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DACHSER’s New LCL Service Offers Expanded Connections for Shippers

DACHSER

DACHSER’s New LCL Service Offers Expanded Connections for Shippers

Shippers seeking a consolidated access option along the route from Europe to Chile are now offered DACHSER’s latest weekly schedule of LCL services. This added service streamlines the process by collecting container shipments followed by consolidation at its Hamburg warehouse. Once consolidated, the items are shipped directly to San Antonio, Chile without interruption.

“Referring to ‘less than container load,’ our new LCL service is designed to meet the specific needs of our customers with smaller merchandise quantities. The service not only optimizes efficiencies and reduces costs, but the fixed weekly schedule improves the planning process,” said Guido Gries, Managing Director, DACHSER Americas.

“An effective LCL service comes down to timing—from the coordination of the grouping of goods and to the fixed container trips between ports. Our management of this timing allows our customers the benefit of improved planning and transit times as well as transparency of their shipments,” said Mr. Gries.

Markets including Germany, France, Austria, Switzerland, Belgium, Denmark, Netherlands, Czech Republic, Poland, and Slovakia are directly connected to the Chilean region thanks to this added service. DACHSER continues to showcase its dedication to expanding network capabilities while supporting the needs of its customers, particularly in a trying time for the supply chain and global logistics players.

“The service offers customers streamlined container coordination and management of all sea freight imports deployed on first-class carriers to Chile,” added Mr. Gries. “Thanks to our extensive European logistics network we can offer seamless visibility from the door of the supplier in Europe to the final destination.”

Additional service offerings include interlocked logistics solutions aimed to support road, air, and sea logistics through transportation and warehousing services as well as pre-carriage handling and transparent supplier tracking.

How to Prevent Kinks in the Global Supply Chain

Knoxville, TN – Working with talented professionals, customer service, agility and reducing cost are just a few of the key issues on the minds of senior level supply chain executives in the US manufacturing and retail sectors, says Dr. J. Paul Dittmann, executive director of the Global Supply Chain Institute at the University of Tennessee – Knoxville.

Meeting in Chicago recently, the Institute’s Advisory Board shared its insights on solutions to some of the most critical issues facing the global supply chain. The board is comprised of 25 high-level managers from some of the largest companies in the country.

According to Dittmann, the executives feel that having “the right people in the right positions” is the key to every solution with companies needing to develop “better processes to assess, identify, recruit, develop and retain top talent, especially since supply chain talent is increasingly scarce.”

Understanding the customer’s current and future needs was also seen as absolutely critical, he says. “They understand that their customers should lead their supply chain strategies and they know that their customers should be better educated on the cost-service tradeoffs.”

AGILITY, COST REDUCTION, REGULATORY COMPLIANCE

Near the top of the list, says Dittmann, are developing the “agility to adapt to changing environments,” given the increasing volatility in the global marketplace and a “need to stay current with technology on many fronts, from warehouse and transportation management systems to network optimization tools and inventory planning systems.”

Cost reduction “will always be a priority and supply chain executives know their companies expect them to take the lead in that area, while still improving service,” he says. “They know that they need to be more creative and proactive. They also understand that they must reduce cost while simultaneously redesigning their supply chains and leveraging the global environment.”

Also critical are developing efficient ways to comply with the growing list of government regulations, as well as optimizing performance despite the condition of the country’s “crumbling transportation infrastructure.”

Supply chain executives, says Dittmann, “understand they should have a better process to identify, prioritize and mitigate supply chain risks that can seriously damage their companies. Even weather must be considered, especially given the extreme challenges of last winter.”

08/27/2014