Steel Import Licenses Must Include Country of “Melt and Pour” - Global Trade Magazine
  September 18th, 2020 | Written by

Steel Import Licenses Must Include Country of “Melt and Pour”

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  • The reporting requirement does not apply to raw materials used in steel manufacturing.
  • Commerce stressed that there will be limited availability for manual license processing.
  • The new required information on the country of “melt and pour” may be useful in investigating circumvention of duties.

The U.S. Department of Commerce’s (Commerce) Steel Import Monitoring and Analysis System (SIMA) will be modified effective October 13, 2020, to require that the country where the steel was “melted and poured” to be identified in the license application. Other changes in the final rule published on September 11, 2020, include adding coverage for eight additional HTS numbers in order to synchronize the system with the coverage of Section 232 for basic steel mill products; increasing the low-value license to $5,000, and allowing multiple uses; and extending the SIMA program indefinitely.

The new rule defines “melted and poured” as “the original location where the raw steel is: (A) First produced in a steel-making furnace in a liquid state; and then (B) Poured into its first solid shape…The first solid state can take the form of either a semi-finished product (slab, billets or ingots) or a finished steel mill product.”

The reporting requirement does not apply to raw materials used in steel manufacturing. The new required information on the country of “melt and pour” may also be useful in investigating circumvention of duties.

The SIMA website will shut down from October 9 until October 13, 2020 when the new website is updated and goes live. Commerce has created a page with the latest updates regarding SIMA. In the interim, Commerce stressed that there will be limited availability for manual license processing.

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Nithya Nagarajan is a Washington-based partner with the law firm Husch Blackwell LLP. She practices in the International Trade & Supply Chain group of the firm’s Technology, Manufacturing & Transportation industry team.

Camron Greer is an Assistant Trade Analyst in Husch Blackwell LLP’s Washington D.C. office.