New Articles

European Fresh Cheese Market – Italy’s Output Doubled Over the Last Five Years

cheese

European Fresh Cheese Market – Italy’s Output Doubled Over the Last Five Years

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Fresh Cheese – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the fresh cheese market in the European Union amounted to $12.6B in 2018, remaining stable against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Overall, fresh cheese consumption continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2014 with an increase of 15% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the fresh cheese market attained its maximum level at $14B in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, consumption remained at a lower figure.

Consumption By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of fresh cheese consumption in 2018 were Italy (967K tonnes), France (585K tonnes) and Germany (548K tonnes), together accounting for 52% of total consumption. These countries were followed by the UK, Poland, Spain, Belgium, the Netherlands, the Czech Republic and Sweden, which together accounted for a further 37%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of fresh cheese consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Italy ($3.8B) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the UK ($1.7B). It was followed by France.

The countries with the highest levels of fresh cheese per capita consumption in 2018 were Italy (16,290 kg per 1000 persons), Belgium (13,307 kg per 1000 persons) and Poland (10,450 kg per 1000 persons).

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of fresh cheese per capita consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in the EU

Driven by increasing demand for fresh cheese in the European Union, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven-year period. Market performance is forecast to decelerate, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +0.7% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 4.3M tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in the EU

In 2018, approx. 4.4M tonnes of fresh cheese were produced in the European Union; going up by 1.6% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.1% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 when production volume increased by 11% y-o-y. Over the period under review, fresh cheese production attained its peak figure volume in 2018 and is likely to see steady growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, fresh cheese production amounted to $11.2B in 2018 estimated in export prices. Over the period under review, fresh cheese production continues to indicate a mild shrinkage. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2014 with an increase of 15% y-o-y. Over the period under review, fresh cheese production attained its peak figure level at $14.3B in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, production remained at a lower figure.

Production By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of fresh cheese production in 2018 were Germany (928K tonnes), Italy (927K tonnes) and France (688K tonnes), with a combined 58% share of total production. Poland, the UK, Denmark, Belgium, Spain and Lithuania lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 32%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of fresh cheese production, amongst the main producing countries, was attained by Belgium, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, the fresh cheese exports in the European Union totaled 1.6M tonnes, growing by 2.1% against the previous year. The total exports indicated resilient growth from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +6.1% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, fresh cheese exports increased by +91.0% against 2007 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 with an increase of 11% against the previous year. Over the period under review, fresh cheese exports attained their maximum in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, fresh cheese exports amounted to $5.6B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total exports indicated remarkable growth from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +6.1% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, fresh cheese exports increased by +30.3% against 2015 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 when exports increased by 23% y-o-y. Over the period under review, fresh cheese exports reached their peak figure in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the immediate term.

Exports by Country

Germany was the largest exporting country with an export of about 516K tonnes, which resulted at 32% of total exports. It was distantly followed by France (221K tonnes), Denmark (183K tonnes), Italy (181K tonnes), Poland (96K tonnes) and Belgium (86K tonnes), together achieving a 48% share of total exports. The UK (67K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

Exports from Germany increased at an average annual rate of +5.5% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, Belgium (+15.3%), Poland (+7.9%), Italy (+6.9%), Denmark (+6.4%), the UK (+5.9%) and France (+2.2%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Belgium emerged as the fastest-growing exporter in the European Union, with a CAGR of +15.3% from 2007-2018. From 2007 to 2018, the share of Germany, Italy, Denmark, Belgium, Poland, France and the UK increased by +14%, +5.9%, +5.7%, +4.3%, +3.4%, +3% and +2% percentage points, while the shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, the largest fresh cheese markets in the European Union were Germany ($1.6B), Italy ($964M) and Denmark ($638M), with a combined 58% share of total exports. France, Belgium, Poland and the UK lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 25%.

In terms of the main exporting countries, Belgium experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to exports, over the last eleven years, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

The fresh cheese export price in the European Union stood at $3,504 per tonne in 2018, picking up by 2.4% against the previous year. In general, the fresh cheese export price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2008 an increase of 18% y-o-y. In that year, the export prices for fresh cheese reached their peak level of $4,179 per tonne. From 2009 to 2018, the growth in terms of the export prices for fresh cheese failed to regain its momentum.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Italy ($5,330 per tonne), while France ($2,660 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced mixed trends in the export price figures.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, the amount of fresh cheese imported in the European Union stood at 1.3M tonnes, increasing by 5.4% against the previous year. The total imports indicated remarkable growth from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +5.3% over the last eleven-year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, fresh cheese imports increased by +76.1% against 2007 indices. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2011 with an increase of 10% against the previous year. The volume of imports peaked in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, fresh cheese imports amounted to $4.4B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total imports indicated a strong increase from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +5.3% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, fresh cheese imports increased by +29.3% against 2016 indices. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2011 with an increase of 21% year-to-year. The level of imports peaked in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the near future.

Imports by Country

The countries with the highest levels of fresh cheese imports in 2018 were Italy (221K tonnes), the UK (189K tonnes), Germany (137K tonnes), the Netherlands (127K tonnes), France (118K tonnes), Spain (95K tonnes) and Belgium (77K tonnes), together resulting at 74% of total import. Austria (39K tonnes), Poland (33K tonnes), Romania (33K tonnes), the Czech Republic (26K tonnes) and Ireland (25K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Ireland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest fresh cheese importing markets in the European Union were Italy ($778M), the UK ($573M) and Germany ($507M), with a combined 42% share of total imports. France, the Netherlands, Spain, Belgium, Austria, Poland, Romania, Ireland and the Czech Republic lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 44%.

In terms of the main importing countries, Poland experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to imports, over the last eleven years, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the fresh cheese import price in the European Union amounted to $3,409 per tonne, rising by 3.7% against the previous year. Overall, the fresh cheese import price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2008 an increase of 17% against the previous year. In that year, the import prices for fresh cheese attained their peak level of $3,996 per tonne. From 2009 to 2018, the growth in terms of the import prices for fresh cheese failed to regain its momentum.

Average prices varied somewhat amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, major importing countries recorded the following prices: in France ($3,885 per tonne) and Austria ($3,750 per tonne), while the Netherlands ($2,750 per tonne) and the UK ($3,029 per tonne) were amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

dog and cat food

EU Dog And Cat Food Market Is Set to Reach 9.6M Tonnes by 2025

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Dog And Cat Food – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the dog and cat food market in the European Union amounted to $12.1B in 2018, surging by 3.6% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +1.1% over the period from 2008 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being observed over the period under review. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2013 when the market value increased by 8.1% year-to-year. In that year, the dog and cat food market attained its peak level of $12.6B. From 2014 to 2018, the growth of the dog and cat food market remained at a somewhat lower figure.

Consumption By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of dog and cat food consumption in 2018 were the UK (1.5M tonnes), France (1.3M tonnes) and Germany (1.3M tonnes), together accounting for 45% of total consumption. Spain, Italy, Poland, the Netherlands, Portugal, Sweden, Belgium, Romania and Hungary lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 42%.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of dog and cat food consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Romania, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest dog and cat food markets in the European Union were the UK ($2.7B), France ($2.3B) and Germany ($2B), together accounting for 57% of the total market. These countries were followed by Italy, Spain, Sweden, the Netherlands, Poland, Belgium, Hungary, Portugal and Romania, which together accounted for a further 32%.

The countries with the highest levels of dog and cat food per capita consumption in 2018 were Sweden (32 kg per person), Portugal (31 kg per person) and Hungary (25 kg per person).

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of dog and cat food per capita consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Romania, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in the EU

Driven by increasing demand for dog and cat food in the European Union, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven-year period. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +1.1% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 9.6M tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in the EU

In 2018, the production of dog and cat food in the European Union stood at 9.8M tonnes, flattening at the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.8% from 2008 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2010 with an increase of 4.1% against the previous year. Over the period under review, dog and cat food production attained its peak figure volume at 9.8M tonnes in 2017, leveling off in the following year.

In value terms, dog and cat food production amounted to $13.1B in 2018 estimated in export prices. The total output value increased at an average annual rate of +1.4% from 2008 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 when production volume increased by 13% against the previous year. In that year, dog and cat food production attained its peak level of $13.6B. From 2014 to 2018, dog and cat food production growth remained at a somewhat lower figure.

Production By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of dog and cat food production in 2018 were France (1.8M tonnes), Germany (1.4M tonnes) and the UK (1.2M tonnes), with a combined 45% share of total production. Spain, Hungary, the Netherlands, Italy and Poland lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 37%.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of dog and cat food production, amongst the main producing countries, was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, the amount of dog and cat food exported in the European Union amounted to 5.5M tonnes, increasing by 2.9% against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +4.0% over the period from 2008 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2017 when exports increased by 9% against the previous year. The volume of exports peaked in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future.

In value terms, dog and cat food exports stood at $9.2B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total exports indicated a strong expansion from 2008 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +4.0% over the last decade. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, dog and cat food exports increased by +29.5% against 2015 indices. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2013 with an increase of 16% year-to-year. Over the period under review, dog and cat food exports reached their maximum in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the immediate term.

Exports by Country

In 2018, Germany (829K tonnes), France (807K tonnes), the Netherlands (572K tonnes), Poland (527K tonnes) and Hungary (517K tonnes) were the main exporters of dog and cat food in the European Union, comprising 59% of total export. It was distantly followed by Spain (323K tonnes), Ireland (309K tonnes), the UK (272K tonnes), the Czech Republic (266K tonnes), Belgium (260K tonnes) and Italy (252K tonnes), together comprising a 31% share of total exports.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest dog and cat food markets in the European Union were Germany ($1.8B), France ($1.5B) and the Netherlands ($1.1B), together comprising 48% of total exports. Poland, Belgium, Hungary, the UK, the Czech Republic, Italy, Ireland and Spain lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 41%.

Poland recorded the highest rates of growth with regard to exports, in terms of the main exporting countries over the last decade, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

The dog and cat food export price in the European Union stood at $1,668 per tonne in 2018, going up by 7.5% against the previous year. Overall, the dog and cat food export price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2011 an increase of 11% against the previous year. The level of export price peaked at $1,730 per tonne in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, export prices stood at a somewhat lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Germany ($2,124 per tonne), while Spain ($885 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the Czech Republic, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

The imports totaled 4.6M tonnes in 2018, surging by 2.7% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.9% over the period from 2008 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2012 with an increase of 8.1% y-o-y. Over the period under review, dog and cat food imports attained their peak figure in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future.

In value terms, dog and cat food imports totaled $7.7B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total import value increased at an average annual rate of +3.6% from 2008 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2017 when imports increased by 14% against the previous year. Over the period under review, dog and cat food imports reached their peak figure in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the near future.

Imports by Country

The countries with the highest levels of dog and cat food imports in 2018 were Germany (646K tonnes), the UK (528K tonnes), Belgium (392K tonnes), France (374K tonnes), Italy (342K tonnes), Poland (290K tonnes), the Netherlands (288K tonnes), Austria (251K tonnes), Spain (196K tonnes), Romania (186K tonnes) and Portugal (179K tonnes), together resulting at 79% of total import. Greece (109K tonnes) held a little share of total imports.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Romania, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Germany ($1.3B), the UK ($878M) and France ($638M) were the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2018, with a combined 36% share of total imports. Italy, Poland, Belgium, the Netherlands, Austria, Spain, Portugal, Romania and Greece lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 45%.

Among the main importing countries, Poland experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to imports, over the last decade, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the dog and cat food import price in the European Union amounted to $1,654 per tonne, rising by 2.5% against the previous year. Overall, the dog and cat food import price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2011 when the import price increased by 11% y-o-y. The level of import price peaked at $1,718 per tonne in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, import prices stood at a somewhat lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Germany ($1,976 per tonne), while Romania ($874 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

chicken egg

Chicken Egg Market in Eastern Europe – Russia’s Production Is Growing Rapidly, Driven by Strong Domestic Demand and Expanding Exports

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘Eastern Europe – Hen Eggs – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the chicken egg market in Eastern Europe amounted to $9.7B in 2018, surging by 6.6% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Over the period under review, chicken egg consumption continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 when the market value increased by 13% against the previous year. The level of chicken egg consumption peaked at $10.8B in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, consumption stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Consumption By Country in Eastern Europe

The country with the largest volume of chicken egg consumption was Russia (2.6M tonnes), accounting for 54% of total consumption. Moreover, chicken egg consumption in Russia exceeded the figures recorded by the region’s second-largest consumer, Ukraine (898K tonnes), threefold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Poland (345K tonnes), with a 7.2% share.

