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Shippers Capitalize on Deep-Water Improvements

shippers

Shippers Capitalize on Deep-Water Improvements

Shipping lines have responded to containerized trade growth by increasing vessel size, which has resulted in fewer port calls to move the same number of containers. And larger vessel sizes also limit which ports can be called due to insufficient access channel depths and air drafts as well as cranes to serve the biggest ships.

“A useful proxy is the average size of containerships transiting the Panama Canal—which increased by 13.1 percent during the canal’s most recent fiscal year (ended Sept. 30, 2018),” states Cushman & Wakefield’s 2019 North American Port Outlook. “The Panama Canal Authority reports that its Neopanamax Locks can now handle ships of almost 15,000 TEUs. Large ship visits are now increasingly common at East Coast ports that have the requisite water depths in channels and at berths. How large will vessels get? Orders have been placed for ships as large as 23,000 TEUs.”

The industry trend toward larger vessels has caused ports to literally dig deeper, particularly on the East Coast. Port of Miami last year completed $1 billion in infrastructure improvements that increased the channel depth to 50-52 feet and also included the addition of a fast access tunnel with direct access to the interstate, the modernization of the on-dock freight rail system and the installation of new Super Post-Panamax cranes that have an outreach of 22 containers wide. Among the projects at other East Coast ports that got underway in 2019 were:

*The $32.7 million deepenings of a second container berth to 50 feet at the Helen Delich Bentley Port of Baltimore’s Seagirt Marine Terminal, which should be done later this year.

*Port of Jacksonville’s Harbor Deepening, which will take the shipping channel to a depth of 47 feet, is expected to conclude in 2023, as is a coinciding project to construct a $238.7 million international container terminal at Blount Island. JAXPORT has already widened Mile Point Harbor (only mitigation work was outstanding at press time), and turning basins at Brills Cut, which is authorized and under review, and Blount Island, which is in the design phase, are also part of the deepening project.

*Port of Virginia increasing the channel depth to: 59 feet in the Atlantic Ocean Channel; 56 feet at Thimble Shoals; and
55 feet in the Norfolk Harbor and Newport News Channels. It also includes widening the channel in select areas to include Thimble Shoals over the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel.

Deepening the Port of Charleston’s Harbor Entrance Channel up to its busiest container terminal, the Wando Welch, is expected by early 2021 and will allow the port to handle 14,000 to 18,000 TEU vessels drawing 50 feet or more without significant depth and other navigational restrictions. Port Everglades’ widening and deepening of navigation channels from 42 feet to 48-50 feet is expected to be completed between 2021-2025. The Georgia Ports Authority’s deepening of Savannah Harbor and its shipping channel from an authorized depth of 44 feet to 47 feet is slated for completion by late 2021 or early 2022.

As ports scramble to accommodate the biggest ships, some shippers have already been taking advantage of their arrival. As the Georgia Ports Authority announced in December it was on track to exceed 4.6 million TEUs for the first time in a calendar year, GPA Board Chairman Will McKnight remarked, “Exciting new business opportunities such as the export of the Georgia-made Kia Telluride, and resins produced in Pennsylvania and the Gulf States, as well as the import of cold-treated fresh produce, are driving the increase in trade through our deepwater ports.”

In roll-on/roll-off cargo, Colonel’s Island Terminal at the GPA’s Port of Brunswick handled 500,512 units of cars, trucks and tractors from January through October 2019. Ocean Terminal in Savannah added another 37,476 for a total of 537,988 units. As of December, total Ro/Ro trade was up for the year by 3,300 units, helping to make Georgia is the second busiest U.S. hub for the import-export of Ro/Ro cargo behind only Baltimore.

Another milestone was the GPA’s decade of partnership with Kia Motors Manufacturing Georgia (KMMG), which has shipped nearly 350,000 TEU of parts and materials through the Port of Savannah to supply its manufacturing plant near the town of West Point, supporting thousands of jobs in Georgia’s transportation and logistics supply chain. Kia also sends shipments in the other direction with overseas exports of the American-made Kia SUV, the Telluride.

“From the first production equipment arriving at the Port of Savannah in 2008 to the first Kia Telluride exports that left the Port of Brunswick this past February (2019), KMMG, the Georgia Ports Authority and the State of Georgia have maintained a strong bond,” said KMMG President and CEO Jason Shin in a statement.

February 2019 was also momentous for Port Manatee, which is the closest U.S. deepwater seaport to the expanded Panama Canal. Then-new terminal operator Carver Maritime Manatee LLC on Feb. 6 brought nearly 50,000 tons of raw material to be used in Florida cement manufacturing. The 47,650 metric tons of the bulk material brought from Europe on the Osprey I to the Central-Southwest Florida Gulf Coast port was soon followed by other Carver shipments.

As part of an agreement with Port Manatee that could extend for as many as 20 years, Carver has extensively renovated a 10-acre cargo facility with deepwater access, including rehabilitating a 1,400-foot-long conveyor system on the leased site. “We are delighted to have Carver as an active participant in the expansion of our port,” said Carlos Buqueras, Port Manatee’s executive director, at the time. “Carver’s operations are a perfect complement to the increasingly diverse activity taking place at Manatee County’s seaport.”

Taking advantage of deepwater ports is not confined to the East Coast, however. In Washington state, the Port of Vancouver USA received the largest single shipment of wind turbine blades in the history blade manufacturer Vestas on June 24, 2019, breaking the previous record of 156 blades on a single ship.

The 198 blades, each measuring 161 feet long, were manufactured and shipped from Italy. Once unloaded from the ship, the blades were moved to the port’s Terminal 5, which boasts 86 acres of unobstructed laydown area with immediate proximity to the port’s deep-water berths. From there, the blades were transported by truck to the Marengo wind farm near Dayton, Washington, where they are now being used to re-power existing turbines.

“With our North American headquarters based in Portland, it is especially gratifying to be part of bringing the environmental and economic benefits of wind energy to the Pacific Northwest,” said Chris Brown, president of Vestas North America, which partnered with project owner PacifiCorp on the blade shipment. “The arrival of this shipment and its 198 blades, represent the significant supply chain industry and jobs created and supported by the wind energy economy.  We’re proud to partner with PacifiCorp and the Port to bring more wind energy benefits to Washington.”

Shrugged Vancouver USA’s Chief Commercial Officer Alex Strogen, “The port is uniquely qualified to handle these types of projects.”

 

career

Forget YouTube Fame; Social Responsibility is Key To Career Happiness.

American children and teens, when asked the age-old question of what they want to be as adults, lean toward careers that could bring personal fame or are just plain fun, rather than those that might contribute to the betterment of society or lead to scientific progress.

“While we’re focused on fame and fun, other countries are emphasizing discipline and a good work ethic,” says Dr. Steven Mintz (www.stevenmintzethics.com), author of Beyond Happiness and Meaning: Transforming Your Life Through Ethical Behavior.

The latest example came in a survey Harris Poll conducted on behalf of Lego, where American children ages 8 to 12 picked vlogger/YouTuber as their No. 1 career choice. Chinese children, in comparison, overwhelmingly chose astronaut.

The results are similar to a survey Chicago-based market-research company C+R conducted a couple of years ago. American teenagers were asked about career aspirations and the largest percentage, 20 percent, said they want to be an athlete, artist or entertainer.

Mintz says the emphasis on fame – combined with a trend of many employers trying to create a “fun” work environment for employees – is troubling.

“Is this really what success looks like in the U.S.?” he asks. “Can we reasonably be expected to compete with the Chinese in the 21st century by making the workplace fun when the Chinese, who will likely surpass the U.S. as the world’s largest economy within the next 10 years, have skyrocketed to the top through hard work and discipline?”

But eschewing fun for fun’s sake doesn’t mean employees can’t find happiness at work. Mintz says that is better accomplished by creating a socially responsible workplace, which he says meshes nicely with the passion millennials and Gen Z have for social causes.

Some ways to help employees find happiness and meaning on the job, he says, include:

Establish an ethical culture. Companies should strive to create an ethical workplace culture where employees are encouraged to serve the interests of the company’s stakeholders – customers, clients and suppliers – and to do so ethically, Mintz says. Creating an ethical workplace starts with ethical values: emphasize doing what is right not wrong; doing good things not harmful ones.

Coach employees on the workplace’s values. Company leaders should engage employees in regular discussions about workplace ethics and the procedures that are designed to uphold ethical practices, Mintz says. “Employers must coach employees so they do good by being good, which means commit to ethical values,” he says.

Tap into the social conscience many employees already have. A recent survey reports that nearly one in five business-school students would sacrifice more than 40 percent of their salary to work for a responsible employer. “Some will work for nonprofits where they are committed to the cause,” Mintz says. “Millennials especially seek out purpose in their employment. I believe that’s because each of us is searching for happiness and greater meaning in life and our jobs provide one of the best sources to enhance our well-being.”

“Although there are troubling signs in our society regarding attitudes about jobs,” Mintz says, “I am heartened by other surveys that show millennials and Gen Z really care about what a business does, whether its actions are ethical and trustworthy, and that a purpose-driven culture exists that puts benefitting society front and center in their mission statement.”

_____________________________________________________________

Dr. Steven Mintz (www.stevenmintzethics.com), author of Beyond Happiness and Meaning: Transforming Your Life Through Ethical Behavior, has frequently commented on ethical issues in society and business ethics. His Workplace Ethics Advice blog has been recognized as one of the top 30 in corporate social responsibility. He also has served as an expert witness on ethics matters. Dr. Mintz spent almost 40 years of his life in academia. He has held positions as a chair in Accounting at San Francisco State University and Texas State University. He was the Dean of the College of Business and Public Administration at Cal State University, San Bernardino. He recently retired as a Professor Emeritus from Cal Poly State University in San Luis Obispo.

pear

Global Pear Market – Russia, Indonesia, and Germany Are the Largest Importers in the World

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘World – Pears – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The global pear market revenue amounted to $27.3B in 2018, increasing by 4.7% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +2.7% over the period from 2008 to 2018; the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2013 with an increase of 14% year-to-year. Over the period under review, the global pear market attained its maximum level at $30.8B in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, consumption failed to regain its momentum.

Consumption By Country

The country with the largest volume of pear consumption was China (16M tonnes), accounting for 66% of total consumption. Moreover, pear consumption in China exceeded the figures recorded by the world’s second-largest consumer, Italy (689K tonnes), more than tenfold. The U.S. (658K tonnes) ranked third in terms of total consumption with a 2.7% share.

From 2008 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume in China stood at +2.1%. The remaining consuming countries recorded the following average annual rates of consumption growth: Italy (+0.2% per year) and the U.S. (+0.9% per year).

In value terms, China ($17.5B) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Italy ($887M). It was followed by the U.S..

The countries with the highest levels of pear per capita consumption in 2018 were Argentina (14,247 kg per 1000 persons), Italy (11,598 kg per 1000 persons) and China (11,233 kg per 1000 persons).

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of pear per capita consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Argentina, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Market Forecast 2019-2025

Driven by increasing demand for pear worldwide, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven years. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +1.9% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 28M tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production 2007-2018

In 2018, the global pear production stood at 25M tonnes, surging by 1.8% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.5% over the period from 2008 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being observed throughout the analyzed period. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 when production volume increased by 6.2% year-to-year. The global pear production peaked at 26M tonnes in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, production stood at a somewhat lower figure. The general positive trend in terms of pear output was largely conditioned by a mild increase of the harvested area and measured growth in yield figures.

In value terms, pear production amounted to $27.7B in 2018 estimated in export prices. The total output value increased at an average annual rate of +3.1% over the period from 2008 to 2018; the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 with an increase of 16% against the previous year. The global pear production peaked at $31.3B in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, production stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Production By Country

China (17M tonnes) remains the largest pear producing country worldwide, comprising approx. 68% of total production. Moreover, pear production in China exceeded the figures recorded by the world’s second-largest producer, Argentina (954K tonnes), more than tenfold. Italy (767K tonnes) ranked third in terms of total production with a 3.1% share.

In China, pear production increased at an average annual rate of +2.2% over the period from 2008-2018. The remaining producing countries recorded the following average annual rates of production growth: Argentina (+2.6% per year) and Italy (-0.0% per year).

Harvested Area 2007-2018

In 2018, the global pear harvested area stood at 1.4M ha, approximately mirroring the previous year. Overall, the pear harvested area continues to indicate a slight contraction. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 with an increase of 2% against the previous year. The global pear harvested area peaked at 1.6M ha in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, harvested area stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Yield 2007-2018

Global average pear yield amounted to 18 tonne per ha in 2018, going up by 2.8% against the previous year. The yield figure increased at an average annual rate of +2.8% over the period from 2008 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with only minor fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2017 with an increase of 7.2% against the previous year. The global pear yield peaked in 2018 and is likely to continue its growth in the near future.

Exports 2007-2018

Global exports amounted to 2.8M tonnes in 2018, jumping by 4.6% against the previous year. Overall, pear exports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2014 when exports increased by 5.7% y-o-y. The global exports peaked at 2.8M tonnes in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, exports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, pear exports stood at $2.7B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Overall, pear exports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 when exports increased by 11% year-to-year. In that year, global pear exports reached their peak of $2.8B. From 2014 to 2018, the growth of global pear exports failed to regain its momentum.

Exports by Country

In 2018, China (544K tonnes), distantly followed by the Netherlands (337K tonnes), Argentina (317K tonnes), South Africa (302K tonnes), Belgium (288K tonnes), Italy (158K tonnes), Chile (156K tonnes), Spain (145K tonnes) and the U.S. (132K tonnes) represented the major exporters of pears, together achieving 86% of total exports.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by South Africa, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, China ($602M), the Netherlands ($381M) and Argentina ($294M) were the countries with the highest levels of exports in 2018, with a combined 48% share of global exports.

China experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to exports, in terms of the main exporting countries over the last decade, while the other global leaders experienced mixed trends in the exports figures.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the average pear export price amounted to $962 per tonne, approximately reflecting the previous year. Over the period under review, the pear export price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2013 an increase of 15% y-o-y. In that year, the average export prices for pears reached their peak level of $1,127 per tonne. From 2014 to 2018, the growth in terms of the average export prices for pears failed to regain its momentum.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Italy ($1,299 per tonne), while South Africa ($636 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by China, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports 2007-2018

Global imports amounted to 2.7M tonnes in 2018, rising by 3% against the previous year. In general, pear imports, however, continue to indicate a mild contraction. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2017 with an increase of 7.3% year-to-year. Over the period under review, global pear imports reached their peak figure at 3.1M tonnes in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, imports failed to regain their momentum.

In value terms, pear imports amounted to $2.7B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Over the period under review, pear imports, however, continue to indicate a measured drop. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2017 with an increase of 13% y-o-y. Over the period under review, global pear imports attained their peak figure at $3.3B in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, imports failed to regain their momentum.

Imports by Country

The countries with the highest levels of pear imports in 2018 were Russia (271K tonnes), Indonesia (187K tonnes), Germany (185K tonnes), Brazil (158K tonnes), the UK (138K tonnes), the Netherlands (129K tonnes), the U.S. (123K tonnes), France (116K tonnes), Viet Nam (100K tonnes), Belarus (83K tonnes), China, Hong Kong SAR (82K tonnes) and Italy (80K tonnes), together accounting for 61% of total import.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Belarus, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Germany ($244M), Russia ($202M) and Indonesia ($147M) were the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2018, together accounting for 22% of global imports. Brazil, Viet Nam, the U.S., the UK, the Netherlands, France, Italy, Belarus and China, Hong Kong SAR lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 37%.

Belarus recorded the highest rates of growth with regard to imports, in terms of the main importing countries over the last decade, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the average pear import price amounted to $994 per tonne, stabilizing at the previous year. Overall, the pear import price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 an increase of 7.4% against the previous year. In that year, the average import prices for pears attained their peak level of $1,108 per tonne. From 2014 to 2018, the growth in terms of the average import prices for pears remained at a lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Viet Nam ($1,414 per tonne), while China, Hong Kong SAR ($577 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Viet Nam, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

trade

Trade and the Impact on Imports and Exports in 2020

Significant and sustained increases in the world trade index (an index measuring the number of times the word uncertainty or its variants are mentioned in Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) reports at a country level) should be a worry for many as “the increase in trade uncertainty observed in the first quarter could be enough to reduce global growth by up to 0.75 percentage points in 2019”[1]

In August, the US Institute for supply management[2] latest report shows a contraction in production, purchasing, and employment indices.

Ahir, H, N Bloom, and D Furceri (2019), “The global economy hit by higher uncertainty”, VoxEU.org. https://voxeu.org/article/trade-uncertainty-rising-and-can-harm-global-economy

 

Uncertainty generated from Brexit, the US-China trade war, Japan – South Korea trade wars, and general discontentment with global trend towards widening income inequality is creating a toxic mix for politicians to deal with. The irony is the conventional approach of blaming your trading partners for your problems is only likely to exacerbate a general lack of confidence and increase further uncertainty.

The current round of the G7 summit in Biarritz concluded with support “to overhaul the WTO to improve effectiveness with regard to intellectual property protection, to settle disputes more swiftly and to eliminate unfair trade practices.” In essence, it’s signaling a need to strengthen the capabilities of the WTO to act faster and more decisively in resolving disputes that are even more political than structural in nature, requiring a more multi-faceted engagement approach. Whilst this may help in the long-run, in reality, companies will have to contend with uncertainty in global trade for some time to come as well as the impacts on the real economy from these disputes.

And all of this is happening as IMO 2020 approaches, the January 1, 2020, date by which the International Maritime Organization mandates a switch to lower sulfur fuels in order to achieve an 80% reduction in sulfur emissions leading to significant cost increases in the shipping goods via ocean freight (initial estimates between 180USD – 420 USD per TEU dependent on routing, base fuel costs, carrier).

So given the significant uncertainty around global trade agreements, the increasing use of trade as a political football, the increasing costs to trade and the shortening of product lifecycles as customers want faster, newer more differentiated offerings. Is it still worth it?

Of course this is very much dependent on what industry you are in. Whether you’re a global manufacturer or a wholesaler sourcing goods, your perspectives may be different based on investments made, sensitivity to current trade/tariff measures, customer demands, your markets, and the degree to which you are exposed to political debate and targeting.

However, I would offer that the benefits of specialization, economies of scale and unique factors of production that have underpinned global trade still exist as Adam Smith put it in 1776:

“By means of glasses, hotbeds, and hot walls, very good grapes can be raised in Scotland, and very good wine too can be made of them at about thirty times the expense for which at least equally good can be brought from foreign countries. Would it be a reasonable law to prohibit the importation of all foreign wines, merely to encourage the making of claret and burgundy in Scotland?”[1]

Today this simple analogy still holds true in skills, competences, capabilities, and access to markets and insights so that over time the expectation is that trade will prevail.

While the recent outlook has been gloomy, opportunities for 2020 include a resolution to a number of ongoing disputes and a final settlement on Brexit (we hope). Additionally, the maturation in technologies such as blockchain, process automation, forecasting and demand management solutions can also offset costs associated with IMO and support greater agility in the uncertain supply-chain world that we currently live in.

Indeed, if 2019 was the year of trade uncertainty, 2020 could be a restorative year in our ability to execute global trade.

