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Supply Chain Professions: Women’s Place Today?

women

Supply Chain Professions: Women’s Place Today?

Despite the diversification of its professions and a recent and relative feminization, the supply chain remains predominantly male, especially the higher up the organization chart you go. We have gathered a panel of experts from the field and from education to understand how to make supply chain jobs more attractive to women and to remove the obstacles to the feminization of a sector that has strong recruitment needs:

 

 

Salomée Ruel: associate professor of information systems management and supply chain management at Kedge Business School;

 

Marie-Laurence Deruaz: Logistics Director at Suez Eau France

 

Anicia Jaegler: director of the Operations Management and Information Systems department and professor at the ISLI at Kedge Business school, delivers their analysis;

 

Just over 4 in 10 (41%) supply chain positions, according to the Gartner 2021 survey, are filled by women. These numbers are slowly changing, as Gartner reported an occupancy rate of 39% in 2020 and 33% in 2019. However, in executive positions, their share is only 17%, and decreasing. What are the persistent obstacles to this feminization? 

 

Anicia Jaegler: “Historically, logistics originated in the military world. Then, it was implemented in the industrial world and associated with transport and storage. This explains its masculinization. The supply chain, which is more recent, is slowly becoming more feminine, with very significant differences depending on the activity and sector”.

 

Salomée Ruel: “The operational functions of logistics – transport, handling, etc. – which make up the bulk of the troops, have less than 10% women. Conversely, in customer services, more than 9 out of 10 employees are women, but these profiles weigh little in the overall workforce.

 

The digitalization of the sector, which is pushing companies to recruit more “mathematical” profiles, does not seem to be conducive to the feminization of the sector, particularly in management positions, which are predominantly male.

 

This is related to the fact that it is a male world that has difficulty making room for women, but also to image problems generating a lack of attractiveness for some women”.

 

Marie-Laurence Deruaz: “The supply chain is often reduced in people’s minds to its “logistics” part, which is historically considered to be a man’s job, physical, with a lot of travel and staggered hours, considered to be very restrictive.

 

These stereotypes apply to recruiters, but also to female candidates, who tend to censor themselves. Fewer in number in training courses, they find it harder to take the plunge when applying.

 

My own team of about 60 employees who perform operational supply and package preparation duties includes six women”.

How can we make these jobs more attractive to women?

 

Anicia Jaegler: “The first action is the promotion of professions in industry, transport, e-commerce, etc. The supply chain is everywhere and its professions are very diverse. Several initiatives are moving in the right direction: a book for primary school children, a card game for high school girls, etc”.

 

Salomée Ruel: “We need to work on the image of these jobs. We must make it known that these jobs, considered as very manual and requiring muscles, have been largely facilitated by mechanization, which also relieves the men.

 

It should be noted that beyond logistics, the sector now encompasses a wide range of functions, around the management of the supply chain.

 

As a teacher, I insist on their transversal and strategic dimensions. We need more female teachers in logistics. At Kedge Business School, the Superior Institute of Industrial Logistics, where I teach, and the Msc “International Transport” are run by women. We have an educational role to play by training our female students in negotiation and leadership and by trying to change the way students view their colleagues.

 

This image work must be led by companies, but also by journalists and public authorities. 100% female events such as the “Global Women Supply Chain Leaders 2020″, organized by B2G Consulting, are starting to be set up.

 

Finally, in the locker room, change also means strict enforcement of the law that prohibits posters of naked women, which is considered sexual harassment. It may seem like anecdotal evidence, but it’s not always.”

 

Marie-Laurence Deruaz: “We also need an active HR policy on gender equality. At Suez, this means communicating to all employees about the stereotypes and discrimination that women may be subject to.

 

It is important that communication also highlights successful women and career opportunities.

 

Recently, we set up a women’s network to give them more visibility, to allow them to share experiences, but also to decipher codes and remove barriers that they sometimes put on themselves.

 

When I set up my team, I made sure to give both men and women a chance: two out of five site managers are women. On a daily basis, I encourage the teams to be open to this type of recruitment. We have some of the best female warehouse staff.

 

But these changes are not always without difficulties. It is also necessary to support the teams, as some members have difficulty recognizing the legitimacy of women managers. This requires open discussions with these employees to help them take a step back from what they are saying and what they think, but also support for the manager.

What are the benefits for a company to have a more active gender diversity policy?

 

Marie-Laurence Deruaz: “Diversity in the broadest sense of the word is an asset for the company. It is the variety of experiences, skills and points of view on the same problem that will make a team more efficient. And diversity is part of this. As long as you know how to agree to cross the views. I have noticed that teams with women leave more room for communication.

 

Anicia Jaegler: “The research conducted made it possible to link the presence of women and financial performance, sustainable performance and diversity.”

 

Salomée Ruel: “Women are more sensitive to issues of well-being in the workplace and to compliance with Quality, Health, Safety and Environment (QHSE) rules.

 

They are also more sensitive to the respect of suppliers’ codes of conduct; a key dimension at a time when consumers do not hesitate to boycott a brand that violates ethical rules. Finally, research has shown that in supply chain audit situations, teams led by women perform better and uncover more disputes and compliance issues.

 

Generix Group North America helps distribution & manufacturing companies achieve operational excellence with their WMS & MES  Supply chain solutions. We invite you to download our WMS Decision Making Guide  here.

This article originally appeared here. Republished with permission. 

leadership

TOP 10 WOMEN IN LOGISTICS 2021: MEET THE NATURAL BORN LEADERS WHO ARE REDEFINING THE INDUSTRY

It is hard to believe that it’s been an entire year since our previous annual Women in Logistics spotlight. As the industry continues to break boundaries in resiliency and innovation, what better way to honor the leading ladies behind the companies that not only made it through the pandemic but who continue to grow and redefine greatness in operations, company culture, and transformation? 

Here are our top 10 picks for this year’s Women in Logistics and why they made our special list:

1. Sandra McQuain
Executive Director
England Economic & Industrial Development District 

Topping the list is the first female leader in England Economic & Industrial Development District’s 25-year history. Sandra, who first joined the “England Airpark” in 2018, is also the only female to manage one of the seven commercial airports in the state of Louisiana.

England Airpark is a 3,600-acre economic and industrial development district serving as a home to a Part 139 Commercial Airport (AEX), a staging base for military training and transfer operations, manufacturing, and warehouse facilities, and more. 

Sandra’s primary focus is to provide critical strategic, financial and operational leadership that is driven by more than 25 years of experience working with businesses, government agencies and elected officials. 

Beyond England Airpark, Sandra was appointed by Louisiana’s Governor John Bel Edwards and Secretary of Transportation and Development Shawn Wilson to serve as a member of the Resilient Louisiana Commission’s Transportation and Infrastructure Task Force. She also serves on the Transportation Policy Committee and Beltway Committee for the Rapides (Parish) Area Planning Commission and is also a Board Member of Fort Polk Progress. 

Additionally, Sandra works closely with the MORE Initiative of the Association for the Improvement of America’s Infrastructure (AIAI), which recruits women for the transportation and logistics industries.

2. Deidre “Dee” Cusack
Senior Vice President of Global Products and Solutions
Dematic

According to her colleagues, Dee is a prime example of a natural-born leader who challenges her team of more than 1,200 to think differently and push boundaries for greatness. 

Dee currently serves as the Senior Vice President of Global Products and Solutions at Dematic, a STEM-focused company that has undergone significant growth and transformation thanks to her leadership and strategic commitment to innovation. 

She was appointed top her SVP role mid-pandemic, and yet her company successfully released 18 new products in strategic areas, increased Build with Standards orders by more than $300 million and generated more than 200 new patents.

As if this was not enough, Dee holds recognition for the following awards:

– CEO Award for International Trade, given by Joe Hogan, the former CEO at ABB 

– 7-time winner of the Customer Focus Award, granted by Roger Bailey, President of Power Products at ABB 

– CEO Award for Collaboration, given by Hasan Dandashly, CEO at Dematic 

Speaking of awards, Dee was awarded the largest customer purchase order in history at Ametek Aerospace and five U.S. and international patents.

 

3. Alexi Cashen
Co-Founder and CEO
Elenteny Imports 

Alexi is known for seeking out leadership rather than waiting for it to find her. This approach has served her well throughout her career as an entrepreneur, even amid the 2010 financial crisis. 

It was after Alexi moved to New York City from a small town in Colorado that she partnered with Tim Elenteny and co-founded Elenteny Imports, an alcohol logistics company. Since its launch, Elenteny represents more than 1 million cases annually and works with over 400 global clients while supporting alcohol brands as they navigate the U.S. three-tier system.

It would only make sense that given her history in thriving during a crisis that she would expand her professional horizons in 2020. Elenteny launched their Less than Container Load (LCL) route into Seattle during the global pandemic. 

Furthermore, Alexi started a mentoring-focused podcast just for entrepreneurs in the sparkling spiked beverage industry in 2020 as well.

4. Hima Bindu Challa
Co-founder
limbiq

Hima was born and raised in India, where she completed her Master’s in Computer Applications and began her career. Fast forward to 2009 and she officially pivoted her career focus to the logistics and supply chain industry in the United States, where she would remain for the next 10 years. 

Hima then moved to Germany, where she co-founded limbiq with the sole intention of providing a simple and complete solution to supply chain partners. 

She and her team focused on SMEs as their first target group.  

“We felt that SMEs are the ones with the biggest problems in collaborating with different partners because of their size,” she explains. “We eventually learned that irrespective of size, it’s a problem everywhere.” 

5. Gerri Commodore
Senior Vice President of New Business Implementation
GEODIS Americas

Gerri’s success goes well beyond the numbers and global impact of GEODIS, which ranks among the top supply chain operators in Europe and the world. Her accomplishments have been achieved during more than 20 years in the industry, from operations management, inventory and omnichannel fulfillment strategies to warehouse management systems and supply chain optimization. 

Her current role supports the successful integration of new clients for the company’s North Americans and South American networks–critical to ensuring operations are launched in a timely manner and within budget, according to client goals. 

She is the driving force behind GEODIS’ Women’s Network–focusing on recruiting, retaining and growing female professionals while continuing to improve the industry’s gender balance. Since becoming the network’s chairperson, membership has grown by more than 500 percent—pandemic and all.

Additionally, Gerri was part of the team that was responsible for growing GEODIS’ worldwide female leadership roles from 13% in 2017 to 18% and has pledged to reach 25% by 2023.

6. Darlene Wolf
Senior Vice President, Strategic Partners
Arrive Logistics 

Darlene focuses on utilizing her expertise and experience to support partners from managing network relationships to navigating business challenges with shippers at the top of mind. 

Part of what makes Darlene’s role so impactful is the level of accountability she holds for herself and for her team. Whatever a shipper needs, her team is standing by to deliver successful and smooth operations. 

“I’m so honored to be spotlighted as a distinguished woman in the logistics industry,” Darlene says. “When our industry faces disruptions or challenges, I pride myself on being a leader who consistently promotes innovative solutions.”

7. Cheryl Emery
Director of Field Resources
Penske Logistics 

Cheryl brings more than 30 years of experience to the logistics sector. Prior to her role as an HR director for the company, she took charge as an operator for the business. 

Her time as an operator further supports her current role in talent management, performance, recruiting and retention. 

Cheryl’s skills as an HR business partner goes beyond supporting the growth of Penske’s business as she is now designing policies and procedures focused on operator needs. In doing this, operator needs are clearly outlined so workers know exactly what it takes for policy implementation while meeting the needs of the business. 

8. Yamini Vellore
Chief Information Officer
Blume Global

Yamini’s 30-year career started off strong with Manhattan Associates, where she focused on developing solutions as the VP of Global Research and Development. Fast forward to 2010, and she joined the Hewlett-Packard team in developing and maintaining global IT architecture. 

She did not stop there as she continues breaking barriers for females in the logistics and technology sectors as CIO at Blume Global, where her primary focus is on infrastructure architecture and DevOps.

Yamini strives to ensure Blume’s solutions are available 24x7x365 to a global customer base. Her leadership role redefines standards in diverse hiring practices. 

Blume’s use of Google Cloud Platform services and customer transition heavily rely on expertise that Yamini’s colleagues have cited as “instrumental” to the company’s architecture. 

9. Elise Le
Head of Customer Experience
ClearMetal 

For ClearMetal’s Fortune 1000 customer base, complex supply chains are a given. When it comes to making sure customers have the best experience regardless of their supply chain complexities, ClearMetal calls on Elise.

Known as a distinguished professional in the logistics field, Elisa is cited by colleagues as possessing exceptional skills, high credibility and ongoing persistence in maintaining customer expectations–something that she seems to accomplish with ease.

“Her work distinguishes her in logistics not only as a woman but as an individual,” says one ClearMetal colleague.

The increase in efficiency, growth, and success for ClearMetal is the overarching theme for initiatives spearheaded by Elise and include Repeatable & Scalable Engine, Value Framework, Deployment Efficiency, Upsell Ratio and Revenue, and Employee Development Process. 

10. Elizabeth Kauchak
Chief Operating Officer
Dermody Properties

Elizabeth has been involved in industrial real estate for more than 20 years. During this time, she has worked with countless companies in fulfilling their supply chain and logistics needs. 

Prior to joining Dermody Properties, she was the Market Leader in Northern California for Prologis. 

She has a wealth of knowledge that she has always been happy to share. This goes for both the people she works alongside and especially to her customers. She has fostered a spirit of diversity and inclusion since joining Dermody Properties.

women logistics

Global Trade Magazine Launches Third Annual “Women in Logistics” Nominations

Global Trade Magazine has officially opened nominations for its annual Women in Logistics feature for the publication’s upcoming May/June issue. This edition marks the publication’s third edition spotlighting leading female executives that continue to redefine leadership and the way logistics business is conducted in the face of industry disruptions and beyond. The ideal candidate displays exemplary leadership and is known for fostering innovative solutions for sectors including transportation, warehousing, shipping, and supply chain management.

“Global Trade Magazine continues to support and celebrate Women in Logistics and our 2021 feature article will exemplify the numerous Executives that helped navigate our industry through tumultuous times over the last twelve months,” said Bret Ronk, Publisher of Global Trade Magazine. “Our call for entries is open, so please take the time to nominate your executive leadership now!”

Last year’s issue included the top ten submissions based on criteria established by senior editors. Among leading ladies included Hannah Kain, Founder of ALOM; Katherina-Olivia Lacey, co-founder and Chief Product Officer of Quincus; and Ana Bailey, Director of LeanCor Supply Chain Group Training and Education. 

Nominations will be limited to one executive per submission and participants can nominate their leader of choice here. Submissions close Thursday, April 15th at 11:59 P.M. CST. 

To submit an ad or inquire about advertising for this issue, please call (469) 778-2606 or contact jmason@globaltrademag.com

succession

5 Ways HR Can Make Diversity and Equality Central to Succession Planning

Women are making progress in corporate leadership. A record 41 female CEOs are scheduled to run Fortune 500 companies in 2021.

Along with this positive news about diversity and equality in the workplace, business observers think another good example was set by a male CEO deciding to step down in 2021. Zalando’s Rubin Ritter said he is leaving his position so he can put his wife’s career first.

While these actions atop corporate structures signal steps forward for women, the challenge at many companies remains how to create a culture of diverse and equal succession planning at all leadership levels, says Jennifer Mackin (www.jennifermackin.com), ForbesBook author of Leaders Deserve Better: A Leadership Development Revolution and a leader of two consulting firms.

“Diverse teams are built through a focused and strategic succession plan, which identifies the best talent early on and commits to developing those people over a long period of time to replace leaders who inevitably leave,” Mackin says.

“It’s been proven that executive teams with varied backgrounds and leadership styles offer important advantages to businesses. And the C-Suite must drive the succession planning strategy in order to maximize the process.”

Mackin offers five ways for companies and their HR departments to create a culture of equal and diverse succession planning:

Intentional emphasis by top leadership. Through her experience working with many organizations, Mackin has found that even among companies focusing on diversity and inclusion, most haven’t hit their goals. One of the problems, she says, is a lack of clear initiatives backed by leadership. “Many companies don’t implement a succession plan consistently,” Mackin says. “If current leaders don’t have the time to devote to it, it comes back to bite the company when potential replacements aren’t properly prepared. It requires a culture change, where top leadership embraces diversity as a foundational part of the succession plan and the company’s future growth.”

Commitment for the long term. Mackin says it can take three to five years for a company to have sufficiently prepared people for their next move. Yet many companies find themselves in a position where they lose a key executive and they haven’t planned well enough ahead for the transition. “Succession planning is a long, detailed process that takes into account all the demands of the job while determining who best to fill it,” Mackin says. “That requires documenting key knowledge and skills needed for success, and the company identifying  support and development needs to make the replacements ready for their new role.”

Focus on all leadership roles at all levels. “A sound culture top to bottom relies on the HR team to ensure that potential leaders at each level are thoroughly prepared,” Mackin says. “That requires a broader development plan for every individual in the organization.”

Measuring performance objectively and subjectively. Mackin says consistent and high-performing employees who keep improving and take on more responsibility may have the right stuff for leadership. But determining how to objectively measure the performance of a possible future leader is critical to the overall process. “It is difficult to create a succession plan without objective data and leadership coaches, who can extrapolate that data and know what it means in terms of leadership capability,” Mackin says.

Share company plans with leadership candidates. “Sharing the plan shows employees that the company is thoughtful about their future plans, is willing to invest in employee development, and that there are opportunities to work toward,” Mackin says. “Communicating and outlining all roles will help others aspire to gain the knowledge and skills they need to fill them in the future.”

“Diversity and equality need to be a cornerstone of succession planning,” Mackin says. “That kind of culture starts at the top and never stops, showing that real progress means everyone’s included.”

_________________________________________________________________

Jennifer Mackin (www.jennifermackin.com) is the ForbesBook author of Leaders Deserve Better: A Leadership Development Revolution, and a leader of two consulting firms – CEO of Oliver Group, Inc. and President and Partner of Leadership Pipeline Institute US. As an author and speaker with over 25 years of consulting experience, she is a recognized leadership development influencer, having worked with CEOs, human resources managers, leadership development leaders, entrepreneurs, and other senior leaders in all industries. She earned her BS in marketing from Indiana University and her MBA from Owen School of Management at Vanderbilt University. 

women

2020’s TOP TEN WOMEN IN LOGISTICS

Women in logistics can be a rare find. That’s not to say women aren’t welcome in the typically male-dominated field; in fact, they often bring a valuable change of perspective.

However, many women simply do not choose careers in logistics. While there are many theories as to why this is, one thing remains for sure: Women in logistics are blazing new trails and helping to change the face of the industry with everything from initiatives that foster growth to environmental policies and even mentorship.

The following 10 women are no exception.

These Top Women in Logistics prove that women are valuable players in the logistics landscape. Here’s why.

Hannah Kain

Founder of ALOM, Hannah Kain grew her business from a single location to multiple facilities across the globe, including several new spots in 2019.

A proponent of environmental sustainability, Kain implemented programs within ALOM to reduce the company’s carbon footprint. Examples of this program include banning disposable plastic bottles across all facilities. Kain is also dedicated to workplace diversity–in fact, under her leadership, ALOM’s diversity spend was 46 percent in 2019 alone.

A champion of women entrepreneurs and business leaders, Kain served in the Danish Parliament in her 20s and currently serves as a mentor and community advocate, sitting on several boards including the Women’s Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC), where she is currently serving her second term.

She is passionate about education within the workplace and encouraging STEM education for children–especially girls–offering personally guided student tours of ALOM facilities and even hiring students as summer interns .

Katherina-Olivia Lacey

Katherina-Olivia Lacey is the co-founder and Chief Product Officer at the Singapore-based logistics technology company Quincus. From her modest beginnings, Katherina was working in a swimwear company managing inventory and doing marketing for the company, Lacey saw inefficiencies within the industry and set out to help solve them. Today, under the helm of Lacey, the company serves a global top two package delivery company and one of Asia’s largest airlines. Says nominator Kelley Prince, “Katherina is a north star for women within logistics or trying to break into it.”

Thanks in no small part to Lacey, Quincus has increased turnover by more than 1,000 percent. Today, Quincus has 70 staff and five location offices globally (India, Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, and UK). Within Quincus, Lacey has spearheaded such committees as Women@Quincus, a mentorship group designed to foster teamwork and mentorship among women employees. Lacey is credited with fostering an environment of teamwork, charity, growth and work/life balance that helps unleash camaraderie and teamwork among Quincus employees.

Ana Bailey

The Director of LeanCor Supply Chain Group Training and Education, Ana Bailey leads a team of instructional designers and trainers in the creation and implementation of online education programs. Bailey is also the primary consultant for Lean transformations, driving customer value and fostering an environment of excellence at LeanCor.

Bailey implemented a cost reduction plan at two-times expected targets, with a 97.5 percent contract rate attainment in 2019 at LeanCor Supply Chain. She has taken the helm of LeanCor’s training and education services and has taught classes at institutions such as Georgia Tech University and the University of Kentucky. Bailey has also lead client engagements with such businesses as GE Transportation, Lexmark, JC Penney and Amazon.com. A Six Sigma Master Black Belt, Bailey is bilingual in English and Spanish and holds a degree in Psychology.

Ashley Yentz

The Vice President of Supply Chain Solutions at LeanCor Supply Chain Group, Ashley Yentz works with clients to ensure everything from goal creation to supply-chain advancement.  Yentz is known for her innovative methods, working to challenge LeanCor’s corporate and social responsibility.

Under Yentz’s leadership, LeanCor has experienced a 10-20 percent improvement in on-time delivery and productivity, developing the company’s management system. Known as “a transparent, approachable leader,” Yentz manages a team of more than 10 remote leaders, still managing to make the team feel cohesive and included. Says her nominator “Some people teach, some people do. Ashley does both very, very well.”

Deanna MacDonald

CEO of BLOC (Blockchain Labs for Open Collaboration) and co-founder of BunkerTrace, Deanna MacDonald is a blockchain innovator. At the helm of BLOC, MacDonald has helped the company develop maritime energy and blockchain solutions. Today, at just four years old, BLOC is the leading platform of its kind.

At BunkerTrace, which MacDonald co-founded in 2019, her goal was to use a combination of synthetic DNA and blockchain to enhance marine fuel traceability, a goal which the company has achieved in just one year’s time. A respected public speaker and proponent of open-source technology, MacDonald uses her expertise in the blockchain field to educate on many aspects of the emerging field.

Michelle Kodrich

Senior Director of Global Logistics at Note Logistics, Michelle Kodrich works to provide clients with end-to-end supply chain solutions around the globe. The role, which Kodrich originated, is meant to help cultivate an international supply chain and strengthen relationships with domestic services.

Kodrich has served in the logistics industry for more than 25 years, managing international supply chains for the retail and grocery industries. She is experienced in ocean contracts and TMS management implementation, as well as planning domestic shipments and freight bill auditing. A truly versatile expert, Kodrich’s experience in all facets of the supply chain makes her the perfect fit for her newest endeavor at Note Logistics.

Judy R. McReynolds

Judy R. McReynolds is the chairman,  president, and CEO of the logistics company ArcBest, where she has risen through the ranks in her 20-plus year tenure. Since joining ArcBest in 1997, McReynolds has held the titles of Chairman of the Board of Directors, Senior Vice President and CFO & Treasurer.

In addition to her role at ArcBest, McReynolds has been active on many transportation industry boards, as well as educational and local boards in her Arkansas community. Today, McReynolds also serves at OG&E as both the Chair of the Compensation Committee and on the board’s executive committee.

Kristin Decas

CEO and Director of the Port of Hueneme in California, Kristin Decas has served at the only deep water harbor between Los Angeles and San Francisco since 2012.  Among her many accomplishments, Decas oversaw the port’s generation of more than $1 billion in annual economic impact and more than 10,200 direct and indirect jobs.

Recognized by the Trade Administration for her notable encouragement of economic development and for her dedicated service to a number of port and shipping committees, Decas has served on numerous panels, including the Freight Advisory Committee (NFAC), the U.S. Marine Transportation System National Advisory Council (MTSNAC) and on the Board of Directors for the American Association of Port Authorities (AAPA).

Elaine Forbes

At the recommendation of the Port Commission, San Francisco Mayor Edwin Lee appointed Elaine Forbes Executive Director of the Port in October 2016, making her (along with Port of Hueneme’s Kristin Decas) one of 12 women port directors in the United States.  Before Forbes’ appointment, she served as Deputy Director for Finance and Administration for the port for six years.

Forbes leads the port to responsibly manage the waterfront as the gateway to a world-class city and advances environmentally and financially sustainable maritime, recreational and economic opportunities to serve San Francisco, the Bay Area region and California.

Jare’ Buckley-Cox

Vice President of Walmart Fulfillment Services, Jare’ Buckley-Cox helped roll out the successful Walmart eCommerce program, which enables third-party sellers to sell through Walmart, allowing the retail giant to provide warehousing, packing and shipping for these vendors.

Prior to her tenure at Walmart, Buckley-Cox served at Amazon.com as Director of Logistics Shipping & Delivery Support, Product Director of Global Support Services, Technical Product Director, Post Purchase Delivery Experience and as the Director of Customer Service Operations for North America.

As the field of logistics becomes all the more important in this increasingly global economy, women remain a valuable resource for innovation, dedication and education. These logistics trailblazers and many more bring years of hard work and diverse experience to the table, all while shattering the glass ceiling along the way.

While the next generation of logistics leadership remains to be seen, we can only hope to see more women entering the logistics field, especially with such exemplary leaders for inspiration.

trade policies

HOW ARE COUNTRIES MAINSTREAMING GENDER IN TRADE POLICIES AND PRACTICES?

Tracking How Much She Trades

On July 7, the International Trade Centre rolled out a new tool to track the types and prevalence of trade policies designed to promote more trade by women-owned businesses.

Called “SheTrades Outlook” and funded by the UK, the index initially covers 25 countries as wide-ranging as Australia and Canada to Mauritius, South Africa, Rwanda, and Samoa, applying quantitative and qualitative data to rank them across 83 indicators and six policy areas. Analysts interviewed more than 460 institutions and organizations in these countries, evaluating factors including women’s access to opportunities for skills development, finance, and global markets, and networks.

Dashboard of SheTrades

The index also queries whether governments and national organizations offer tailored support to enterprises owned and run by women to enable them to grow their businesses globally, whether programs exist to help women entrepreneurs win government contracts, and if governments have begun to collect gender-disagreggated data that might better inform policies to support women in trade.

Finally, SheTrades Outlook compiles recommended practices across these policy areas to share the experiences of countries covered in the index as a global resource.

Example of SheTrades Tracker

Starting to Get the Picture

SheTrades Outlook seeks to create a more complete picture of how women participate in the global economy through trade. Doing so will help inform trade policies and national trade promotion programs that better serve women as critical drivers of productivity and economic growth worldwide.

_____________________________________________________________________

Andrea Durkin is the Editor-in-Chief of TradeVistas and Founder of Sparkplug, LLC. Ms. Durkin previously served as a U.S. Government trade negotiator and has proudly taught international trade policy and negotiations for the last fifteen years as an Adjunct Professor at Georgetown University’s Master of Science in Foreign Service program.

This article originally appeared on TradeVistas.org. Republished with permission.

nominations

Global Trade Magazine Accepting “Women in Logistics” Nominations

Global Trade Magazine officially opened nominations for its May/June cover story, “Women in Logistics” beginning this week through the end of March. This marks the publication’s second annual feature spotlighting leading female executives reshaping the way companies approach industry disruptions. The ideal candidate has a proven track record of creating long-term solutions impacting various sectors including transportation, warehousing, shipping, and supply chain management.

“As we continue to see a rise in female leaders within the logistics industry, I wanted to take recognition to the next level for female executives fostering positive company culture while displaying exemplary leadership all industry players can learn from,” said Eric Kleinsorge, Publisher and Chairman of Global Trade Magazine. “Last year’s cover story was a huge success. We received a lot of positive feedback from our readers and we’ve already received impressive nominations for this year’s feature.”

Among leading ladies featured in the 2019 issue included Joan Smemoe of RailInc., Jane Kennedy Greene of Kenco, Wendy Buxton of LynnCo Supply Chain Solutions, and Barbara Yeninas and Lisa Aurichio of BSYA. This year’s selected nominees will be selected based on factors including tenure, industry relevance, impact on the industry, the health of relationships with employees, with a high emphasis on their workplace culture approach. Nominations will be limited to one executive per submission and participants can enter their executive of choice until March 31st at 5 p.m.

“I encourage workers from around the globe to take a few minutes and submit female leaders that have changed the way they view leadership and have made a positive impact on their career and industry. It’s important to the evolving culture of global companies to recognize these women for their dedication to the industry and the workers that make success possible,” Kleinsorge concluded.

To submit a nomination, please click here or call (469) 778-2606 for more information. 

ArcBest

Women in Logistics: ArcBest’s Judy R. McReynolds

Known for its “more than just logistics” business solutions approach, ArcBest logistics company boasts much more than offering unique, innovative, and competitive solutions for industry players through outstanding leadership.

The company’s president and CEO, Judy R. McReynolds, was announced as the Most Influential Corporate Directors for the  WomenInc.’s winter edition. This recognition is in addition to other acknowledgments received by McReynolds for 2019, including Women in Trucking Association’s 2019 Distinguished Woman in
Logistics.

“It’s a great honor for me to be among WomenInc.’s Most Influential Corporate Directors,” McReynolds said. “I’m proud to be at ArcBest, where we have a great culture of creativity and innovation and constantly strive to keep ahead of rapidly changing market conditions and to meet our customers’ evolving needs.”

ArcBest has transformed its reputation over the years by adding more options for its customer solutions offerings ranging from less-than-truckload carrier ABF Freight®, ground expedite shipping through Panther Premium Logistics®, as well as truckload, time critical, international ocean and air, and managed transportation. These solutions are customizable to solve unique and complex challenges for customers.

Since 2010, McReynolds has served as ArcBest’s president and CEO. In 2016, she was the chosen Chairman of the Board for the company in addition to 22 years of service.

McReynolds also serves as the current chair for the American Transportation Research Institute board, a member of the American Trucking Associations Board of Directors and Executive Committee, and a list of outside boards: OGE Energy Corp., First Bank Corp. and First National Bank of Fort Smith. She serves on the Dean’s Executive Advisory Board of the Sam M. Walton College of Business at the University of Arkansas and the Brandon Burlsworth Foundation Board.

Women in Logistics: Kim Maready, VP of Accounting and Finance, Old Dominion Freight Line

When it comes to exemplary leadership, Old Dominion – a leading provider in LTL and transportation logistics, takes implementing its core values of integrity and greatness to the next level. Through its strong relationships both externally with its customers and internally with each individual working for the company, these values are what keep its employees working towards the Old Dominion vision. With her passion for mentoring and leadership, Kim Maready, Vice President of Accounting and Finance for the company, is a prime example of the way Old Dominion takes her position in leadership one step further by shaping employees through a fresh, unique approach. It was this very approach combined with the culture at Old Dominion that ultimately peaked her interest to join the team in 2014.

“I think the Old Dominion culture places a tremendous amount of value on its people. It is a family-oriented culture and once you join the family, you really feel that. I felt that as an outside service provider. They not only cared about their own success, but they cared about my success as a provider,” she said. “A lot of other large public companies haven’t found that magic really. It’s all about the business and I think that comes through the profitability, or lack thereof, of some companies because ODFL recognizes that it’s profitable because of its people and the amount that they give to our customers every single day.”

Kim has served Old Dominion for five years, bringing with her over 20 years of experience in the middle market Fortune 1,000 space. Prior to her onboarding with Old Dominion, she worked as a partner. It was through her time serving the company that convinced her the Old Dominion culture was different.

“They were a client of mine for six years, so I knew the company well, the leadership team well, their environment, and core values. I spent time serving a lot of different companies across a lot of different industries from banking to manufacturing, to retail, consumer products, technology, and other transportation companies,” she said. “What interested me in Old Dominion was the culture – the leadership team, the value they place on their people, and the integrity that’s here at the company.”

In her role as VP of Accounting and Finance, she does a lot more than oversee the financials. Mrs. Maready takes her passion for mentorship and aims to create a strong team that feels valued and respected by challenging them to take their ideas and concerns to the leadership team. Old Dominion prides itself in its “Open-Door” Policy that gives every person at the company a voice. This approach bolsters the company’s vision to create the next generation of employees that carry on the core values of integrity, honesty, and transparency while managing risks. This policy serves as another differentiator among competitors.

“If you’re trying to innovate and get processes that aren’t working anymore to change, and you’re having roadblocks with those changes or don’t know where to take your ideas, you can come in to any of these 20 or so people and have a discussion and get action around that discussion while having someone that can champion it with their authority or help remove those roadblocks. I think that really mitigates a lot of our risk and it really is unique to this organization. I’ve seen a lot of companies and I haven’t heard of other companies embracing that quite like we do,” she adds.

Beyond the company’s robust customer base and successful operations, Old Dominion boasts a large organization of employees that value excellence day in and out. It’s through these valued employees that Old Dominion serves its customers while creating competitive advantage. The value Old Dominion places in its employees follows the wise saying from Richard Branson: “Whatever industry a company is in, its employees are its biggest competitive advantage.”

“In the short term it’s my responsibility and my team’s responsibility to really grow the next generation of leaders and to help them understand our culture, our core values of integrity, and ensure that we have the right leaders in place two decades down the road from now to maintain the culture and the unique environment that we have. It’s beyond just looking at the debits and the credits that some expect us to be talking about and thinking about every day,” she added.

Kimberly S. Maready currently serves as Principal Accounting Officer for Old Dominion Freight Line, Inc., a position she has held since May of 2017. Mrs. Maready joined ODFL in February of 2014 as the Vice President – Accounting and Finance and is responsible for directing ODFL’s accounting operations, financial reporting, payroll, tax and financial planning. Prior to joining ODFL, Mrs. Maready spent 21 years with Ernst & Young LLP, including 9 years as partner in the Assurance and Advisory Services practice. Her finance and accounting experience spans across multiple sectors including banking, retail, technology and transportation. Mrs. Maready holds an accounting degree from North Carolina State University and is a licensed CPA in the state of North Carolina. She has served as an active board member of Goodwill of Central North Carolina and the Winston-Salem Children’s Museum and the advisory boards of N.C. State’s Poole College of Management and Appalachian State University’s Walker School of Business.

Transplace Shipper Symposium

The 17th annual event brings together today’s most forward-thinking transportation and logistics visionaries. Impacted by data management, capacity constraints and economic and regulatory issues? The Transplace Shipper Symposium is the place to be.

Don’t miss the opportunity to join transportation industry leaders at the Four Seasons Resort and Club in Dallas, Texas from May 6-8. Keynote speakers scheduled include Kenneth W. Gronbach, President of KGC Direct, LLC and Sarah Robb O’Hagan, Founder and CEO of Extreme Living.

The two-day conference is packed with networking and charity opportunities and includes an impressive lineup of panel speakers providing insight on topics such as LTL, intermodal, shippers,  and supply chain trends for 2019. This year’s event will also feature a special Women in Logistics Networking Event at the Four Seasons Well & Being Spa.

To register your spot for this exquisite conference, click here.