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Multilateral Trade Negotiations Continue

Multilateral Trade Negotiations Continue

Austria is the latest country to step up and contribute to support developing and least-developed countries (LDCs) and thier participation in global trade efforts. A total of 400,000 EUR was donated last week to assist in financing trade workshops with an overall vision of successful implementation of WTO agreements, according to a release from WTO.

I firmly believe that the multilateral trading system, particularly the World Trade Organization, plays an essential role in boosting international trade and helping improve the livelihoods of millions of people in both developed and developing economies. Through our contribution to the Trust Fund, we aim to help developing economies integrate into world trade and contribute more actively to the world economy,” Austria’s Federal Minister for Digital and Economic Affairs, Margarete Schramböck, said.

This donation is one of many over the last 15 years from the country of Austria, totaling $15 million EUR towards funds for the WTO. As more developing countries are educated and supported in trade education initiatives, global trade efforts will present more opportunities for industry players.

“I want to thank Austria for supporting WTO trade-related programmes aimed at enhancing the capacity of developing countries and LDCs to trade and to fully participate in multilateral trade negotiations. Austria’s generous donations are very welcome,” said Director-General Roberto Azevêdo.

Source: WTO

WTO: Global Customs Agreement Deal In a Fortnight

Los Angeles, CA – There is a “high probability” that a major deal on streamlining global customs rules will be implemented within two weeks now that the U.S., the European Union and India have reached a compromise agreement on agricultural subsidies.

India said it will sign the Trade Facilitation Agreement (TFA) as the U.S. and the EU have said they will accept India’s demand that it be allowed to stockpile food without observing the usual World Trade Organization rules on government subsidies and that developing countries be provided flexibility in fixing minimum support price for farm products.

India’s stand plunged the WTO into a crisis that effectively paralyzed the global trade group and risked derailing the customs reforms that are seen affecting an estimated $1 trillion to global trade.

“I would say that we have a high probability that the Bali package will be implemented very shortly,” said WTO Director-General Roberto Azevedo. “I’m hopeful that we can do it in a very short period of time, certainly within the next two weeks.”

Implementation of all aspects of the Trade Facilitation Agreement package, he added, “would be a major boost to the WTO, enhancing our ability to deliver beneficial outcomes to all our members.”

Azevedo made his comments ahead of the recent Group of 20 Leaders Summit in Brisbane, Australia.

The compromise U.S./EU/India agricultural subsidy deal included no major revision of the original WTO deal struck last December, which provided for India’s food stockpiling to be shielded from legal challenge by a “peace clause.”

A food security law passed by India’s last government expanded the number of people entitled to receive cheap food grains to 850 million.

India recently disclosed that its state food procurement cost $13.8 billion in 2010-11, part of the total of $56.1 billion it spends on farm support. Wheat stocks, at 30 million tons, are more than double official target levels.

The deal, which needs to be backed by all 160 WTO members, has resurrected hopes that the trade body can now push through those reforms, opening the way up for further negotiations.

11/19/2014

WTO Downgrades Trade Growth Forecasts

Geneva, Switzerland – The World Trade Organization has reduced its forecast for world trade growth in 2014 to 3.1 percent, a significant drop from the 4.6 percent it made in April.

In addition, it also cut its estimate for 2015 to 4.0 percent from its previous 5.3 percent forecast.

The downgrade “comes in response to weaker-than-expected GDP growth and muted import demand in the first half of 2014, particularly in natural resource exporting regions such as South and Central America,” the global trade group said.

Beyond the specific downward revisions, it said, “risks to the forecast remain predominantly on the downside, as global growth remains uneven and as geopolitical tensions and risks have risen,” while “international institutions have significantly revised their GDP forecasts after disappointing economic growth in the first half of the year,” said WTO Director-General Roberto Azevêdo.

When the last forecast was released in April 2014, conditions for stronger trade growth seemed to be falling into place after a two year slump that saw world merchandise trade grow just 2.2 percent on average during 2012–13, with leading indicators at the time pointing to an upturn in developed economies and Europe in particular.

“Although growth has strengthened somewhat in 2014, it has remained unsteady,” the WTO said with output in the US during the first quarter of this year falling by –2.1 percent, annualized rates and in the second quarter in Germany by –0.6 percent, “sapping global import demand.”

China’s GDP growth also slowed from 7.7 percent in 2013 to 6.1 percent in the first quarter of this year before rebounding in the second. The slow first quarter contributed to weak exports in trading partners.

“As a result of these and other factors, global trade stagnated in the first half of 2014, as the gradual recovery of import demand in developed countries was offset by declines in developing countries,” the WTO said.

Growth in trade and output “is expected to be somewhat stronger in the second half of 2014 as governments and central banks may provide policy support to boost growth, and as idiosyncratic factors such as harsh weather conditions in the US and a sales tax rise in Japan weighted on trade in the first half of this year begin to fade.”

However, the WTO said, “several risk factors on the horizon have the potential to produce worse economic outcomes.”

For example, it said, tensions between the European Union and the US on the one hand and the Russian Federation on the other over Ukraine have already resulted in trade sanctions on certain agricultural commodities, and the number of products affected could widen if the crisis persists.

At the same time, the continuing conflict in the Middle East “is also stoking uncertainty, and could lead to a spike in oil prices if the security of oil supplies is threatened.”

This is the moment, he said, “to remind ourselves that trade can play a positive role here. Cutting trade costs and broadening trade opportunities can be a key ingredient to reversing this trend,” said the WTO’s Azevêdo.

09/24/2014