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Global Cassava Market Is Expected to Successfully Resist the COVID Pandemic

cassava

Global Cassava Market Is Expected to Successfully Resist the COVID Pandemic

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘World – Cassava – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

Since Cassava Constitutes a Staple Food in Tropical Countries, the Market Should Remain Stable Even Amid the Pandemic

Cassava (Manihot esculenta), also known as manioc, yuca, macaxeira, mandioca, aipim, and agbeli, is a plant native to South America which is extensively cultivated as a staple crop in tropical and subtropical regions in Africa and Asia for its edible starchy tuberous root, a major source of carbohydrates. Cassava, along with rice and maize, is one of the largest sources of calories in the tropics, thereby constituting a major staple food in the developing world, providing a basic diet for millions of people.

In 2019, the global cassava market increased by 0.4% to $164.1B (IndexBox estimates), rising for the third consecutive year after two years of decline. Overall, consumption continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2014 with an increase of 7.8% y-o-y. As a result, consumption attained a peak level of $172.1B. From 2015 to 2019, the growth of the global market remained at a somewhat lower figure.

The countries with the highest volumes of cassava consumption in 2019 were Nigeria (61M tonnes), the Democratic Republic of the Congo (32M tonnes) and Thailand (32M tonnes), with a combined 42% share of global consumption. Ghana, Brazil, Indonesia, Angola, Viet Nam, Cambodia, Mozambique, China, and Malawi lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 37%.

The countries with the highest levels of cassava per capita consumption in 2019 were Ghana (646 kg per person), Cambodia (572 kg per person), and Angola (494 kg per person).

From 2013 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of cassava per capita consumption, amongst the leading consuming countries, was attained by Mozambique, while cassava per capita consumption for the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Since cassava constitutes a well-established product in tropical countries of Africa and South America, as well as in some countries of South-Eastern Asia, the patterns of cassava consumption and the overall market demand should remain stable. Therefore, the growth of the population of tropical countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America, and, consequently, the demand for food products will remain the key driver of the market in the medium term.

As cassava is one of the most drought-tolerant crops, capable of growing on poor soils, it is less sensitive to the risk of adverse weather conditions as many other crops. Accordingly, political instability in African countries, which hampers economic development, remains the main constraint on market growth.

Moreover, in early 2020, the global economy entered a period of the crisis caused by the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. In order to battle the spread of the virus, most countries in the world implemented quarantine measures that put on halt production and transport activity. The combination of those factors hampers economic growth heavily throughout the world and disrupts the international supply chains. The result will be a drop in GDP relative to previous years which is to cut consumer spending.

Cassava, however, features among staple food products which are rather tolerant to crisis periods in terms of consumption. Given the fact that cassava is largely consumed in countries with low incomes and where it constitutes an affordable and important diet item, it is not expected that the COVID crisis will lead to a deep decrease in cassava consumption. It is more likely that people would cut the consumption of more expensive food items on the backdrop of lower incomes but keep the main diet element. In the medium term, therefore, population growth will continue to stimulate growth in demand for cassava.

Driven by increasing demand for cassava in major consuming countries, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next decade. Market performance, however, is forecast to expand with an anticipated CAGR of +0.8% for the period from 2019 to 2030, which is projected to bring the market volume to 326M tonnes by the end of 2030.

Tropical Countries of Africa, Asia, and Latin America Remain the Largest Producers of Cassava

The countries with the highest volumes of cassava production in 2019 were Nigeria (61M tonnes), Thailand (32M tonnes), and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (32M tonnes), with a combined 42% share of global production. Ghana, Brazil, Indonesia, Angola, Cambodia, Viet Nam, Mozambique, Malawi, and Cote d’Ivoire lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 37%.

From 2013 to 2019, the biggest increases were in Cote d’Ivoire, while cassava production for the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In 2019, the total area harvested in terms of cassava production worldwide rose to 26M ha, increasing by 3.3% on the previous year’s figure. Over the period under review, the harvested area, however, saw a relatively flat trend pattern. The global harvested area peaked at 26M ha in 2017; however, from 2018 to 2019, the harvested area failed to regain the momentum.

In 2019, the global average cassava yield dropped slightly to 12 tonnes per ha, leveling off at the previous year’s figure. The yield figure increased at an average annual rate of +1.2% over the period from 2013 to 2019; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2014 with an increase of 6.4% year-to-year. Over the period under review, the average cassava yield hit record highs at 12 tonnes per ha in 2018 and then dropped in the following year.

China, Thailand and Viet Nam Constitute the Largest Importers of Cassava

In 2019, the amount of cassava imported worldwide reduced to 6.6M tonnes, declining by -14.9% against the previous year. Overall, imports recorded a pronounced descent. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2015 when imports increased by 15% y-o-y. Global imports peaked at 10M tonnes in 2017; however, from 2018 to 2019, imports failed to regain momentum. In value terms, cassava imports dropped significantly to $1.3B (IndexBox estimates) in 2019.

The purchases of the three major importers of cassava, namely China, Thailand, and Viet Nam, represented more than two-thirds of total imports. South Korea (239K tonnes) took a relatively small share of total imports.

From 2013 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of purchases, amongst the key importing countries, was attained by Thailand, while imports for the other global leaders experienced mixed trends in the import figures.

In value terms, China ($531M), Viet Nam ($285M), and Thailand ($267M) constituted the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2019, together accounting for 83% of global imports.

In terms of the main importing countries, Thailand saw the highest rates of growth with regard to the value of imports, over the period under review, while purchases for the other global leaders experienced mixed trends in the import figures.

The average cassava import price stood at $198 per tonne in 2019, which is down by -11.4% against the previous year. Overall, the import price recorded a pronounced curtailment. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2018 when the average import price increased by 2.9% against the previous year. Over the period under review, average import prices attained the peak figure at $270 per tonne in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2019, import prices remained at a lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2019, the country with the highest price was China ($219 per tonne), while Thailand ($124 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2013 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by South Korea, while the other global leaders experienced a decline in the import price figures.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

sheep meat

The Middle Eastern Lamb And Sheep Meat Market to Post Measured Growth

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘Middle East – Lamb And Sheep Meat – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the lamb and sheep meat market in the Middle East amounted to $7.8B in 2019, remaining relatively unchanged against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +2.0% over the period from 2007 to 2019; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The level of lamb and sheep meat consumption peaked in 2019 and is expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

Consumption by Country

The countries with the highest volumes of lamb and sheep meat consumption in 2019 were Turkey (371K tonnes), Iran (325K tonnes) and Syrian Arab Republic (158K tonnes), with a combined 63% share of total consumption. Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Kuwait, the United Arab Emirates, Iraq, Oman, Qatar, Jordan and Bahrain lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 35%.

From 2007 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of lamb and sheep meat consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Qatar, while lamb and sheep meat consumption for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest lamb and sheep meat markets in the Middle East were Iran ($2.3B), Turkey ($2.1B) and Syrian Arab Republic ($952M), together accounting for 69% of the total market. These countries were followed by Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Iraq, Qatar, Yemen, Bahrain, Kuwait, Jordan and Oman, which together accounted for a further 29%.

The countries with the highest levels of lamb and sheep meat per capita consumption in 2019 were Bahrain (16 kg per person), Qatar (13 kg per person) and Kuwait (12 kg per person).

Market Forecast 2019-2030

Driven by increasing demand for lamb and sheep meat in the Middle East, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next decade. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +1.4% for the period from 2019 to 2030, which is projected to bring the market volume to 1.6M tonnes by the end of 2030.

Production in the Middle East

In 2019, production of lamb and sheep meat increased by 1% to 1.2M tonnes, rising for the second year in a row after two years of decline. Over the period under review, production saw a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2015 when the production volume increased by 7.7% y-o-y. The volume of production peaked in 2019 and is expected to retain growth in years to come.

Production by Country

The countries with the highest volumes of lamb and sheep meat production in 2019 were Turkey (371K tonnes), Iran (320K tonnes) and Syrian Arab Republic (158K tonnes), together comprising 71% of total production. These countries were followed by Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Iraq and Kuwait, which together accounted for a further 20%.

From 2007 to 2019, the biggest increases were in Yemen, while lamb and sheep meat production for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Producing Animals in the Middle East

In 2019, the number of animals slaughtered for lamb and sheep meat production in the Middle East totaled 56M heads, standing approx. at 2018 figures. Overall, the producing animals recorded a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2012 when the number of producing animals increased by 8.6% year-to-year. The level of producing animals peaked in 2019 and is likely to continue growth in the near future.

Yield in the Middle East

In 2019, the average lamb and sheep meat yield in the Middle East reduced modestly to 21 kg per head, approximately equating the previous year. In general, the yield, however, saw a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2009 when the yield increased by 7.6% year-to-year. The level of yield peaked at 23 kg per head in 2011; however, from 2012 to 2019, the yield failed to regain the momentum.

Imports in the Middle East

In 2019, purchases abroad of lamb and sheep meat increased by 2.9% to 177K tonnes for the first time since 2015, thus ending a three-year declining trend. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.5% over the period from 2007 to 2019; the trend pattern remained consistent, with only minor fluctuations being observed throughout the analyzed period. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2012 with an increase of 17% y-o-y. The volume of import peaked at 197K tonnes in 2015; however, from 2016 to 2019, imports remained at a lower figure.

In value terms, lamb and sheep meat imports expanded rapidly to $1.1B (IndexBox estimates) in 2019. Total imports indicated resilient growth from 2007 to 2019: its value increased at an average annual rate of +1.5% over the last twelve-year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period.

Imports by Country

The purchases of the three major importers of lamb and sheep meat, namely the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia and Qatar, represented more than half of total import. Jordan (18K tonnes) ranks next in terms of the total imports with a 10% share, followed by Kuwait (9%), Oman (7.2%) and Bahrain (4.6%).

From 2007 to 2019, the biggest increases were in Qatar, while purchases for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest lamb and sheep meat importing markets in the Middle East were the United Arab Emirates ($302M), Qatar ($218M) and Saudi Arabia ($217M), with a combined 68% share of total imports.

Import Prices by Country

In 2019, the lamb and sheep meat import price in the Middle East amounted to $6,132 per tonne, surging by 2.1% against the previous year. Import price indicated a buoyant expansion from 2007 to 2019: its price increased at an average annual rate of +5.7% over the last twelve years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2019 figures, lamb and sheep meat import price increased by +27.0% against 2016 indices. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2010 an increase of 27% year-to-year. Over the period under review, import prices hit record highs in 2019 and is expected to retain growth in years to come.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Qatar ($7,170 per tonne), while Oman ($4,104 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Jordan, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

beet sugar

Global Sugar Beet Demand Is Expected to Hit 332M Tonnes by 2030

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘World – Sugar Beet – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The global sugar beet market stood at $657.6B in 2019, with an increase of 2.1% against the previous year. World consumption indicated a notable expansion from 2009 to 2019: its value increased at an average annual rate of +2.1% over the last decade. The trend line, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2011 when the market value increased by 52% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the global market reached a maximum level of $805.2B in 2017; however, from 2018 to 2019, consumption failed to regain the momentum. Based on 2019 figures, consumption decreased by -18.3% against 2017 indices.

Consumption by Country

The countries with the highest volumes of sugar beet consumption in 2019 were Russia (44M tonnes), France (40M tonnes), and the U.S. (30M tonnes), with a combined 42% share of global consumption. These countries were followed by Germany, Turkey, Poland, Ukraine, China, Egypt, the Netherlands, Belgium, and Belarus, which together accounted for a further 42%.

From 2009 to 2019, the biggest increases were in Egypt, while sugar beet consumption for the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Russia ($340.4B) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the U.S. ($151.2B). It was followed by Turkey.

The countries with the highest levels of sugar beet per capita consumption in 2019 were France (612 kg per person), Belarus (521 kg per person), and Belgium (432 kg per person).

Market Forecast to 2030

Driven by increasing demand for sugar beet worldwide, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next decade. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +1.9% for the period from 2019 to 2030, which is projected to bring the market volume to 332M tonnes by the end of 2030.

Sugar Beet Production

In 2019, global production of sugar beet totaled 271M tonnes, approximately equating 2018. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.2% over the period from 2009 to 2019; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed in certain years. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2011 with an increase of 22% against the previous year. Over the period under review, global production attained the maximum volume at 299M tonnes in 2017; however, from 2018 to 2019, production stood at a somewhat lower figure. The generally positive trend in terms output was largely conditioned by a pronounced increase of the harvested area and modest growth in yield figures.

Production by Country

The countries with the highest volumes of sugar beet production in 2019 were Russia (44M tonnes), France (40M tonnes), and the U.S. (30M tonnes), with a combined 42% share of global production. These countries were followed by Germany, Turkey, Poland, Ukraine, China, Egypt, the Netherlands, Belgium, and Belarus, which together accounted for a further 42%.

From 2009 to 2019, the biggest increases were in Egypt, while sugar beet production for the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Harvested Area

In 2019, the global harvested area of sugar beet shrank slightly to 4.7M ha, standing approx. at 2018 figures. The harvested area increased at an average annual rate of +1.2% from 2009 to 2019; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations throughout the analyzed period. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2010 with an increase of 9.5% y-o-y. The global harvested area peaked at 5M ha in 2011; however, from 2012 to 2019, the harvested area stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Yield

In 2019, the global average yield of sugar beet stood at 58 tonnes per ha, picking up by 1.6% against the previous year’s figure. In general, the yield saw a mild increase. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2011 with an increase of 12% year-to-year. Over the period under review, the average sugar beet yield hit record highs at 62 tonne per ha in 2017; however, from 2018 to 2019, the yield stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Exports

For the fourth year in a row, the global market recorded growth in overseas shipments of sugar beet, which increased by 42% to 503K tonnes in 2019.

In value terms, sugar beet exports rose sharply to $50M (IndexBox estimates) in 2019. Over the period under review, exports saw a noticeable shrinkage. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2011 with an increase of 34% against the previous year. Global exports peaked at $91M in 2012; however, from 2013 to 2019, exports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Exports by Country

Germany ($16M) remains the largest sugar beet supplier worldwide, comprising 32% of global exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the Netherlands ($6.9M), with a 14% share of global exports. It was followed by Belgium, with a 6.3% share.

In Germany, sugar beet exports expanded at an average annual rate of +12.8% over the period from 2009-2019. In other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: the Netherlands (-7.1% per year) and Belgium (+106.1% per year).

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

carrot

The Middle Eastern Carrot And Turnip Market Continues Moderate but Robust Growth

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘Middle East – Carrots And Turnips – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

In 2019, the Middle Eastern carrot and turnip market increased by 3.1% to $458M, rising for the fourth year in a row after two years of decline. The market value increased at an average annual rate of +1.7% from 2007 to 2019; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2012 with an increase of 8.9% year-to-year. Over the period under review, the market attained the maximum level in 2019 and is expected to retain growth in the immediate term.

Consumption by Country

The countries with the highest volumes of carrot and turnip consumption in 2019 were Turkey (564K tonnes), Iran (319K tonnes) and Israel (142K tonnes), with a combined 73% share of total consumption. These countries were followed by the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Oman and Kuwait, which together accounted for a further 20%.

From 2007 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of carrot and turnip consumption, amongst the leading consuming countries, was attained by Oman, while carrot and turnip consumption for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest carrot and turnip markets in the Middle East were Turkey ($96M), Israel ($86M) and Iran ($86M), with a combined 59% share of the total market. These countries were followed by the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Oman and Jordan, which together accounted for a further 31%.

The countries with the highest levels of carrot and turnip per capita consumption in 2019 were Israel (16 kg per person), the United Arab Emirates (12 kg per person) and Turkey (6.81 kg per person).

Production in the Middle East

In 2019, carrot and turnip production in the Middle East stood at 1.3M tonnes, stabilizing at the previous year. Over the period under review, production, however, saw a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2016 when the production volume increased by 4.8% against the previous year. Over the period under review, production hit record highs at 1.4M tonnes in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2019, production stood at a somewhat lower figure. The general negative trend in terms output was largely conditioned by a relatively flat trend pattern of the harvested area and a relatively flat trend pattern in yield figures.

In value terms, carrot and turnip production reached $396M in 2019 estimated in export prices. The total output value increased at an average annual rate of +1.3% over the period from 2007 to 2019; the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years.

Production by Country

The countries with the highest volumes of carrot and turnip production in 2019 were Turkey (644K tonnes), Iran (331K tonnes) and Israel (228K tonnes), together accounting for 89% of total production. The United Arab Emirates lagged somewhat behind, accounting for a further 3.6%.

From 2007 to 2019, the biggest increases were in the United Arab Emirates, while carrot and turnip production for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Harvested Area in the Middle East

In 2019, the carrot and turnip harvested area in the Middle East stood at 40K ha, approximately reflecting the year before. Over the period under review, the harvested area, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2015 when the harvested area increased by 11% year-to-year. The level of harvested area peaked at 41K ha in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2019, the harvested area remained at a lower figure.

Yield in the Middle East

In 2019, the average carrot and turnip yield in the Middle East shrank modestly to 34 tonne per ha, remaining relatively unchanged against 2018. In general, the yield continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2011 with an increase of 5.1% y-o-y. The level of yield peaked at 39 tonne per ha in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2019, the yield remained at a lower figure.

Exports in the Middle East

In 2019, overseas shipments of carrots and turnips increased by 2.1% to 202K tonnes for the first time since 2016, thus ending a two-year declining trend. Total exports indicated a noticeable expansion from 2007 to 2019: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.7% over the last twelve-year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2019 figures, exports decreased by -29.9% against 2016 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 when exports increased by 45% year-to-year. As a result, exports reached the peak of 312K tonnes. From 2012 to 2019, the growth exports failed to regain the momentum.

In value terms, carrot and turnip exports totaled $79M (IndexBox estimates) in 2019. Total exports indicated a noticeable expansion from 2007 to 2019: its value increased at an average annual rate of +2.7% over the last twelve-year period.

Exports by Country

Israel (86K tonnes) and Turkey (80K tonnes) dominates carrot and turnip exports structure, together creating 83% of total exports. It was distantly followed by Iran (12K tonnes), committing a 5.9% share of total exports. The following exporters – Saudi Arabia (8.8K tonnes), Syrian Arab Republic (4.9K tonnes) and Oman (4.9K tonnes) – together made up 9.2% of total exports.

From 2007 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of shipments, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Iran, while exports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Israel ($53M) remains the largest carrot and turnip supplier in the Middle East, comprising 68% of total exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Turkey ($14M), with a 17% share of total exports. It was followed by Saudi Arabia, with a 3.2% share.

In Israel, carrot and turnip exports expanded at an average annual rate of +4.3% over the period from 2007-2019. The remaining exporting countries recorded the following average annual rates of exports growth: Turkey (+2.7% per year) and Saudi Arabia (+0.9% per year).

Export Prices by Country

In 2019, the carrot and turnip export price in the Middle East amounted to $389 per tonne, rising by 2.7% against the previous year. In general, the export price saw a relatively flat trend pattern. Over the period under review, export prices attained the maximum at $469 per tonne in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2019, export prices remained at a lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Israel ($620 per tonne), while Turkey ($170 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Syrian Arab Republic, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the Middle East

Carrot and turnip imports expanded sharply to 262K tonnes in 2019, growing by 6.9% against the previous year. Total imports indicated a tangible expansion from 2007 to 2019: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +4.1% over the last twelve years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2019 figures, imports increased by +55.3% against 2012 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2009 with an increase of 30% y-o-y. Over the period under review, imports hit record highs in 2019 and are likely to see steady growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, carrot and turnip imports expanded rapidly to $138M (IndexBox estimates) in 2019. Overall, imports continue to indicate a remarkable increase. Over the period under review, imports reached the peak figure in 2019 and are likely to see steady growth in the near future.

Imports by Country

The United Arab Emirates (81K tonnes) and Saudi Arabia (74K tonnes) represented roughly 59% of total imports of carrots and turnips in 2019. Kuwait (22K tonnes) ranks next in terms of the total imports with a 8.3% share, followed by Qatar (7.5%), Lebanon (6.7%) and Bahrain (4.8%). Oman (9.8K tonnes) took a little share of total imports.

From 2007 to 2019, the biggest increases were in Saudi Arabia, while purchases for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest carrot and turnip importing markets in the Middle East were the United Arab Emirates ($45M), Saudi Arabia ($36M) and Qatar ($14M), with a combined 69% share of total imports.

Saudi Arabia recorded the highest rates of growth with regard to the value of imports, in terms of the main importing countries over the period under review, while purchases for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

The carrot and turnip import price in the Middle East stood at $529 per tonne in 2019, picking up by 3.6% against the previous year. Import price indicated a tangible expansion from 2007 to 2019: its price increased at an average annual rate of +4.3% over the last twelve-year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2019 figures, carrot and turnip import price increased by +16.1% against 2017 indices. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2008 an increase of 23% against the previous year. Over the period under review, import prices hit record highs at $554 per tonne in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2019, import prices stood at a somewhat lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2019, the country with the highest price was Qatar ($708 per tonne), while Lebanon ($352 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Qatar, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

pineapple juice

The EU Pineapple Juice Market Lacks to Gain Momentum

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Pineapple Juice – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The EU pineapple juice market (which refers to the single strength juice of both direct extraction and reconstituted from the concentrate) was estimated at $368M in 2019, approximately equating the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price. Over the period under review, consumption recorded a mild decline. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2009 when the market value increased by 30% against the previous year. As a result, consumption attained the peak level of $624M. From 2010 to 2019, the growth of the market failed to regain the momentum.

COVID-19: Challenges and Opportunities

The COVID-19 pandemic triggered a noticeable transformation of the markets throughout the world, in particular, with regard to the pineapple juice market. So far, the uncertainty regarding the depth of both the global and the national economic decline is too great to make reliable forecasts. However, changes are currently taking place in key market fundamentals: macroeconomic background, sales channels, supply chains, consumer behavior, and prices.

According to the IMF, even several months lived outbreak would lead to at least a 3% contraction of the global GDP in 2020. Previously, during the 2008-2010 crisis, pineapple juice production in the world declined in 2010, and afterward, it rebounded over the next two years. Since pineapple juice is a less popular product than more common types of juice, it is more at risk from the COVID-19 epidemic than staple food products. In the context of falling incomes, consumers primarily tend to exclude non-staple goods from purchases, which in the EU countries is relevant for pineapple juice. Given those assumptions, the contraction of the market in the short term of 2020 might be perceptible. In the medium term, the market growth should start to rebound gradually along with rising incomes and the wane of the pandemic.

Major supply chain risk comes from the fact that the pineapple industry in large producing countries (Costa Rica, the Philippines, Thailand) is largely export-oriented, therefore, a decrease in demand in Western countries can hurt local producers. Future pineapple cultivation may be hampered by the possible lack of investment in 2020 due to the economic uncertainty and tight financial conditions for both farmers and investors. Consequently, it could undermine supply chains because local producers will switch to other crops if pineapple cultivation becomes unprofitable.

Another risk may appear due to the disruption of established international supply chains including food handling and packaging intermediaries, as well as in the processing sector. Supply chains may be undermined by asynchronous quarantine measures taken in the involved countries as well as the restraints in deliveries. However, this is now mitigated by the gradual re-opening of the economies in the are key importing markets  – the U.S. and Europe, which should support the market demand.

Given the limitations of the HoReCa sector and the reduced number of visits to traditional malls and shops, online retail is becoming a key channel for the sale of food products, including pineapple juice. Moreover, contactless delivery becomes a ‘must-have’ option for retail services. As online retail becomes the key sales channel, advertising budgets are to shift increasingly from point-of-sale advertising towards Internet messengers and social networks.

On the other hand, retail packaging adapted to different consumption situations becomes more popular: family packages, single person packages of various shapes and dimensions, snack packages, etc. Furthermore, increased consumer attention to health stimulates changes in branding and promotion towards focusing on the health benefits of pineapple juice, which may support the rise of ‘non-from-concentrate’ brands.

Consumption by Country

The countries with the highest volumes of pineapple juice consumption in 2019 were Spain (117K tonnes), France (82K tonnes) and Germany (47K tonnes), together comprising 52% of total consumption. These countries were followed by Italy, the Netherlands, the UK and Belgium, which together accounted for a further 33%.

From 2007 to 2019, the biggest increases were in Belgium, while pineapple juice (single strength) consumption for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Spain ($115M) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by France ($52M). It was followed by Italy.

The countries with the highest levels of pineapple juice per capita consumption in 2019 were the Netherlands (2.54 kg per person), Spain (2.49 kg per person) and Belgium (2 kg per person).

Production in the EU

In 2019, pineapple juice production in the European Union declined modestly to 334K tonnes, which is down by -3.6% on 2018. In general, production continues to indicate a noticeable downturn. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2018 with an increase of 33% y-o-y. Over the period under review, production reached the peak volume at 669K tonnes in 2009; however, from 2010 to 2019, production failed to regain the momentum.

Production By Country

Spain (100K tonnes) remains the largest pineapple juice producing country in the European Union, accounting for 30% of total volume. Moreover, pineapple juice (single strength) production in Spain exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest producer, France (47K tonnes), twofold. Italy (44K tonnes) ranked third in terms of total production with a 13% share.

From 2007 to 2019, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume in Spain amounted to -2.4%. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: France (-0.7% per year) and Italy (-6.4% per year).

Exports in the EU

In 2019, exports of pineapple juice in the European Union shrank notably to 112K tonnes, which is down by -29.9% compared with the previous year. Total exports indicated tangible growth from 2007 to 2019: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +3.4% over the last twelve-year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The volume of export peaked at 160K tonnes in 2018, and then reduced notably in the following year.

In value terms, pineapple juice (single strength) exports contracted to $82M (IndexBox estimates) in 2019. The total export value increased at an average annual rate of +2.5% over the period from 2007 to 2019; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years.

Exports by Country

The Netherlands was the largest exporter of pineapple juice in the European Union, with the volume of exports recording 59K tonnes, which was near 52% of total exports in 2019. It was distantly followed by Germany (13K tonnes), Belgium (11K tonnes), Spain (6.9K tonnes) and Cyprus (5.5K tonnes), together achieving a 32% share of total exports. Austria (4.1K tonnes) and France (3.6K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

The Netherlands was also the fastest-growing in terms of the pineapple juice (single strength) exports, with a CAGR of +16.1% from 2007 to 2019. At the same time, France (+11.0%), Cyprus (+9.1%), Belgium (+9.0%) and Spain (+8.0%) displayed positive paces of growth. Germany experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. By contrast, Austria (-9.7%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period. From 2007 to 2019, the share of the Netherlands, Belgium, Spain, Cyprus and France increased by +44%, +6.1%, +3.7%, +3.2% and +2.3% percentage points, while Austria (-8.7 p.p.) saw their share reduced. The shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, the Netherlands ($38M) remains the largest pineapple juice supplier in the European Union, comprising 46% of total exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Germany ($12M), with a 14% share of total exports. It was followed by Belgium, with a 8.4% share.

In the Netherlands, pineapple juice exports increased at an average annual rate of +14.4% over the period from 2007-2019. The remaining exporting countries recorded the following average annual rates of exports growth: Germany (+0.8% per year) and Belgium (+7.0% per year).

Export Prices by Country

The average pineapple juice  export price in the European Union stood at $733 per tonne in 2019. Over the period under review, the export price, however, saw a relatively flat trend pattern. Over the period under review, export prices attained the maximum at $873 per tonne in 2011; however, from 2012 to 2019, export prices remained at a lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was France ($1,212 per tonne), while Cyprus ($543 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by France, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

In 2019, overseas purchases of pineapple juice decreased by -5.1% to 249K tonnes, falling for the third year in a row after two years of growth. Against its outset level of 2007, imports, however, enjoyed a prominent increase. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2016 when imports increased by 36% against the previous year. As a result, imports attained the peak of 318K tonnes. From 2017 to 2019, the growth imports remained at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, pineapple juice imports reduced to $131M (IndexBox estimates) in 2019. Total imports indicated a pronounced increase from 2007 to 2019: its value increased at an average annual rate of +6.3% over the last twelve-year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period.

Imports by Country

In 2019, the Netherlands (87K tonnes) was the main importer of pineapple juice, generating 35% of total imports. France (39K tonnes) ranks second in terms of the total imports with a 16% share, followed by Germany (15%), Belgium (12%), Spain (9.5%) and the UK (6.4%).

Imports into the Netherlands increased at an average annual rate of +6.5% from 2007 to 2019. At the same time, Belgium (+19.7%), Spain (+17.8%), Germany (+11.6%) and France (+9.8%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Belgium emerged as the fastest-growing importer imported in the European Union, with a CAGR of +19.7% from 2007-2019. The UK experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. While the share of the Netherlands (+18 p.p.), Germany (+11 p.p.), France (+10 p.p.), Belgium (+10 p.p.) and Spain (+8.1 p.p.) increased significantly, the shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, the Netherlands ($35M), France ($24M) and Germany ($20M) were the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2019, with a combined 60% share of total imports. Belgium, the UK and Spain lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 27%.

Import Prices by Country

In 2019, the pineapple juice import price in the European Union amounted to $528 per tonne, waning by -9.9% against the previous year. Overall, the import price showed a perceptible reduction. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2009 when the import price increased by 8.4% year-to-year. As a result, import price attained the peak level of $850 per tonne. From 2010 to 2019, the growth in terms of the import prices remained at a lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was the UK ($649 per tonne), while the Netherlands ($404 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by France, while the other leaders experienced a decline in the import price figures.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

africa

Africa’s Frozen Whole Fish Market – Nigeria Emerges As the Largest Market, with $488M of Imports in 2018

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘Africa – Frozen Whole Fish – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The value of the frozen whole fish market in Africa expanded markedly to $5B in 2018, jumping by 5.8% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the market size attained its peak level in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the years to come.

Exports in Africa

In 2018, approx. 1.5M tonnes of frozen whole fish were exported in Africa; increasing by 4.4% against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +7.3% over the period from 2013 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2017 when exports increased by 11% against the previous year.

In value terms, frozen whole fish exports went up modestly to $1.9B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total export value peaked in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the near future.

Exports by Country

Namibia (393K tonnes), Mauritania (287K tonnes), Morocco (284K tonnes) and Senegal (209K tonnes) represented roughly 76% of total exports of frozen whole fish in 2018. Seychelles (124K tonnes) occupied an 8% share (based on tonnes) of total exports, which put it in second place, followed by Angola (4.7%). South Africa (47K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2013 to 2018, the biggest increases were in Seychelles, while shipments for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest frozen whole fish supplying countries in Africa were Mauritania ($302M), Morocco ($286M) and Namibia ($278M), together comprising 46% of total exports. Seychelles, Senegal, South Africa and Angola lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 37%.

Export Prices by Country

The frozen whole fish export price in Africa stood at $1,219 per tonne in 2018, approximately reflecting the previous year.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was South Africa ($2,742 per tonne), while Namibia ($708 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by South Africa, while the other leaders experienced mixed trends in the export price figures.

Imports in Africa

In 2018, approx. 2.7M tonnes of frozen whole fish were imported in Africa; lowering by -1.7% against 2017.

In value terms, frozen whole fish imports went down modestly to $3B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total import value hit record highs at $3B in 2014; afterwards, it flattened through to 2018.

Imports by Country

The purchases of the four major importers of frozen whole fish, namely Nigeria, Cameroon, Cote d’Ivoire and Egypt, represented more than half of total import. It was distantly followed by South Africa (163K tonnes), Ghana (157K tonnes) and Mauritius (142K tonnes), together achieving a 17% share of total imports. Benin (97K tonnes), Democratic Republic of the Congo (96K tonnes) and Zambia (96K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2013 to 2018, the biggest increases were in Benin, while purchases for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest frozen whole fish importing markets in Africa were Nigeria ($488M), Cameroon ($467M) and Egypt ($290M), with a combined 42% share of total imports. These countries were followed by Cote d’Ivoire, Mauritius, Ghana, South Africa, Zambia, Benin and Democratic Republic of the Congo, which together accounted for a further 39%.

Import Prices by Country

The frozen whole fish import price in Africa stood at $1,088 per tonne in 2018, surging by 4.8% against the previous year.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Mauritius ($1,810 per tonne), while Nigeria ($839 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Ghana, while the other leaders experienced a decline in the import price figures.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

Tobacco Market

Global Unmanufactured Tobacco Market – Exports form Brazil Declined for the Sixth Year in a Row to $1.9B in 2018

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘World – Unmanufactured Tobacco – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

Brazil, the world’s largest supplier of tobacco, is plagued by falling demand. Exports from this country have been steadily declining for six consecutive years, from $ 3.2 billion in 2012 to $ 1.9 billion in 2018.

From 2007-2018, the global market rose at an average annual rate of +2.0% to reach $24.6B. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price).

Consumption by Country

China (2.2M tonnes) remains the largest unmanufactured tobacco consuming country worldwide, accounting for 35% of total volume. Moreover, unmanufactured tobacco consumption in China exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest consumer, India (565K tonnes), fourfold. Brazil (321K tonnes) ranked third in terms of total consumption with a 5.1% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume in China was relatively modest. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: India (+4.3% per year) and Brazil (+2.8% per year).

Exports 2007-2018

In 2018, approx. 2.5M tonnes of tobacco (unmanufactured) were exported worldwide; reducing by -1.7% against the previous year. Overall, unmanufactured tobacco exports continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2012 when exports increased by 6.6% against the previous year. The global exports peaked at 2.8M tonnes in 2009; however, from 2010 to 2018, exports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, unmanufactured tobacco exports stood at $11.4B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

In 2018, Brazil (449K tonnes), distantly followed by Belgium (228K tonnes), China (203K tonnes), India (186K tonnes), Malawi (173K tonnes), Zimbabwe (172K tonnes) and the U.S. (153K tonnes) were the main exporters of tobacco (unmanufactured), together achieving 63% of total exports. Italy (75K tonnes), Mozambique (70K tonnes), Turkey (68K tonnes), Argentina (64K tonnes) and Germany (59K tonnes) occupied a minor share of total exports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Belgium, while exports for the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Brazil ($1.9B), Belgium ($1.2B) and the U.S. ($1B) appeared to be the countries with the highest levels of exports in 2018, together comprising 36% of global exports.

Belgium experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to the value of exports, in terms of the main exporting countries over the period under review, while exports for the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

The average unmanufactured tobacco export price stood at $4,582 per tonne in 2018, therefore, remained relatively stable against the previous year. Over the last eleven years, it increased at an average annual rate of +2.8%. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2008 when the average export price increased by 15% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the average export prices for tobacco (unmanufactured) reached their peak figure at $4,874 per tonne in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, export prices remained at a lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Germany ($7,076 per tonne), while India ($3,249 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Italy, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

toilet paper

Global Toilet Paper Market – U.S. ($375M), Germany ($320M), and the Netherlands ($164M) Are the Biggest Importers

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘World – Toilet Paper – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The global toilet paper market revenue amounted to $60.4B in 2018, going up by 6.6% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price).

The market value increased at an average annual rate of +2.9% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being observed throughout the analyzed period. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2008 with an increase of 12% year-to-year. The global toilet paper consumption peaked in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

Exports 2007-2018

In 2018, approx. 2.1M tonnes of toilet paper were exported worldwide; going up by 4.9% against the previous year. Over the period under review, toilet paper exports continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2010 when exports increased by 5.3% against the previous year. Over the period under review, global toilet paper exports reached their peak figure in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future.

In value terms, toilet paper exports totaled $3.7B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

China (229K tonnes) and Germany (222K tonnes) represented the main exporters of toilet paper in 2018, finishing at approx. 11% and 11% of total exports, respectively. It was followed by Italy (127K tonnes), France (113K tonnes), Poland (109K tonnes) and Sweden (104K tonnes), together comprising a 21% share of total exports. Canada (84K tonnes), El Salvador (80K tonnes), Mexico (73K tonnes), Slovakia (73K tonnes), the U.S. (71K tonnes) and Austria (70K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Mexico, while exports for the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the average toilet paper export price amounted to $1,735 per tonne, increasing by 5.9% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the toilet paper export price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2008 when the average export price increased by 15% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the average export prices for toilet paper attained their maximum at $1,903 per tonne in 2011; however, from 2012 to 2018, export prices stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was the U.S. ($2,648 per tonne), while Slovakia ($1,346 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the U.S., while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports 2007-2018

In 2018, the global toilet paper imports amounted to 2.1M tonnes, growing by 5.1% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.4% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2010 when imports increased by 7.9% year-to-year. Over the period under review, global toilet paper imports attained their peak figure in 2018 and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, toilet paper imports amounted to $3.6B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

The U.S. (208K tonnes) and Germany (199K tonnes) represented roughly 20% of total imports of toilet paper in 2018. It was followed by the Netherlands (100K tonnes), achieving a 4.9% share of total imports. The following importers – France (87K tonnes), China, Hong Kong SAR (83K tonnes), Denmark (72K tonnes), Saudi Arabia (66K tonnes), Canada (66K tonnes), Belgium (64K tonnes), the Czech Republic (60K tonnes), Norway (52K tonnes) and Austria (48K tonnes) – together made up 29% of total imports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Saudi Arabia, while imports for the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the U.S. ($375M), Germany ($320M) and the Netherlands ($164M) were the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2018, with a combined 24% share of global imports.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the average toilet paper import price amounted to $1,747 per tonne, jumping by 3.1% against the previous year. Overall, the toilet paper import price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2008 when the average import price increased by 9.5% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the average import prices for toilet paper attained their maximum at $1,937 per tonne in 2011; however, from 2012 to 2018, import prices remained at a lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Norway ($2,473 per tonne), while Saudi Arabia ($1,460 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by China, Hong Kong SAR, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

toys

BORN TO TRADE

The stork brings more than babies

My husband and I welcomed our first child, a baby boy, in January. As we prepared for his arrival, we quickly learned that as first-time parents, we will be acquiring an enormous amount of baby stuff, in complete disproportion to the expected size of our newborn. Our apartment was rapidly inundated with a car seat, stroller, swing and Pack ‘n Play, playmats, toys, onesies, hats, pajamas, burp cloths, swaddles, bibs, a crib, a changing table, and of course, mounds of diapers and wipes.

The baby product industry is booming. Sales reached an estimated $10.9 billion in 2017 and are expected to reach $16.8 billion by 2025. And with the pressures placed on first-time moms to be the perfect parent, it’s no wonder we shell out thousands of dollars in the baby’s first year to keep them warm and safe, hoping to avoid the 3am cries as much as possible.

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the annual spending on a child under two was $12,680 in 2015 (for a married couple with two children). While most of that spending was allocated to housing and child care, an average family still spent over $1,000 a year on baby products, excluding food.

No surprise, the three big components of baby-related expenditure – diapers, car seats and toys — are global industries.

Dry and clean derrieres

A first-time parent might be surprised by the number of diapers they will change in their child’s first year. At two and a half months, my son goes through 6-8 diapers a day, not including the occasional mishap affectionately known as a “poop explosion”. And while I applaud families that choose to use cloth reusable diapers, by necessity or out of eco-consciousness, we opted for disposable diapers in my family.

The global disposable diaper market is dominated by two brands – Pampers made by Procter & Gamble (P&G) and Huggies made by Kimberly-Clark. Together, the two companies control roughly 80 percent of the global disposable diaper market. The disposable diaper industry has been undergoing significant changes in recent decades, driven by a decline in birth rates in the West and increased demand in China and other emerging markets. Both P&G and Kimberly-Clark have complex supply chains that span dozens of facilities around the world to meet parental needs.

China only recently became a significant market for disposable diapers, with Pampers leading the way. In the 1990s, P&G launched a low-cost diaper brand in China that failed to make inroads locally. Recognizing that Chinese consumers valued the diaper’s softness and ability to absorb over price, the company reentered the market in 2010 with higher-end products targeted at China’s middle class, and sales have been growing strongly since. In 2018, diaper sale revenues in China reached $7.6 billion. American diaper producers are working to convince Chinese parents to ditch kaidangku, Chinese back split-pants, which allow young toddlers to squat anywhere. While kaidangku are still popular among China’s rural population, China’s middle class is rapidly adopting the disposable diaper lifestyle.

Strapped in for safety

Car seats are often one of the most expensive purchases new parents will make in the baby’s first year. Given the stringent safety requirements for baby car seats, large international brands generally do not face significant competition from low-cost, lower-quality brands.

The global car seat market was estimated at $7 billion in 2018, with infant seats representing 32 percent of global sales. Leading companies are headquartered around the world: Dorel, Quinny and Cosco are brands based in Canada; Artsana Group’s Chicco brand and Kiwi Baby are Italian; UPPAbaby and Newell Brands, which make Graco and Baby Jogger are based in the United States; Goodbaby, the maker of Cybex and Evenflo, is based in Hong Kong; Renolux is based in France, Mothercare in the U.K., and InfaSecure is headquartered in Australia – to name a few.

While the companies above are headquartered around the world, many of their brands are manufactured in China (a few high-end brands are also made in the United States). Over the last several years, the U.S. trade war with China placed significant pressure on the car seat industry. While the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) provided exemptions from Chinese tariffs to some safety products, including finished car seats, the components and materials used to manufacture the car seats did not receive the same treatment, placing increasing costs on U.S.-based car seat manufacturers. Advocating for an exemption for all baby safety products, the Juvenile Products Manufacturers Association argued that an increase in the costs of these products could put children, especially those in low-income families, at risk. And while the conclusion of the phase one trade negotiation with China suspended the tariffs, the risk to the industry remains.

Play time

You may be surprised to learn, much like my husband was, that toys play an important role in a baby’s development from their first weeks of life. Toys not only entertain, but they help develop key skills such as creativity, innovative thinking, and other important developmental milestones.

The global toy market dwarfs all other products for children, reaching $90.4 billion in 2018. The top seven toy companies in the world account for 55 percent of global toy sales. These include Mattel (with brands such as Barbie and Fisher-Price), Hasbro (making the Disney toys), Lego, and others. It’s estimated that 80 percent of all toys produced worldwide are manufactured in China and 85 percent of U.S. toy imports are from China. It’s no wonder that the trade war between the U.S. and China had a significant impact on the toy industry.

While the toy industry managed to avoid the 15 percent tariffs that were planned for December 2019 on Chinese-made toys, the tariff threats resulted in a turbulent environment for two large U.S. toy makers Hasbro and Mattel. Shares of both companies fell in late 2019, driven in part by the tariff uncertainty. As toy manufacturers generally operate with low margins in a highly volatile market driven by consumer preferences, most manufacturers are hoping for a long-term resolution of the trade tensions with China to ease their pressures ahead of the next holiday season.

A bottomless pit

As my son approaches three months, I am amazed at how quickly my purchasing habits have changed. I’m already thinking of our next car seat that can transition with him as he gets older, looking into the weight recommendations for different diaper sizes, and researching new toys to keep him (and myself) interested. And while we may slow down our purchasing to prevent a total baby takeover of our apartment, one thing is absolutely clear – we will always need to buy more diapers.

______________________________________________________________

Ayelet Haran is a contributor to TradeVistas. She is a government affairs and policy executive in the life sciences industry. She holds a Master’s of Public Administration degree in International Economic Policy from Columbia University.

This article originally appeared on TradeVistas.org. Republished with permission.
Dubai

Dubai’s Latest Report Confirms Non-Oil Foreign Trade Increased 6 Percent in 2019

In the latest report by the Government of Dubai, the region was confirmed its efforts to achieve its 2025 trade target of AED2 trillion helped spur growth in trade last year. The report also confirmed that non-oil external trade saw an increase of 19 percent in volume from 91 million tons in 2018 to reach 109 million tons in 2019. Re-exports rose by a record 48 percent to reach 17 million tons, while exports rose by 45 percent to 19 million tons and imports grew by 9 percent to 72 million tons. These figures capped a prosperous decade for Dubai from 2010-2020, during which external trade grew by 70 percent.

Dubai achieved exceptional external trade growth in 2019 despite the headwinds from an intensified global economic downturn. In terms of value, Dubai’s external trade surged 6 percent to AED1.371 trillion from AED 1.299 trillion in 2018. Exports skyrocketed 22 percent to AED155 billion, re-exports grew by 4 percent to AED420 billion and imports rose by 3 percent to AED796 billion. Over the decade (2010-2019), the value of Dubai’s external trade went up by 52 percent thanks to the agility, versatility and flexibility of the external trade sector in the emirate, which discovered alternative markets and trade paths to make up for sluggish growth in some markets.

“Dubai’s external trade has contributed significantly to the emirate’s economic achievements, further raising its status as a global hub for trade, business, and tourism, giving it a solid platform for growth in the next 50 years and creating the optimal conditions for more sustainable development across sectors,” said Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed, Crown Prince of Dubai and Chairman of The Executive Council. “Inspired by the vision of His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai, Dubai’s external trade sector is progressing steadily towards the 2025 trade target of AED2 trillion set by His Highness.

“All government entities are working seamlessly together to provide the best services, facilitate trade and foreign investments, and further develop infrastructure across the emirate, especially at airports and free zones, to galvanize its journey of excellence and enhance its role as a commercial bridge between the east and west. Furthermore, hosting mega-events such as EXPO 2020 will provide opportunities for the international trade sector to explore new possibilities and expand growth.”

Dubai’s foreign trade out of free zones in 2019 was a major contributor to the overall increase, accounting for AED592 billion, an 11 percent increase year-on-year. Direct trade saw a 2 percent growth to reach AED770 billion. Customs warehouse trade hit AED9 billion.

Land trade grew by 11 percent contributing to AED228 billion, air trade rose by 5 percent to AED641 billion and sea trade increased by 4 percent to AED502 billion.

Sultan bin Sulayem, DP World Group Chairman & CEO and Chairman of Ports, Customs and Free Zone Corporation, said: “Growth in Dubai’s external trade is the fruit of dedicated and well-planned work over the last few years, which helped us establish global leadership in different sectors. The future is promising and there are no limits when it comes to our expectations. We will keep growing and developing based on the latest and most advanced innovations and breakthroughs in AI smart applications following the vision and directives of our leadership.

“Hosting major international events will give our organizations a greater voice on the world stage, backed by our presence and strong network out of the 80 terminals that DP World operates worldwide, and our bold economic initiatives including the Dubai Silk Road.”

Bin Sulayem added: “Free zones in Dubai are a key factor behind the emirate’s trade success. The sophisticated infrastructure of our free zones, especially Jebel Ali Free Zone (JAFZA), has helped businesses benefit from different incentives and facilities, and attracted more foreign investments over the years.”

Bin Sulayem said Dubai Customs is continuously evolving to facilitate greater trade and provide more exceptional service to its customers. The number of customs transactions completed by Dubai Customs grew by a record 34 percent in 2019 to 13 million from 9.7 million in 2018. As part of the Dubai Silk Road strategy, Dubai Customs launched the World Logistics Passport, which links Customs World, DP World, and Emirates Group to enhance connectivity through Dubai and, through sharing of expertise and process development directly between partner countries. Dubai Customs also launched the second phase of the productivity engine, an initiative developed in-house and approved by The Executive Council with the aim of boosting productivity by 8 – 10 percent.

China remained Dubai’s largest trading partner, contributing AED150 billion. India was the second-biggest trading partner, contributing AED135 billion, followed by the USA with AED77.7 billion, and Switzerland with AED60 billion.

Saudi Arabia maintained its position as Dubai’s largest Arab trade partner. The country was the emirate’s fifth-biggest partner globally, contributing AED56 billion.

The highest traded commodity by value in 2019 was gold, jewelry, and diamonds which contributed AED370 billion, a growth of 7 percent from 2018. Gold took the lion’s share of trade with AED169.5 billion, followed by phones with AED164 billion, an increase of 9 percent from the previous year. The third-highest traded commodity was jewelry at AED116.6 billion, followed by petroleum oils which contributed AED85.4 billion in 2019, a growth of 55 percent, and diamonds which accounted for AED83.9 billion.

*Republished with permission