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France Emerged as the Largest Dried Grapes Producer in the EU

dried grapes

France Emerged as the Largest Dried Grapes Producer in the EU

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Dried Grapes – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the dried grapes market in the European Union amounted to $1B in 2018, flattening at the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +1.3% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed over the period under review.

Consumption By Country

The countries with the highest volumes of dried grapes consumption in 2018 were the UK (98K tonnes), Germany (68K tonnes) and France (56K tonnes), with a combined 55% share of total consumption. These countries were followed by the Netherlands, Italy, Spain, Poland, Belgium, Greece, Romania, Hungary and the Czech Republic, which together accounted for a further 35%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of dried grapes consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Greece, while dried grapes consumption for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the UK ($426M) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by France ($125M). It was followed by Italy.

The countries with the highest levels of dried grapes per capita consumption in 2018 were the Netherlands (2,466 kg per 1000 persons), the UK (1,470 kg per 1000 persons) and Belgium (1,080 kg per 1000 persons).

Production in the EU

In 2018, the amount of dried grapes produced in the European Union amounted to 84K tonnes, flattening at the previous year. In general, dried grapes production, however, continues to indicate a significant drop. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 when production volume increased by 16% y-o-y. In that year, dried grapes production attained its peak volume of 130K tonnes. From 2012 to 2018, dried grapes production growth failed to regain its momentum.

Production By Country

The countries with the highest volumes of dried grapes production in 2018 were France (31K tonnes), Greece (21K tonnes) and Hungary (5.3K tonnes), with a combined 69% share of total production. These countries were followed by Portugal, Slovakia, Romania and Spain, which together accounted for a further 19%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of dried grapes production, amongst the main producing countries, was attained by Slovakia, while dried grapes production for the other leaders experienced mixed trends in the production figures.

Exports in the EU

The exports totaled 70K tonnes in 2018, approximately reflecting the previous year. In general, dried grapes exports continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. In value terms, dried grapes exports totaled $175M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

In 2018, Greece (18K tonnes), the Netherlands (13K tonnes), Germany (9.8K tonnes) and Belgium (9.2K tonnes) represented the major exporters of dried grapes exported in the European Union, generating 71% of total export. It was distantly followed by the UK (4,306 tonnes) and Latvia (3,768 tonnes), together creating an 11% share of total exports. Denmark (2,442 tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Denmark, while exports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest dried grapes exporters in the European Union were Greece ($51M), the Netherlands ($31M) and Germany ($25M), with a combined 61% share of total exports. Belgium, the UK, Denmark and Latvia lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 23%.

Latvia experienced the highest growth rate of market size, among the main exporting countries over the period under review, while exports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the dried grapes export price in the European Union amounted to $2,495 per tonne, picking up by 11% against the previous year. Over the last eleven years, it increased at an average annual rate of +2.9%.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Greece ($2,859 per tonne), while Latvia ($1,592 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Greece, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

The volume imports stood at 391K tonnes in 2018, lowering by -3.4% against the previous year. In general, dried grapes imports continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern, in accordance with the overall dynamic of the market. In value terms, dried grapes imports amounted to $791M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

The imports of the three major importers of dried grapes, namely the UK, Germany and the Netherlands, represented more than half of total import. France (26K tonnes) held a 6.8% share (based on tonnes) of total imports, which put it in second place, followed by Belgium (5.5%), Italy (5.5%) and Spain (4.7%).

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Spain, while imports for the other leaders experienced mixed trends in the imports figures.

In value terms, the largest dried grapes importing markets in the European Union were the UK ($199M), Germany ($163M) and the Netherlands ($109M), together comprising 60% of total imports. These countries were followed by France, Italy, Belgium and Spain, which together accounted for a further 21%.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the dried grapes import price in the European Union amounted to $2,021 per tonne, rising by 11% against the previous year. Over the last eleven-year period, it increased at an average annual rate of +2.7%. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2008 when the import price increased by 27% against the previous year. The level of import price peaked at $2,503 per tonne in 2012; however, from 2013 to 2018, import prices remained at a lower figure.

Average prices varied somewhat amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, major importing countries recorded the following prices: in France ($2,204 per tonne) and Germany ($2,105 per tonne), while Spain ($1,615 per tonne) and Belgium ($1,776 per tonne) were amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

mackerel

Germany Consumes Most of Preserved Mackerel in the EU

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Mackerel (Prepared Or Preserved) – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the mackerel market in the European Union amounted to $705M in 2018, remaining constant against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Over the period under review, mackerel consumption continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. Over the period under review, the mackerel market attained its maximum level at $785M in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, consumption stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Consumption By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of mackerel consumption in 2018 were Germany (50K tonnes), the UK (35K tonnes) and France (21K tonnes), with a combined 51% share of total consumption. Poland, the Netherlands, Italy, Spain, Romania, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Portugal and Hungary lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 37%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of mackerel consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Poland, while mackerel consumption for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Production in the EU

In 2018, the mackerel production in the European Union stood at 202K tonnes, rising by 4.4% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.9% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2015 when production volume increased by 13% year-to-year. The volume of mackerel production peaked in 2018 and is likely to continue its growth in the near future. In value terms, mackerel production totaled $715M in 2018 estimated in export prices.

Production By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of mackerel production in 2018 were Germany (52K tonnes), the UK (28K tonnes) and Poland (19K tonnes), together comprising 49% of total production.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of mackerel production, amongst the main producing countries, was attained by Poland, while preserved mackerel production for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, approx. 47K tonnes of prepared or preserved mackerel were exported in the European Union, jumping by 8.3% against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +3.1% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. In value terms, preserved mackerel exports stood at $239M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

Portugal (9,014 tonnes), Denmark (8,530 tonnes), Latvia (6,809 tonnes) and Germany (5,299 tonnes) represented roughly 63% of total exports of prepared or preserved mackerel in 2018. Sweden (3,303 tonnes) occupied the next position in the ranking, followed by France (3,126 tonnes) and Poland (2,787 tonnes). All these countries together took near 20% share of total exports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by France, while exports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the preserved mackerel export price in the European Union amounted to $5,096 per tonne, flattening at the previous year. Over the period under review, the export prices for prepared or preserved mackerel attained their maximum at $5,839 per tonne in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, export prices failed to regain their momentum.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Portugal ($6,372 per tonne), while Germany ($3,686 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, the amount of prepared or preserved mackerel imported in the European Union amounted to 52K tonnes, increasing by 5.5% against the previous year. In value terms, mackerel imports amounted to $250M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total import value increased at an average annual rate of +1.2% over the period from 2007 to 2018.

Imports by Country

Italy (9,688 tonnes), the UK (7,966 tonnes), France (6,565 tonnes) and Spain (6,081 tonnes) represented roughly 59% of total imports of prepared or preserved mackerel in 2018. It was distantly followed by Germany (3,440 tonnes), Sweden (3,014 tonnes), Belgium (2,737 tonnes), Romania (2,517 tonnes) and Denmark (2,395 tonnes), together creating a 27% share of total imports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Romania, while imports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the mackerel import price in the European Union amounted to $4,846 per tonne, jumping by 6.8% against the previous year. There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Belgium ($5,532 per tonne), while Romania ($3,499 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Belgium, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

tuna

Tuna Market in Germany Reached $1.5B

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘Germany – Tuna (Prepared Or Preserved) – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the tuna market in Germany amounted to $1.5B in 2018, surging by 12% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +1.9% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. Tuna market size peaked at $1.6B in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, consumption remained at a lower figure.

Production in Germany

In 2018, the amount of tuna (prepared or preserved) produced in Germany totaled 163K tonnes, increasing by 3.1% against the previous year. Overall, tuna production, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

Exports from Germany

In 2018, the exports of tuna (prepared or preserved) from Germany totaled 15K tonnes, going up by 8.9% against the previous year. In value terms, tuna exports stood at $75M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

Austria (2.9K tonnes), Belgium (1.8K tonnes) and the Netherlands (1.5K tonnes) were the main destinations of tuna exports from Germany, together comprising 42% of total exports. Romania, Poland, France, Denmark, Hungary, the UK, Finland, Switzerland and the Czech Republic lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 43%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main countries of destination, was attained by Romania, while exports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest markets for tuna exported from Germany were Austria ($15M), Belgium ($11M) and the Netherlands ($7.9M), with a combined 45% share of total exports.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the average tuna export price amounted to $5,047 per tonne, jumping by 15% against the previous year. Over the period from 2007 to 2018, it increased at an average annual rate of +1.8%. The export price peaked at $5,726 per tonne in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, export prices remained at a lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average prices for the major foreign markets. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Switzerland ($6,474 per tonne), while the average price for exports to Hungary ($2,890 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

Imports into Germany

In 2018, the imports of tuna (prepared or preserved) into Germany stood at 93K tonnes, surging by 10% against the previous year. In general, tuna imports continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2017 when imports increased by 23% y-o-y. Imports peaked in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the immediate term. In value terms, tuna imports totaled $466M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

Ecuador (23K tonnes), the Philippines (16K tonnes) and Papua New Guinea (13K tonnes) were the main suppliers of tuna imports to Germany, together accounting for 55% of total imports. These countries were followed by the Netherlands, Spain, Viet Nam and Italy, which together accounted for a further 30%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main suppliers, was attained by Spain, while imports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Ecuador ($116M), the Philippines ($68M) and Papua New Guinea ($61M) appeared to be the largest tuna suppliers to Germany, with a combined 53% share of total imports. The Netherlands, Spain, Italy and Viet Nam lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 32%.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the average tuna import price amounted to $5,005 per tonne, going up by 11% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the import price indicated a strong increase from 2007 to 2018: it increased at an average annual rate of +4.1% over the last eleven-year period.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Italy ($7,507 per tonne), while the price for Viet Nam ($3,454 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

frozen fruit

Frozen Fruit and Nut Market in the EU Grew Slightly to $2.4B

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Frozen Fruit And Nuts – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the frozen fruit and nuts market in the European Union amounted to $2.4B in 2018, growing by 1.5% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +1.5% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with only minor fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Over the period under review, the frozen fruit and nuts market attained its maximum level in 2018 and is likely to see steady growth in the near future.

Consumption By Country

The country with the largest volume of frozen fruit and nuts consumption was Germany (369K tonnes), comprising approx. 25% of total volume. Moreover, frozen fruit and nuts consumption in Germany exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest consumer, France (184K tonnes), twofold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Italy (149K tonnes), with a 10% share.

In Germany, frozen fruit and nuts consumption expanded at an average annual rate of +2.2% over the period from 2007-2018. The remaining consuming countries recorded the following average annual rates of consumption growth: France (+1.8% per year) and Italy (-5.0% per year).

In value terms, Germany ($632M), France ($389M) and Italy ($272M) constituted the countries with the highest levels of market value in 2018, with a combined 54% share of the total market. These countries were followed by Poland, the UK, Belgium, the Netherlands, Sweden, Austria, Spain, Hungary and Romania, which together accounted for a further 37%.

The countries with the highest levels of frozen fruit and nuts per capita consumption in 2018 were Belgium (6,286 kg per 1000 persons), Austria (5,257 kg per 1000 persons) and Germany (4,509 kg per 1000 persons).

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in the EU

Driven by increasing demand for frozen fruit and nuts in the European Union, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven-year period. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +1.2% for the period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 1.6M tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in the EU

In 2018, approx. 951K tonnes of frozen fruit and nuts were produced in the European Union; shrinking by -5.9% against the previous year. Overall, frozen fruit and nuts production continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. Over the period under review, frozen fruit and nuts production attained its maximum volume at 1.1M tonnes in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, production stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Production By Country

Poland (351K tonnes) remains the largest frozen fruit and nuts producing country in the European Union, comprising approx. 37% of total volume. It was followed by Spain (127K tonnes) and Italy (122K tonnes), with the combined share of 26%.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume in Poland stood at +1.5%. The remaining producing countries recorded the following average annual rates of production growth: Spain (-1.2% per year) and Italy (-5.8% per year).

Exports in the EU

In 2018, the exports of frozen fruit and nuts in the European Union stood at 885K tonnes, rising by 2.6% against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.3% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. In value terms, frozen fruit and nuts exports totaled $1.7B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

Poland represented the key exporter of frozen fruit and nuts exported in the European Union, with the volume of exports recording 349K tonnes, which was near 39% of total exports in 2018. The Netherlands (117K tonnes) held a 13% share (based on tonnes) of total exports, which put it in second place, followed by Belgium (9.3%), Spain (5.9%) and Germany (5.8%). Italy (34K tonnes), Greece (32K tonnes), France (18K tonnes), Bulgaria (17K tonnes), Austria (17K tonnes), Portugal (15K tonnes) and Lithuania (15K tonnes) occupied a little share of total exports.

From 2007 to 2018, average annual rates of growth with regard to frozen fruit and nuts exports from Poland stood at +2.2%. At the same time, Portugal (+10.7%), France (+7.4%), Bulgaria (+5.0%), the Netherlands (+4.3%), Germany (+3.5%), Italy (+3.3%), Lithuania (+2.0%), Spain (+1.7%) and Greece (+1.4%) displayed positive paces of growth.

Moreover, Portugal emerged as the fastest-growing exporter exported in the European Union, with a CAGR of +10.7% from 2007-2018. Belgium experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. By contrast, Austria (-3.6%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period.

In value terms, Poland ($563M) remains the largest frozen fruit and nuts supplier in the European Union, comprising 33% of total frozen fruit and nuts exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the Netherlands ($229M), with a 13% share of total exports. It was followed by Belgium, with a 11% share.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the frozen fruit and nuts export price in the European Union amounted to $1,931 per tonne, surging by 5.8% against the previous year. Overall, the frozen fruit and nuts export price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 an increase of 27% year-to-year. The level of export price peaked at $2,304 per tonne in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, export prices stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Lithuania ($3,052 per tonne), while Greece ($1,450 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, approx. 1.4M tonnes of frozen fruit and nuts were imported in the European Union; surging by 2.5% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.8% over the period from 2007 to 2018. The volume of imports peaked in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future. In value terms, frozen fruit and nuts imports amounted to $2.6B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

Germany represented the largest importer of frozen fruit and nuts imported in the European Union, with the volume of imports finishing at 396K tonnes, which was approx. 28% of total imports in 2018. It was distantly followed by France (183K tonnes), the Netherlands (154K tonnes), Belgium (136K tonnes), Poland (93K tonnes), the UK (89K tonnes) and Austria (63K tonnes), together committing a 52% share of total imports.

In value terms, the largest frozen fruit and nuts importing markets in the European Union were Germany ($671M), France ($386M) and the Netherlands ($257M), together comprising 50% of total imports. Belgium, the UK, Poland and Austria lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 28%.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the frozen fruit and nuts import price in the European Union amounted to $1,903 per tonne, jumping by 5.4% against the previous year. Overall, the frozen fruit and nuts import price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

Average prices varied somewhat amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, major importing countries recorded the following prices: in the UK ($2,256 per tonne) and France ($2,102 per tonne), while the Netherlands ($1,664 per tonne) and Germany ($1,696 per tonne) were amongst the lowest.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

frozen crustacean

The Growth Of Frozen Crustaceans Market in the EU Slowed Down

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Frozen Crustaceans – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the frozen crustaceans market in the European Union amounted to $7.3B in 2018, remaining stable against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +1.8% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2014 with an increase of 12% y-o-y. In that year, the frozen crustaceans market reached its peak level of $7.3B. From 2015 to 2018, the growth of the frozen crustaceans market practically regained its momentum.

Consumption By Country

The countries with the highest volumes of frozen crustaceans consumption in 2018 were Germany (214K tonnes), Spain (172K tonnes) and France (104K tonnes), with a combined 58% share of total consumption. These countries were followed by Italy, Poland, the UK and the Netherlands, which together accounted for a further 29%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of frozen crustaceans consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by the UK, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Germany ($1.8B), Spain ($1.3B) and France ($927M) constituted the countries with the highest levels of market value in 2018, together comprising 56% of the total market.

The countries with the highest levels of frozen crustaceans per capita consumption in 2018 were Spain (3,692 kg per 1000 persons), Germany (2,611 kg per 1000 persons) and the Netherlands (2,511 kg per 1000 persons).

Production in the EU

In 2018, the frozen crustaceans production in the European Union amounted to 435K tonnes, jumping by 3.5% against the previous year. Overall, frozen crustaceans production, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

Production By Country

Germany (188K tonnes) constituted the country with the largest volume of frozen crustaceans production, comprising approx. 43% of total production. Moreover, frozen crustaceans production in Germany exceeded the figures recorded by the region’s second-largest producer, Poland (65K tonnes), threefold. Spain (39K tonnes) ranked third in terms of total production with a 9% share.

In Germany, frozen crustaceans production remained relatively stable over the period from 2007-2018. The remaining producing countries recorded the following average annual rates of production growth: Poland (+0.1% per year) and Spain (-1.5% per year).

Exports in the EU

In 2018, the amount of frozen crustaceans exported in the European Union stood at 261K tonnes, picking up by 6.8% against the previous year. Over the period under review, frozen crustaceans exports, however, continue to indicate a slight descent.

In value terms, frozen crustaceans exports amounted to $2.3B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total export value increased at an average annual rate of +1.5% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. Over the period under review, frozen crustaceans exports attained their peak figure in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

Exports by Country

The exports of the four major exporters of frozen crustaceans, namely Denmark, Spain, Belgium and the Netherlands, represented more than two-thirds of total export. The UK (23K tonnes) occupied the next position in the ranking, followed by France (13K tonnes). All these countries together took near 14% share of total exports. Ireland (11K tonnes) took a relatively small share of total exports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Spain, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Denmark ($434M), Spain ($418M) and the Netherlands ($373M) constituted the countries with the highest levels of exports in 2018, together accounting for 52% of total exports.

Export Prices by Country

The frozen crustaceans export price in the European Union stood at $8,976 per tonne in 2018, declining by -3.9% against the previous year. Over the last decade, it increased at an average annual rate of +2.6%. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2011 when the export price increased by 17% year-to-year. The level of export price peaked at $9,340 per tonne in 2017, and then declined slightly in the following year.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was France ($11,146 per tonne), while Belgium ($7,334 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Denmark, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, the frozen crustaceans imports in the European Union totaled 674K tonnes, growing by 2.5% against the previous year. Over the period under review, frozen crustaceans imports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. In value terms, frozen crustaceans imports stood at $6B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total import value increased at an average annual rate of +2.3% over the period from 2007 to 2018.

Imports by Country

In 2018, Spain (177K tonnes), distantly followed by France (112K tonnes), Italy (87K tonnes), Belgium (53K tonnes), the Netherlands (48K tonnes), the UK (48K tonnes), Germany (36K tonnes) and Portugal (32K tonnes) were the major importers of frozen crustaceans, together comprising 88% of total imports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Spain ($1.4B), France ($1B) and Italy ($737M) were the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2018, with a combined 52% share of total imports. These countries were followed by Belgium, the UK, the Netherlands, Germany and Portugal, which together accounted for a further 37%.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the frozen crustaceans import price in the European Union amounted to $8,975 per tonne, approximately equating the previous year. Over the last eleven-year period, it increased at an average annual rate of +2.6%. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2014 when the import price increased by 16% against the previous year. In that year, the import prices for frozen crustaceans reached their peak level of $9,037 per tonne. From 2015 to 2018, the growth in terms of the import prices for frozen crustaceans remained at a lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Belgium ($11,996 per tonne), while Spain ($7,794 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Belgium, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

cheese

European Fresh Cheese Market – Italy’s Output Doubled Over the Last Five Years

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Fresh Cheese – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the fresh cheese market in the European Union amounted to $12.6B in 2018, remaining stable against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Overall, fresh cheese consumption continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2014 with an increase of 15% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the fresh cheese market attained its maximum level at $14B in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, consumption remained at a lower figure.

Consumption By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of fresh cheese consumption in 2018 were Italy (967K tonnes), France (585K tonnes) and Germany (548K tonnes), together accounting for 52% of total consumption. These countries were followed by the UK, Poland, Spain, Belgium, the Netherlands, the Czech Republic and Sweden, which together accounted for a further 37%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of fresh cheese consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Italy ($3.8B) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the UK ($1.7B). It was followed by France.

The countries with the highest levels of fresh cheese per capita consumption in 2018 were Italy (16,290 kg per 1000 persons), Belgium (13,307 kg per 1000 persons) and Poland (10,450 kg per 1000 persons).

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of fresh cheese per capita consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in the EU

Driven by increasing demand for fresh cheese in the European Union, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven-year period. Market performance is forecast to decelerate, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +0.7% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 4.3M tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in the EU

In 2018, approx. 4.4M tonnes of fresh cheese were produced in the European Union; going up by 1.6% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.1% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 when production volume increased by 11% y-o-y. Over the period under review, fresh cheese production attained its peak figure volume in 2018 and is likely to see steady growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, fresh cheese production amounted to $11.2B in 2018 estimated in export prices. Over the period under review, fresh cheese production continues to indicate a mild shrinkage. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2014 with an increase of 15% y-o-y. Over the period under review, fresh cheese production attained its peak figure level at $14.3B in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, production remained at a lower figure.

Production By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of fresh cheese production in 2018 were Germany (928K tonnes), Italy (927K tonnes) and France (688K tonnes), with a combined 58% share of total production. Poland, the UK, Denmark, Belgium, Spain and Lithuania lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 32%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of fresh cheese production, amongst the main producing countries, was attained by Belgium, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, the fresh cheese exports in the European Union totaled 1.6M tonnes, growing by 2.1% against the previous year. The total exports indicated resilient growth from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +6.1% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, fresh cheese exports increased by +91.0% against 2007 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 with an increase of 11% against the previous year. Over the period under review, fresh cheese exports attained their maximum in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, fresh cheese exports amounted to $5.6B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total exports indicated remarkable growth from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +6.1% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, fresh cheese exports increased by +30.3% against 2015 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 when exports increased by 23% y-o-y. Over the period under review, fresh cheese exports reached their peak figure in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the immediate term.

Exports by Country

Germany was the largest exporting country with an export of about 516K tonnes, which resulted at 32% of total exports. It was distantly followed by France (221K tonnes), Denmark (183K tonnes), Italy (181K tonnes), Poland (96K tonnes) and Belgium (86K tonnes), together achieving a 48% share of total exports. The UK (67K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

Exports from Germany increased at an average annual rate of +5.5% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, Belgium (+15.3%), Poland (+7.9%), Italy (+6.9%), Denmark (+6.4%), the UK (+5.9%) and France (+2.2%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Belgium emerged as the fastest-growing exporter in the European Union, with a CAGR of +15.3% from 2007-2018. From 2007 to 2018, the share of Germany, Italy, Denmark, Belgium, Poland, France and the UK increased by +14%, +5.9%, +5.7%, +4.3%, +3.4%, +3% and +2% percentage points, while the shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, the largest fresh cheese markets in the European Union were Germany ($1.6B), Italy ($964M) and Denmark ($638M), with a combined 58% share of total exports. France, Belgium, Poland and the UK lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 25%.

In terms of the main exporting countries, Belgium experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to exports, over the last eleven years, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

The fresh cheese export price in the European Union stood at $3,504 per tonne in 2018, picking up by 2.4% against the previous year. In general, the fresh cheese export price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2008 an increase of 18% y-o-y. In that year, the export prices for fresh cheese reached their peak level of $4,179 per tonne. From 2009 to 2018, the growth in terms of the export prices for fresh cheese failed to regain its momentum.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Italy ($5,330 per tonne), while France ($2,660 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced mixed trends in the export price figures.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, the amount of fresh cheese imported in the European Union stood at 1.3M tonnes, increasing by 5.4% against the previous year. The total imports indicated remarkable growth from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +5.3% over the last eleven-year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, fresh cheese imports increased by +76.1% against 2007 indices. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2011 with an increase of 10% against the previous year. The volume of imports peaked in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, fresh cheese imports amounted to $4.4B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total imports indicated a strong increase from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +5.3% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, fresh cheese imports increased by +29.3% against 2016 indices. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2011 with an increase of 21% year-to-year. The level of imports peaked in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the near future.

Imports by Country

The countries with the highest levels of fresh cheese imports in 2018 were Italy (221K tonnes), the UK (189K tonnes), Germany (137K tonnes), the Netherlands (127K tonnes), France (118K tonnes), Spain (95K tonnes) and Belgium (77K tonnes), together resulting at 74% of total import. Austria (39K tonnes), Poland (33K tonnes), Romania (33K tonnes), the Czech Republic (26K tonnes) and Ireland (25K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Ireland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest fresh cheese importing markets in the European Union were Italy ($778M), the UK ($573M) and Germany ($507M), with a combined 42% share of total imports. France, the Netherlands, Spain, Belgium, Austria, Poland, Romania, Ireland and the Czech Republic lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 44%.

In terms of the main importing countries, Poland experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to imports, over the last eleven years, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the fresh cheese import price in the European Union amounted to $3,409 per tonne, rising by 3.7% against the previous year. Overall, the fresh cheese import price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2008 an increase of 17% against the previous year. In that year, the import prices for fresh cheese attained their peak level of $3,996 per tonne. From 2009 to 2018, the growth in terms of the import prices for fresh cheese failed to regain its momentum.

Average prices varied somewhat amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, major importing countries recorded the following prices: in France ($3,885 per tonne) and Austria ($3,750 per tonne), while the Netherlands ($2,750 per tonne) and the UK ($3,029 per tonne) were amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

essential oil

Essential Oil Market Size Estimated To Reach $16,172.2 Million By 2026

According to a new report published by Polaris Market Research the essential oil market is anticipated to reach USD $16,172.2 million by 2026. In 2017, the orange essential oil segment dominated the global market, in terms of revenue. Europe is expected to be the leading contributor to the global market revenue during the forecast period.

A significant increase in disposable income, changing lifestyles, and initiatives by market players to promote healthy lifestyles drive the growth of this market. Other driving factors include increasing incidences of stress and anxiety, growing inclination towards the use of natural and organic products, and increasing awareness regarding physical and mental health. The use of essential oils in various applications such as food and beverages, healthcare, pharmaceutical, cosmetics, and aromatherapy further propel market growth. Increasing demand in developing nations is expected to provide numerous growth opportunities to market players during the forecast period.

There has been a shift towards e-commerce and consumers are increasingly purchasing essential oils through online platforms. The variety of choices available coupled with ease of purchase offered by online platforms encourages consumers to buy essential oils online, supplementing the growth of the market.

Improvement in lifestyle due to the rise in income level, especially in the developing countries of Asia-Pacific fuels the demand for essential oils market. Factors such as increase in per capita income and changes in consumer behavior towards physical and mental health are expected to accelerate the adoption of essential oils in the coming years.

Europe generated the highest revenue in the market in 2017, and is expected to lead the global market throughout the forecast period. The high geriatric population in the region coupled with high disposable income drives market growth. The high demand of essential oils in food & beverages and cosmetic products support the market growth in the region. Asia-Pacific is expected to grow at the highest CAGR during the forecast period owing to increasing disposable incomes in developing countries of this region, rising awareness about benefits of essential oils, and rising demand of essential oils from healthcare sector in this region.

The different types of essential oils in the market include lemon, lime, orange, corn mint, eucalyptus, peppermint, citronella, clove leaf, and others. In 2017, the orange essential oil segment accounted for the highest market share. The increasing demand for orange essential oil is owing to properties such as anti-inflammatory, antidepressant, and antispasmodic. Use of orange essential oil has a calming effect on mind and body, and is used in various cosmetics products. It is also used in various foods and beverages to enhance flavor.

The well-known companies profiled in the report include Dōterra International LLC., Rocky Mountain Oils, LLC, Naturals Together, Robertet SA, Now Health Group, Inc., Biolandes SAS, Falcon Essential Oils, Ungerer Limited, The Lebermuth Company, Flavex Naturextrakte GmbH, Farotti Srl, and E. I. Du Pont De Nemours and Company among others. These companies launch new products and collaborate with other market leaders to innovate and launch new products to meet the increasing needs and requirements of consumers.

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For More Information About Essential oil market Please Click The Link Below @  https://www.polarismarketresearch.com/industry-analysis/essential-oil-market/request-for-sample

 

fish fillet

Preserved Fish Fillet Market in the EU Flattened At $750M

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Fish Fillets (Dried, Salted Or In Brine, But Not Smoked) – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the preserved fish fillet market in the European Union amounted to $751M in 2018, approximately equating the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Over the period under review, preserved fish fillet consumption continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. Over the period under review, the preserved fish fillet market reached its peak figure level in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

Consumption By Country

The countries with the highest volumes of preserved fish fillet consumption in 2018 were Italy (28K tonnes), Poland (16K tonnes) and the UK (13K tonnes), with a combined 49% share of total consumption. Spain, the Netherlands, France, Romania, Portugal, the Czech Republic, Belgium, Hungary and Greece lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 39%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of preserved fish fillet consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Portugal, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest preserved fish fillet markets in the European Union were France ($138M), Italy ($132M) and the Netherlands ($110M), together comprising 51% of the total market. These countries were followed by Spain, Poland, Romania, the Czech Republic, Belgium, Hungary, Greece, Portugal and the UK, which together accounted for a further 35%.

The countries with the highest levels of preserved fish fillet per capita consumption in 2018 were Italy (469 kg per 1000 persons), the Netherlands (463 kg per 1000 persons) and Poland (407 kg per 1000 persons).

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in the EU

Driven by increasing demand for preserved fish fillet in the European Union, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven years. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +2.6% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 139K tonnes by the end of 2025.

Exports in the EU

The exports totaled 30K tonnes in 2018. In general, preserved fish fillet exports continue to indicate a slight contraction. In value terms, preserved fish fillet exports amounted to $160M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

In 2018, Denmark (17K tonnes) represented the key exporter of fish fillets (dried, salted or in brine, but not smoked), committing 56% of total exports. Sweden (4,361 tonnes) took the second position in the ranking, followed by Spain (3,007 tonnes), the UK (2,113 tonnes) and Germany (1,526 tonnes). All these countries together took approx. 36% share of total exports. The following exporters – Italy (554 tonnes) and Belgium (526 tonnes) – each finished at a 3.6% share of total exports.

Exports from Denmark increased at an average annual rate of +8.1% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, Belgium (+16.1%) and Spain (+4.2%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Belgium emerged as the fastest-growing exporter in the European Union, with a CAGR of +16.1% from 2007-2018. By contrast, Italy (-1.5%), the UK (-4.7%), Sweden (-5.7%) and Germany (-12.8%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period. While the share of Denmark (+33 p.p.) and Spain (+3.6 p.p.) increased significantly in terms of the total exports from 2007-2018, the share of the UK (-4.8 p.p.), Sweden (-13 p.p.) and Germany (-17.7 p.p.) displayed negative dynamics. The shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

Imports in the EU

The imports totaled 60K tonnes in 2018, jumping by 9.8% against the previous year. Over the period under review, preserved fish fillet imports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

In value terms, preserved fish fillet imports totaled $386M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. In general, preserved fish fillet imports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2014 when imports increased by 9.7% y-o-y. In that year, preserved fish fillet imports reached their peak of $433M. From 2015 to 2018, the growth of preserved fish fillet imports remained at a somewhat lower figure.

Imports by Country

The countries with the highest levels of preserved fish fillet imports in 2018 were Italy (14K tonnes), Denmark (12K tonnes) and Spain (9.8K tonnes), together recording 60% of total import. The Netherlands (6,113 tonnes) ranks next in terms of the total imports with a 10% share, followed by Sweden (8%), Portugal (5.9%) and Germany (5.4%).

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Portugal, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Italy ($119M), Spain ($73M) and Denmark ($51M) appeared to be the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2018, with a combined 63% share of total imports. The Netherlands, Sweden, Germany and Portugal lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 28%.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

brexit

What’s Your Brexit Security Strategy?

Boris Johnson’s new Conservative majority is set to plow forward with leaving the EU on January 31st, 2020, however, what exactly does this mean for Britain’s logistics industry? K9patrol has put together this infographic highlighting concerns and possible issues with the logistics industry post-Brexit.

As we’ve seen so far, there still appears to be uncertainty ahead regarding Brexit, and this could impact logistics especially. With further disruption and delays, new regulations and potential diplomatic breakdown between the UK, the Republic of Ireland and the EU, there does seem to be some very real threats posed to this particular industry. Cargo security, in particular, will be a major concern for many businesses within logistics because of goods that would otherwise be in transit may have a possibility of being sold on or delayed for long periods of time in foreign countries. The EU receives around 50% of our exports, so with this, e should take this possible risk very seriously.

We hope this infographic lays out potential future issues that this may bring, and with this better understand the key political decisions that might affect them and their business.

Any arguments made by the evidence in the infographic is incidental and do not reflect our political opinions as a business.

 

 

 

 

What’s Your Brexit Security Strategy?
Infographic: K9 Patrol

 

 

The Netherlands Emerges as Key Supplier of Potato Chips into the UK

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘United Kingdom – Potato Chips – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the potato chips market in the UK amounted to $686M in 2018, dropping by -4.6% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). In physical terms, however, the volume of consumption stood at 197K tonnes in 2018, flattening against the previous year. Over the last five years, the market was relatively stable, fluctuating mildly from 189K tonnes in 2013 to the mentioned level of 2018.

Production in the UK

Potato chips production in the UK amounted to 194K tonnes in 2018, coming down by -3.8% against the previous year. Despite this, the total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.5% over the period from 2013 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed throughout the analyzed period.

Exports from the UK

In 2018, exports of potato chips from the UK stood at 56K tonnes, remaining stable against the previous year. Over the period under review, the total exports indicated a buoyant expansion from 2013 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +11.1% over the last five-year period.

The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 when exports increased by 18% y-o-y. Over the period under review, potato chips exports reached their peak figure in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, potato chips exports totaled $216M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total export value increased at an average annual rate of +4.0% over the period from 2013 to 2018; the trend pattern generally reflected that of the volume of exports.

Exports by Country

Ireland (17K tonnes), Nigeria (11K tonnes) and the Netherlands (3.4K tonnes) were the main destinations of potato chips exports from the UK, with a combined 55% share of total exports. These countries were followed by France, the United Arab Emirates, Pakistan, Belgium, Germany, the U.S., and Sierra Leone, which together accounted for a further 24%.

In value terms, Ireland ($65M) remains the key foreign market for potato chips exports from the UK, comprising 30% of total potato chips exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Nigeria ($30M), with a 14% share of total exports. It was followed by France, with an 8.6% share.

From 2013 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of value to Ireland totaled +1.3%. Exports to the other major destinations recorded the following average annual rates of export growth: Nigeria (-4.3% per year) and France (+17.3% per year).

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the average potato chips export price amounted to $3,869 per tonne, jumping by 5.6% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the potato chips export price, however, experience a noticeable decline. Over the period under review, the average export prices for potato chips attained their maximum at $5,384 per tonne in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, export prices stood at a somewhat lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average prices for the major foreign markets. In 2018, the country with the highest price was France ($5,752 per tonne), while the average price for exports to Ireland ($3,919 per tonne) was amongst the middle-level destinations.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was recorded for supplies to France, while the prices for the other major destinations experienced a decline.

Imports into the UK

In 2018, potato chips imports into the UK stood at 59K tonnes, growing by 14% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +3.2% over the period from 2013 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations over the period under review. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2018 with an increase of 14% year-to-year. In that year, potato chips imports reached their peak and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term. In value terms, potato chips imports amounted to $116M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

The Netherlands (31K tonnes), Belgium (16K tonnes) and Germany (3.7K tonnes) were the main suppliers of potato chips imports to the UK, with a combined 85% share of total imports. Spain, Ireland, France and Poland lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 11%.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main suppliers, was attained by Spain, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the average potato chips import price amounted to $1,948 per tonne, going up by 9.9% against the previous year. Over the period from 2013 to 2018, it increased at an average annual rate of +2.2%.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major supplying countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was France ($5,244 per tonne), while the price for the Netherlands ($1,246 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by France, while the prices for the other major suppliers experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform