Trump Signs USMCA Into Law But Not Everyone is Cheering - Global Trade Magazine
  February 21st, 2020 | Written by

Trump Signs USMCA Into Law But Not Everyone is Cheering

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  • "The Department of Labor stands ready to fully implement USMCA to the benefit of American workers.”
  • “USMCA will bring jobs, increased trade and stronger economic growth to our already record-setting economy."
  • “The USMCA is the largest, most significant, modern, and balanced trade agreement in history."

President Donald Trump signed the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) into law at a Jan. 29 White House ceremony, officially canceling the North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). “The USMCA is the largest, most significant, modern, and balanced trade agreement in history,” Trump told admirers and the press. “All of our countries will benefit greatly.”

“Thanks to the unyielding dedication of President Trump, the United States will now have a fair and reciprocal trade agreement with Mexico and Canada,” reacted U.S. Secretary of Labor Eugene Scalia. “USMCA will bring jobs, increased trade and stronger economic growth to our already record-setting economy, growing GDP by as much as $235 billion and adding as many as 500,000 new jobs.

“President Trump has delivered on a promise,” Scalia continued. “This historic agreement will level the playing field for American workers, preparing American businesses for the demands of a 21st Century economy. The Department of Labor stands ready to fully implement USMCA to the benefit of American workers.”

An independent report by trade credit insurer Atradius found the USMCA “has reduced trade policy uncertainty in North America, shielding Mexico and Canada from any global tariffs on cars the U.S. might impose on national security grounds.”

But not everyone was cheering. “USMCA is only marginally better than previous trade deals and doesn’t do nearly enough to create American jobs, increase workers’ wages, or protect workers and the environment,” states Groundwork Collaborative, an initiative dedicated to advancing a coherent, persuasive progressive economic worldview and narrative. “Trade is like every other economic issue: It is only really working when it is working for ALL people, not just the wealthy and well-connected. USMCA doesn’t meet that standard and is a major missed opportunity.