In Russia, chicken egg consumption expanded at an average annual rate of +1.6% over the period from 2007-2018. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: Ukraine (+1.0% per year) and Poland (-3.8% per year).

In value terms, the largest chicken egg markets in Eastern Europe were Ukraine ($4.5B), Russia ($2.8B) and Hungary ($673M), together accounting for 82% of the total market.

The countries with the highest levels of chicken egg per capita consumption in 2018 were Ukraine (20 kg per person), Belarus (18 kg per person) and Russia (18 kg per person).

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of chicken egg per capita consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Russia, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in Eastern Europe

Driven by increasing demand for chicken egg in Eastern Europe, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven years. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +0.8% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 5.1M tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in Eastern Europe

The chicken egg production amounted to 5.1M tonnes in 2018, therefore, remained relatively stable against the previous year. Overall, chicken egg production continues to indicate mild growth. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2010 when production volume increased by 3.2% against the previous year. The volume of chicken egg production peaked in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future. The general positive trend in terms of chicken egg output was largely conditioned by slight growth of the number of producing animals and a relatively flat trend pattern in yield figures.

In value terms, chicken egg production stood at $11.3B in 2018 estimated in export prices. The total output value increased at an average annual rate of +1.4% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 with an increase of 39% against the previous year. The level of chicken egg production peaked at $12B in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, production stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Production By Country in Eastern Europe

Russia (2.5M tonnes) constituted the country with the largest volume of chicken egg production, comprising approx. 50% of total production. Moreover, chicken egg production in Russia exceeded the figures recorded by the region’s second-largest producer, Ukraine (895K tonnes), threefold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Poland (600K tonnes), with a 12% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume in Russia totaled +1.6%. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: Ukraine (+0.9% per year) and Poland (+0.8% per year).

Producing Animals in Eastern Europe

In 2018, approx. 444M heads of producing animals were grown in Eastern Europe; approximately reflecting the previous year. This number increased at an average annual rate of +1.1% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being observed over the period under review. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2012 with an increase of 5.3% y-o-y. Over the period under review, this number attained its peak figure level in 2018 and is likely to continue its growth in the near future.

Yield in Eastern Europe

In 2018, the average chicken egg yield in Eastern Europe totaled 11 kg per head, remaining stable against the previous year. Over the period under review, the chicken egg yield continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2009 when yield increased by 7% year-to-year. In that year, the chicken egg yield attained its peak level of 12 kg per head. From 2010 to 2018, the growth of the chicken egg yield remained at a lower figure.

Exports in Eastern Europe

In 2018, approx. 437K tonnes of chicken eggs were exported in Eastern Europe; rising by 6.8% against the previous year. Over the period under review, chicken egg exports continue to indicate resilient growth. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 when exports increased by 91% year-to-year. The volume of exports peaked in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, chicken egg exports amounted to $657M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. In general, chicken egg exports continue to indicate a buoyant expansion. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 when exports increased by 53% against the previous year. The level of exports peaked in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

Exports by Country

Poland prevails in chicken egg exports structure, finishing at 267K tonnes, which was near 61% of total exports in 2018. Belarus (40K tonnes) took the second position in the ranking, followed by Russia (33K tonnes), Latvia (23K tonnes) and the Czech Republic (20K tonnes). All these countries together occupied approx. 27% share of total exports. Bulgaria (15K tonnes) and Romania (12K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

Poland was also the fastest-growing in terms of the chicken eggs exports, with a CAGR of +21.8% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, Russia (+19.2%), Bulgaria (+15.5%), the Czech Republic (+6.4%), Latvia (+5.8%), Romania (+5.6%) and Belarus (+2.5%) displayed positive paces of growth. From 2007 to 2018, the share of Poland, Russia, Bulgaria, Latvia, the Czech Republic and Belarus increased by +54%, +6.5%, +2.8%, +2.4%, +2.3% and +2.2% percentage points, while the shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, Poland ($402M) remains the largest chicken egg supplier in Eastern Europe, comprising 61% of total chicken egg exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the Czech Republic ($43M), with a 6.5% share of total exports. It was followed by Bulgaria, with a 5.2% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of value in Poland amounted to +19.0%. The remaining exporting countries recorded the following average annual rates of exports growth: the Czech Republic (+2.1% per year) and Bulgaria (+11.2% per year).

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the chicken egg export price in Eastern Europe amounted to $1,504 per tonne, picking up by 3.6% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the chicken egg export price, however, continues to indicate a noticeable slump. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2017 when the export price increased by 24% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the export prices for chicken eggs attained their peak figure at $2,301 per tonne in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, export prices stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Bulgaria ($2,219 per tonne), while Belarus ($733 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced a decline in the export price figures.

Imports in Eastern Europe

In 2018, the imports of chicken eggs in Eastern Europe stood at 182K tonnes, jumping by 6.4% against the previous year. The total imports indicated strong growth from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +4.6% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, chicken egg imports decreased by -6.8% against 2015 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 with an increase of 20% y-o-y. The volume of imports peaked at 196K tonnes in 2015; however, from 2016 to 2018, imports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, chicken egg imports amounted to $383M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Over the period under review, chicken egg imports continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2014 when imports increased by 20% y-o-y. In that year, chicken egg imports attained their peak of $489M. From 2015 to 2018, the growth of chicken egg imports remained at a lower figure.

Imports by Country

Russia represented the main importing country with an import of around 84K tonnes, which amounted to 46% of total imports. It was distantly followed by the Czech Republic (20K tonnes), Hungary (17K tonnes), Poland (12K tonnes), Lithuania (11K tonnes), Latvia (8.7K tonnes) and Romania (8.5K tonnes), together creating a 42% share of total imports.

Imports into Russia increased at an average annual rate of +6.5% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, Hungary (+15.5%), Lithuania (+15.4%), Romania (+7.6%), Latvia (+3.7%) and Poland (+2.7%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Hungary emerged as the fastest-growing importer in Eastern Europe, with a CAGR of +15.5% from 2007-2018. The Czech Republic experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. While the share of Russia (+23 p.p.), Hungary (+7.3 p.p.), Lithuania (+4.6 p.p.), Romania (+2.6 p.p.), Poland (+1.6 p.p.) and Latvia (+1.6 p.p.) increased significantly, the shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, Russia ($208M) constitutes the largest market for imported chicken eggs in Eastern Europe, comprising 54% of total chicken egg imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the Czech Republic ($35M), with a 9% share of total imports. It was followed by Hungary, with a 7.2% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of value in Russia amounted to +3.3%. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: the Czech Republic (-4.1% per year) and Hungary (+10.6% per year).

Import Prices by Country

The chicken egg import price in Eastern Europe stood at $2,099 per tonne in 2018, picking up by 3.7% against the previous year. Overall, the chicken egg import price, however, continues to indicate a noticeable slump. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2017 an increase of 11% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the import prices for chicken eggs attained their maximum at $3,152 per tonne in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, import prices failed to regain their momentum.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Russia ($2,490 per tonne), while Latvia ($1,300 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Russia, while the other leaders experienced a decline in the import price figures.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

Goods

Is Your Supply Chain Prepared for Potential U.S. Tariffs on EU Goods?

Transatlantic tariffs came closer to reality in recent months after the United States Trade Representative (USTR) proposed tariffs on a list of products from the European Union (EU). 

Unfortunately, even if you’ve already gone through something similar with goods imported from China, the same strategy may not be effective for the tariffs on EU goods. This is due in large part to the types of proposed commodities from the EU.

The good news is there are things you can do today to adjust your import strategy to maintain compliance while insulating your company from the proposed tariffs.

Up to $25 billion worth of EU goods at stake

The USTR announcements in April and July proposed tariffs targeting up to $25 billion worth of goods. This includes items such as new aircraft and aircraft parts, foods ranging from seafood and meat to cheese and pasta, wine and whiskey, and even ceramics and cleaning chemicals. 

To date, the USTR has only provided a preliminary commodity list for the proposed U.S. tariffs on EU goods. No percentages have been announced, leaving many to wonder if the tariffs will be manageable—in the 5-10% range—or more substantial, like the 25% tariffs applied to China imports. 

On top of the tariffs, when the French Senate announced a 3% tax on revenue from digital services earned in France, President Trump threatened a counter-tax on French wine. But it’s unclear if this tax will come to fruition or fizzle out—especially since the USTR’s tariff list already includes many types of wine. 

5 key questions to insulate your supply chain

Looking for the best way to prepare your business from the potential tariff increases? Answering these key questions may help you adapt and insulate your company. 

-Do you have a plan to cover the costs? 

You may not be able to avoid paying the tariffs, but there are various strategies you may consider to help cover their costs. 

While not ideal, you could increase prices to end consumers. It may not be feasible to recover the entire cost of an added tariff, but you can at least offset a small portion of the tariff this way.

You can also adjust the cost of the goods with suppliers and manufacturers to cover a portion of the tariff. Just remember: pricing changes still need to meet the valuation regulations with U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP). 

-Will you need to increase your customs bond? 

The smallest customs bond an importer can hold is $50,000. That used to be enough for many importers to cover generally 10% of the duties and taxes you expect to pay CBP. 

Unfortunately, as many importers from China are learning, a 25% tariff on products can quickly exceed your bond amount. And bond insufficiency can shut down all your imports while resulting in delays and added expenses. 

To help avoid bond insufficiency, consider any increased duty amounts in advance of your next bond renewal period. And don’t wait to do this until the last minute, because raising your customs bond with your surety company can take up to four weeks. 

-Do you re-export goods brought into the U.S.? 

Duty drawback programs can’t be used by every importer. But if you can take advantage of them, they can result in big savings for your company.

In fact, you can get back 99% of certain import duties, taxes, and fees on imported goods that you re-export out of the U.S. Just be aware that you still need to pay the duties up front. And you might need to wait up to two years to get your refund. 

-Are your product classifications current and accurate?

With potential tariffs looming, consider reviewing your product classifications and make sure they’re accurate. If you find an issue, discuss it with your broker or customs counsel to discuss how you can properly rectify the issue, and avoid penalties from doing it incorrectly.

And while we’re on the topic of product classifications, never change them to evade tariffs. CBP will be on the lookout for this kind of activity, and the penalties for noncompliance can be steep.

-Do you have the support you need?

Changing your customs brokers may not sound appealing, but ensuring they provide all the services you need to stay compliant should be your top priority when working with them.

Your provider should help make sure you pay the appropriate duty rates for your products. And they should have people and services available globally to support your freight wherever it is located throughout the world. 

Also, consider simplifying your support by working with one provider that offers not only customs brokerage and trade compliance services but also global ocean and air freight logistics services. 

If you only employ one strategy…

Discuss your import strategy with your customs attorney or customs compliance expert. Bringing in specialized expertise is the most effective way to analyze how these tariffs could affect your products, your supply chain, and your business. 

If you don’t yet have a customs broker who can meet all your needs in today’s changing environment, consider C.H. Robinson’s customs compliance services. With over 100 licensed customs brokers in North America, and a Trusted Advisor® approach, our experts are ready to help.

____________________________________________________________

Ben Bidwell serves as the Director of U.S. Customs at  C.H. Robinson

fresh chicken market

European Fresh Chicken Cut Market – Output Doubled over the Last Decade

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Fresh Or Chilled Cuts Of Chicken – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the fresh chicken cut market in the European Union is estimated at $18B in 2018. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The total market indicated a buoyant increase from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +7.1% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period.

Based on 2018 figures, fresh chicken cut consumption increased by +15.2% against 2015 indices. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2011 with an increase of 14% year-to-year. The level of fresh chicken cut consumption peaked in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Consumption By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of fresh chicken cut consumption in 2018 were the Netherlands (1.1M tonnes), Poland (947K tonnes) and the UK (911K tonnes), with a combined 45% share of total consumption.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of fresh chicken cut consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the UK ($3.7B), the Netherlands ($2.6B) and France ($2.2B) constituted the countries with the highest levels of market value in 2018, together accounting for 47% of the total market.

In 2018, the highest levels of fresh chicken cut per capita consumption was registered in the Netherlands (64 kg per person), followed by Poland (25 kg per person), the UK (14 kg per person) and Spain (11 kg per person), while the world average per capita consumption of fresh chicken cut was estimated at 13 kg per person.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of the fresh chicken cut per capita consumption in the Netherlands stood at +13.8%. The remaining consuming countries recorded the following average annual rates of per capita consumption growth: Poland (+10.1% per year) and the UK (+2.4% per year).

Production in the EU

The fresh chicken cut production totaled 6.8M tonnes in 2018, growing by 7.8% against the previous year. The total output indicated a prominent expansion from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +7.0% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, fresh chicken cut production increased by +110.1% against 2007 indices. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2016 with an increase of 13% y-o-y. The volume of fresh chicken cut production peaked in 2018 and is likely to continue its growth in the near future.

In value terms, fresh chicken cut production amounted to $17.2B in 2018 estimated in export prices. The total output value increased at an average annual rate of +4.1% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 with an increase of 18% against the previous year. Over the period under review, fresh chicken cut production reached its maximum level in 2018 and is likely to continue its growth in the near future.

Production By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of fresh chicken cut production in 2018 were Poland (1.4M tonnes), the Netherlands (1.3M tonnes) and the UK (835K tonnes), together comprising 51% of total production.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of fresh chicken cut production, amongst the main producing countries, was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, approx. 1.9M tonnes of fresh or chilled cuts of chicken were exported in the European Union; rising by 4% against the previous year. Over the period under review, fresh chicken cut exports continue to indicate a buoyant increase. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 with an increase of 25% against the previous year. Over the period under review, fresh chicken cut exports reached their maximum in 2018 and are likely to continue its growth in the near future.

In value terms, fresh chicken cut exports totaled $4.6B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total exports indicated prominent growth from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +8.2% over the last eleven-year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, fresh chicken cut exports increased by +20.5% against 2014 indices. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 when exports increased by 25% against the previous year. Over the period under review, fresh chicken cut exports reached their maximum in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

Exports by Country

The Netherlands (542K tonnes), Poland (430K tonnes) and Belgium (292K tonnes) represented roughly 67% of total exports of fresh or chilled cuts of chicken in 2018. Germany (167K tonnes) held an 8.9% share (based on tonnes) of total exports, which put it in second place, followed by the UK (7%). The following exporters – France (53K tonnes) and Spain (40K tonnes) – together made up 4.9% of total exports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the Netherlands ($1.4B), Poland ($1.2B) and Belgium ($637M) constituted the countries with the highest levels of exports in 2018, with a combined 69% share of total exports.

Among the main exporting countries, Poland experienced the highest growth rate of exports, over the last eleven-year period, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the fresh chicken cut export price in the European Union amounted to $2,466 per tonne, surging by 11% against the previous year. In general, the fresh chicken cut export price, however, continues to indicate a mild downturn. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2018 an increase of 11% against the previous year. The level of export price peaked at $3,023 per tonne in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, export prices remained at a lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was France ($2,819 per tonne), while the UK ($780 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Spain, while the other leaders experienced a decline in the export price figures.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, approx. 1.6M tonnes of fresh or chilled cuts of chicken were imported in the European Union; jumping by 4.9% against the previous year. Over the period under review, fresh chicken cut imports continue to indicate buoyant growth. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2009 with an increase of 23% year-to-year. Over the period under review, fresh chicken cut imports reached their maximum in 2018 and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, fresh chicken cut imports amounted to $4.1B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total imports indicated buoyant growth from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +9.2% over the last eleven-year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, fresh chicken cut imports increased by +29.5% against 2015 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 when imports increased by 31% year-to-year. Over the period under review, fresh chicken cut imports reached their maximum in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the near future.

Imports by Country

In 2018, Germany (319K tonnes) and the Netherlands (316K tonnes) were the largest importers of fresh or chilled cuts of chicken in the European Union, together accounting for approx. 39% of total imports. It was followed by France (210K tonnes), the UK (207K tonnes) and Belgium (143K tonnes), together comprising a 34% share of total imports. Ireland (46K tonnes), the Czech Republic (45K tonnes), Hungary (43K tonnes), Slovakia (30K tonnes), Bulgaria (28K tonnes), Austria (26K tonnes) and Greece (25K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Bulgaria, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest fresh chicken cut importing markets in the European Union were Germany ($762M), the UK ($743M) and France ($641M), together comprising 53% of total imports. The Netherlands, Belgium, Ireland, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Austria, Slovakia, Greece and Bulgaria lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 36%.

Among the main importing countries, Bulgaria experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to imports, over the last eleven-year period, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

The fresh chicken cut import price in the European Union stood at $2,498 per tonne in 2018, jumping by 10% against the previous year. In general, the fresh chicken cut import price, however, continues to indicate a slight setback. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2010 an increase of 11% y-o-y. The level of import price peaked at $3,092 per tonne in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, import prices failed to regain their momentum.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Ireland ($4,079 per tonne), while Bulgaria ($1,517 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Hungary, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

imports

U.S. Imports of Fats And Oils Refining and Blending Doubled over the Last Five Years

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘U.S. Fats And Oils Market. Analysis And Forecast to 2025.’ Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

In 2018, the revenue of the fat and oil market in the U.S. amounted to $10.6B. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Over the period under review, fat and oil consumption continues to indicate a decrease. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2016 when the market value decreased by -4% year-to-year. Fat and oil consumption peaked at $18.6B in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, consumption stood at a somewhat lower figure.

U.S. Fat And Oil Production

In value terms, fat and oil production totaled $10.5B in 2018. In general, fat and oil production continues to indicate a decline. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2016 with a decrease of -4% year-to-year. Over the period under review, fat and oil production reached its peak figure level at $18.6B in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, production stood at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, shortening and cooking oils ($9.1B) constituted the leading product category. The second position in the ranking was occupied by margarine, butter blends, and butter substitutes ($1.3B).

From 2013 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of the production volume of shortening and cooking oils stood at -11.4%. With regard to the other produced products, the following average annual rates of growth were recorded: margarine, butter blends, and butter substitutes (-6.6% per year) and other fats and oils refining and blending (+20.4% per year).

Exports from the U.S.

In 2018, the amount of fats and oils exported from the U.S. stood at 22K tonnes, surging by 47% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the total exports indicated a strong expansion from 2013 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +6.8% over the last five-year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, fat and oil exports increased by +126.1% against 2015 indices. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2018 when exports increased by 47% year-to-year. In that year, fat and oil exports attained their peak and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, fat and oil exports stood at $26M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Over the period under review, the total exports indicated strong growth from 2013 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +6.8% over the last five years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, fat and oil exports increased by +115.0% against 2015 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2018 when exports increased by 39% against the previous year. In that year, fat and oil exports reached their peak and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

Exports by Country

Libya (5.9K tonnes), Egypt (3.1K tonnes) and India (3K tonnes) were the main destinations of fat and oil exports from the U.S., with a combined 55% share of total exports.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main countries of destination, was attained by India (+270.1% per year), while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Libya ($5.1M) emerged as the key foreign market for fat and oil exports from the U.S., comprising 19% of total fat and oil exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by India ($2.3M), with a 8.6% share of total exports. It was followed by Egypt, with a 8.2% share.

From 2013 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of value to Libya was relatively modest. Exports to the other major destinations recorded the following average annual rates of exports growth: India (+201.4% per year) and Egypt (0.0% per year).

Export Prices by Country

The average fat and oil export price stood at $1,210 per tonne in 2018, going down by -5.7% against the previous year. Over the last five-year period, it increased at an average annual rate of +3.1%. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2015 an increase of 23% year-to-year. The export price peaked at $1,283 per tonne in 2017, and then declined slightly in the following year.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was South Korea ($4,008 per tonne), while the average price for exports to Egypt ($690 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was recorded for supplies to South Korea, while the prices for the other major destinations experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports into the U.S.

In 2018, the fat and oil imports into the U.S. stood at 55K tonnes, increasing by 18% against the previous year. In general, fat and oil imports continue to indicate a skyrocketing expansion. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2014 with an increase of 42% y-o-y. Imports peaked in 2018 and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, fat and oil imports totaled $154M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Over the period under review, the total imports indicated remarkable growth from 2013 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +20.1% over the last five-year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, fat and oil imports increased by +80.1% against 2013 indices. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2018 when imports increased by 18% y-o-y. In that year, fat and oil imports reached their peak and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

Imports by Country

In 2018, Indonesia (16K tonnes) constituted the largest supplier of fat and oil to the U.S., with a 29% share of total imports. Moreover, fat and oil imports from Indonesia exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest supplier, Spain (6.1K tonnes), threefold. India (5.9K tonnes) ranked third in terms of total imports with a 11% share.

From 2013 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume from Indonesia stood at +105.7%. The remaining supplying countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: Spain (+81.4% per year) and India (+8.4% per year).

In value terms, Indonesia ($49M) constituted the largest supplier of fat and oil to the U.S., comprising 32% of total fat and oil imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Malaysia ($15M), with a 10% share of total imports. It was followed by India, with a 7.6% share.

From 2013 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of value from Indonesia stood at +113.3%. The remaining supplying countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: Malaysia (+52.6% per year) and India (+9.8% per year).

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the average fat and oil import price amounted to $2,774 per tonne, flattening at the previous year. Over the period under review, the fat and oil import price continues to indicate an abrupt decline. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2016 an increase of 26% year-to-year. The import price peaked at $3,840 per tonne in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, import prices stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Germany ($7,513 per tonne), while the price for Ecuador ($1,043 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Malaysia, while the prices for the other major suppliers experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

couscous

EU Couscous Market 2019 – France is the Undisputed Leader in Consumption, Production, and Imports

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Couscous – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the couscous market in the European Union amounted to $538M in 2018, approximately equating the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +2.2% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 with an increase of 13% y-o-y. The level of couscous consumption peaked in 2018 and is likely to see steady growth in the near future.

Consumption By Country in the EU

France (143K tonnes) remains the largest couscous consuming country in the European Union, comprising approx. 43% of total consumption. Moreover, couscous consumption in France exceeded the figures recorded by the region’s second-largest consumer, Germany (53K tonnes), threefold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Italy (25K tonnes), with a 7.5% share.

In France, couscous consumption remained relatively stable over the period from 2007-2018. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: Germany (+7.7% per year) and Italy (+4.1% per year).

In value terms, France ($238M) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the UK ($79M). It was followed by Germany.

In 2018, the highest levels of couscous per capita consumption was registered in France (2,198 kg per 1000 persons), followed by the Netherlands (690 kg per 1000 persons), Belgium (669 kg per 1000 persons) and Germany (640 kg per 1000 persons), while the world average per capita consumption of couscous was estimated at 654 kg per 1000 persons.

In France, couscous per capita consumption remained relatively stable over the period from 2007-2018. The remaining consuming countries recorded the following average annual rates of per capita consumption growth: the Netherlands (+5.7% per year) and Belgium (+5.3% per year).

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in the EU

Driven by increasing demand for couscous in the European Union, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven years. Market performance is forecast to decelerate, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +1.1% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 361K tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in the EU

In 2018, the amount of couscous produced in the European Union stood at 333K tonnes, growing by 3.6% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.8% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2016 with an increase of 8.3% against the previous year. Over the period under review, couscous production attained its peak figure volume in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future.

In value terms, couscous production stood at $509M in 2018 estimated in export prices. The total output value increased at an average annual rate of +1.5% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern remained consistent, with only minor fluctuations in certain years. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2011 with an increase of 9% against the previous year. The level of couscous production peaked in 2018 and is likely to continue its growth in the near future.

Production By Country in the EU

France (140K tonnes) remains the largest couscous producing country in the European Union, accounting for 42% of total production. Moreover, couscous production in France exceeded the figures recorded by the region’s second-largest producer, Italy (67K tonnes), twofold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Germany (46K tonnes), with a 14% share.

In France, couscous production remained relatively stable over the period from 2007-2018. The remaining producing countries recorded the following average annual rates of production growth: Italy (+6.4% per year) and Germany (+6.8% per year).

Exports in the EU

The exports stood at 77K tonnes in 2018, lowering by -8.1% against the previous year. The total exports indicated a remarkable expansion from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +4.0% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2010 with an increase of 18% against the previous year. The volume of exports peaked at 84K tonnes in 2017, and then declined slightly in the following year.

In value terms, couscous exports totaled $107M in 2018. The total export value increased at an average annual rate of +3.7% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2008 with an increase of 29% y-o-y. The level of exports peaked in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Exports by Country

Italy represented the largest exporter of couscous in the European Union, with the volume of exports resulting at 44K tonnes, which was approx. 57% of total exports in 2018. It was distantly followed by France (23K tonnes), making up a 30% share of total exports. The following exporters – Belgium (2.8K tonnes), the UK (1.8K tonnes), the Netherlands (1.5K tonnes) and Germany (1.2K tonnes) – together made up 9.5% of total exports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest couscous markets in the European Union were Italy ($47M), France ($39M) and Belgium ($6.1M), together accounting for 86% of total exports. These countries were followed by the UK, the Netherlands and Germany, which together accounted for a further 9.2%.

In terms of the main exporting countries, the Netherlands experienced the highest growth rate of exports, over the last eleven-year period, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

The couscous export price in the European Union stood at $1,381 per tonne in 2018, surging by 12% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the couscous export price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2008 an increase of 28% against the previous year. In that year, the export prices for couscous reached their peak level of $1,825 per tonne. From 2009 to 2018, the growth in terms of the export prices for couscous failed to regain its momentum.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Germany ($2,524 per tonne), while Italy ($1,058 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, couscous imports in the European Union amounted to 77K tonnes, reducing by -12.7% against the previous year. Overall, couscous imports, however, continue to indicate resilient growth. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 with an increase of 19% against the previous year. Over the period under review, couscous imports attained their maximum at 89K tonnes in 2017, and then declined slightly in the following year.

In value terms, couscous imports stood at $106M in 2018. The total imports indicated a buoyant increase from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +5.9% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, couscous imports increased by +84.0% against 2010 indices. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 with an increase of 27% year-to-year. Over the period under review, couscous imports attained their peak figure at $108M in 2017, and then declined slightly in the following year.

Imports by Country

France was the key importer of couscous in the European Union, with the volume of imports reaching 26K tonnes, which was near 34% of total imports in 2018. It was distantly followed by the UK (11K tonnes), Belgium (8.7K tonnes), Germany (7.8K tonnes), Spain (5.1K tonnes) and the Netherlands (3.5K tonnes), together comprising a 47% share of total imports. The Czech Republic (2.8K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2018, average annual rates of growth with regard to couscous imports into France stood at +2.8%. At the same time, the Czech Republic (+17.9%), Germany (+14.8%), the UK (+8.9%), Spain (+6.6%), Belgium (+5.5%) and the Netherlands (+4.7%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, the Czech Republic emerged as the fastest-growing importer in the European Union, with a CAGR of +17.9% from 2007-2018. While the share of the UK (+8.7 p.p.), France (+8.7 p.p.), Germany (+7.9 p.p.), Belgium (+5 p.p.), Spain (+3.3 p.p.), the Czech Republic (+3 p.p.) and the Netherlands (+1.8 p.p.) increased significantly, the shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, France ($35M) constitutes the largest market for imported couscous in the European Union, comprising 33% of total couscous imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Belgium ($15M), with a 14% share of total imports. It was followed by the UK, with a 12% share.

In France, couscous imports increased at an average annual rate of +5.3% over the period from 2007-2018. The remaining importing countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: Belgium (+6.0% per year) and the UK (+8.7% per year).

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the couscous import price in the European Union amounted to $1,369 per tonne, rising by 13% against the previous year. Over the last eleven years, it increased at an average annual rate of +1.2%. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2008 when the import price increased by 30% y-o-y. In that year, the import prices for couscous reached their peak level of $1,572 per tonne. From 2009 to 2018, the growth in terms of the import prices for couscous remained at a somewhat lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was the Netherlands ($1,837 per tonne), while the Czech Republic ($1,109 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

Vinegar Market in the EU – Germany Emerges As The Largest Importer, Italy Lags Behind Slightly

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Vinegar – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the vinegar market in the European Union amounted to $1B in 2018, surging by 5.8% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). In general, vinegar consumption continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2011, with an increase of 12% year-to-year. In that year, the vinegar market attained its peak level of $1.1B. From 2012 to 2018, the growth of the vinegar market remained at a somewhat lower figure.

Production in the EU

In 2018, production of vinegar in the European Union stood at 1.2B litres, growing by 4.4% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.6% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being observed in certain years.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, vinegar exports in the European Union amounted to 409M litres, jumping by 3.7% against the previous year. The total exports indicated a pronounced increase from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +3.4% over the last eleven year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, the vinegar exports increased by +31.7% against 2015 indices. In value terms, vinegar exports totaled $520M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

In 2018, Italy (124M litres) was the key exporter for vinegar, achieving 30% of total exports. Germany (63M litres) took the second position in the ranking, followed by the Czech Republic (38M litres), Greece (36M litres), Spain (30M litres), the Netherlands (28M litres) and France (26M litres). All these countries together held approx. 54% share of total exports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by the Czech Republic, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Italy ($303M) remains the largest vinegar supplier in the European Union, comprising 58% of total vinegar exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Spain ($45M), with a 8.7% share of total exports. It was followed by Germany, with a 7.1% share.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the vinegar export price in the European Union amounted to $1,273 per thousand litres, going up by 6.5% against the previous year. In general, the vinegar export price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. There were significant differences in the average export prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest export price was Italy ($2,432 per thousand litres), while the Czech Republic ($325 per thousand litres) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of export prices was attained by Spain, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

The imports stood at 306M litres in 2018, growing by 4% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +4.0% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. In value terms, vinegar imports totaled $349M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

Germany (60M litres) and Italy (58M litres) represented roughly 39% of total imports of vinegar in 2018. The UK (32M litres) held a 10% share (based on tonnes) of total imports, which put it in second place, followed by France (8.6%), the Netherlands (6.5%) and Hungary (4.5%). The Czech Republic (12M litres), Austria (12M litres), Poland (10M litres), Sweden (9.1M litres), Spain (8.9M litres) and Belgium (7.9M litres) held a minor share of total imports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Hungary, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Germany ($86M), the UK ($53M) and France ($52M) were the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2018, with a combined 55% share of total imports. Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Austria, Belgium, Sweden, the Czech Republic, Poland and Hungary lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 35%.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the vinegar import price in the European Union amounted to $1,142 per thousand litres, jumping by 13% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the vinegar import price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2018, an increase of 13% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the import prices for vinegar attained their peak figure at $1,186 per thousand litres in 2009; however, from 2010 to 2018, import prices stood at a somewhat lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average import prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest import price was France ($1,956 per thousand litres), while Hungary ($331 per thousand litres) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of import prices was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

frozen fruit

European Frozen Fruit Market Posted Sixth Consecutive Year of Growth and Reached $5.3B in 2018

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Frozen Fruit – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the frozen fruit market in the European Union amounted to $5.3B in 2018, increasing by 2.3% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price).

The market value increased at an average annual rate of +3.0% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2010, with an increase of 10% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the frozen fruit market attained its maximum level in 2018, and is expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

Production in the EU

In 2018, approx. 1.3M tonnes of frozen fruits were produced in the European Union; lowering by -2.8% against the previous year.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, frozen fruit exports in the European Union amounted to 783K tonnes, declining by -4.1% against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.1% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. In value terms, frozen fruit exports stood at $1.6B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

Poland represented the major exporting country with an export of around 272K tonnes, which resulted at 35% of total exports. The Netherlands (117K tonnes) occupied the second position in the ranking, followed by Belgium (73K tonnes), Spain (65K tonnes) and Germany (48K tonnes). All these countries together occupied near 39% share of total exports. Italy (32K tonnes), Greece (29K tonnes), France (20K tonnes), Sweden (17K tonnes), Bulgaria (15K tonnes) and the UK (12K tonnes) took a relatively small share of total exports.

Poland experienced a relatively flat trend pattern of frozen fruits exports. At the same time, the Netherlands (+4.3%), Bulgaria (+4.2%), Spain (+4.1%), the UK (+3.6%), Germany (+3.6%), Italy (+2.9%), Sweden (+2.6%) and France (+1.8%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, the Netherlands emerged as the fastest growing exporter in the European Union, with a CAGR of +4.3% from 2007-2018. Belgium and Greece experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. From 2007 to 2018, the share of Germany, Spain and the Netherlands decreased by -1.9%, -3% and -5.5% percentage points, while the shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, Poland ($489M) remains the largest frozen fruit supplier in the European Union, comprising 31% of total frozen fruit exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the Netherlands ($226M), with a 14% share of total exports. It was followed by Belgium, with a 9.8% share.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the frozen fruit export price in the European Union amounted to $2,009 per tonne, growing by 6.7% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the frozen fruit export price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

There were significant differences in the average export prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest export price was Sweden ($2,908 per tonne), while Greece ($1,588 per tonne) was amongst the lowest. From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of export prices was attained by Spain, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, approx. 1.2M tonnes of frozen fruits were imported in the European Union; remaining relatively unchanged against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.3% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. In value terms, frozen fruit imports amounted to $2.4B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

In 2018, Germany (323K tonnes), distantly followed by France (183K tonnes), the Netherlands (122K tonnes), Belgium (119K tonnes), Poland (98K tonnes) and the UK (79K tonnes) were the key importers of frozen fruits, together constituting 77% of total imports. The following importers – Italy (47K tonnes), Austria (46K tonnes), Sweden (37K tonnes), the Czech Republic (23K tonnes), Denmark (20K tonnes) and Lithuania (18K tonnes) – together made up 16% of total imports. From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by the Czech Republic, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest frozen fruit importing markets in the European Union were Germany ($566M), France ($382M) and Belgium ($233M), with a combined 49% share of total imports. The Netherlands, Poland, the UK, Austria, Italy, Sweden, Denmark, the Czech Republic and Lithuania lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 42%.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the frozen fruit import price in the European Union amounted to $1,984 per tonne, jumping by 6.2% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the frozen fruit import price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2011, an increase of 23% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the import prices for frozen fruits reached their maximum at $2,218 per tonne in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, import prices failed to regain their momentum.

Import prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest import price was Sweden ($2,638 per tonne), while Germany ($1,752 per tonne) was amongst the lowest. From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of import prices was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

EU Citrus Fruit Market Reached to $12B in 2018

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Citrus Fruit – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the citrus fruit market in the European Union amounted to $12B in 2018, increasing by 2.8% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price).

The market value increased at an average annual rate of +1.2% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed in certain years.

The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2008, with an increase of 22% against the previous year. In that year, the citrus fruit market attained its peak level of $12.7B. From 2009 to 2018, the growth of the citrus fruit market remained at a lower figure.

Production in the EU

The citrus fruit production stood at 11M tonnes in 2018, stabilizing at the previous year. Over the period under review, citrus fruit production continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, approx. 4.8M tonnes of citrus fruits were exported in the European Union; coming down by -9.1% against the previous year. Overall, citrus fruit exports continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. In value terms, citrus fruit exports stood at $5.1B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

Spain prevails in citrus fruit exports structure, recording 3.2M tonnes, which was approx. 66% of total exports in 2018. It was distantly followed by Greece (357K tonnes), the Netherlands (296K tonnes) and Italy (252K tonnes), together generating 19% share of total exports. Germany (215K tonnes), Portugal (174K tonnes) and France (105K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

Exports from Spain decreased at an average annual rate of -1.3% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, Portugal (+16.9%), Germany (+7.3%), Greece (+3.4%) and France (+2.9%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Portugal emerged as the fastest growing exporter in the European Union, with a CAGR of +16.9% from 2007-2018. The Netherlands and Italy experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. Spain (10%) significantly strengthened its position in terms of the global exports, while Greece, Germany and Portugal saw its share reduced by -2.3%, -2.4% and -3% from 2007 to 2018, respectively. The shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, Spain ($3.5B) remains the largest citrus fruit supplier in the European Union, comprising 69% of total citrus fruit exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the Netherlands ($354M), with a 7% share of total exports. It was followed by Germany, with a 5.3% share.

Export Prices by Country

The citrus fruit export price in the European Union stood at $1,046 per tonne in 2018, picking up by 9% against the previous year. Over the period from 2007 to 2018, it increased at an average annual rate of +1.3%. There were significant differences in the average export prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest export price was Germany ($1,245 per tonne), while Greece ($557 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of export prices was attained by Portugal, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

The imports stood at 6.7M tonnes in 2018, dropping by -6% against the previous year. Over the period under review, citrus fruit imports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. In value terms, citrus fruit imports totaled $6.3B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

The countries with the highest levels of citrus fruit imports in 2018 were France (1.2M tonnes), Germany (1.1M tonnes) and the Netherlands (1.1M tonnes), together reaching 51% of total import. The UK (602K tonnes) took the next position in the ranking, followed by Italy (369K tonnes), Poland (357K tonnes) and Spain (349K tonnes). All these countries together took near 25% share of total imports. Romania (269K tonnes), Portugal (183K tonnes), Sweden (160K tonnes), the Czech Republic (145K tonnes) and Belgium (141K tonnes) occupied a minor share of total imports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Portugal, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, France ($1.2B), Germany ($1.1B) and the Netherlands ($979M) appeared to be the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2018, with a combined 52% share of total imports. These countries were followed by the UK, Italy, Poland, Spain, Romania, Sweden, Belgium, Portugal and the Czech Republic, which together accounted for a further 37%.

Import Prices by Country

The citrus fruit import price in the European Union stood at $933 per tonne in 2018, flattening at the previous year. In general, the citrus fruit import price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. There were significant differences in the average import prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest import price was Belgium ($1,135 per tonne), while Romania ($745 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of import prices was attained by Sweden, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform