EU Salt Pork Market Is Estimated at $5.2B - Global Trade Magazine
New Articles
  October 2nd, 2019 | Written by

EU Salt Pork Market Is Estimated at $5.2B

Sharelines

  • From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the Netherlands.
  • In value terms, preserved pork imports stood at $1.8B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.
  • The market size for preserved pork in the European Union is estimated at $5.2B (2018).

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Pig Meat Salted (Salted, In Brine, Dried Or Smoked) – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The market size for preserved pork in the European Union is estimated at $5.2B (2018), an increase of 3.5% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price).

Over the period under review, preserved pork consumption, however, continues to indicate a temperate setback. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2013 with an increase of 5.6% against the previous year. The level of preserved pork consumption peaked at $6.8B in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, consumption failed to regain its momentum.

Consumption By Country in the EU

The UK (419K tonnes) constituted the country with the largest volume of preserved pork consumption, accounting for 39% of total consumption. Moreover, preserved pork consumption in the UK exceeded the figures recorded by the region’s second-largest consumer, Germany (116K tonnes), fourfold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Italy (94K tonnes), with a 8.8% share.

From 2008 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of volume in the UK totaled -2.7%. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: Germany (-5.0% per year) and Italy (+6.8% per year).

In value terms, the UK ($1.9B) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by France ($748M). It was followed by Germany.

The countries with the highest levels of preserved pork per capita consumption in 2018 were Ireland (12,561 kg per 1000 persons), the UK (6,284 kg per 1000 persons) and Romania (2,789 kg per 1000 persons).

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of preserved pork per capita consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Austria, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Production in the EU

In 2018, the amount of pig meat salted (salted, in brine, dried or smoked) produced in the European Union totaled 1.1M tonnes, remaining constant against the previous year. Over the period under review, preserved pork production, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2009 with an increase of 11% y-o-y. In that year, preserved pork production attained its peak volume of 1.3M tonnes. From 2010 to 2018, preserved pork production growth remained at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, preserved pork production stood at $4.8B in 2018 estimated in export prices. Overall, preserved pork production, however, continues to indicate a measured setback. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 with an increase of 6.8% year-to-year. The level of preserved pork production peaked at $6.4B in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, production failed to regain its momentum.

Production By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of preserved pork production in 2018 were the UK (247K tonnes), Germany (151K tonnes) and Italy (141K tonnes), with a combined 48% share of total production.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of preserved pork production, amongst the main producing countries, was attained by Italy, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, the preserved pork exports in the European Union totaled 398K tonnes, stabilizing at the previous year. In general, preserved pork exports continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2016 with an increase of 5.7% y-o-y. The volume of exports peaked at 423K tonnes in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, exports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, preserved pork exports totaled $2.2B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Over the period under review, preserved pork exports continue to indicate a slight descent. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 when exports increased by 8.1% year-to-year. The level of exports peaked at $2.4B in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, exports failed to regain their momentum.

Exports by Country

In 2018, the Netherlands (98K tonnes), distantly followed by Italy (60K tonnes), Germany (58K tonnes), Denmark (55K tonnes), Spain (50K tonnes), Poland (31K tonnes) and the UK (18K tonnes) were the major exporters of pig meat salted (salted, in brine, dried or smoked), together committing 93% of total exports.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Italy ($648M), Spain ($423M) and the Netherlands ($292M) constituted the countries with the highest levels of exports in 2018, with a combined 63% share of total exports.

Spain experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to exports, in terms of the main exporting countries over the last decade, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the preserved pork export price in the European Union amounted to $5,399 per tonne, remaining relatively unchanged against the previous year. Overall, the preserved pork export price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 when the export price increased by 6.7% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the export prices for pig meat salted (salted, in brine, dried or smoked) attained their peak figure at $6,151 per tonne in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, export prices stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Italy ($10,792 per tonne), while Denmark ($2,876 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Spain, while the other leaders experienced a decline in the export price figures.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, the amount of pig meat salted (salted, in brine, dried or smoked) imported in the European Union totaled 339K tonnes, going up by 1.9% against the previous year. Over the period under review, preserved pork imports, however, continue to indicate a temperate slump. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2010 with an increase of 48% y-o-y. In that year, preserved pork imports attained their peak of 433K tonnes. From 2011 to 2018, the growth of preserved pork imports remained at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, preserved pork imports stood at $1.8B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. In general, preserved pork imports, however, continue to indicate a temperate setback. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2013 with an increase of 10% against the previous year. The level of imports peaked at $2.3B in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, imports failed to regain their momentum.

Imports by Country

The UK prevails in preserved pork imports structure, accounting for 190K tonnes, which was approx. 56% of total imports in 2018. France (34K tonnes) ranks second in terms of the total imports with a 10% share, followed by Germany (7%) and Ireland (4.9%). The following importers – Italy (13,638 tonnes), Austria (8,514 tonnes), Denmark (8,242 tonnes), Belgium (8,025 tonnes) and the Netherlands (5,643 tonnes) – together made up 13% of total imports.

From 2008 to 2018, average annual rates of growth with regard to preserved pork imports into the UK stood at -4.0%. At the same time, Austria (+9.6%), France (+3.5%), Germany (+3.0%), Italy (+2.3%) and Ireland (+2.2%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Austria emerged as the fastest-growing importer in the European Union, with a CAGR of +9.6% from 2008-2018. By contrast, Belgium (-1.6%), Denmark (-5.5%) and the Netherlands (-8.0%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period. France (+2.9 p.p.), Germany (+1.8 p.p.) and Austria (+1.5 p.p.) significantly strengthened its position in terms of the total imports, while Denmark, the Netherlands and the UK saw its share reduced by -1.9%, -2.2% and -27.9% from 2008 to 2018, respectively. The shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, the UK ($634M) constitutes the largest market for imported pig meat salted (salted, in brine, dried or smoked) in the European Union, comprising 36% of total preserved pork imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by France ($280M), with a 16% share of total imports. It was followed by Germany, with a 14% share.

In the UK, preserved pork imports shrank by an average annual rate of -6.5% over the period from 2008-2018. The remaining importing countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: France (+1.7% per year) and Germany (+1.6% per year).

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the preserved pork import price in the European Union amounted to $5,220 per tonne, jumping by 2.5% against the previous year. Overall, the preserved pork import price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2009 an increase of 22% against the previous year. In that year, the import prices for pig meat salted (salted, in brine, dried or smoked) reached their peak level of $6,609 per tonne. From 2010 to 2018, the growth in terms of the import prices for pig meat salted (salted, in brine, dried or smoked) remained at a somewhat lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Belgium ($11,387 per tonne), while the UK ($3,331 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced mixed trends in the import price figures.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform


%d bloggers like this: