improving the effectiveness and performance of the supply chain.  He identified what advancements will assist in solving bottlenecks such as facility constraints, space issues, and the current situation in unemployment. As these challenges persist, robotics continues to mature.

“There’s a limited workforce, a limited number of people that can drive the distance to enter the immediate geographic region, and these larger buildings are competing for that workforce that’s already at a low unemployment rate along with offering increased wages and siphoning workers off of others. This is a real challenge for some markets.”

“Labor is scarce and we have record-low unemployment, typically to expand capacity from a volume perspective and companies are turning to more shifts. If you already have a tight labor market and you’re adding shifts, where are the workers coming from? And this creates a bigger problem.”

The workforce is a key constraint and while workforce rates are lower than others in some places, Futch states that companies are competing to stay ahead of demand through increased wages while solving the best approach to a limited workforce.

Machines continue to do the same things a human can do but without interruptions with repetitive, difficult, or taxing work that inevitably fatigues the human body. That being said, the industry still requires a skilled workforce and robotics should not be purchased for their appeal. It’s becoming clear that a blend of workers and robotics is a more common theme for integrating such advancements over the idea that robotics will “overtake” worker’s jobs. In fact, robotics is providing a way to re-establish worker tasks rather than eliminating the worker.

“Robotics has matured tremendously from where they were a few years ago. About 5-10 years ago, the pick-and-place robots at the show could not do the things they are capable of doing now. Two years from now, they’ll have the capability to do twice as much as now. Robotics is maturing and meeting the three R’s: improve rate, improve reliability, and improve the range of products and items,” he explained. ”

In terms of a fully automated DC, Futch added that about 60-85 percent of manual tasks can be automated realistically rather than a “lights out” center.

“Beyond the pick-and-place robots, other robots are doing the same thing: creating a blur of separation between what a human can do and what a machine can do.”

MODEX 2020 Day One: Millennials and Their Impact on Distribution

Day one of this year’s MODEX event kicked-off with its anticipated array of technology solutions in action and hundreds of global companies sharing the latest and greatest impacting the supply chain. From warehousing and robotics to transportation and packaging, just about every moving part of the supply chain represented a part of the show.

Keynote speakers such as Michael Roe, Senior Account Executive at DMW&H, took on challenges specific to the distribution and ecommerce sector: millennials.

The generational differences brought to the ecommerce market have shaken the way distributors approach customer adaptation. Furthermore, distributors are now challenged to balance multiple consumer demands while remaining relevant. Roe explains:

“Millennials changed retail because of the way they shop. Millennials value culture, experience, and they value the value of the experience. Although it may seem new, it may not be so new.”

“Distribution practices have changed because we have to adapt to the customer base. If you understand what your customer wants, you have to change your distribution and understand how it’s going to work.”

He goes onto explain that during the early days of ecommerce, companies like Amazon (known to-date as the fastest company to reach $100 billion in sales) changed that model and took the stores out of the equation. This effort was a strategy used by ecommerce companies to reinvent the consumer’s shopping and comparison experience by adding ease and convenience. Amazon created a presence everywhere through its distribution centers – they were simply found everywhere. To this day, Amazon continues to expand its footprint with the help of automation.

For the modern consumer, the days of mall visits are a thing of the past for some, while for others in the same consumer pool prefer the option of both ecommerce and the traditional store model. Baby boomers typically still prefer the in-store experience with 84 percent confirming this preference. They want their product when they leave and aren’t keen on the idea of waiting for something already paid for.

Meanwhile, Gen X prefers the option of comparison-shopping while reaping the benefits of maximized value. Millennials demand a hybrid model offering a complex blend of what Boomers and Gen X’ers seek. And they want it for a competitive price. Navigating this shift has left some scratching their head as they identify the most adaptable approach.

At the end of the day, it boils down to understanding the customer and identifying the best approach to navigating the balance of consumer demands. The millenials concept isn’t all that new at all. in fact, generational changes have always been present, it’s all a matter of anticipating these changes and preparing the solution accordingly. Roe concluded that “Every generation has changed their shopping preferences. With each generation comes faster response times to customer preferences.”

KC SmartPort

KC SmartPort Shares Leading Differentiators for its Ecommerce Surge

Known as the “hub for food logistics” in the Midwest, the Kansas City region boasts a unique approach to economic development. KC SmartPort – a nonprofit economic development organization – focuses on attracting freight-based businesses to the region through its streamlined efforts in workforce development, real estate opportunities, and thriving logistics-focused operations. The Kansas City region recently reported substantial growth in ecommerce and distribution companies establishing operations in the area with these companies planning to invest $1.3 billion and aiming for the creation of seven thousand jobs. KC SmartPort president Chris Gutierrez and his team attended the Dallas RILA/LINK 2020 conference as exhibitors and shared the latest and greatest developments emerging in the Kansas City region.

“With online sales increasing every year, companies have really been focusing on their omnichannel strategy. The Kansas City region is centrally located and offers a robust transportation infrastructure from road, air, rail and water, ultimately supporting the ability for businesses to reach 88-90 percent of the population in about two days. This really lends itself as a successful strategy around ecommerce,” said Chris Gutierrez, president of KC SmartPort.

“Since 2012, we’ve had over 40 million square feet of industrial buildings built primarily on spec because the ecommerce companies will go through a peak season and if they hit their numbers, they need to be in the next building within a certain time frame to hit next year’s peak. If they don’t have a building to move into, then the opportunity is lost. That’s something our region has been very successful in supporting,” he added.

Among big-name ecommerce and distribution companies that made the move to the Kansas City region in 2019 include Wal-Mart, Hostess, Amazon, CVS Pharmacy, Overstock.com, Tool Source Warehouse, and more. Part of this surge in ecommerce, automotive, and retailers is dually supported by the region’s balancing of business and workforce development efforts.

“What we are doing locally is a three-step process. First, we create an awareness buzz at the elementary and high schools and community colleges around supply chain jobs that serve as career opportunities with great benefits and growth options rather than just filling a position. The second part of local efforts involves public transportation, rideshare, and other mobility solutions to support getting the employee to the job site.”

“The third leg of this approach is encouraging employers to critically think about workplace culture. We take it a step further and educate employers of the importance of the first week during onboarding, eliminating the desire to go to the next company offering a quarter more in pay but offering a potentially more satisfying culture. If the company offers a healthy culture, it makes a huge difference, specifically with non-tangible things that add value to the employee experience.”

These multi-layered efforts not only support the existing workforce and growth in economic development but serve as proactive solutions for future workforce generations in Kansas City. More than 2.3 million people in the region rely on the unique economic development team covering both Kansas and Missouri. The Kansas City Area Transportation Authority (KCATA) serves as a bi-state authority covering a broader regional area while addressing large-scale concerns. This partnership serves as a major differentiator in the region for businesses seeking a myriad of options in amenities, incentives, and transportation.

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Chris Gutierrez is the President of KC SmartPort, Inc., a KCADC affiliate organization focused on attracting freight based economic development to the greater Kansas City region and providing thought leadership to the supply chain industry in Kansas City. Chris has been active in economic development and logistics for over 30 years. He joined KC SmartPort in 2003.

artificial intelligence

Artificial Intelligence Market to Reach $54 Billion by 2026

According to a new study published by Polaris Market Research, the global artificial intelligence market is anticipated to reach USD 54 billion by 2026. The advancements of robots and the rise in their deployment rate particularly, in the developing economies globally have had a positive impact on the global artificial intelligence market.

Augmented customer experience, expanded application areas, enhanced productivity, and big data integration have highly propelled the artificial intelligence market worldwide. Although, the absence of adequate skilled workforce, as well as threat to human dignity, are some of the factors that could affect the growth of the market. However, these factors are expected to have minimal impact on the market attributed to the introduction of advanced technologies.

An extraordinary increase in productivity has been achieved with machine-learning. For instance, Google, with the help of its experimental driverless technology has transformed cars including, Toyota Prius. The integration of various tools by artificial intelligence has helped in the transformation of business management. These tools include brand purchase advertising, workflow management tools, trend predictions among others. For example, Google’s voice accuracy technology has a 98% accuracy rate. Furthermore, Facebook’s DeepFace technology has a success rate of approximately 97% in recognizing faces. Such accuracy in technologies is further anticipated to bolster the market growth during the forecast period.

Currently, North America dominates the global artificial intelligence market attributed to the high government funding availability, existence of prominent providers in the region, and robust technical adoption base. Also, the region is expected to continue its dominance during the forecast period. Moreover, the adoption of cloud-based services in key economies, such as the US and Canada, is considering adding to the market growth in the North American region. The markets in Asia Pacific, MEA and South America region are expected to notice a high growth during the coming years. The growth in the Asia Pacific region is attributed to the increasing demand for artificial technologies by the developing economies. Thus, the region is anticipated to grow at the highest CAGR during the forecast period.

 

Major companies profiled in the report include Google Inc., Intel Corporation, Nvidia Corporation, Microsoft Corporation, IBM Corporation, General Vision, Inc., Qlik Technologies Inc., MicroStrategy, Inc., Brighterion, Inc., and Baidu, Inc. among others.

Key Findings from the study suggest North America is expected to command the market over the forecast years. APAC is presumed to be the fastest-growing market, developing at a CAGR of more than 65% over the forecast period. The artificial intelligence market is presumed to develop at a CAGR of over 55.9% from 2018 to 2026. The high implementation of artificial intelligence in several end-user verticals including, retail, automotive and healthcare is projected to boost the growth of the market over the forecast period. Several companies are making considerable investments to integrate artificial intelligence competencies into their portfolio of products. For instance, in 2016, SK Telecom and Intel Corporation signed an agreement for the development of the artificial intelligence-based vehicle-to-everything (V2X) technology as well as video recognition.

For More Information About Artificial Intelligence Market @ https://www.polarismarketresearch.com/industry-analysis/artificial-intelligence-market/request-for-customization
melon

Global Melon Market Reached $27B, Driven By Rising Demand in China

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘World – Melons – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The global melon market revenue amounted to $27.4B in 2018, increasing by 2.2% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +2.1% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being recorded in certain years. Over the period under review, the global melon market attained its peak figure level in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Consumption By Country

The country with the largest volume of melon consumption was China (17M tonnes), comprising approx. 53% of total volume. Moreover, melon consumption in China exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest consumer, Turkey (1.8M tonnes), tenfold. Iran (1.6M tonnes) ranked third in terms of total consumption with a 4.8% share.

In China, melon consumption increased at an average annual rate of +1.9% over the period from 2007-2018. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: Turkey (+0.9% per year) and Iran (-2.3% per year).

In value terms, China ($15.1B) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Turkey ($1.3B). It was followed by Egypt.

In 2018, the highest levels of melon per capita consumption was registered in Kazakhstan (50 kg per person), followed by Turkey (22 kg per person), Iran (19 kg per person) and Morocco (15 kg per person), while the world average per capita consumption of melon was estimated at 4.25 kg per person.

Market Forecast 2019-2025

Driven by increasing demand for melon worldwide, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next decade. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +0.9% for the period from 2018 to 2030, which is projected to bring the market volume to 36M tonnes by the end of 2030.

Production 2007-2018

Global melon production totaled 33M tonnes in 2018, going up by 1.6% against the previous year. Over the period under review, melon production continues to indicate a modest growth. The general positive trend in terms of melon output was largely conditioned by a modest expansion of the harvested area and a mild increase in yield figures.

Production By Country

China (17M tonnes) constituted the country with the largest volume of melon production, comprising approx. 53% of total volume. Moreover, melon production in China exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest producer, Turkey (1.8M tonnes), tenfold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Iran (1.6M tonnes), with a 4.7% share.

In China, melon production expanded at an average annual rate of +1.9% over the period from 2007-2018. The remaining producing countries recorded the following average annual rates of production growth: Turkey (+0.9% per year) and Iran (-2.3% per year).

Harvested Area 2007-2018

In 2018, the global melon harvested area amounted to 1.2M ha, therefore, remained relatively stable against the previous year. Overall, the melon harvested area, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

Yield 2007-2018

In 2018, the global average yield of melons amounted to 27 tonne per ha, therefore, remained relatively stable against the previous year. The yield figure increased at an average annual rate of +1.3% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with only minor fluctuations being observed over the period under review.

Exports 2007-2018

In 2018, the global exports of melons stood at 2.3M tonnes, rising by 8.6% against the previous year. Over the period under review, melon exports continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2018 when exports increased by 8.6% y-o-y. In that year, global melon exports reached their peak and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term. In value terms, melon exports stood at $1.9B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

In 2018, Spain (405K tonnes) and Guatemala (397K tonnes) were the largest exporters of melonsin the world, together accounting for approx. 34% of total exports. Honduras (254K tonnes) occupied an 11% share (based on tonnes) of total exports, which put it in second place, followed by Brazil (10%), the U.S. (8.7%), the Netherlands (6.8%), Costa Rica (5.7%) and Mexico (5.7%).

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by the Netherlands, while exports for the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest melon supplying countries worldwide were Spain ($361M), Guatemala ($236M) and Honduras ($189M), with a combined 42% share of global exports.

Export Prices by Country

The average melon export price stood at $800 per tonne in 2018, lowering by -4.4% against the previous year. Over the period from 2007 to 2018, it increased at an average annual rate of +1.6%. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 when the average export price increased by 12% year-to-year. In that year, the average export prices for melons reached their peak level of $838 per tonne, and then declined slightly in the following year.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was the Netherlands ($1,155 per tonne), while Guatemala ($594 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Costa Rica, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports 2007-2018

In 2018, the amount of melons imported worldwide amounted to 2.1M tonnes, stabilizing at the previous year. Overall, melon imports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. In value terms, melon imports stood at $1.8B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

The U.S. represented the main importer of melons imported in the world, with the volume of imports recording 655K tonnes, which was approx. 30% of total imports in 2018. The Netherlands (205K tonnes) ranks second in terms of the total imports with a 9.5% share, followed by France (8.5%), the UK (8%), Canada (7.4%) and Germany (6.2%). Spain (86K tonnes), Portugal (62K tonnes), Belgium (40K tonnes), Switzerland (33K tonnes), Italy (33K tonnes) and Mexico (33K tonnes) occupied minor shares of total imports.

The U.S. experienced a relatively flat trend pattern with regard to volume of imports of melons imports. At the same time, Mexico (+7.1%), Switzerland (+3.2%), France (+2.7%), Spain (+2.3%), the Netherlands (+1.8%) and Portugal (+1.3%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Mexico emerged as the fastest-growing importer imported in the world, with a CAGR of +7.1% from 2007-2018. Italy and Canada experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. By contrast, Germany (-1.3%), the UK (-1.9%) and Belgium (-2.5%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period.

In value terms, the U.S. ($403M) constitutes the largest market for imported melons worldwide, comprising 22% of global imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by France ($197M), with a 11% share of global imports. It was followed by the Netherlands, with a 10% share.

Import Prices by Country

The average melon import price stood at $857 per tonne in 2018, picking up by 5.5% against the previous year. Over the last eleven years, it increased at an average annual rate of +1.6%.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Belgium ($1,461 per tonne), while the U.S. ($615 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Mexico, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

cabbage

Global Cabbage Market to Reach 80M Tonnes by 2025

IndexBox published a report: ‘World – Cabbage And Other Brassicas – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The global cabbage market revenue amounted to $39.4B in 2018, dropping by -3% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +3.1% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2010 when the market value increased by 14% year-to-year. Global cabbage consumption peaked at $43.7B in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, consumption failed to regain its momentum.

Consumption By Country

The country with the largest volume of cabbage consumption was China (33M tonnes), comprising approx. 45% of total consumption. Moreover, cabbage consumption in China exceeded the figures recorded by the world’s second-largest consumer, India (9.2M tonnes), fourfold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Russia (3.7M tonnes), with a 5.2% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of volume in China was relatively modest. The remaining consuming countries recorded the following average annual rates of consumption growth: India (+4.7% per year) and Russia (+2.6% per year).

In value terms, China ($13.9B) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by India ($5.7B). It was followed by Japan.

The countries with the highest levels of cabbage per capita consumption in 2018 were Romania (57 kg per person), South Korea (46 kg per person) and Ukraine (39 kg per person).

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of cabbage per capita consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by India, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Market Forecast 2019-2025

Driven by increasing demand for cabbage worldwide, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven-year period. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +1.4% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 80M tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production 2007-2018

In 2018, the amount of cabbage and other brassicas produced worldwide stood at 73M tonnes, picking up by 1.7% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.4% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being observed in certain years. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 with an increase of 6.8% against the previous year. Global cabbage production peaked in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future. The general positive trend in terms of cabbage output was largely conditioned by slight growth of the harvested area and a relatively flat trend pattern in yield figures.

In value terms, cabbage production totaled $40.5B in 2018 estimated in export prices. In general, the total output indicated prominent growth from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +1.4% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, cabbage production decreased by -11.0% against 2016 indices. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2010 when production volume increased by 26% year-to-year. Global cabbage production peaked at $45.5B in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, production failed to regain its momentum.

Production By Country

China (34M tonnes) constituted the country with the largest volume of cabbage production, accounting for 47% of total production. Moreover, cabbage production in China exceeded the figures recorded by the world’s second-largest producer, India (9.2M tonnes), fourfold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Russia (3.6M tonnes), with a 5% share.

In China, cabbage production expanded at an average annual rate of +1.1% over the period from 2007-2018. The remaining producing countries recorded the following average annual rates of production growth: India (+4.7% per year) and Russia (+2.9% per year).

Harvested Area 2007-2018

In 2018, approx. 2.5M ha of cabbage and other brassicas were harvested worldwide; therefore, remained relatively stable against the previous year. The harvested area increased at an average annual rate of +1.3% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 when harvested area increased by 5.6% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the harvested area dedicated to cabbage production reached its peak figure in 2018 and is likely to see steady growth in the near future.

Yield 2007-2018

In 2018, the global average cabbage yield totaled 29 tonne per ha, approximately reflecting the previous year. Overall, the cabbage yield continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2008 with an increase of 2.2% y-o-y. The global cabbage yield peaked at 29 tonne per ha in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, yield stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Exports 2007-2018

In 2018, the global exports of cabbage and other brassicas totaled 2.5M tonnes, surging by 7.2% against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +3.4% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 when Exports increased by 16% y-o-y. Over the period under review, global cabbage exports reached their maximum in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the near future.

In value terms, cabbage exports amounted to $1.7B in 2018. Over the period under review, the total exports indicated a resilient expansion from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +3.4% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, cabbage exports increased by +85.8% against 2007 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 when Exports increased by 18% against the previous year. Over the period under review, global cabbage exports attained their peak figure in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Exports by Country

China was the largest exporter of cabbage and other brassicas in the world, with the volume of exports reaching 990K tonnes, which was near 39% of total exports in 2018. The U.S. (220K tonnes) ranks second in terms of the total exports with a 8.7% share, followed by the Netherlands (8.3%), Spain (6.2%) and Mexico (5.7%). Canada (85K tonnes), Poland (84K tonnes), Italy (72K tonnes), Germany (66K tonnes) and Macedonia (57K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

Exports from China increased at an average annual rate of +7.0% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, Macedonia (+11.5%), Spain (+9.3%), Mexico (+6.1%), Canada (+5.6%) and the Netherlands (+3.1%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Macedonia emerged as the fastest growing exporter in the world, with a CAGR of +11.5% from 2007-2018. The U.S. and Italy experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. By contrast, Germany (-2.2%) and Poland (-3.7%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period. While the share of China (+21 p.p.), Spain (+3.9 p.p.), Mexico (+2.7 p.p.), the Netherlands (+2.4 p.p.), Macedonia (+1.6 p.p.) and Canada (+1.5 p.p.) increased significantly in terms of the global exports from 2007-2018, the share of Poland (-1.7 p.p.) displayed negative dynamics. The shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, the largest cabbage markets worldwide were China ($398M), the U.S. ($344M) and the Netherlands ($194M), with a combined 54% share of global exports. Spain, Mexico, Italy, Canada, Poland, Germany and Macedonia lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 32%.

Macedonia recorded the highest growth rate of exports, in terms of the main exporting countries over the last eleven years, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the average cabbage export price amounted to $682 per tonne, coming down by -5.4% against the previous year. Over the last eleven-year period, it increased at an average annual rate of +2.3%. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2008 when the average export price increased by 10% against the previous year. The global export price peaked at $722 per tonne in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, export prices remained at a lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was the U.S. ($1,567 per tonne), while Macedonia ($391 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the U.S., while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports 2007-2018

In 2018, approx. 2.3M tonnes of cabbage and other brassicas were imported worldwide; dropping by -10.3% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.4% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2015 with an increase of 24% y-o-y. Over the period under review, global cabbage imports reached their peak figure at 2.6M tonnes in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, imports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, cabbage imports totaled $1.5B in 2018. Overall, the total imports indicated a conspicuous increase from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +2.4% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, cabbage imports decreased by -12.2% against 2016 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 with an increase of 16% against the previous year. Global imports peaked at $1.7B in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, imports failed to regain their momentum.

Imports by Country

In 2018, China, Hong Kong SAR (546K tonnes), distantly followed by the U.S. (225K tonnes), Canada (189K tonnes), Malaysia (176K tonnes), Russia (113K tonnes), Germany (112K tonnes) and Thailand (105K tonnes) represented the main importers of cabbage and other brassicas, together mixing up 64% of total imports. Singapore (64K tonnes), Japan (60K tonnes), the Czech Republic (53K tonnes), France (50K tonnes) and the UK (42K tonnes) occupied a minor share of total imports.

Imports into China, Hong Kong SAR increased at an average annual rate of +6.3% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, Thailand (+32.5%), Malaysia (+9.8%), France (+2.5%), the U.S. (+2.2%), Canada (+2.0%) and the Czech Republic (+1.2%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Thailand emerged as the fastest growing importer in the world, with a CAGR of +32.5% from 2007-2018. Singapore experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. By contrast, Japan (-1.2%), Germany (-1.3%), Russia (-3.5%) and the UK (-5.5%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period. From 2007 to 2018, the share of China, Hong Kong SAR, Malaysia, Thailand, the U.S. and Canada increased by +12%, +4.9%, +4.3%, +2.1% and +1.6% percentage points, while the UK (-1.6 p.p.) and Russia (-2.3 p.p.) saw their share reduced. The shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, Canada ($302M), China, Hong Kong SAR ($223M) and the U.S. ($167M) were the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2018, with a combined 47% share of global imports. These countries were followed by Germany, Malaysia, France, Thailand, Singapore, the UK, Japan, Russia and the Czech Republic, which together accounted for a further 30%.

Among the main importing countries, Thailand experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to imports, over the last eleven-year period, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

The average cabbage import price stood at $641 per tonne in 2018, approximately reflecting the previous year. Over the period from 2007 to 2018, it increased at an average annual rate of +1.1%. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2013 when the average import price increased by 18% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the average import prices for cabbage and other brassicas attained their maximum at $692 per tonne in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, import prices failed to regain their momentum.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Canada ($1,597 per tonne), while Russia ($315 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Canada, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

business

Why these Elite Lone Star State Cities are Right for Your Business

When it comes to site selection, there are a lot of big choices to be made. From locating a city with a business-friendly environment to selecting the perfect site to build your business, it can be hard to find a place that has everything you need if you go it alone. But that’s not a problem when you “Choose Texas.” The Choose Texas program wants to help you make the easiest choice you’ll ever make: to choose to relocate or expand in the Lone Star State.

The Choose Texas program helps new or expanding businesses looking to relocate in the state by introducing them to cities or towns that match their individual needs. Always free for businesses, the Choose Texas program can help with locating incentives, finding properties and getting valuable facetime with local economic development professionals. For more than 25 years, the team at Choose Texas has been helping new and expanding businesses relocate to Texas, all the while helping grow the economy within the state. 

Whether you’re already considering a move to Texas or are just beginning your site selection journey, these Texas communities are eager to tell you why Choosing Texas is right for your business.

CENTRAL TEXAS

Belton

Located along the I-35 corridor between Waco and Austin, Belton has a population of just under 22,000 and access to a regional population of over 450,000. With current major industries that include military, government, manufacturing, retail, agriculture and medical, the Belton area boasts a young, skilled workforce that is perfect for shift and part-time labor. Belton is also close to Fort Hood, the largest U.S. Army training post in the country, with more than 900 retiring soldiers each month—many of whom elect to remain in the Belton area after discharge.

Ana Borchardt, director of Business Expansion and Retention for the Belton Economic Development Corp., cites the hospitable climate in Texas among the many things that make it prime for incoming businesses. “In most parts of the state, the climate allows for higher productivity, housing costs are mostly below the national average, and the people are friendly,” explains Borchardt. “In addition, the Texas hills, valleys, rivers, lakes and the Gulf Coast shoreline offer many outdoor recreational opportunities.” Belton is no exception. With its captivating scenery, highly rated schools and low crime-rate, the city is poised to welcome a variety of incoming businesses.

Mexia

Located along US 84 in the heart of the “Texas Triangle,” Mexia is just 90 miles south of the Dallas/Fort Worth metro area, and it connects to San Antonio, Houston and Austin via state and interstate highways, making it an ideal distribution hub. In fact, you can reach 93 percent of the U.S. population within 48 hours of Mexia.

Additionally, Mexia boasts a skilled workforce, with access to a more than 40-mile-wide labor pool of over 85,000 workers. Mexia workers excel in manufacturing, customer service administration and distribution, and local workforce training programs such as the Texas Workforce CommissionHeart of Texas Workforce and the Skills Development Fund can assist with training the next generation of employees for incoming businesses.

Click here to listen to their latest podcast.

NORTH TEXAS

Bowie

Just outside the Dallas-Fort Worth metro area in the famed Red River Valley area of Texas sits Bowie. Positioned at the crossroads of US 81, US 287 and TX 59, Bowie is just 90 minutes from downtown Dallas, an hour from Fort Worth and under an hour from Wichita Falls. With a variety of available properties and workforce development programs at the ready, Bowie can help your incoming business get off the ground running. 

A designated 4A and 4B sales tax community, Bowie offers incoming businesses a one-stop-shop for economic development. The city of just over 5,500 provides site selectors with a lower cost of doing business, along with highly rated schools, excellent healthcare and a thriving business community.

Corsicana

Located 58 miles south of downtown Dallas, Corsicana has made a name for itself, especially in the food manufacturing industries. Formerly the home of Wolf Chili, Corsicana today boasts the Collin Street Bakery, a famous fruitcake bakery, and Russell Stover. It is also where distribution centers for retail giants like Kohl’s and Home Depot are located. Though the city is outside of the traffic and congestion of its neighbors, thanks to its proximity to the Dallas-Fort Worth metro area Corsicana benefits from the convenience and access to the city but provides businesses and residents with lower operational costs than the big city. 

Commercial flyers are just one hour away from DFW International airport, and those looking for cargo airports are within 75 minutes of Fort Worth Alliance Airport. Just 200 miles from the Port of Houston and 230 from the Port of Beaumont, Corsicana is convenient to ocean freight terminals. It is also accessible by rail, with service from the Union Pacific and Burlington North Santa Fe railroads. It is also just over 30 minutes to the Union Pacific Dallas Intermodal Terminal.

TexAmericas Center

The New Boston, Texas-based TexAmericas Center is one of the largest industrial centers in the Americas. Located just 15 miles west of Texarkana, the center boasts 12,000 acres with 3,000,000 square feet of industrial space, and it is the lowest aggregate mile location in Texas to reach the North American market.

TexAmericas Center Executive Vice President Eric Voyles believes businesses should Choose Texas because of the state’s diverse economy “where many industries can flourish.” According to Voyles, his center prides itself on working with small to medium-sized companies that may not have otherwise gotten a chance—and helping them flourish in a competitive marketplace. “We know these companies are growing and need to move quickly,” says Voyles. “They have opportunity NOW, and our focus is on providing speed-to-market real estate solutions. The match is perfect, and TexAmericas Center has developed a niche of meeting the needs of these often-overlooked employers.”

That’s a sentiment that Voyles says rings true throughout Texas and the Choose Texas partners. “Texas and many of its communities have invested in themselves in order to make choosing the right location less risky, especially when it comes to workforce development decisions. TexAmericas Center prides itself on being a ‘can-do’ company. We actively challenge the companies we work with to ask us to help solve their business problems.” 

 Cedar Hill

Just 20 minutes from downtown Dallas, Cedar Hill is a rising star in the economic development marketplace. Cedar Hill offers incoming businesses low taxes, low costs of living and a skilled workforce of more than 1 million people within a 30-minute commute. Cedar Hill hosts over 3 million square feet of retail and class-A office space, all without the cost and congestion of larger nearby cities.

Andy Buffington, Marketing and Research manager with the Cedar Hill Economic Development Corp., says site selectors should bring their businesses to Texas because the of the state’s reputation as a growth leader, especially when it comes to business incentives. “It’s estimated the state spends 1.3 percent of its GDP on business incentives,” says Buffington. “Texas also offers a variety of non-profit and government-backed programs for assisting small businesses with funding, coupled with the fact that neither corporate nor personal income tax are put on enterprise.”

DeSoto

Not far south from downtown Dallas, DeSoto is a uniquely poised city with the benefits of access to the big city and major highways, but without the higher cost of doing business in a metropolitan area. DeSoto currently has more than 400 acres of shovel-ready land, and 93 percent of U.S. markets are within two days or less via truck from the city of just over 56,000. With 90 percent of DeSoto’s workforce holding a high school diploma or higher, it’s no wonder that the city boasts a low 5 percent unemployment rate for its labor force of nearly 30,000. In fact, DeSoto’s labor force is growing faster than the national average.

 Joe Newman, CEO of the DeSoto Economic Development Corp., believes that the labor force and partnerships with organizations such as the Texas Workforce Commission are just a few of the key reasons businesses are so eager to call Texas home. That, coupled with a little help from their friends. “Oftentimes large companies see what their peers in other industries are doing and inquire as to why that firm moved,” Newman says. “Most often it is logistics or workforce, and most communities offer attractive incentives to justify such a move. As more and more companies move to Texas, it causes a synergy that attracts others.”

GULF COAST

 Brazoria County

One of the fastest-growing counties in Texas is home to the Brazoria County Alliance, an organization that was formed to “promote and diversify” the county’s economic base and attract high-wage jobs. 

Located in the southeast part of the state in the Houston statistical area, Brazoria County has a population of more than 313,000.

 Matagorda County

Beautiful Matagorda County is halfway between Galveston and Corpus Christi and just 65 miles from the Houston metropolitan area. The county boasts a population of more than 36,000 with a total workforce population of over 18,000. The average household income of Matagorda County residents is $40,860, and the major industries include education, healthcare, farming, ranching, seafood, petroleum, manufacturing, pipeline and production among others.

The county, which is part of a growing energy cluster, is seeking retail and residential partners to help fill the growing needs for the workforce of the future and for the tourism industry for beachfront needs. The county is home to the Port of Palacios, which boasts one of the largest shrimping fleets in the Gulf of Mexico, and the Port of Bay City, which is home to a terminal turning basin and includes a modern concrete dock, metal shed and liquid cargo dock. With a 200-foot-wide channel and an average depth of 12 feet, the Port Turning Basin and Terminal Facility are conveniently located 15 miles from the Colorado River locks at the ICW.

EAST TEXAS

Grapeland/Crockett

Named for the legendary David Crockett, who is said to have camped in the town on his way to The Alamo, Crockett, Texas is the Houston County seat. Today, the storied town of 23,000 is more than just a stop along the way; it’s home to a thriving community with industries ranging from manufacturing to logistics.

In fact, Grapeland/Crockett is in an ideal position for your business’ logistics needs of the future. With projected area growth of 25 million more people to the Texas Triangle area in the next 30 years, Grapeland/Crockett provides a low traffic impact that will likely avoid the bottlenecks and traffic congestion that is projected for other nearby areas. Plus, with its proximity to highways US 287, TX 19 and Highways 21, 7 and 9, it has access all its own.

Mount Pleasant

Located in Titus County, Mount Pleasant has a population of 32,000. Thanks to its proximity to major transportation routes, the community owes much of its success to the transportation industry as well as the people working behind the scenes to ensure that sector’s success.

 Also known for its timber and poultry industries, Mount Pleasant is currently working to expand its workforce repertoire through a partnership between the Mount Pleasant Economic Development Corp. and the local community college system. Called the Manufacturing Technology Training Center, this workforce education program trains students in entrepreneurial skills that will help ensure Mount Pleasant remains a leader in Texas business for years to come.

WEST TEXAS

Floydada

Located in Floyd County, Floydada is known as the Pumpkin Capital of Texas. With high premiums on education, Floydada is the only city in the state that has the honor of their schools being Apple Computers’ distinguished schools. 

Floydada also has many free workforce training programs for residents that are run through the Floydada Professional Development Center and the Floydada Economic Development Corporation. Employers can even request financial assistance to train workers through the Skills Development Fund and the Self-Sufficiency Fund as administered by the Texas Workforce Commission

Seminole

Located at the northern portion of the Permian Basin and along the southern portion of the agricultural South Plains of Texas, Seminole is best known for its agriculture and oil and steel production. The town has a highly skilled workforce with expertise in fields ranging from metal and woodworking to carpentry and construction.  

A family-oriented community, Seminole also boasts a low crime rate and diverse business community.

Andrews

A city experiencing tremendous transformation, Andrews was initially built on oil and has since become one of the “most progressive” communities in West Texas, diversifying its portfolio of businesses in recent years. “Andrews is in the middle of the shale oil boom and we provide a great location for companies to set up business and serve clients all over the Permian Basin,” says Morse Haynes, executive director of Economic Development for Andrews.

 With significant investments in the city and education system, Andrews is now a modernized community poised to take on new businesses, but with expertise in everything from manufacturing to energy to chemicals. It is that very investment in the Texas workforce that Haynes believes is what sets the state apart from other states. “Texas has over 14 million productive workers along with top-notch schools that continue to grow our workforce,” he says. That, combined with the world’s most diverse economy, “provides job opportunities and a quality of life second to none.”

 Stamford

Part of the Rolling Plains area of Texas, Stamford has a population of just over 3,000 people. Located along US Highway 277, the small town has a strong economy in agriculture and natural resources.

Named in 1900 for the Stamford, Connecticut, birthplace of Central Texas Railroad President Henry King McHarg, the town today boasts a convenient location that is desirable to incoming businesses. Just 41 miles north of Abilene, and fewer than 150 miles west of Fort Worth, Stamford is close to both DFW International airport and the DFW Metroplex. It is also under 150 miles southeast of Lubbock.

Dumas

Located in Moore County, Dumas is halfway between Dallas and Denver, Colorado, and just 45 miles north of Amarillo. With just over 14,691 people, Dumas has one of the lowest unemployment rates in the U.S., and it leads the state in retail growth. Dumas counts as major industries beef slaughtering, chemicals, gas and oil. 

The city places a high premium on education, with a branch of Amarillo College located in town as well as the North Plains Opportunity Center, a training center for  at-risk students and continuing education.

Check out their GT Podcast here. 

NORTHWEST TEXAS 

 Amarillo

The largest city in the Texas Panhandle, Amarillo is the 14th most populous city in the state, with a population of approximately 276,000 in its metropolitan area. Amarillo boasts a young, educated and non-unionized labor force that grew by more than 15 percent from 2000 to 2011. 

Amarillo prides itself on being able to match incoming businesses with valuable incentives and a skilled workforce, and it offers a number of workforce training programs.

Canadian-Hemphill County

Referred to as the “Oasis of the High Plains,” Canadian-Hemphill County is situated on the Oklahoma border. Founded in 1876, the county was named for Judge John Hemphill. The name Canadian comes from the Canadian River, a nearby tributary of the Arkansas River. Though Canadian-Hemphill County has a population of fewer than 11,000 people, it has a lot to offer incoming businesses, including available land, incentives and access to workforce training programs. 

“Simply put, Texas is open for business,” says Shane Spencer, executive director at the Canadian Hemphill County Economic Development Corporation. “Its lower tax rates and lack of personal income tax make Texas great for employers.” And that includes smaller communities, like Canadian-Hemphill County. “Texas consistently has a growing economy,” Spencer says. “It is such a huge state, there is plenty of room to grow and also to reuse sites for new companies.”

 With connections to nearby highways such as US 60, US 83 and Highway 33, Canadian-Hemphill County is well connected to the rest of Texas and Oklahoma. “Texas has a huge interstate system and roads that are built to carry those across the country,” says Spencer. “The Dallas-Fort Worth, Austin and Houston areas can support global sized companies with large amounts employees, and our other towns and cities can play host to smaller ones.”

But don’t let the size of those smaller cities and towns fool you. As Spencer notes, smaller infrastructure doesn’t equate to slower service. “Companies continue to take advantage of Texas’ business climate because of ease and speed of getting a company up and running. Also, infrastructure is always growing to allow expansion of businesses.” Ultimately, Spencer believes when it comes down to it, it’s the people of Texas that make doing business there so much better than anywhere else. “When your employees are happy, the company performs well. Companies have discovered that there are a lot of happy workers in Texas!”

Click here to listen to their GT Podcast.

Shamrock

The first Route 66-city in Texas upon eastern approach, Shamrock is home to not just the famous historic U-Drop Inn but to a vibrant, thriving West Texas community. Located at the intersections of I-40 (Route 66) and 83, the city of just under 2,000 residents is a well-connected cultural hub in the Panhandle, with landmarks, museums and a famous St. Patrick’s Day festival that is so big it’s considered the official St. Patrick’s Day Celebration of the State of Texas.

With more than 600 hotel rooms, the city is well equipped to handle tourism and visiting business guests. It is also a notable hunting community. Shamrock is just 90 minutes from Amarillo (along I-40), three hours to Lubbock and about two-and-a-half hours to Oklahoma City.

SOUTH TEXAS

Harlingen

Located in the Rio Grande Valley, along the border of Mexico, Harlingen, was recently named the No. 1 Least Expensive Urban Area in the U.S. by the Council for Community and Economic Research. Though not a household name, Harlingen has become somewhat of a “best kept secret,” with an economic climate that’s heating up as the city continues to attract more businesses thanks to its proximity to the border. But besides location, Harlingen offers incentives and workforce training programs from South Texas that make it a bargain for many incoming businesses.

“Texas is so appealing to many people because of our diversity in climate, culture, geography and much more,” says Raudel Garza, the manager and CEO of the Harlingen Economic Development Corporation. “Our workforce training partners such as Texas State Technical College, with campuses throughout the state, work locally to help solve labor requirements for companies. Local utility companies along with the Texas Department of Transportation invest in Texas to improve access to electricity, clean water, great highways, rail and so much more. Texas has everything a growing company needs to succeed, from a young trainable diverse workforce to easy access to markets.”

But, according to Garza, the reason businesses are flocking to Texas is that the state has more to offer than just business incentives. “Texans enjoy all the amenities of both big city life and country living,” he explains “Large companies know about our standard of living and they understand that Texas is drawing people in because of all they can do here—not only during work hours but also when one is at home or nearby at play. Companies want a reliable labor force, and Texas provides all the amenities such a labor force wants, thus keeping people happy and productive.”

Orange County

Located in the southeast corner of Texas, Orange County has a population of more than 81,000. Orange County’s major industries include petroleum, rice farming, shrimping, paper milling and recently, shipbreaking. The county provides workers with training programs and opportunities to help advance skills zero in on the specific industries that help the county thrive. Orange County is home to a workforce of 39,824 workers, with an unemployment rate of just 5.5 percent.

With its convenient border location, Orange County is close to navigable waterways, major railways, interstate highways and the Louisiana border. As for air travel, Orange County has access to 18 airports within 50 miles, including Orange County Airport and Lake Charles Regional Airport in Lake Charles, Louisiana.

SOUTHWEST TEXAS

Boerne-Kendall County

With a growing population that currently exceeds 46,000, Boerne-Kendall County is projected to expand by 24 percent over the next five years. The seventh fastest growing county in the U.S., and the third fastest growing in Texas, Boerne-Kendall County is already home to a vast multi-skilled, multi-cultural workforce with above average levels of education. Boerne-Kendall County workers have a strong background in biosciences, aerospace, cybersecurity, renewable energy, military and more.

The county is also conveniently located just 10 miles north of San Antonio, and it is central to numerous highways that lead to the Dallas and Austin metropolitan areas, as well as the Texas coast. Within 50 miles of Boerne-Kendall County, there are 25 colleges, universities and trade schools that provide a population of nearly 150,000 college students, who add new energy to the pool of approximately 387,000 workers that already call Boerne-Kendall County home.

WEST CENTRAL TEXAS

Leander

Ranked by Forbes magazine as No. 3 in America for the Best Small Cities for Families, Leander is a northwest suburb of Austin that was also named the Fastest Growing City in the Nation with a population of over 15,000 by the U.S. Census Bureau.

Leander has all the benefits of doing business in Austin without the high overhead and traffic. Leander has its own commuter rail, a lower cost of living and an award-winning education system that consistently ranks high in Texas’ STAAR testing. The city is poised to welcome not just new businesses but a new workforce, too. With more than 14,000 new housing units expected to be built within the next decade, this dynamic community is prepared to welcome you and your business.

To learn more about doing business in Texas and how the Choose Texas team can aid in finding a new location for your expanding or relocating business, visit www.Choose-Texas.com to register your project or request information. 

chicken egg

Chicken Egg Market in Eastern Europe – Russia’s Production Is Growing Rapidly, Driven by Strong Domestic Demand and Expanding Exports

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘Eastern Europe – Hen Eggs – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the chicken egg market in Eastern Europe amounted to $9.7B in 2018, surging by 6.6% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Over the period under review, chicken egg consumption continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 when the market value increased by 13% against the previous year. The level of chicken egg consumption peaked at $10.8B in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, consumption stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Consumption By Country in Eastern Europe

The country with the largest volume of chicken egg consumption was Russia (2.6M tonnes), accounting for 54% of total consumption. Moreover, chicken egg consumption in Russia exceeded the figures recorded by the region’s second-largest consumer, Ukraine (898K tonnes), threefold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Poland (345K tonnes), with a 7.2% share.

In Russia, chicken egg consumption expanded at an average annual rate of +1.6% over the period from 2007-2018. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: Ukraine (+1.0% per year) and Poland (-3.8% per year).

In value terms, the largest chicken egg markets in Eastern Europe were Ukraine ($4.5B), Russia ($2.8B) and Hungary ($673M), together accounting for 82% of the total market.

The countries with the highest levels of chicken egg per capita consumption in 2018 were Ukraine (20 kg per person), Belarus (18 kg per person) and Russia (18 kg per person).

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of chicken egg per capita consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Russia, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in Eastern Europe

Driven by increasing demand for chicken egg in Eastern Europe, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven years. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +0.8% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 5.1M tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in Eastern Europe

The chicken egg production amounted to 5.1M tonnes in 2018, therefore, remained relatively stable against the previous year. Overall, chicken egg production continues to indicate mild growth. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2010 when production volume increased by 3.2% against the previous year. The volume of chicken egg production peaked in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future. The general positive trend in terms of chicken egg output was largely conditioned by slight growth of the number of producing animals and a relatively flat trend pattern in yield figures.

In value terms, chicken egg production stood at $11.3B in 2018 estimated in export prices. The total output value increased at an average annual rate of +1.4% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 with an increase of 39% against the previous year. The level of chicken egg production peaked at $12B in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, production stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Production By Country in Eastern Europe

Russia (2.5M tonnes) constituted the country with the largest volume of chicken egg production, comprising approx. 50% of total production. Moreover, chicken egg production in Russia exceeded the figures recorded by the region’s second-largest producer, Ukraine (895K tonnes), threefold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Poland (600K tonnes), with a 12% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume in Russia totaled +1.6%. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: Ukraine (+0.9% per year) and Poland (+0.8% per year).

Producing Animals in Eastern Europe

In 2018, approx. 444M heads of producing animals were grown in Eastern Europe; approximately reflecting the previous year. This number increased at an average annual rate of +1.1% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being observed over the period under review. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2012 with an increase of 5.3% y-o-y. Over the period under review, this number attained its peak figure level in 2018 and is likely to continue its growth in the near future.

Yield in Eastern Europe

In 2018, the average chicken egg yield in Eastern Europe totaled 11 kg per head, remaining stable against the previous year. Over the period under review, the chicken egg yield continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2009 when yield increased by 7% year-to-year. In that year, the chicken egg yield attained its peak level of 12 kg per head. From 2010 to 2018, the growth of the chicken egg yield remained at a lower figure.

Exports in Eastern Europe

In 2018, approx. 437K tonnes of chicken eggs were exported in Eastern Europe; rising by 6.8% against the previous year. Over the period under review, chicken egg exports continue to indicate resilient growth. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 when exports increased by 91% year-to-year. The volume of exports peaked in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, chicken egg exports amounted to $657M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. In general, chicken egg exports continue to indicate a buoyant expansion. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 when exports increased by 53% against the previous year. The level of exports peaked in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

Exports by Country

Poland prevails in chicken egg exports structure, finishing at 267K tonnes, which was near 61% of total exports in 2018. Belarus (40K tonnes) took the second position in the ranking, followed by Russia (33K tonnes), Latvia (23K tonnes) and the Czech Republic (20K tonnes). All these countries together occupied approx. 27% share of total exports. Bulgaria (15K tonnes) and Romania (12K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

Poland was also the fastest-growing in terms of the chicken eggs exports, with a CAGR of +21.8% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, Russia (+19.2%), Bulgaria (+15.5%), the Czech Republic (+6.4%), Latvia (+5.8%), Romania (+5.6%) and Belarus (+2.5%) displayed positive paces of growth. From 2007 to 2018, the share of Poland, Russia, Bulgaria, Latvia, the Czech Republic and Belarus increased by +54%, +6.5%, +2.8%, +2.4%, +2.3% and +2.2% percentage points, while the shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, Poland ($402M) remains the largest chicken egg supplier in Eastern Europe, comprising 61% of total chicken egg exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the Czech Republic ($43M), with a 6.5% share of total exports. It was followed by Bulgaria, with a 5.2% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of value in Poland amounted to +19.0%. The remaining exporting countries recorded the following average annual rates of exports growth: the Czech Republic (+2.1% per year) and Bulgaria (+11.2% per year).

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the chicken egg export price in Eastern Europe amounted to $1,504 per tonne, picking up by 3.6% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the chicken egg export price, however, continues to indicate a noticeable slump. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2017 when the export price increased by 24% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the export prices for chicken eggs attained their peak figure at $2,301 per tonne in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, export prices stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Bulgaria ($2,219 per tonne), while Belarus ($733 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced a decline in the export price figures.

Imports in Eastern Europe

In 2018, the imports of chicken eggs in Eastern Europe stood at 182K tonnes, jumping by 6.4% against the previous year. The total imports indicated strong growth from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +4.6% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, chicken egg imports decreased by -6.8% against 2015 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 with an increase of 20% y-o-y. The volume of imports peaked at 196K tonnes in 2015; however, from 2016 to 2018, imports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, chicken egg imports amounted to $383M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Over the period under review, chicken egg imports continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2014 when imports increased by 20% y-o-y. In that year, chicken egg imports attained their peak of $489M. From 2015 to 2018, the growth of chicken egg imports remained at a lower figure.

Imports by Country

Russia represented the main importing country with an import of around 84K tonnes, which amounted to 46% of total imports. It was distantly followed by the Czech Republic (20K tonnes), Hungary (17K tonnes), Poland (12K tonnes), Lithuania (11K tonnes), Latvia (8.7K tonnes) and Romania (8.5K tonnes), together creating a 42% share of total imports.

Imports into Russia increased at an average annual rate of +6.5% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, Hungary (+15.5%), Lithuania (+15.4%), Romania (+7.6%), Latvia (+3.7%) and Poland (+2.7%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Hungary emerged as the fastest-growing importer in Eastern Europe, with a CAGR of +15.5% from 2007-2018. The Czech Republic experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. While the share of Russia (+23 p.p.), Hungary (+7.3 p.p.), Lithuania (+4.6 p.p.), Romania (+2.6 p.p.), Poland (+1.6 p.p.) and Latvia (+1.6 p.p.) increased significantly, the shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, Russia ($208M) constitutes the largest market for imported chicken eggs in Eastern Europe, comprising 54% of total chicken egg imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the Czech Republic ($35M), with a 9% share of total imports. It was followed by Hungary, with a 7.2% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of value in Russia amounted to +3.3%. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: the Czech Republic (-4.1% per year) and Hungary (+10.6% per year).

Import Prices by Country

The chicken egg import price in Eastern Europe stood at $2,099 per tonne in 2018, picking up by 3.7% against the previous year. Overall, the chicken egg import price, however, continues to indicate a noticeable slump. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2017 an increase of 11% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the import prices for chicken eggs attained their maximum at $3,152 per tonne in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, import prices failed to regain their momentum.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Russia ($2,490 per tonne), while Latvia ($1,300 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Russia, while the other leaders experienced a decline in the import price figures.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform