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LOGISTICS AND TRANSPORTATION PROGRAMS AWAIT AT HOME AND ABROAD

programs

LOGISTICS AND TRANSPORTATION PROGRAMS AWAIT AT HOME AND ABROAD

There are tons of transportation and logistics programs out there. But the question is: Which program will get you from Point A (where you are now) to Point B (where you want to be)? We imagine that where you want to be includes being fully integrated into a global supply system with cutting-edge ideas, and training that helps to bring solutions to the problems of 2020 and beyond.

Here’s our round-up of five transportation and logistics education programs, worldwide. There are plenty more, but these are ones we think are a good place to start.

UNITED STATES

MIT: Masters in Supply Chain Management

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology program takes students from the lab to the real world of transportation and logistics. Students take what they’ve learned from researchers and experts in transportation and logistics, bringing their new knowledge to the global market. The curriculum includes analytical problem solving, communication, and leadership. Courses include: Logistics Systems, Database Analysis/Information Systems/System Technologies, Finance, Economics, Accounting, Leading Global Teams, Technical Communication/Writing, and Analytical Methods. Students in the master’s program undertake a research project (called a capstone or thesis), where they work with industry experts to solve real-world supply chain problems.

This program has two options: a Residential program and a Blended program. The Residential program is a 10-month on-campus program. The Blended program is a five-month program that blends both on-campus and online classes. Accepted applicants have a choice between studying for a Master of Applied Science in Supply Chain Management (MASc-SCM) or a Master of Engineering in Supply Chain Management (MEng-SCM).

Purdue Univerity Karanner School of Management: Master of Science in Global Supply Chain Management

The Master of Science in Global Supply Chain Management (MSGSCM) helps develop skills in supply chain management, business analytics, and operations. It ranks No. 12 for Top North American Graduate Supply Chain Programs in Gartner’s. Best-Masters.com ranked it No. 2 in the world for Masters Programs for Transportation and Logistics in 2018. This program prepares students for leadership roles through formal and informal education opportunities with industry leaders. A traditional, 18-month program, for those with little work experience, and a 10-month accelerated program for people with 6+ years of industry experience are offered. Courses include: Intro to Operations Management, Supply Chain Analytics, Summer Semester Experiential Learning and Logistics Strategic Sourcing.

PERU

Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru CENTRUM Business School: International Corporate Master in Operations

The International Corporate Master’s Degree in Supply Chain Management helps people to have a strategic impact on supply chains. The focus is on service and applying tech and global management standards. This program is open to operations and logistics professionals with 3+ years of experience and is open to looking at things from a global point of view. Courses offered include: Supply Chain Management, Statistics, Tools or Managerial Decision Making, Qualitative Research of Food Marketing, Management of Procurement, Warehouse Management, Management of Data in Organizations, and Research Methodology. Admissions are year-round. Applications, which are processed within two weeks of receipt, include an interview that is set up immediately.

ITALY

MIP Politécnico di Milano Graduate School of Business: International Master in Supply Chain and Procurement Management

The Master In Supply Chain Management helps transportation and logistics professionals build a global supply chain career with a competitive advantage. The program, which provides strategies to increase revenues and lower costs, also champions innovation and novel ideas. Though it takes place in Italy, it is taught in English and is a full-time program over the course of 12 months. Tuition is $17,651 U.S. (or 16,500 Euros). The program is created for graduates with fewer than three years of work experience.

Topics of focus are innovation, technology, and sustainability, with additional training in soft skills. It’s accredited by CIPS, the largest professional organization serving supply chain management. It is also listed at No. 4 for the Top 2019 Best Masters in the Eduniversal Ranking. The average class size is 25 students. Applications are accepted on a year-long rolling basis. The degree awarded after graduation is the First Level University Specializing Master, recognized by Italy’s government. Students should check with their respective countries to confirm that the degree is transferrable. Some of the skills desired in applicants are an affinity for leadership, an openness to learn about a range of areas in procurement/supply chain, and business and analytical skills.

FRANCE

Kedge Business School: MSc in Global Supply Chain Management

On average, graduates of the Kedge School of Management have a salary of 42,800 euros ($45,927.40 U.S.). All who graduate work in an international capacity, 95 percent are offered a job before graduation and 80 percent join a large company. This MSc degree prepares students for the new era of supply chain management, boasts Kedge, which specializes in teaching within a multicultural framework, with students from more than 20 countries. To this end, students have the opportunity to learn from a diversity of experiences and ideas and build skills to overcome cultural differences.

The MSc in Global Supply Chain Management also offers different supply chain workshops, such as seminars for consultancy assignments, where students apply lessons learned to specific conditions. Students also work with business leaders from such companies as LVMH, Amazon, and Renault and also participate in a six-month internship to solidify supply chain education in real-world settings. This program aims to teach students to embrace change and integrate new ideas and approaches. The MSc program is for three semesters and costs 19,500 euros ($20,862 U.S.). Applications are accepted on a rolling basis from October to July. Scholarships are awarded to 45 percent of the international students.

These programs in the U.S., Peru, Italy, and France only scratch the surface of all that’s out there for those looking for a way to move to the next level in their logistics, transportation and supply chain careers. All of these programs will give you the tools that you need to move forward in an ever-changing, fast-paced world. And with additional education under your belt, you’ll be able to take your transportation and logistics career to new heights.

education

IS THERE A BRIGHT FUTURE FOR TRADE IN EDUCATION?

American University Blues

The arrival of COVID-19 sent students packing mid-semester as many universities continue to mull over options for restarting in-person classes in the fall. Many international students who had returned home for the spring break were unable to return to the United States to finish out their studies.

Travel restrictions and changing student visa rules will have international applicants questioning whether to pursue studies abroad. Universities are working to increase their capabilities to deliver courses virtually but online classes may be less attractive when part of the allure and prestige of American universities is associated with the campus experience. Prospective foreign students may also decline to enroll if they cannot network to secure post-degree employment in the United States.

This is happening against a backdrop of declining new enrollment in American universities by foreign students after a decade-long boom. New international student enrollment has decreased year on year since the 2016/2017 academic year, though the overall number of international students in the United States has increased as more students take advantage of Optional Practical Training, which allows them to stay under their student visa to work for one year.

Education as an Export for International Students

During the 2017/2018 academic year, American educational institutions hosted over one million students. When foreign students come to the United States to study, those institutions are exporting their educational services. Perhaps surprisingly, educational service exports ranked 5th among all U.S. services exports, valued at $45.3 billion in 2018, according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis.

Services trade can be described as supplied in one or more of four ways: the service itself travels over a border but the provider and consumer remain in their home countries; the consumer travels across a border to receive a service; the provider establishes a commercial presence in another country to provide the service; and/or, the service provider travels to another country to provide the service.

Educational services – to varying degrees – are being provided today in all four of these ways. Of course, the most traditional approach is for students to enroll and travel to attend classes in educational institutions abroad for a semester, a year or for a full degree. To a lesser extent, professors may travel to campuses overseas to teach in residence.

As communications technologies improve and become more widely used, virtual education is increasing in popularity. Think: distance learning, corporate training online and expansion of educational software and platforms. Lastly, it has become much more popular in recent years for large universities to open satellite campuses overseas.

Limited Trade Commitments

In the WTO General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS), members have taken commitments to create more market access, enabling the expansion of global educational exports. However, education services still rank among the least committed of all sectors subject to GATS coverage (after audio-visual and energy services).

WTO members are not required to make any commitments to liberalize their markets for educational services and GATS provides exemptions for members to avoid commitments where services are supplied “in the exercise of governmental authority,” or in other words, providing a public service. Furthermore, where educational services are covered in a country’s commitments, they may maintain some limitations on foreign investment, or set limits on the number of service suppliers, on the total value of service transactions or assets, or other types of limitations such as ensuring that quality standards are maintained.

U.S. is Still Top Destination

The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) estimates that 8 million students will be studying abroad by 2025.

The United States has long held the number one spot for students seeking an international education. According to the Institute of International Education’s 2019 Open Doors Report, the United States played host to over 30,000 students per year during the 1950s. By the late 1990s, that number reached 500,000 and reached an all-time high of 1,095,299 students in the 2018/2019 academic year, including undergraduates, graduate-level students, and students undertaking a one- or two-year post-graduation experience under their student visa.

The U.S. education system attracts students from virtually every country of the world. China sends the most students to the United States by far. India is a not-so-close second.
As a percentage of total students in higher education, however, the United States has relatively fewer international students than many other countries, at only 5.5 percent. By comparison, Australia’s average foreign student body is 28.0 percent, Canada’s 21.4 percent, the U.K.’s 20.9 percent, France’s 12.8 percent, and Russia’s 8.6 percent.

The Foreign Student Premium

It pays for universities and governments to attract international students. Aside from the cultural value, diversity of perspectives and ideas they bring, international students studying at U.S. colleges and universities contributed $41 billion in revenue and supported 458,290 jobs during the 2018/19 academic year, according to NAFSA: Association of International Educators.

International students in the United States, as well as in Australia, Canada and New Zealand, pay on average double the tuition fees paid by domestic students. In the United States, this is largely due to the difference between in-state and out-of-state tuition at public universities, but in other countries, international students are charged separate – often much higher – tuition rates.

In addition to padding university budgets, international students bring additional spending to local shops and restaurants, and tend to travel in their host country, helping to support jobs in the community and through tourism. For example, NAFSA found that international students in the top two enrolling states, California and New York, contributed $6.8 billion and $5.3 billion to each state’s economy, and supported 74,814 and 59,586 jobs, respectively.

Graduating to the Next Level?

Educational service exports are facing some serious headwinds. If schools want to keep hold of the huge benefits international students bring, they must incentivize new student enrollment and ensure safe returns to campus. One country doing just that is Australia, which is trialing a pilot scheme to gradually reintroduce international students, whose presence in the country supports 259,000 jobs.

In addition to delivering their educational services on campus, the global health pandemic is forcing universities to adapt and innovate to deliver education online. The mainstreaming of distance learning may also create opportunities for more providers to offer educational services across international borders. We’re all learning in this new environment.

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Alice Calder received her MA in Applied Economics at GMU. Originally from the UK, where she received her BA in Philosophy and Political Economy from the University of Exeter, living and working internationally sparked her interest in trade issues as well as the intersection of economics and culture.

This article originally appeared on TradeVistas.org. Republished with permission.
international

International Diploma-cy

Higher education is one of the world’s leading “exports”

To compete in today’s knowledge-driven economy, college-bound students are increasingly going global in their pursuit of a top-notch degree. Since 2001, the number of students pursuing studies abroad has more than doubled, from 2.1 million to 5.0 million in 2018.

As one result, higher education is fast becoming one of the world’s leading “exports.” Many people may not think of education as an “export,” but when an international student comes to the United States, for example, the monies spent on tuition, fees and living expenses are considered “exports” of education services.

The current world leader in education exports is the United States, whose 7,021 two- and four-year colleges and universities attracted nearly a quarter of the world’s international students in 2018. According to the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC), revenues from U.S. higher education accounted for about one-fourth of the $903 billion global education services industry in 2011.

Top host destinations for foreign students

International students are the consumers of higher education exports

On the other side of the equation, the world’s leading “consumers” of higher education are China and India, both of whom see enormous benefits in sending hundreds of thousands of their students abroad to take advantage of educational opportunities and to bring that knowledge home.

Chinese students, for example, make up 33 percent of all international students in the United States, according to a 2019 report by the Institute of International Education (IIE), while the share of students from India has also grown dramatically. In 2018, China sent 369,548 students to America, while India sent 202,014. For both groups of students, the most popular fields of study are science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), followed by business and management.

American schools also benefit from the presence of international students, which is one reason why their numbers are rising (although their share of total U.S. college enrollment is still only about five percent). In addition to the cultural and social diversity these students bring, they also pay “full freight” – out-of-state tuition in the case of public universities or sticker price in the case of private schools. At some schools, international students even pay extra. At the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana, for example, international students paid a $2,800 surcharge during the 2012-2013 school year.

These well-paying students have been a boon for schools facing rising costs or cash-strapped by cuts in state education budgets. But even elite institutions find these students attractive. For example, according to the ITC, foreign students made up at least 15 percent of the students entering Boston University, Columbia University and the University of Pennsylvania during the 2011-2012 school year and at least 10 percent of students at such flagship state schools as the University of California-Berkeley. Many schools also actively recruit foreign students and even hire “brokers” to find students abroad. The ITC also reports that a growing number of public colleges and universities are forming state-wide consortia, such as “Study New Jersey” and “Study Wisconsin,” to host recruiting fairs and conferences for foreign students.

US Colleges with Greatest Share of Foreign Students 2018

Global competition to provide higher education

American schools, however, are increasingly facing competition from other countries that see the same opportunities. India, for example, recently decided to raise by 10,000 the number of foreign students admitted to its engineering schools as a way to improve the prestige of its national universities. As a result, the U.S. share of the international student market is slipping. While the number of international students going to America continues to climb, its overall share of these students in 2016 was three percent lower than it was in 2001.

While the dominance of U.S. higher education will likely continue for quite some time, competition for the world’s “best and brightest” will only get more fierce.

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This article was updated as of November 20, 2019.

Anne Kim

 

Anne Kim is a contributing editor to Washington Monthly and the author of Abandoned: America’s Lost Youth and the Crisis of Disconnection, forthcoming in 2020 from the New Press. Her writings on economic opportunity, social policy, and higher education have appeared in numerous national outlets, including the Washington Monthly, the Washington Post, Governing and Atlantic.com, among others. She is a veteran of the think tanks the Progressive Policy Institute and Third Way as well as of Capitol Hill, where she worked for Rep. Jim Cooper (D-TN). Anne has a law degree from Duke University and a bachelor’s in journalism from the University of Missouri-Columbia.

This article originally appeared on TradeVistas.org. Republished with permission.