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U.S. – Fruits, Nuts And Peel (Sugar Preserved) – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights

fruits nuts

U.S. – Fruits, Nuts And Peel (Sugar Preserved) – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘U.S. – Fruits, Nuts And Peel (Sugar Preserved) – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

Exports from the U.S.

In 2018, the amount of fruits, nuts and peel (sugar preserved) exported from the U.S. stood at 5.2K tonnes, shrinking by -7.3% against the previous year. Overall, exports of fruits, nuts and peel (sugar preserved) continue to indicate a slight reduction. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2009 with an increase of 42% y-o-y. Exports peaked at 9.3K tonnes in 2015; however, from 2016 to 2018, exports failed to regain their momentum.

In value terms, exports of fruits, nuts and peel (sugar preserved) totaled $11M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Over the period under review, exports of fruits, nuts and peel (sugar preserved) continue to indicate a slight contraction. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2009 with an increase of 76% against the previous year. In that year, exports of fruits, nuts and peel (sugar preserved) reached their peak of $21M. From 2010 to 2018, the growth of exports of fruits, nuts and peel (sugar preserved) failed to regain its momentum.

Exports by Country

Canada (1.8K tonnes) was the main destination for exports of fruits, nuts and peel (sugar preserved) from the U.S., with a 35% share of total exports. Moreover, exports of fruits, nuts and peel (sugar preserved) to Canada exceeded the volume sent to the second major destination, Saudi Arabia (385 tonnes), fivefold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by China (352 tonnes), with a 6.8% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume to Canada stood at +16.1%. Exports to the other major destinations recorded the following average annual rates of exports growth: Saudi Arabia (+11.9% per year) and China (+9.2% per year).

In value terms, Canada ($2.7M), China ($1.6M) and Turkey ($888K) constituted the largest markets for sweetened dried fruit and nut exported from the U.S. worldwide, together accounting for 46% of total exports.

Turkey recorded the highest growth rate of exports, among the main countries of destination over the last eleven-year period, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

The average export price for fruits, nuts and peel (sugar preserved) stood at $2,198 per tonne in 2018, coming down by -1.5% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the export price for fruits, nuts and peel (sugar preserved), however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2009 an increase of 25% year-to-year. In that year, the average export prices for fruits, nuts and peel (sugar preserved) attained their peak level of $2,776 per tonne. From 2010 to 2018, the growth in terms of the average export prices for fruits, nuts and peel (sugar preserved) failed to regain its momentum.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Turkey ($4,656 per tonne), while the average price for exports to Australia ($983 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was recorded for supplies to Taiwan, Chinese, while the prices for the other major destinations experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports into the U.S.

In 2018, the imports of fruits, nuts and peel (sugar preserved) into the U.S. totaled 9.4K tonnes, picking up by 22% against the previous year. In general, imports of fruits, nuts and peel (sugar preserved), however, continue to indicate a slight downturn. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2018 with an increase of 22% y-o-y. Imports peaked at 12K tonnes in 2010; however, from 2011 to 2018, imports failed to regain their momentum.

In value terms, imports of fruits, nuts and peel (sugar preserved) stood at $32M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total import value increased at an average annual rate of +2.3% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2010 with an increase of 18% year-to-year. Over the period under review, imports of fruits, nuts and peel (sugar preserved) reached their peak figure in 2018 and are likely to continue its growth in the near future.

Imports by Country

In 2018, Thailand (4.5K tonnes) constituted the largest supplier of sweetened dried fruit and nut to the U.S., with a 48% share of total imports. Moreover, imports of fruits, nuts and peel (sugar preserved) from Thailand exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest supplier, China (827 tonnes), fivefold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Fiji (722 tonnes), with a 7.7% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of volume from Thailand totaled -1.1%. The remaining supplying countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: China (-1.9% per year) and Fiji (+20.1% per year).

In value terms, Thailand ($14.2M) constituted the largest supplier of sweetened dried fruit and nut to the U.S., comprising 45% of total imports of fruits, nuts and peel (sugar preserved). The second position in the ranking was occupied by Fiji ($3.5M), with a 11% share of total imports. It was followed by China, with a 11% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of value from Thailand totaled +3.4%. The remaining supplying countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: Fiji (+23.8% per year) and China (+0.5% per year).

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the average import price for fruits, nuts and peel (sugar preserved) amounted to $3,379 per tonne, falling by -9.4% against the previous year. Overall, the import price indicated a noticeable increase from 2007 to 2018: its price increased at an average annual rate of +3.5% over the last eleven-year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, import price for fruits, nuts and peel (sugar preserved) increased by +54.7% against 2009 indices. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2013 an increase of 27% year-to-year. Over the period under review, the average import prices for fruits, nuts and peel (sugar preserved) reached their peak figure at $3,729 per tonne in 2017, and then declined slightly in the following year.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major supplying countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Fiji ($4,917 per tonne), while the price for India ($1,887 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Mexico, while the prices for the other major suppliers experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

corn exports

U.S. Wet Corn Exports Rose for the Third Consecutive Year

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘U.S. Wet Corn Market. Analysis And Forecast to 2025’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the wet corn market in the U.S. amounted to $8.7B in 2018, dropping by -8.3% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Over the period under review, wet corn consumption continues to indicate a drastic deduction. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2016 with a decrease of -1.8% against the previous year. Wet corn consumption peaked at $15.3B in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, consumption stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Wet Corn Production in the U.S.

In value terms, wet corn production stood at $9.6B in 2018. In general, wet corn production continues to indicate an abrupt shrinkage. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2016 when production volume decreased by -1.1% year-to-year. Wet corn production peaked at $16.7B in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, production remained at a lower figure.

Exports from the U.S.

In 2018, the amount of wet corn exported from the U.S. stood at 2.1M tonnes, falling by -15.1% against the previous year. Over the period under review, wet corn exports continue to indicate a perceptible decline. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2016 when exports increased by 5.2% year-to-year. Over the period under review, wet corn exports reached their peak figure at 2.6M tonnes in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, exports remained at a lower figure.

In value terms, wet corn exports stood at $922M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. In general, wet corn exports continue to indicate a deep shrinkage. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2017 with an increase of 1.8% y-o-y. Over the period under review, wet corn exports attained their peak figure at $1.6B in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, exports remained at a lower figure.

Exports by Country

Ireland (493K tonnes), Israel (265K tonnes) and Colombia (147K tonnes) were the main destinations of wet corn exports from the U.S., with a combined 43% share of total exports. Chile, Egypt, the UK, Indonesia, Turkey, Morocco, New Zealand, Portugal and China lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 39%.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main countries of destination, was attained by New Zealand (+86.2% per year), while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Chile ($96M), Ireland ($92M) and Colombia ($78M) were the largest markets for wet corn exported from the U.S. worldwide, together accounting for 29% of total exports. Egypt, Indonesia, China, Israel, the UK, New Zealand, Turkey, Morocco and Portugal lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 34%.

New Zealand recorded the highest growth rate of exports, among the main countries of destination over the last five-year period, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

The average wet corn export price stood at $435 per tonne in 2018, going down by -11.2% against the previous year. In general, the wet corn export price continues to indicate a deep descent. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2015 when the average export price increased by 1.7% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the average export prices for wet corn attained their peak figure at $629 per tonne in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, export prices remained at a lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was China ($1,055 per tonne), while the average price for exports to Portugal ($153 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was recorded for supplies to China, while the prices for the other major destinations experienced a decline.

Imports into the U.S.

In 2018, approx. 467K tonnes of wet corn were imported into the U.S.; increasing by 5.5% against the previous year. Overall, the total imports indicated a strong expansion from 2013 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +9.5% over the last five years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, wet corn imports increased by +57.5% against 2013 indices. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2015 with an increase of 16% year-to-year. Imports peaked in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, wet corn imports totaled $506M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total import value increased at an average annual rate of +7.7% over the period from 2013 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2018 when imports increased by 12% y-o-y. In that year, wet corn imports reached their peak and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

Imports by Country

Thailand (128K tonnes), Germany (70K tonnes) and the Netherlands (41K tonnes) were the main suppliers of wet corn imports to the U.S., with a combined 51% share of total imports. These countries were followed by Pakistan, Denmark, France, China, Belgium, Taiwan, Chinese, Poland, Viet Nam and Brazil, which together accounted for a further 34%.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main suppliers, was attained by Viet Nam, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest wet corn suppliers to the U.S. were Germany ($84M), Thailand ($82M) and the Netherlands ($46M), together comprising 42% of total imports. France, Belgium, Pakistan, China, Denmark, Taiwan, Chinese, Viet Nam, Brazil and Poland lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 40%.

Viet Nam recorded the highest growth rate of imports, among the main suppliers over the last five-year period, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the average wet corn import price amounted to $1,083 per tonne, rising by 6.6% against the previous year. In general, the wet corn import price, however, continues to indicate a mild downturn. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2018 when the average import price increased by 6.6% year-to-year. Over the period under review, the average import prices for wet corn reached their maximum at $1,194 per tonne in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, import prices stood at a somewhat lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major supplying countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Belgium ($2,141 per tonne), while the price for Thailand ($641 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Taiwan, Chinese, while the prices for the other major suppliers experienced more modest paces of growth.

Companies Mentioned in the Report

Archer-Daniels-Midland Company, Ingredion Incorporated, Roquette America, Inc., Penford Corporation, Penford Products Co., Briess Industries, Inc., Rahr Malting Co., Malteurop North America Inc., Tate & Lyle Ingredients Americas LLC, Malt Products Corporation, Enjoy Life Natural Brands, Semo Milling, Great Western Malting Co, Western Polymer Corporation, Gro Alliance, Philadelphia Beer Works Inc, Unilever Bestfoods North America, Anderson Custom Processing, Tate & Lyle Americas, Great Western Malting, La Aceitera Inc, Holdings In Zone Inc, Staley Holdings, Cornproducts/Mcp Sweeteners, High Sea Sugar

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

trade

Peeling Away Trade Protections for Bananas

Simple in appearance, pleasantly sweet, nutritious, and nearly universal in appeal, that Cavendish bunch of bananas on your counter comes off as pretty unassuming. In reality, it has been through jungle wars and trade wars and now sits on the precipice of extinction. More than half of the bananas traded globally are the Cavendish variety. But with two diseases threatening the world’s largest Cavendish plantations, growing to love more varieties could help save trade in bananas.

Still an Important Cash Crop

Grown in more than 150 countries, bananas are the eighth most important food crop in the world – fourth most important in developing countries. Bananas are among the most traded fruit in the world, generating revenues of more than $8 billion a year for the top banana exporters including Ecuador, the Philippines, Costa Rica, Colombia and Guatemala. However, most are produced for local or national consumption.

For example, the Food and Agriculture Organization estimates that between 70 and 80 percent of bananas in Africa are produced by smallholder farmers. Around 114 million tons are produced globally beyond what isn’t too small to be counted, yet only 19 million tons were shipped globally. That said, for the top five exporters, bananas are a major contributor to the total value of their agricultural exports. India and China are among the biggest producers but their output mainly serves the large domestic markets.

global bananas trade

Peeling Away Trade Protections

The Banana Wars, centered on the European Union’s (EU) banana trade regime, spanned 20 years as the longest running series of disputes in the multilateral trading system to date (although the Boeing-Airbus dispute may be on track to take that title). As one of the most significant episodes in trade law, the Banana Wars are deserving of more attention, but here are some abridged highlights.

Europe’s banana regime began as an umbrella for complex arrangements at the individual EU Member State level that were designed to offer exclusive or preferential access to former colonies in Africa, Caribbean and the Pacific (ACP), and at the same time shield EU producers from competition.

Under the EU’s original regime, ACP countries received a zero-tariff rate while imports from other countries were taxed at 20 percent. However, each Member State was allowed to “derogate” and maintain special protective provisions for imports from their overseas departments. For example, France set aside two-thirds of its market for Guadeloupe and Martinique and the remaining third for the ACP Franc Zone states of Cameroon and Cote d’Ivoire. The Spanish market was reserved for shipments from the Canary Islands. Greece banned imports to protect its own production in Crete. Only Germany opened to free trade.

The Single European Act of 1986 mandated an integrated EU market by January 1993, which required that Member States consolidate their programs into a common regime for bananas. As devised, this version still enabled members to discriminate among imports by source, offering better terms to their overseas departments and to imports from ACP countries. Colombia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Nicaragua and Venezuela (supported by the United States) challenged the regime as inconsistent with the EU’s obligations under the GATT.

The EU’s ability to offer tariff preferences was upheld because it had a waiver in the GATT for its general tariff preference program; but the GATT Panel found the EU’s discrimination through tariff quotas to be inconsistent with its obligations. However, prior to the WTO, a GATT member could simply veto the outcome of a panel decision, enabling the EU effectively to ignore the GATT Panel ruling.
EU banana imports

Second Banana

The EU revised its banana regime in 1993 to include new special distribution licenses under a general quota. Licenses were divvied up among primary importers and importers performing secondary activities such as customs clearance, warehousing and storage; licenses were dependent on historical performance, subject to country allocations, market share and other criteria. After yet another challenge by the five Latin American countries, a GATT Panel found in 1994 that the EU’s licensing system was excessively restrictive and not covered by its waiver.

After 1995, with the WTO’s enforceable dispute settlement system in place and additional obligations to avoid discrimination in trade in services, the EU recognized it would face more challenges to its regime. The large multinational producers involved in shipping, warehousing, ripening, marketing and distribution had an even stronger case to make. The EU negotiated with all of the disgruntled Latin American producers but Guatemala to head off the legal challenge. Having offered additional or expanded quotas, they temporarily pleased some countries but further worsened the discriminatory effect for those countries not a part of the negotiation.

A third complaint against the EU’s banana regime was reviewed in the WTO in 1996, this time with the United States as the lead plaintiff in response to complaints from Chiquita and the Hawaiian Banana Association. A WTO decision in 1997 again concluded that, although the EU’s discriminatory tariffs were covered under its historical waiver, its tariff quota allocations and convoluted import licensing administration violated its WTO obligations. The EU’s next version of its banana regime did little to remedy the discriminatory elements, which led to the imposition of tariffs by the United States and Ecuador in response to the EU’s failure to comply with the WTO ruling. By 2001, the EU made another attempt to transition its system, but not until 2006 would the EU decide to phase in a tariff-only system, dispensing with quotas.

Banana Splits

At the end of 2009, after negotiations with non-ACP producers, the EU agreed to reduce the tariff rate it applies to all WTO members. Tariffs would come down from 176 euros per ton to 114 euros per ton by January 2017 (stipulating it could revert to higher rates if exporting countries exceed a “trigger” amount of imports). It wouldn’t be until 2012, that the EU and 10 Latin American countries finalized signed an agreement in the WTO to codify the revised EU banana tariff schedule (“The Geneva Banana Agreement”), officially closing the longstanding legal disputes.

As a prologue, the EU signed trade agreements with Andean and Central American countries in 2013 and Ecuador in 2017. Ecuador has seen a large bump in global export volume as its agreement with the EU is implemented. By next year, the tariff on bananas from Ecuador to the EU will go down to 75 euros per ton with no quota on the amount eligible for this rate. As the EU continues to edge toward “freer” trade in bananas, the ACP producers will face considerable adjustment.

2009 Geneva Banana Agreement

Going Bananas

Having survived the banana trade wars, the popular Cavendish banana faces a new challenge, one that could actually wipe them out.

“Panama disease TR4” has ravaged thousands of acres of Cavendish plantations throughout Southeast Asia and Australia and is spreading to Africa and the Middle East. It can lie dormant in soil for decades and has proven resistant to fungicides and fumigants. It is only a matter of time before TR4 takes hold in Latin America, which supplies nearly the entire U.S. market. Banana plantations in the Caribbean are threatened by another disease called Black Sigatoka, which has been reducing banana yields by 40 percent every year in affected areas.

Before Cavendish was top banana, a banana called the Gros Michel (Big Mike) dominated the banana trade in the early 1900s until the fungus TR1 took it to the brink of extinction in the mid-1950s. At that time, the Cavendish variety from China was discovered to be resistant to TR1 so it replaced Mike. But bananas don’t have seeds. They breed asexually so they cannot recombine their genes to ward off threats. In other words, the Cavendish is ripe for attack because it cannot evolve – every generation is a clone of the previous.

Try Hanging with a New Bunch

If scientists don’t make a breakthrough, TR4 and TR1 could spell the end for the beloved Cavendish. With over 1,000 different varieties of bananas growing around the world, why not get to know some others that might grow more popular through trade – here are a few to get you started.

For your next dessert, try using Niño, Manzano (“apple bananas”) that have a hint of apple and strawberry flavor, or Goldfinger, a newer variety from Honduras. Intriguingly, there’s also Blue Java, named for its blue skin, which has a creamy, ice cream-like texture and purportedly offers a subtle vanilla flavor.

Cooking bananas include the Macho plantain and other fun-sounding varieties like the Burro which has squared sides and a lemon flavor when ripe, and the Rhino Horn from Africa, which can grow up to two feet long. If consumers demand it, perhaps global trade in bananas will finally branch out.

_________________________________________________________________________

Andrea Durkin is the Editor-in-Chief of TradeVistas and Founder of Sparkplug, LLC. Ms. Durkin previously served as a U.S. Government trade negotiator and has proudly taught international trade policy and negotiations for the last fourteen years as an Adjunct Professor at Georgetown University’s Master of Science in Foreign Service program.

This article originally appeared on TradeVistas.org. Republished with permission.

 

grapefruit

Grapefruit Market in Asia – Japan Halved Grapefruit Imports Over the Last Decade

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘Asia – Grapefruits (Inc. Pomelos) – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the grapefruit market in Asia amounted to $6.4B in 2018, picking up by 6.1% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). In general, grapefruit consumption continues to indicate strong growth. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2015 when the market value increased by 18% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the grapefruit market reached its maximum level in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Consumption By Country in Asia

China (4.8M tonnes) remains the largest grapefruit consuming country in Asia, comprising approx. 72% of total consumption. Moreover, grapefruit consumption in China exceeded the figures recorded by the region’s second-largest consumer, Viet Nam (611K tonnes), eightfold. India (377K tonnes) ranked third in terms of total consumption with a 5.6% share.

In China, grapefruit consumption increased at an average annual rate of +7.5% over the period from 2007-2018. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: Viet Nam (+5.5% per year) and India (+7.1% per year).

In value terms, China ($4.5B) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Viet Nam ($707M). It was followed by Thailand.

The countries with the highest levels of grapefruit per capita consumption in 2018 were Viet Nam (6,331 kg per 1000 persons), China (3,340 kg per 1000 persons) and Thailand (3,267 kg per 1000 persons).

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of grapefruit per capita consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by China, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in Asia

Driven by increasing demand for grapefruit in Asia, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven years. Market performance is forecast to decelerate, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +3.7% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 8.7M tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in Asia

The grapefruit production stood at 7M tonnes in 2018, growing by 6.4% against the previous year. The total output indicated a remarkable increase from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +5.6% over the last eleven-year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, grapefruit production increased by +81.9% against 2007 indices. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2015 when production volume increased by 12% y-o-y. Over the period under review, grapefruit production reached its maximum volume in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the immediate term. The general positive trend in terms of grapefruit output was largely conditioned by a resilient increase of the harvested area and temperate growth in yield figures.

In value terms, grapefruit production stood at $6.9B in 2018 estimated in export prices. Overall, grapefruit production continues to indicate a strong increase. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2015 when production volume increased by 18% against the previous year. The level of grapefruit production peaked in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

Production By Country in Asia

The country with the largest volume of grapefruit production was China (5M tonnes), accounting for 71% of total production. Moreover, grapefruit production in China exceeded the figures recorded by the region’s second-largest producer, Viet Nam (598K tonnes), eightfold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by India (377K tonnes), with a 5.4% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume in China amounted to +7.5%. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: Viet Nam (+5.3% per year) and India (+7.1% per year).

Harvested Area in Asia

In 2018, the total area harvested in terms of grapefruits production in Asia stood at 220K ha, going up by 3.7% against the previous year. The harvested area increased at an average annual rate of +2.8% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2015 with an increase of 18% year-to-year. The level of grapefruit harvested area peaked at 226K ha in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, harvested area stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Yield in Asia

The average grapefruit yield amounted to 32 tonne per ha in 2018, jumping by 2.6% against the previous year. The yield figure increased at an average annual rate of +2.7% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations in certain years. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 when yield increased by 9.6% against the previous year. The level of grapefruit yield peaked in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

Exports in Asia

In 2018, the amount of grapefruits exported in Asia amounted to 525K tonnes, jumping by 21% against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +5.6% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2008 when exports increased by 23% year-to-year. Over the period under review, grapefruit exports reached their maximum in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the near future.

In value terms, grapefruit exports totaled $449M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total exports indicated a strong expansion from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +5.6% over the last eleven-year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, grapefruit exports increased by +15.7% against 2014 indices. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2008 with an increase of 21% y-o-y. Over the period under review, grapefruit exports reached their maximum in 2018 and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

Exports by Country

In 2018, China (211K tonnes) and Turkey (182K tonnes) were the major exporters of grapefruits in Asia, together recording near 75% of total exports. It was distantly followed by Israel (88K tonnes), achieving a 17% share of total exports. China, Hong Kong SAR (16K tonnes) and Cyprus (8.3K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by China, Hong Kong SAR, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest grapefruit markets in Asia were China ($200M), Turkey ($119M) and Israel ($87M), with a combined 91% share of total exports. These countries were followed by China, Hong Kong SAR and Cyprus, which together accounted for a further 4%.

Among the main exporting countries, China, Hong Kong SAR recorded the highest rates of growth with regard to exports, over the last eleven years, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

The grapefruit export price in Asia stood at $855 per tonne in 2018, waning by -3.7% against the previous year. Over the last eleven years, it increased at an average annual rate of +1.2%. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 when the export price increased by 10% y-o-y. In that year, the export prices for grapefruits attained their peak level of $888 per tonne, and then declined slightly in the following year.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Israel ($995 per tonne), while Cyprus ($585 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by China, Hong Kong SAR, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in Asia

In 2018, the amount of grapefruits imported in Asia totaled 272K tonnes, surging by 24% against the previous year. In general, grapefruit imports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2018 when imports increased by 24% y-o-y. Over the period under review, grapefruit imports reached their maximum at 280K tonnes in 2010; however, from 2011 to 2018, imports failed to regain their momentum.

In value terms, grapefruit imports amounted to $232M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Over the period under review, grapefruit imports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2014 when imports increased by 15% y-o-y. The level of imports peaked at $236M in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, imports remained at a lower figure.

Imports by Country

In 2018, Japan (85K tonnes), distantly followed by China (45K tonnes), Saudi Arabia (34K tonnes), South Korea (23K tonnes), China, Hong Kong SAR (23K tonnes) and Viet Nam (15K tonnes) were the largest importers of grapefruits, together comprising 83% of total imports. Iraq (11K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Viet Nam (+115.4% per year), while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Japan ($64M), China ($60M) and South Korea ($32M) were the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2018, with a combined 67% share of total imports. China, Hong Kong SAR, Saudi Arabia, Viet Nam and Iraq lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 21%.

Viet Nam (+99.6% per year) experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to imports, in terms of the main importing countries over the last eleven-year period, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

The grapefruit import price in Asia stood at $853 per tonne in 2018, dropping by -8.6% against the previous year. Overall, the grapefruit import price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2017 when the import price increased by 12% against the previous year. In that year, the import prices for grapefruits reached their peak level of $933 per tonne, and then declined slightly in the following year.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was South Korea ($1,420 per tonne), while Iraq ($323 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by China, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

pork

EU Salt Pork Market Is Estimated at $5.2B

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Pig Meat Salted (Salted, In Brine, Dried Or Smoked) – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The market size for preserved pork in the European Union is estimated at $5.2B (2018), an increase of 3.5% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price).

Over the period under review, preserved pork consumption, however, continues to indicate a temperate setback. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2013 with an increase of 5.6% against the previous year. The level of preserved pork consumption peaked at $6.8B in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, consumption failed to regain its momentum.

Consumption By Country in the EU

The UK (419K tonnes) constituted the country with the largest volume of preserved pork consumption, accounting for 39% of total consumption. Moreover, preserved pork consumption in the UK exceeded the figures recorded by the region’s second-largest consumer, Germany (116K tonnes), fourfold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Italy (94K tonnes), with a 8.8% share.

From 2008 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of volume in the UK totaled -2.7%. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: Germany (-5.0% per year) and Italy (+6.8% per year).

In value terms, the UK ($1.9B) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by France ($748M). It was followed by Germany.

The countries with the highest levels of preserved pork per capita consumption in 2018 were Ireland (12,561 kg per 1000 persons), the UK (6,284 kg per 1000 persons) and Romania (2,789 kg per 1000 persons).

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of preserved pork per capita consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Austria, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Production in the EU

In 2018, the amount of pig meat salted (salted, in brine, dried or smoked) produced in the European Union totaled 1.1M tonnes, remaining constant against the previous year. Over the period under review, preserved pork production, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2009 with an increase of 11% y-o-y. In that year, preserved pork production attained its peak volume of 1.3M tonnes. From 2010 to 2018, preserved pork production growth remained at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, preserved pork production stood at $4.8B in 2018 estimated in export prices. Overall, preserved pork production, however, continues to indicate a measured setback. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 with an increase of 6.8% year-to-year. The level of preserved pork production peaked at $6.4B in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, production failed to regain its momentum.

Production By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of preserved pork production in 2018 were the UK (247K tonnes), Germany (151K tonnes) and Italy (141K tonnes), with a combined 48% share of total production.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of preserved pork production, amongst the main producing countries, was attained by Italy, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, the preserved pork exports in the European Union totaled 398K tonnes, stabilizing at the previous year. In general, preserved pork exports continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2016 with an increase of 5.7% y-o-y. The volume of exports peaked at 423K tonnes in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, exports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, preserved pork exports totaled $2.2B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Over the period under review, preserved pork exports continue to indicate a slight descent. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 when exports increased by 8.1% year-to-year. The level of exports peaked at $2.4B in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, exports failed to regain their momentum.

Exports by Country

In 2018, the Netherlands (98K tonnes), distantly followed by Italy (60K tonnes), Germany (58K tonnes), Denmark (55K tonnes), Spain (50K tonnes), Poland (31K tonnes) and the UK (18K tonnes) were the major exporters of pig meat salted (salted, in brine, dried or smoked), together committing 93% of total exports.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Italy ($648M), Spain ($423M) and the Netherlands ($292M) constituted the countries with the highest levels of exports in 2018, with a combined 63% share of total exports.

Spain experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to exports, in terms of the main exporting countries over the last decade, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the preserved pork export price in the European Union amounted to $5,399 per tonne, remaining relatively unchanged against the previous year. Overall, the preserved pork export price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 when the export price increased by 6.7% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the export prices for pig meat salted (salted, in brine, dried or smoked) attained their peak figure at $6,151 per tonne in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, export prices stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Italy ($10,792 per tonne), while Denmark ($2,876 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Spain, while the other leaders experienced a decline in the export price figures.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, the amount of pig meat salted (salted, in brine, dried or smoked) imported in the European Union totaled 339K tonnes, going up by 1.9% against the previous year. Over the period under review, preserved pork imports, however, continue to indicate a temperate slump. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2010 with an increase of 48% y-o-y. In that year, preserved pork imports attained their peak of 433K tonnes. From 2011 to 2018, the growth of preserved pork imports remained at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, preserved pork imports stood at $1.8B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. In general, preserved pork imports, however, continue to indicate a temperate setback. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2013 with an increase of 10% against the previous year. The level of imports peaked at $2.3B in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, imports failed to regain their momentum.

Imports by Country

The UK prevails in preserved pork imports structure, accounting for 190K tonnes, which was approx. 56% of total imports in 2018. France (34K tonnes) ranks second in terms of the total imports with a 10% share, followed by Germany (7%) and Ireland (4.9%). The following importers – Italy (13,638 tonnes), Austria (8,514 tonnes), Denmark (8,242 tonnes), Belgium (8,025 tonnes) and the Netherlands (5,643 tonnes) – together made up 13% of total imports.

From 2008 to 2018, average annual rates of growth with regard to preserved pork imports into the UK stood at -4.0%. At the same time, Austria (+9.6%), France (+3.5%), Germany (+3.0%), Italy (+2.3%) and Ireland (+2.2%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Austria emerged as the fastest-growing importer in the European Union, with a CAGR of +9.6% from 2008-2018. By contrast, Belgium (-1.6%), Denmark (-5.5%) and the Netherlands (-8.0%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period. France (+2.9 p.p.), Germany (+1.8 p.p.) and Austria (+1.5 p.p.) significantly strengthened its position in terms of the total imports, while Denmark, the Netherlands and the UK saw its share reduced by -1.9%, -2.2% and -27.9% from 2008 to 2018, respectively. The shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, the UK ($634M) constitutes the largest market for imported pig meat salted (salted, in brine, dried or smoked) in the European Union, comprising 36% of total preserved pork imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by France ($280M), with a 16% share of total imports. It was followed by Germany, with a 14% share.

In the UK, preserved pork imports shrank by an average annual rate of -6.5% over the period from 2008-2018. The remaining importing countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: France (+1.7% per year) and Germany (+1.6% per year).

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the preserved pork import price in the European Union amounted to $5,220 per tonne, jumping by 2.5% against the previous year. Overall, the preserved pork import price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2009 an increase of 22% against the previous year. In that year, the import prices for pig meat salted (salted, in brine, dried or smoked) reached their peak level of $6,609 per tonne. From 2010 to 2018, the growth in terms of the import prices for pig meat salted (salted, in brine, dried or smoked) remained at a somewhat lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Belgium ($11,387 per tonne), while the UK ($3,331 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced mixed trends in the import price figures.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

chicken egg

Chicken Egg Market in Eastern Europe – Russia’s Production Is Growing Rapidly, Driven by Strong Domestic Demand and Expanding Exports

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘Eastern Europe – Hen Eggs – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the chicken egg market in Eastern Europe amounted to $9.7B in 2018, surging by 6.6% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Over the period under review, chicken egg consumption continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 when the market value increased by 13% against the previous year. The level of chicken egg consumption peaked at $10.8B in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, consumption stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Consumption By Country in Eastern Europe

The country with the largest volume of chicken egg consumption was Russia (2.6M tonnes), accounting for 54% of total consumption. Moreover, chicken egg consumption in Russia exceeded the figures recorded by the region’s second-largest consumer, Ukraine (898K tonnes), threefold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Poland (345K tonnes), with a 7.2% share.

In Russia, chicken egg consumption expanded at an average annual rate of +1.6% over the period from 2007-2018. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: Ukraine (+1.0% per year) and Poland (-3.8% per year).

In value terms, the largest chicken egg markets in Eastern Europe were Ukraine ($4.5B), Russia ($2.8B) and Hungary ($673M), together accounting for 82% of the total market.

The countries with the highest levels of chicken egg per capita consumption in 2018 were Ukraine (20 kg per person), Belarus (18 kg per person) and Russia (18 kg per person).

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of chicken egg per capita consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Russia, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in Eastern Europe

Driven by increasing demand for chicken egg in Eastern Europe, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven years. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +0.8% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 5.1M tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in Eastern Europe

The chicken egg production amounted to 5.1M tonnes in 2018, therefore, remained relatively stable against the previous year. Overall, chicken egg production continues to indicate mild growth. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2010 when production volume increased by 3.2% against the previous year. The volume of chicken egg production peaked in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future. The general positive trend in terms of chicken egg output was largely conditioned by slight growth of the number of producing animals and a relatively flat trend pattern in yield figures.

In value terms, chicken egg production stood at $11.3B in 2018 estimated in export prices. The total output value increased at an average annual rate of +1.4% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 with an increase of 39% against the previous year. The level of chicken egg production peaked at $12B in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, production stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Production By Country in Eastern Europe

Russia (2.5M tonnes) constituted the country with the largest volume of chicken egg production, comprising approx. 50% of total production. Moreover, chicken egg production in Russia exceeded the figures recorded by the region’s second-largest producer, Ukraine (895K tonnes), threefold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Poland (600K tonnes), with a 12% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume in Russia totaled +1.6%. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: Ukraine (+0.9% per year) and Poland (+0.8% per year).

Producing Animals in Eastern Europe

In 2018, approx. 444M heads of producing animals were grown in Eastern Europe; approximately reflecting the previous year. This number increased at an average annual rate of +1.1% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being observed over the period under review. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2012 with an increase of 5.3% y-o-y. Over the period under review, this number attained its peak figure level in 2018 and is likely to continue its growth in the near future.

Yield in Eastern Europe

In 2018, the average chicken egg yield in Eastern Europe totaled 11 kg per head, remaining stable against the previous year. Over the period under review, the chicken egg yield continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2009 when yield increased by 7% year-to-year. In that year, the chicken egg yield attained its peak level of 12 kg per head. From 2010 to 2018, the growth of the chicken egg yield remained at a lower figure.

Exports in Eastern Europe

In 2018, approx. 437K tonnes of chicken eggs were exported in Eastern Europe; rising by 6.8% against the previous year. Over the period under review, chicken egg exports continue to indicate resilient growth. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 when exports increased by 91% year-to-year. The volume of exports peaked in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, chicken egg exports amounted to $657M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. In general, chicken egg exports continue to indicate a buoyant expansion. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 when exports increased by 53% against the previous year. The level of exports peaked in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

Exports by Country

Poland prevails in chicken egg exports structure, finishing at 267K tonnes, which was near 61% of total exports in 2018. Belarus (40K tonnes) took the second position in the ranking, followed by Russia (33K tonnes), Latvia (23K tonnes) and the Czech Republic (20K tonnes). All these countries together occupied approx. 27% share of total exports. Bulgaria (15K tonnes) and Romania (12K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

Poland was also the fastest-growing in terms of the chicken eggs exports, with a CAGR of +21.8% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, Russia (+19.2%), Bulgaria (+15.5%), the Czech Republic (+6.4%), Latvia (+5.8%), Romania (+5.6%) and Belarus (+2.5%) displayed positive paces of growth. From 2007 to 2018, the share of Poland, Russia, Bulgaria, Latvia, the Czech Republic and Belarus increased by +54%, +6.5%, +2.8%, +2.4%, +2.3% and +2.2% percentage points, while the shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, Poland ($402M) remains the largest chicken egg supplier in Eastern Europe, comprising 61% of total chicken egg exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the Czech Republic ($43M), with a 6.5% share of total exports. It was followed by Bulgaria, with a 5.2% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of value in Poland amounted to +19.0%. The remaining exporting countries recorded the following average annual rates of exports growth: the Czech Republic (+2.1% per year) and Bulgaria (+11.2% per year).

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the chicken egg export price in Eastern Europe amounted to $1,504 per tonne, picking up by 3.6% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the chicken egg export price, however, continues to indicate a noticeable slump. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2017 when the export price increased by 24% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the export prices for chicken eggs attained their peak figure at $2,301 per tonne in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, export prices stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Bulgaria ($2,219 per tonne), while Belarus ($733 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced a decline in the export price figures.

Imports in Eastern Europe

In 2018, the imports of chicken eggs in Eastern Europe stood at 182K tonnes, jumping by 6.4% against the previous year. The total imports indicated strong growth from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +4.6% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, chicken egg imports decreased by -6.8% against 2015 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 with an increase of 20% y-o-y. The volume of imports peaked at 196K tonnes in 2015; however, from 2016 to 2018, imports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, chicken egg imports amounted to $383M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Over the period under review, chicken egg imports continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2014 when imports increased by 20% y-o-y. In that year, chicken egg imports attained their peak of $489M. From 2015 to 2018, the growth of chicken egg imports remained at a lower figure.

Imports by Country

Russia represented the main importing country with an import of around 84K tonnes, which amounted to 46% of total imports. It was distantly followed by the Czech Republic (20K tonnes), Hungary (17K tonnes), Poland (12K tonnes), Lithuania (11K tonnes), Latvia (8.7K tonnes) and Romania (8.5K tonnes), together creating a 42% share of total imports.

Imports into Russia increased at an average annual rate of +6.5% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, Hungary (+15.5%), Lithuania (+15.4%), Romania (+7.6%), Latvia (+3.7%) and Poland (+2.7%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Hungary emerged as the fastest-growing importer in Eastern Europe, with a CAGR of +15.5% from 2007-2018. The Czech Republic experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. While the share of Russia (+23 p.p.), Hungary (+7.3 p.p.), Lithuania (+4.6 p.p.), Romania (+2.6 p.p.), Poland (+1.6 p.p.) and Latvia (+1.6 p.p.) increased significantly, the shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, Russia ($208M) constitutes the largest market for imported chicken eggs in Eastern Europe, comprising 54% of total chicken egg imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the Czech Republic ($35M), with a 9% share of total imports. It was followed by Hungary, with a 7.2% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of value in Russia amounted to +3.3%. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: the Czech Republic (-4.1% per year) and Hungary (+10.6% per year).

Import Prices by Country

The chicken egg import price in Eastern Europe stood at $2,099 per tonne in 2018, picking up by 3.7% against the previous year. Overall, the chicken egg import price, however, continues to indicate a noticeable slump. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2017 an increase of 11% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the import prices for chicken eggs attained their maximum at $3,152 per tonne in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, import prices failed to regain their momentum.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Russia ($2,490 per tonne), while Latvia ($1,300 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Russia, while the other leaders experienced a decline in the import price figures.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

palm oil market

Africa’s Palm Oil Market – Foreign Suppliers Benefit From Resilient Market Growth

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘Africa – Palm Oil – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The palm oil market size in Africa is estimated at $8.2B in 2018, an increase of 3.7% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price).

The total market indicated a resilient expansion from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +4.6% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, palm oil consumption increased by +9.3% against 2016 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 when the market value increased by 24% year-to-year. Over the period under review, the palm oil market attained its peak figure level at $9.9B in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, consumption stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Consumption By Country in Africa

The countries with the highest volumes of palm oil consumption in 2018 were Nigeria (1.2M tonnes), Egypt (959K tonnes) and Kenya (705K tonnes), with a combined 31% share of total consumption. These countries were followed by Tanzania, Ghana, South Africa, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Mozambique, Uganda, Togo and Cameroon, which together accounted for a further 42%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of palm oil consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Djibouti, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest palm oil markets in Africa were Nigeria ($861M), Egypt ($626M) and Tanzania ($559M), with a combined 25% share of the total market. Kenya, Cameroon, Ghana, Djibouti, South Africa, Togo, Uganda, Mozambique and Democratic Republic of the Congo lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 37%.

In 2018, the highest levels of palm oil per capita consumption was registered in Djibouti (431 kg per person), followed by Togo (40 kg per person), Ghana (18 kg per person) and Kenya (14 kg per person), while the world average per capita consumption of palm oil was estimated at 7.09 kg per person.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of the palm oil per capita consumption in Djibouti stood at +17.6%. The remaining consuming countries recorded the following average annual rates of per capita consumption growth: Togo (+6.9% per year) and Ghana (+3.6% per year).

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in Africa

Driven by increasing demand for palm oil in Africa, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven-year period. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +3.9% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 12M tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in Africa

The palm oil production amounted to 2.4M tonnes in 2018, approximately equating the previous year. Overall, palm oil production, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2011 when production volume increased by 3.7% y-o-y. The volume of palm oil production peaked at 2.5M tonnes in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, production remained at a lower figure.

In value terms, palm oil production stood at $2.1B in 2018 estimated in export prices. Over the period under review, palm oil production, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2011 when production volume increased by 9.7% year-to-year. In that year, palm oil production reached its peak level of $2.8B. From 2012 to 2018, palm oil production growth remained at a lower figure.

Production By Country in Africa

The countries with the highest volumes of palm oil production in 2018 were Nigeria (739K tonnes), Cote d’Ivoire (426K tonnes) and Democratic Republic of the Congo (410K tonnes), together accounting for 65% of total production.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of palm oil production, amongst the main producing countries, was attained by Democratic Republic of the Congo, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Exports in Africa

In 2018, approx. 462K tonnes of palm oil were exported in Africa; picking up by 7.6% against the previous year. Over the period under review, palm oil exports continue to indicate a prominent expansion. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2014 with an increase of 39% against the previous year. Over the period under review, palm oil exports attained their maximum in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, palm oil exports totaled $355M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total exports indicated a strong expansion from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +6.0% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, palm oil exports increased by +29.9% against 2016 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2014 with an increase of 33% y-o-y. Over the period under review, palm oil exports attained their peak figure in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Exports by Country

In 2018, Cote d’Ivoire (200K tonnes) was the major exporter of palm oil, making up 43% of total exports. It was distantly followed by Ghana (80K tonnes), Kenya (59K tonnes) and Seychelles (45K tonnes), together creating a 40% share of total exports. South Africa (15K tonnes), Senegal (13K tonnes), Togo (9.5K tonnes) and Liberia (8.9K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

Exports from Cote d’Ivoire increased at an average annual rate of +7.6% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, Liberia (+31.6%), Ghana (+23.8%), Senegal (+21.7%), Seychelles (+19.8%), Togo (+13.3%), Kenya (+4.9%) and South Africa (+4.2%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Liberia emerged as the fastest-growing exporter in Africa, with a CAGR of +31.6% from 2007-2018. While the share of Cote d’Ivoire (+24 p.p.), Ghana (+16 p.p.), Seychelles (+8.3 p.p.), Kenya (+5.2 p.p.), Senegal (+2.4 p.p.), Liberia (+1.8 p.p.) and Togo (+1.5 p.p.) increased significantly, the shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, the largest palm oil markets in Africa were Cote d’Ivoire ($133M), Ghana ($73M) and Kenya ($46M), together accounting for 71% of total exports. Seychelles, South Africa, Senegal, Togo and Liberia lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 22%.

Among the main exporting countries, Liberia recorded the highest rates of growth with regard to exports, over the last eleven-year period, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the palm oil export price in Africa amounted to $769 per tonne, jumping by 2.1% against the previous year. Overall, the palm oil export price, however, continues to indicate a slight contraction. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2008 when the export price increased by 20% year-to-year. Over the period under review, the export prices for palm oil attained their peak figure at $1,084 per tonne in 2012; however, from 2013 to 2018, export prices failed to regain their momentum.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was South Africa ($1,021 per tonne), while Cote d’Ivoire ($665 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by South Africa, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in Africa

In 2018, the palm oil imports in Africa stood at 7.1M tonnes, surging by 5.1% against the previous year. Over the period under review, palm oil imports continue to indicate a remarkable expansion. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2014 with an increase of 21% against the previous year. The volume of imports peaked in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the near future.

In value terms, palm oil imports totaled $4.8B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total imports indicated a buoyant expansion from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +7.2% over the last eleven-year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, palm oil imports increased by +7.9% against 2016 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 when imports increased by 33% against the previous year. Over the period under review, palm oil imports attained their maximum at $5.8B in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, imports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Imports by Country

Egypt (968K tonnes), Kenya (764K tonnes), Tanzania (648K tonnes), Ghana (481K tonnes), South Africa (473K tonnes), Nigeria (425K tonnes), Djibouti (419K tonnes), Uganda (343K tonnes), Mozambique (342K tonnes) and Togo (320K tonnes) represented roughly 73% of total imports of palm oil in 2018. Algeria (198K tonnes) and Angola (178K tonnes) held a relatively small share of total imports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Nigeria, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest palm oil importing markets in Africa were Egypt ($592M), Kenya ($505M) and Tanzania ($455M), together comprising 32% of total imports. Ghana, Djibouti, South Africa, Nigeria, Uganda, Mozambique, Togo, Angola and Algeria lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 45%.

Nigeria experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to imports, in terms of the main importing countries over the last eleven years, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the palm oil import price in Africa amounted to $673 per tonne, declining by -10.5% against the previous year. In general, the palm oil import price continues to indicate a mild decrease. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2008 an increase of 29% y-o-y. The level of import price peaked at $1,038 per tonne in 2011; however, from 2012 to 2018, import prices stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Average prices varied somewhat amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, major importing countries recorded the following prices: in Angola ($806 per tonne) and Djibouti ($746 per tonne), while Egypt ($611 per tonne) and South Africa ($627 per tonne) were amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Mozambique, while the other leaders experienced a decline in the import price figures.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

Global Beef Market 2019 – Rising Demand In China Boosts Imports Up, Securing New Opportunities For Foreign Suppliers

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘World – Beef (Cattle Meat) – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The global beef market revenue amounted to $385.7B in 2018, growing by 5.1% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +3.2% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2008 with an increase of 11% year-to-year. Global beef consumption peaked in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Production 2007-2018

In 2018, approx. 70M tonnes of beef (cattle meat) were produced worldwide; flattening at the previous year. In general, beef production continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2013 when Production Volume increased by 1.8% against the previous year. Over the period under review, global beef production reached its peak figure volume in 2018 and is likely to continue its growth in the immediate term. The general positive trend in terms of beef output was largely conditioned by a relatively flat trend pattern of the number of producing animals and a relatively flat trend pattern in yield figures.

In value terms, beef production stood at $392.3B in 2018 estimated in export prices. The total output value increased at an average annual rate of +4.3% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2008 with an increase of 19% y-o-y. Global beef production peaked in 2018 and is likely to see steady growth in the immediate term.

Exports 2007-2018

In 2018, approx. 8.1M tonnes of beef (cattle meat) were exported worldwide; approximately equating the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.6% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with only minor fluctuations being observed throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 with an increase of 10% against the previous year. Over the period under review, global beef exports attained their peak figure at 8.2M tonnes in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, exports failed to regain their momentum.

In value terms, beef exports amounted to $40.7B in 2018. In general, the total exports indicated a resilient increase from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +1.6% over the last eleven year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, the beef exports increased by +6.0% against 2016 indices. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2008 with an increase of 18% against the previous year. Over the period under review, global beef exports attained their maximum at $44.1B in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, exports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Exports by Country

In 2018, Brazil (1.3M tonnes), followed by Australia (857K tonnes), the U.S. (691K tonnes), New Zealand (436K tonnes), Ireland (410K tonnes), the Netherlands (383K tonnes) and Argentina (367K tonnes) were the major exporters of beef (cattle meat), together mixing up 55% of total exports. Canada (345K tonnes), India (337K tonnes), Poland (325K tonnes), Uruguay (283K tonnes) and Germany (266K tonnes) took a relatively small share of total exports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Poland, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest beef markets worldwide were Brazil ($5.3B), the U.S. ($4.8B) and Australia ($4.7B), together comprising 36% of global exports. Ireland, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Argentina, Canada, Uruguay, Poland, Germany and India lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 40%.

In terms of the main exporting countries, Poland experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to exports, over the last eleven year period, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the average beef export price amounted to $5,052 per tonne, leveling off at the previous year. Over the period from 2007 to 2018, it increased at an average annual rate of +2.3%. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2008 when the average export price increased by 20% year-to-year. Over the period under review, the average export prices for beef (cattle meat) attained their maximum at $5,370 per tonne in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, export prices remained at a lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average Export Price prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest Export Price price was the U.S. ($6,894 per tonne), while India ($3,448 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of Export Price prices was attained by India, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports 2007-2018

In 2018, the global imports of beef (cattle meat) stood at 9.5M tonnes, increasing by 4.3% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.3% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with only minor fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 with an increase of 7.4% year-to-year. Global imports peaked in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future.

In value terms, beef imports totaled $47.3B in 2018. Overall, the total imports indicated a remarkable increase from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +2.3% over the last eleven year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, the beef imports increased by +15.4% against 2016 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 when Imports increased by 16% year-to-year. Over the period under review, global beef imports reached their maximum in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

Imports by Country

In 2018, China (1M tonnes), the U.S. (912K tonnes), Viet Nam (619K tonnes), Japan (610K tonnes), South Korea (442K tonnes), China, Hong Kong SAR (439K tonnes), Italy (386K tonnes), Germany (367K tonnes), Russia (359K tonnes), the Netherlands (356K tonnes), the UK (294K tonnes) and France (247K tonnes) represented the largest importers of beef (cattle meat) in the world, mixing up 64% of total import.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by China, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest beef importing markets worldwide were the U.S. ($5B), China ($4.7B) and Japan ($3.5B), together accounting for 28% of global imports.

China recorded the highest growth rate of imports, in terms of the main importing countries over the last eleven years, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the average beef import price amounted to $4,996 per tonne, increasing by 2.2% against the previous year. Over the period from 2007 to 2018, it increased at an average annual rate of +2.3%. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2008 an increase of 18% year-to-year. Global import price peaked at $5,104 per tonne in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, import prices failed to regain their momentum.

There were significant differences in the average Import Price prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest Import Price price was South Korea ($6,415 per tonne), while Viet Nam ($3,258 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of Import Price prices was attained by the U.S., while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

avocado

Global Avocado Market 2019 – Mexican Exporters Enjoy New Growth Momentum, Thanks To Rising Demand In the U.S.

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘World – Avocados – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The global avocado market revenue amounted to $13.5B in 2018, reducing by -9.3% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Overall, avocado consumption continues to indicate a remarkable expansion. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2017 with an increase of 29% y-o-y. In that year, the global avocado market attained its peak level of $14.9B, and then declined slightly in the following year.

Production 2007-2018

In 2018, the amount of avocados produced worldwide amounted to 6.4M tonnes, rising by 6% against the previous year. Overall, the total output indicated a strong expansion from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +5.3% over the last eleven year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, the avocado production increased by +85.2% against 2008 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2009 with an increase of 13% y-o-y. Over the period under review, global avocado production attained its peak figure volume in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the immediate term. The general positive trend in terms of avocado output was largely conditioned by remarkable growth of the harvested area and a modest expansion in yield figures.

In value terms, avocado production stood at $12.9B in 2018 estimated in export prices. Over the period under review, avocado production continues to indicate a remarkable increase. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2017 when the output figure increased by 40% against the previous year. In that year, global avocado production attained its peak level of $15.6B, and then declined slightly in the following year.

Exports 2007-2018

In 2018, approx. 2.4M tonnes of avocados were exported worldwide; growing by 23% against the previous year. In general, avocado exports continue to indicate resilient growth. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2018 when exports increased by 23% y-o-y. In that year, global avocado exports attained their peak and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, avocado exports totaled $5.6B in 2018. Overall, avocado exports continue to indicate a buoyant increase. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2016 with an increase of 36% against the previous year. Global exports peaked at $5.8B in 2017, and then declined slightly in the following year.

Exports by Country

Mexico represented the major exporting country with an export of around 1.1M tonnes, which reached 45% of total exports. It was distantly followed by Peru (361K tonnes), the Netherlands (246K tonnes) and Chile (133K tonnes), together comprising a 31% share of total exports. The following exporters – Spain (106K tonnes), South Africa (85K tonnes), Kenya (72K tonnes) and the U.S. (68K tonnes) – together made up 14% of total exports.

From 2007 to 2018, average annual rates of growth with regard to avocado exports from Mexico stood at +12.5%. At the same time, Peru (+20.8%), the U.S. (+19.6%), the Netherlands (+18.2%), Kenya (+14.3%), Spain (+7.3%) and South Africa (+6.3%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Peru emerged as the fastest growing exporter in the world, with a CAGR of +20.8% from 2007-2018. By contrast, Chile (-1.1%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period. Mexico (+33 p.p.), Peru (+13 p.p.), the Netherlands (+8.6 p.p.), the U.S. (+2.4 p.p.), Spain (+2.4 p.p.), Kenya (+2.3 p.p.) and South Africa (+1.7 p.p.) significantly strengthened its position in terms of the global exports, while the shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, Mexico ($2.4B) remains the largest avocado supplier worldwide, comprising 43% of global exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the Netherlands ($734M), with a 13% share of global exports. It was followed by Peru, with a 13% share.

In Mexico, avocado exports increased at an average annual rate of +13.4% over the period from 2007-2018. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: the Netherlands (+21.6% per year) and Peru (+23.1% per year).

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the average avocado export price amounted to $2,308 per tonne, lowering by -22% against the previous year. Over the period from 2007 to 2018, it increased at an average annual rate of +2.5%. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2017 when the average export price increased by 25% y-o-y. In that year, the average export prices for avocados attained their peak level of $2,960 per tonne, and then declined slightly in the following year.

Export prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest export price was Spain ($3,160 per tonne), while Kenya ($1,646 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of export prices was attained by Chile, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports 2007-2018

In 2018, the amount of avocados imported worldwide stood at 2.4M tonnes, growing by 12% against the previous year. Overall, avocado imports continue to indicate a resilient expansion. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2010 when imports increased by 25% against the previous year. Over the period under review, global avocado imports attained their maximum in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, avocado imports amounted to $5.9B in 2018. Overall, avocado imports continue to indicate a buoyant expansion. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 with an increase of 32% year-to-year. Global imports peaked at $6.3B in 2017, and then declined slightly in the following year.

Imports by Country

The U.S. was the key importing country with an import of around 1M tonnes, which accounted for 43% of total imports. The Netherlands (258K tonnes) held the second position in the ranking, followed by France (144K tonnes), the UK (118K tonnes) and Spain (115K tonnes). All these countries together took near 26% share of total imports. Canada (93K tonnes), Germany (93K tonnes), Japan (74K tonnes) and China (54K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

Imports into the U.S. increased at an average annual rate of +10.4% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, China (+136.2%), the Netherlands (+16.0%), Spain (+15.1%), Germany (+14.6%), Canada (+13.5%), Japan (+9.8%), the UK (+9.1%) and France (+2.3%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, China emerged as the fastest growing importer in the world, with a CAGR of +136.2% from 2007-2018. The U.S. (+29 p.p.), the Netherlands (+8.6 p.p.), Spain (+3.8 p.p.), the UK (+3 p.p.), Germany (+3 p.p.), Canada (+2.9 p.p.), China (+2.2 p.p.) and Japan (+2 p.p.) significantly strengthened its position in terms of the global imports, while the shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, the U.S. ($2.4B) constitutes the largest market for imported avocados worldwide, comprising 42% of global imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the Netherlands ($539M), with a 9.2% share of global imports. It was followed by France, with a 7% share.

In the U.S., avocado imports expanded at an average annual rate of +13.4% over the period from 2007-2018. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: the Netherlands (+17.1% per year) and France (+6.5% per year).

Import Prices by Country

The average avocado import price stood at $2,439 per tonne in 2018, dropping by -16.8% against the previous year. Over the last eleven year period, it increased at an average annual rate of +2.7%. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2011 an increase of 23% year-to-year. Global import price peaked at $2,931 per tonne in 2017, and then declined slightly in the following year.

Import prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest import price was Germany ($3,414 per tonne), while Spain ($1,920 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of import prices was attained by Germany, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

Roasted Nut And Peanut Butter Market in the USA – Key Insights

IndexBox has just published a new report, the U.S. Roasted Nuts And Peanut Butter Market. Analysis And Forecast to 2025. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the market of roasted nuts and peanut butter in the U.S. amounted to $16.9B in 2018, picking up by 7.4% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +8.3% from 2013 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2014, with an increase of 14% year-to-year. Consumption of roasted nuts and peanut butter peaked in 2018, and is likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

Production of Roasted Nuts And Peanut Butter in the USA

In value terms, production of roasted nuts and peanut butter stood at $16.8B in 2018. The total output value increased at an average annual rate of +8.2% from 2013 to 2018, fluctuating slightly in certain years. 

Nuts and seeds (salted, roasted, cooked, or blanched) ($14.8B) constituted the leading product category in terms of the total output. The second position in the ranking was occupied by peanut butter ($1.6B).

From 2013 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth of the production volume of nuts and seeds (salted, roasted, cooked, or blanched) stood at +10.4%. Meanwhile, production of peanut butter (-3.7% per year) contracted over the same period.

Exports of Roasted Nuts And Peanut Butter
Exports from the USA

In 2018, approx. 49K tonnes of roasted nuts and peanut butter were exported from the U.S.; increasing by 24% against the previous year. In general, the total exports indicated a tangible growth from 2013 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +4.6% over the last five year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. In value terms, exports of roasted nuts and peanut butter amounted to $318M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

China (11K tonnes), Taiwan, Chinese (7.3K tonnes) and China, Hong Kong SAR (7.1K tonnes) were the main destinations of exports of roasted nuts and peanut butter from the U.S., together accounting for 52% of total exports.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main countries of destination, was attained by China (+49.1% per year), while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, China ($80M), China, Hong Kong SAR ($53M) and Australia ($33M) were the largest markets for roasted nut and peanut butter exported from the U.S.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the average export price for roasted nuts and peanut butter amounted to $6.5 per kg, picking up by 23% against the previous year. Over the last five year period, it increased at an average annual rate of +6.4%.

There were significant differences in the average export prices for the major foreign markets. In 2018, the country with the highest export price was Australia ($11 per kg), while the average price for exports to Taiwan, Chinese ($4.1 per kg) was amongst the lowest.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of export prices was recorded for supplies to Australia (+25.4% per year), while the export prices for the other major destinations experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports of Roasted Nuts And Peanut Butter
Imports into the USA

In 2018, imports of roasted nuts and peanut butter into the U.S. stood at 75K tonnes, shrinking by -26.8% against the previous year. Overall, imports of roasted nuts and peanut butter continue to indicate a strong increase.

In value terms, imports of roasted nuts and peanut butter stood at $323M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total import value increased at an average annual rate of +8.7% over the period from 2013 to 2018; moreover, imports peaked in 2018, and are expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Imports by Country

Argentina (15K tonnes), China (13K tonnes) and Israel (11K tonnes) were the main suppliers of roasted nuts and peanut butter to the U.S., together comprising 52% of total imports. These countries were followed by Viet Nam, India, Thailand and Turkey, which together accounted for a further 30%.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main suppliers, was attained by Viet Nam (+22.3% per year), while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest roasted nut and peanut butter suppliers to the U.S. were Viet Nam ($74M), Thailand ($44M) and China ($30M), together accounting for 46% of total imports.

Import Prices by Country

The average import price for roasted nuts and peanut butter stood at $4.3 per kg in 2018, increasing by 50% against the previous year. Overall, the import price for roasted nuts and peanut butter continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

Import prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest import price was Thailand ($9.7 per kg), while the price for Argentina ($2 per kg) was amongst the lowest.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of import prices was attained by Vietnam (+12.4% per year), while the import prices for the other major suppliers experienced mixed trend patterns.

Companies Mentioned in the Report

Diamond Foods, Wonderful Pistachios & Almonds, John B. Sanfilippo & Son, Stewart & Jasper Marketing, Bergin Fruit Company, Trophy Nut, Hazelnut Growers of Oregon, Algood Food Company, Kanan Enterprises, Texoma Peanut Company, Terri Lynn, A. L. Schutzman Company, Suntree, Star Snacks Co., Sahale Snacks, Sahale Snacks, Primex Farms, Ann’s House of Nuts, Nutcracker Brands, Nichols Pistachio, Westnut, Mauna Loa Macadamia Nut, Bazzini Holdings, ABC Peanut Butter, Whitsons Food Service (bronx)

Source: IndexBox AI Platform