Partnering with an experienced supply chain leader will be essential to minimizing cost increases while ensuring the efficient flow of your company’s goods and services.

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[1] World Economic Forum:https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2019/07/how-trade-uncertainty-is-impacting-the-global-economy/

[2]https://www.instituteforsupplymanagement.org/ismreport/mfgrob.cfm?SSO=1

[3]Adam Smith: Wealth of nations 1776

Neil Wheeldon is the Vice Presidents Solutions, BDP International.

cabbage

Global Cabbage Market to Reach 80M Tonnes by 2025

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘World – Cabbage And Other Brassicas – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The global cabbage market revenue amounted to $39.4B in 2018, dropping by -3% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +3.1% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2010 when the market value increased by 14% year-to-year. Global cabbage consumption peaked at $43.7B in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, consumption failed to regain its momentum.

Consumption By Country

The country with the largest volume of cabbage consumption was China (33M tonnes), comprising approx. 45% of total consumption. Moreover, cabbage consumption in China exceeded the figures recorded by the world’s second-largest consumer, India (9.2M tonnes), fourfold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Russia (3.7M tonnes), with a 5.2% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of volume in China was relatively modest. The remaining consuming countries recorded the following average annual rates of consumption growth: India (+4.7% per year) and Russia (+2.6% per year).

In value terms, China ($13.9B) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by India ($5.7B). It was followed by Japan.

The countries with the highest levels of cabbage per capita consumption in 2018 were Romania (57 kg per person), South Korea (46 kg per person) and Ukraine (39 kg per person).

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of cabbage per capita consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by India, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Market Forecast 2019-2025

Driven by increasing demand for cabbage worldwide, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven-year period. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +1.4% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 80M tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production 2007-2018

In 2018, the amount of cabbage and other brassicas produced worldwide stood at 73M tonnes, picking up by 1.7% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.4% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being observed in certain years. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 with an increase of 6.8% against the previous year. Global cabbage production peaked in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future. The general positive trend in terms of cabbage output was largely conditioned by slight growth of the harvested area and a relatively flat trend pattern in yield figures.

In value terms, cabbage production totaled $40.5B in 2018 estimated in export prices. In general, the total output indicated prominent growth from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +1.4% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, cabbage production decreased by -11.0% against 2016 indices. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2010 when production volume increased by 26% year-to-year. Global cabbage production peaked at $45.5B in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, production failed to regain its momentum.

Production By Country

China (34M tonnes) constituted the country with the largest volume of cabbage production, accounting for 47% of total production. Moreover, cabbage production in China exceeded the figures recorded by the world’s second-largest producer, India (9.2M tonnes), fourfold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Russia (3.6M tonnes), with a 5% share.

In China, cabbage production expanded at an average annual rate of +1.1% over the period from 2007-2018. The remaining producing countries recorded the following average annual rates of production growth: India (+4.7% per year) and Russia (+2.9% per year).

Harvested Area 2007-2018

In 2018, approx. 2.5M ha of cabbage and other brassicas were harvested worldwide; therefore, remained relatively stable against the previous year. The harvested area increased at an average annual rate of +1.3% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 when harvested area increased by 5.6% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the harvested area dedicated to cabbage production reached its peak figure in 2018 and is likely to see steady growth in the near future.

Yield 2007-2018

In 2018, the global average cabbage yield totaled 29 tonne per ha, approximately reflecting the previous year. Overall, the cabbage yield continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2008 with an increase of 2.2% y-o-y. The global cabbage yield peaked at 29 tonne per ha in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, yield stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Exports 2007-2018

In 2018, the global exports of cabbage and other brassicas totaled 2.5M tonnes, surging by 7.2% against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +3.4% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 when Exports increased by 16% y-o-y. Over the period under review, global cabbage exports reached their maximum in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the near future.

In value terms, cabbage exports amounted to $1.7B in 2018. Over the period under review, the total exports indicated a resilient expansion from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +3.4% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, cabbage exports increased by +85.8% against 2007 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 when Exports increased by 18% against the previous year. Over the period under review, global cabbage exports attained their peak figure in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Exports by Country

China was the largest exporter of cabbage and other brassicas in the world, with the volume of exports reaching 990K tonnes, which was near 39% of total exports in 2018. The U.S. (220K tonnes) ranks second in terms of the total exports with a 8.7% share, followed by the Netherlands (8.3%), Spain (6.2%) and Mexico (5.7%). Canada (85K tonnes), Poland (84K tonnes), Italy (72K tonnes), Germany (66K tonnes) and Macedonia (57K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

Exports from China increased at an average annual rate of +7.0% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, Macedonia (+11.5%), Spain (+9.3%), Mexico (+6.1%), Canada (+5.6%) and the Netherlands (+3.1%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Macedonia emerged as the fastest growing exporter in the world, with a CAGR of +11.5% from 2007-2018. The U.S. and Italy experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. By contrast, Germany (-2.2%) and Poland (-3.7%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period. While the share of China (+21 p.p.), Spain (+3.9 p.p.), Mexico (+2.7 p.p.), the Netherlands (+2.4 p.p.), Macedonia (+1.6 p.p.) and Canada (+1.5 p.p.) increased significantly in terms of the global exports from 2007-2018, the share of Poland (-1.7 p.p.) displayed negative dynamics. The shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, the largest cabbage markets worldwide were China ($398M), the U.S. ($344M) and the Netherlands ($194M), with a combined 54% share of global exports. Spain, Mexico, Italy, Canada, Poland, Germany and Macedonia lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 32%.

Macedonia recorded the highest growth rate of exports, in terms of the main exporting countries over the last eleven years, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the average cabbage export price amounted to $682 per tonne, coming down by -5.4% against the previous year. Over the last eleven-year period, it increased at an average annual rate of +2.3%. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2008 when the average export price increased by 10% against the previous year. The global export price peaked at $722 per tonne in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, export prices remained at a lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was the U.S. ($1,567 per tonne), while Macedonia ($391 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the U.S., while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports 2007-2018

In 2018, approx. 2.3M tonnes of cabbage and other brassicas were imported worldwide; dropping by -10.3% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.4% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2015 with an increase of 24% y-o-y. Over the period under review, global cabbage imports reached their peak figure at 2.6M tonnes in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, imports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, cabbage imports totaled $1.5B in 2018. Overall, the total imports indicated a conspicuous increase from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +2.4% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, cabbage imports decreased by -12.2% against 2016 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 with an increase of 16% against the previous year. Global imports peaked at $1.7B in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, imports failed to regain their momentum.

Imports by Country

In 2018, China, Hong Kong SAR (546K tonnes), distantly followed by the U.S. (225K tonnes), Canada (189K tonnes), Malaysia (176K tonnes), Russia (113K tonnes), Germany (112K tonnes) and Thailand (105K tonnes) represented the main importers of cabbage and other brassicas, together mixing up 64% of total imports. Singapore (64K tonnes), Japan (60K tonnes), the Czech Republic (53K tonnes), France (50K tonnes) and the UK (42K tonnes) occupied a minor share of total imports.

Imports into China, Hong Kong SAR increased at an average annual rate of +6.3% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, Thailand (+32.5%), Malaysia (+9.8%), France (+2.5%), the U.S. (+2.2%), Canada (+2.0%) and the Czech Republic (+1.2%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Thailand emerged as the fastest growing importer in the world, with a CAGR of +32.5% from 2007-2018. Singapore experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. By contrast, Japan (-1.2%), Germany (-1.3%), Russia (-3.5%) and the UK (-5.5%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period. From 2007 to 2018, the share of China, Hong Kong SAR, Malaysia, Thailand, the U.S. and Canada increased by +12%, +4.9%, +4.3%, +2.1% and +1.6% percentage points, while the UK (-1.6 p.p.) and Russia (-2.3 p.p.) saw their share reduced. The shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, Canada ($302M), China, Hong Kong SAR ($223M) and the U.S. ($167M) were the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2018, with a combined 47% share of global imports. These countries were followed by Germany, Malaysia, France, Thailand, Singapore, the UK, Japan, Russia and the Czech Republic, which together accounted for a further 30%.

Among the main importing countries, Thailand experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to imports, over the last eleven-year period, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

The average cabbage import price stood at $641 per tonne in 2018, approximately reflecting the previous year. Over the period from 2007 to 2018, it increased at an average annual rate of +1.1%. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2013 when the average import price increased by 18% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the average import prices for cabbage and other brassicas attained their maximum at $692 per tonne in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, import prices failed to regain their momentum.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Canada ($1,597 per tonne), while Russia ($315 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Canada, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

beeswax

Asia’s Beeswax Market Is Estimated at $206M in 2018, an Increase of 3.4%

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘Asia – Beeswax – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the beeswax market in Asia amounted to $206M in 2018, increasing by 3.4% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The total market indicated a moderate increase from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +0.7% over the last eleven years.

Consumption By Country in Asia

The country with the largest volume of beeswax consumption was India (26K tonnes), accounting for 64% of total consumption. Moreover, beeswax consumption in India exceeded the figures recorded by the region’s second-largest consumer, Turkey (4.9K tonnes), fivefold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by South Korea (3.7K tonnes), with a 9.1% share.

In India, beeswax consumption expanded at an average annual rate of +2.6% over the period from 2007-2018. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: Turkey (+1.9% per year) and South Korea (-1.1% per year).

In value terms, India ($127M) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Turkey ($42M). It was followed by South Korea.

The countries with the highest levels of beeswax per capita consumption in 2018 were South Korea (73 kg per 1000 persons), Turkey (59 kg per 1000 persons) and Malaysia (39 kg per 1000 persons).

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of beeswax per capita consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Japan, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in Asia

Driven by increasing demand for beeswax in Asia, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven-year period. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +0.2% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 42K tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in Asia

In 2018, approx. 50K tonnes of beeswax were produced in Asia; remaining stable against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.3% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with only minor fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2008 when production volume increased by 5.6% against the previous year. Over the period under review, beeswax production reached its peak figure volume in 2018 and is likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, beeswax production stood at $292M in 2018 estimated in export prices. Over the period under review, beeswax production continues to indicate prominent growth. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2011 with an increase of 25% against the previous year. Over the period under review, beeswax production attained its peak figure level at $392M in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, production failed to regain its momentum.

Production By Country in Asia

India (24K tonnes) remains the largest beeswax producing country in Asia, comprising approx. 49% of total production. Moreover, beeswax production in India exceeded the figures recorded by the region’s second-largest producer, China (11K tonnes), twofold. Turkey (4.5K tonnes) ranked third in terms of total production with a 9% share.

In India, beeswax production increased at an average annual rate of +2.0% over the period from 2007-2018. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: China (+0.5% per year) and Turkey (+1.4% per year).

Exports in Asia

The exports totaled 14K tonnes in 2018, surging by 8.1% against the previous year. The total exports indicated a strong increase from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +6.7% over the last eleven-year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, beeswax exports increased by +9.1% against 2016 indices. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2010 when exports increased by 26% year-to-year. The volume of exports peaked in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future.

In value terms, beeswax exports amounted to $79M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. In general, beeswax exports continue to indicate a resilient expansion. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2010 with an increase of 34% y-o-y. The level of exports peaked at $80M in 2015; however, from 2016 to 2018, exports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Exports by Country

In 2018, China (9.7K tonnes) represented the major exporter of beeswax, committing 69% of total exports. It was distantly followed by Malaysia (1,970 tonnes) and Viet Nam (1,494 tonnes), together committing a 25% share of total exports. India (339 tonnes) held a little share of total exports.

Exports from China increased at an average annual rate of +5.3% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, Viet Nam (+19.6%), India (+15.2%) and Malaysia (+8.8%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Viet Nam emerged as the fastest-growing exporter in Asia, with a CAGR of +19.6% from 2007-2018. China (+30 p.p.), Viet Nam (+9.2 p.p.), Malaysia (+8.5 p.p.) and India (+1.9 p.p.) significantly strengthened its position in terms of the total exports, while the shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, China ($61M) remains the largest beeswax supplier in Asia, comprising 77% of total beeswax exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Viet Nam ($12M), with a 15% share of total exports. It was followed by India, with a 2% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of value in China stood at +10.9%. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: Viet Nam (+24.8% per year) and India (+15.5% per year).

Export Prices by Country

The beeswax export price in Asia stood at $5,595 per tonne in 2018, going up by 1.8% against the previous year. The export price indicated a buoyant increase from 2007 to 2018: its price increased at an average annual rate of +4.4% over the last eleven-year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, beeswax export price decreased by -5.3% against 2015 indices. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2012 when the export price increased by 20% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the export prices for beeswax reached their maximum at $5,910 per tonne in 2015; however, from 2016 to 2018, export prices failed to regain their momentum.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Viet Nam ($7,731 per tonne), while Malaysia ($670 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by China, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in Asia

In 2018, approx. 5.5K tonnes of beeswax were imported in Asia; stabilizing at the previous year. Overall, beeswax imports continue to indicate remarkable growth. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2010 when imports increased by 40% against the previous year. The volume of imports peaked in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the near future.

In value terms, beeswax imports totaled $28M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. In general, beeswax imports continue to indicate a prominent increase. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2010 when imports increased by 47% year-to-year. Over the period under review, beeswax imports reached their maximum in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

Imports by Country

India represented the major importing country with an import of around 2.2K tonnes, which resulted at 40% of total imports. Japan (889 tonnes) took the second position in the ranking, followed by China (557 tonnes), Turkey (405 tonnes) and South Korea (357 tonnes). All these countries together took approx. 40% share of total imports. Pakistan (186 tonnes), Thailand (181 tonnes) and Taiwan, Chinese (93 tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

India was also the fastest-growing in terms of the beeswax imports, with a CAGR of +23.1% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, China (+20.6%), Pakistan (+14.2%), Turkey (+9.8%), Thailand (+5.9%) and Taiwan, Chinese (+1.8%) displayed positive paces of growth. Japan experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. By contrast, South Korea (-2.4%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period. India (+36 p.p.), China (+8.9 p.p.), Turkey (+4.7 p.p.), Pakistan (+2.6 p.p.), Japan (+1.6 p.p.) and Thailand (+1.5 p.p.) significantly strengthened its position in terms of the total imports, while South Korea saw its share reduced by -2% from 2007 to 2018, respectively. The shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, the largest beeswax importing markets in Asia were Japan ($8.2M), China ($5.5M) and South Korea ($2.9M), with a combined 60% share of total imports.

China recorded the highest growth rate of imports, among the main importing countries over the last eleven years, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

The beeswax import price in Asia stood at $5,033 per tonne in 2018, remaining stable against the previous year. Over the last eleven years, it increased at an average annual rate of +1.5%. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2014 when the import price increased by 35% y-o-y. In that year, the import prices for beeswax attained their peak level of $5,431 per tonne. From 2015 to 2018, the growth in terms of the import prices for beeswax remained at a lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was China ($9,919 per tonne), while India ($1,098 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by South Korea, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

tomato

COMMERCE SUSPENDS INVESTIGATION INTO FRESH TOMATO IMPORTS FROM MEXICO

On Sept. 19, Commerce finalized an agreement with Mexican tomato growers to suspend the AD investigation of fresh tomatoes from Mexico, halting the process for imposing antidumping duties on tomatoes from Mexico

“Today’s successful outcome validates the administration’s strong and smart approach to negotiating trade deals,” Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross said.  “The department’s action brought the Mexican growers to the negotiating table and led to a result that protects U.S. tomato producers from unfair trade. It also removes major uncertainties for the Mexican growers and their workers.”

The suspension agreement completely eliminates the injurious effects of unfairly priced Mexican tomatoes, prevents price suppression and undercutting, and eliminates substantially all dumping, while allowing Commerce to audit up to 80 Mexican tomato producers and U.S. sellers per quarter, or more with good cause. 

In addition, the agreement also closes loopholes from past suspension agreements that permitted sales below the reference prices in certain circumstances, and includes an inspection mechanism to prevent the importation of low-quality, poor-condition tomatoes from Mexico, which can have price-suppressive effects on the market. 

The probe came from a Nov. 14, 2018, request from the Florida Tomato Exchange.

Global Lard Market to Grow 1.6% a Year through 2025, Fuelled by Rising Demand in China

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘World – Lard – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The global lard market revenue amounted to $15.7B in 2018, jumping by 2.9% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +2.1% from 2012 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 when the market value increased by 6.6% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the global lard market attained its peak figure level in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Consumption By Country

The country with the largest volume of lard consumption was China (2.6M tonnes), accounting for 40% of total consumption. Moreover, lard consumption in China exceeded the figures recorded by the world’s second-largest consumer, Germany (615K tonnes), fourfold. Brazil (478K tonnes) ranked third in terms of total consumption with a 7.3% share.

From 2012 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of volume in China totaled +2.2%. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: Germany (+0.7% per year) and Brazil (+1.3% per year).

In value terms, China ($11.1B) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Russia ($1B). It was followed by Brazil.

The countries with the highest levels of lard per capita consumption in 2018 were Belgium (12,397 kg per 1000 persons), Germany (7,481 kg per 1000 persons) and Canada (4,662 kg per 1000 persons).

From 2012 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of lard per capita consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Russia, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Market Forecast 2019-2025

Driven by increasing demand for lard in China, the world market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven-year period. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +1.6% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 7.3M tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production 2007-2018

Global lard production totaled 6.5M tonnes in 2018, increasing by 2% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.6% over the period from 2012 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 with an increase of 2.5% against the previous year. The global lard production peaked in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, lard production stood at $15.6B in 2018 estimated in export prices. The total output value increased at an average annual rate of +2.0% over the period from 2012 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 with an increase of 11% against the previous year. The global lard production peaked in 2018 and is likely to continue its growth in the near future.

Production By Country

The country with the largest volume of lard production was China (2.6M tonnes), accounting for 39% of total production. Moreover, lard production in China exceeded the figures recorded by the world’s second-largest producer, Germany (653K tonnes), fourfold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Brazil (481K tonnes), with a 7.4% share.

In China, lard production expanded at an average annual rate of +2.3% over the period from 2012-2018. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: Germany (+0.6% per year) and Brazil (+1.3% per year).

Exports 2007-2018

In 2018, approx. 243K tonnes of lard were exported worldwide; jumping by 9.2% against the previous year. Over the period under review, lard exports continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2015 with an increase of 11% y-o-y. The global exports peaked in 2018 and are likely to continue its growth in the near future.

In value terms, lard exports amounted to $220M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. In general, lard exports continue to indicate a slight setback. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 when exports increased by 26% y-o-y. The global exports peaked at $241M in 2012; however, from 2013 to 2018, exports failed to regain their momentum.

Exports by Country

Germany (46K tonnes), Spain (45K tonnes) and Belgium (35K tonnes) represented roughly 52% of total exports of lard in 2018. The U.S. (17K tonnes) ranks next in terms of the total exports with a 6.9% share, followed by the Netherlands (5.7%), Italy (5.3%) and Austria (5%). France (10,645 tonnes), Canada (9,206 tonnes), Denmark (7,849 tonnes), Poland (7,002 tonnes) and Portugal (4,028 tonnes) took a minor share of total exports.

From 2012 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Portugal, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Spain ($57M), Germany ($31M) and Belgium ($23M) appeared to be the countries with the highest levels of exports in 2018, together comprising 50% of global exports. The U.S., Italy, the Netherlands, Canada, Poland, France, Austria, Denmark and Portugal lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 41%.

In terms of the main exporting countries, Portugal experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to exports, over the last six years, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the average lard export price amounted to $902 per tonne, falling by -4.1% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the lard export price continues to indicate a temperate slump. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 when the average export price increased by 15% against the previous year. The global export price peaked at $1,027 per tonne in 2012; however, from 2013 to 2018, export prices failed to regain their momentum.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Poland ($1,359 per tonne), while Austria ($452 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2012 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the U.S., while the other global leaders experienced mixed trends in the export price figures.

Imports 2007-2018

Global imports stood at 223K tonnes in 2018, increasing by 8.2% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.3% from 2012 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2015 with an increase of 11% y-o-y. In that year, global lard imports attained their peak of 236K tonnes. From 2016 to 2018, the growth of global lard imports remained at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, lard imports totaled $194M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. In general, lard imports continue to indicate a moderate drop. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2017 with an increase of 11% y-o-y. Over the period under review, global lard imports attained their peak figure at $227M in 2012; however, from 2013 to 2018, imports remained at a lower figure.

Imports by Country

In 2018, Spain (50K tonnes), distantly followed by the Netherlands (26K tonnes), Mexico (20K tonnes), Slovakia (18K tonnes), Denmark (16K tonnes) and France (11K tonnes) were the key importers of lard, together achieving 63% of total imports. Belgium (9,105 tonnes), the UK (7,294 tonnes), Germany (7,042 tonnes), the U.S. (6,910 tonnes), Portugal (6,763 tonnes) and the Philippines (5,311 tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2012 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by the Philippines, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Spain ($41M), Mexico ($22M) and the Netherlands ($18M) were the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2018, with a combined 42% share of global imports. Denmark, Belgium, France, the U.S., the UK, Germany, Slovakia, Portugal and the Philippines lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 35%.

Slovakia experienced the highest growth rate of imports, in terms of the main importing countries over the last six-year period, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the average lard import price amounted to $870 per tonne, standing approx. at the previous year. In general, the lard import price continues to indicate a perceptible reduction. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2017 when the average import price increased by 13% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the average import prices for lard attained their peak figure at $1,100 per tonne in 2012; however, from 2013 to 2018, import prices failed to regain their momentum.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was the U.S. ($1,157 per tonne), while the Philippines ($131 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2012 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Denmark, while the other global leaders experienced mixed trends in the import price figures.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

USMCA

THESE COMPANIES KEEP CROSS-BORDER CARGO MOVING, EVEN WITH USMCA UP IN THE AIR

Our trilateral trade bloc is in a sort of limbo, stuck between the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) that went into effect on Jan. 1, 1994, and the floundering United States Mexico Canada Agreement (USMCA), which the countries’ leaders signed on Nov. 30, 2018, but has only been ratified in Mexico.

According to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which has pushed for more ease of free trade among the three nations for years, about $1.7 billion worth of goods and services flow between the U.S. and Mexico borders every day. That’s about 2 percent of the GDP in America, where, according to the United Nations’ International Trade Center, Mexico and Canada are the two largest trading partners for U.S. manufacturers and shippers after China.

Despite these uncertain times, there are North American cross-border traders that continue to thrive. Consider the collection that follows. 

AVERITT EXPRESS

One of the nation’s leading freight transportation and supply chain management providers, Averitt is celebrating 50 years of service. The company cites customized, cross-border transportation solutions among its many, many specialties. Five years ago, Averitt slashed less-than-truckload (LTL) service times from the U.S. Midwest to Ontario, Canada, in recognition of the province’s rise as a manufacturing hub. Averitt’s strategically placed border service centers in Laredo, El Paso, Harlingen and Del Rio provide easy access to all points throughout Mexico, by rail, truck or expedited air. 

BNSF RAILWAY

One of North America’s leading freight transportation companies, BNSF boasts a.32,500 route-mile network covering 28 U.S. states and three Canadian provinces. The railway utilizes multiple strategies to make international shipments easier for customers. These include market experience, customs clearance know-how and participation in special North American rail service alliances. The BNSF network also includes five U.S.-Mexico gateways (San Diego, El Paso, Eagle Pass, Laredo and Brownsville) and operations in Fort Worth, Texas, and Mexico City, Guadalajara and Monterrey, Mexico. Service options include carload, transload and intermodal (Mexi-Modal) that allow for shipments of all major commodities into and out of Mexico.  

CG RAILWAY

Picture in your head a railroad line extending from the American South to southern Mexico. You can imagine the track snaking along the contour of the Gulf of Mexico, extending west from Alabama through Mississippi and Louisiana before reaching Texas and turning due south through the border and beyond. What you did not picture was a shift from rail at Alabama’s Port of Mobile to an ocean ferry making a direct route over water to Puerto Coatzacoalcos in Veracruz, Mexico. That’s what CG Railway (CGR) has been doing since 2000: providing a faster, more cost-effective route between the eastern U.S. and Canada to central and southern Mexico. CGR offers C-TPAT (Customs Trade Partnership Against Terrorism) certification, bilingual customer support, proactive port security, reduced mileage and wear and tear on equipment and direct interchanges with the CSX, Norfolk Southern, Canadian National and Kansas City Southern railroads, the Alabama & Gulf Coast Railway and Terminal Railway Alabama State Docks and their Mexican counterparts. 

CN NORTH AMERICA

Canadian National is based in Montreal, Quebec, and the Class I freight railway’s network is the largest in that country by physical size and revenue. Established in 1919 and formerly government-owned, Canada’s only transcontinental railway spans from the Atlantic coast in Nova Scotia to the Pacific coast in British Columbia, across about 20,400 route miles of track. But you’d be mistaken to think CN, as it has more commonly known since 1960, is strictly a Great White North concern. The railway also serves the U.S. South and Midwest and, having gone private in 1995, it now counts as its single largest shareholder Bill Gates. Through the ’90s and 2000s, CN North America has acquired multiple lines passing through several U.S. states.

CROWLEY

The private, Jacksonville, Florida-based corporation is the largest operator of tugboats and barges in the world. Crowley American Transport provides ocean liner cargo services between the U.S., Canada, Mexico, South America and the Caribbean. Its American Marine Transport unit delivers local, over-the-road, and commercial trucking services in the continental U.S. Crowley Marine Services provides worldwide contract and specialized marine transportation services, including petroleum product transportation and sales, tanker escort and ship assist, contract barge transportation and ocean towing, logistics and support services, marine salvage and emergency response services, spill-response services on the West Coast and all-terrain transportation services.

CSX TRANSPORTATION

The subsidiary of CSX Corp., a Fortune 500 company headquartered in Jacksonville, Florida, CSX Transportation is a Class I freight railroad operating in the eastern United States and the Canadian provinces of Ontario and Quebec. The railroad operates around 21,000 route miles of track. While its lines blanket the east coasts of Canada and the U.S., you don’t have to be located on railroad track for CSX to help you, as it has access to 70 ports and nationwide transloading and warehousing services.

DB SCHENKER 

The global logistics and supply chain management giant has 93 branches in every U.S. state, Mexico and Canada. Schenker of Canada Ltd. provides logistics services, airfreight, custom brokerage, custom consulting, sports events, land transport and courier services. DB Schenker Mexico celebrated its 40th anniversary in 2017, having begun down there with a single location and 40 associates and now boasting of 500 employees in its corporate office in Mexico City as well as in Guadalajara, Monterrey, Queretaro, Puebla, Cancun, Ciudad Juarez and various other branches. DB Schenker Mexico offers air freight, ocean freight, land freight, customs brokerage, over-dimensioned projects, warehousing and contract logistics.

KANSAS CITY SOUTHERN

The KCS North American rail holdings and strategic alliances are primary components of a NAFTA railway system linking the commercial and industrial centers of the U.S., Mexico and Canada. “KCS is just one interchange away from every major market in North America,” boasts the railroad. KC Southern de Mexico offers unique rail access to the Port of Lazaro Cardenas on Mexico’s Pacific coast, which is an ideal spot to avoid congestion in U.S. West Coast ports. KCS also has access to Gulf of Mexico ports, including Altamira, Tampico and Veracruz in Mexico and Brownsville, New Orleans, Corpus Christi, Houston, Gulfport, Lake Charles, Mobile and Port Arthur in the U.S. 

LIVINGSTON INTERNATIONAL

Billed as North America’s No. 1 company focused on customs brokerage and compliance, Livingston International also offers international trade consulting and freight forwarding across the continent and around the globe. Headquartered in Chicago, Livingston operates along the U.S.-Canada border, with regional air/sea hubs in Los Angeles, New York and Norfolk. Livingston employs more than 3,200 employees at more than 125 key border points, seaports, airports and other strategic locations in North America, Europe and the Far East. Livingston is a customs brokerage leader in Canada, and the company also promises to move goods seamlessly into Mexico.

LOGISTICS PLUS

Whether it is working as a 3PL or 4PL partner, the Erie, Pennsylvania-based company specializes in total logistics management, LTL and truckload transportation, rail and intermodal services, project cargo and project management, import/export services, air and ocean freight forwarding, warehousing and distribution, global trade compliance services and logistics and technology solutions. Logistics Plus serves small and large businesses throughout the Greater Toronto Area, with an office in the zone that has access to the Port of Toronto and expertise in shipping in and out of Canada though the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario. Bilingual logistics experts help customers with intra-Mexico, cross-border, or international shipping using air, ocean, ground or rail transportation. 

LYNDEN

Seattle-based Lynden not only delivers to, from and within Canada, the company does business there. Its long-established Canadian presence allows it to provide complete coverage for any transportation need. They can help with warehousing and distribution or 3PL in Canada, where Lynden boasts of knowing “the ins and outs of customs brokerage, duties and taxes, imports and exports.” From its offices in Edmonton and Calgary, Alberta, and Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, Lynden offers scheduled less-than-truckload (LTL) and truckload (TL) service to points in Alaska and the Lower 48.

LYNNCO

The Tulsa, Oklahoma-based company optimizes customers’ supply chains coast-to-coast in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. LynnCo manages businesses and determines how and when ground, international air/ocean, spot/capacity, procurement and expedited services are the best options. For instance, LynnCo helped a U.S. manufacturer determine if shifting units to Mexico was profitable. The answer was no after factoring in the risks of moving, poor facilities, added shipping costs and product quality. 

POLARIS TRANSPORTATION GROUP

Billing itself as “an American company headquartered in Toronto,” Polaris has a quarter century of experience in scheduled LTL service between the U.S. and Canada. The company knows both countries’ customs rules and participates in every border security program, including C-TPAT, PIP (Partners in Protection), CSA (Customs Self- Assessment) and FAST (Free and Secure Trade). The company’s scheduled service connects Ontario and Quebec markets with the U.S. through a combination of its fleet and facilities along with those of its long-established partner carriers.

PUROLATOR INTERNATIONAL

The U.S. subsidiary of Canada’s leading provider of integrated freight and parcel delivery services, Jericho, New York-based Purolator International seamlessly transports shipments between the U.S. and Canada and manages the respective countries’ customs processes with aplomb. They pick up/drop off at every point in the U.S. and boast of a distribution network that extends to every Canadian province and territory. What truly takes Purolator International over the top is a commitment to continue improving, as evidenced by a recent $1 billion growth investment that includes two new hubs that will allow for faster fulfillment for both courier and e-commerce shipments from the U.S. throughout Canada, where consumers also will be seeing more access points, including upgraded retail pickup locations.

R+L GLOBAL

“Shipping to Mexico is facil,” according to Ocala, Florida-based R+L Global Logistics. Its qualified network of premium carriers in Mexico provide secure door-to-door Less than Truckload (LTL) and Full Truckload (FTL) services. They cover the entire Mexican territory and move cargo across all major U.S./Mexico border gateways. They also move intra-Mexico shipments. 

SCHNEIDER

The Green Bay, Wisconsin-based giant specializes in regional trucking, long-haul, bulk, intermodal, supply chain management, brokerage, warehousing, port logistics and transloading. Decades of cross-border freight experience means customer cargo moves without question or delay. Once goods move across the border, Schneider has the assets and personnel in place to deliver it safely and securely. “Here’s the simple fact: No one makes shipping to Canada and Mexico easier or more efficient than Schneider,” the company boasts. “By road or by rail, your freight is in the best hands possible.”

SENKO 

The Japanese logistics giant has offices in the U.S., where their own trucks and warehouses work with a network of vendors. The 3PL/4PL supply chain solutions provider uses its own IT technology developed in Japan to help arrange liquid tank transportation, flatbed, drayage, refrigerated, dry, expedited shipping and freight broker services. Senko Logistics Mexico is the company unit south of the border.

SUNSET TRANSPORTATION

The St. Louis-based company has offices and agents across the country, and customers whose shipments are moved around the globe. Sunset arranges freight for a wide range of industries, from wholesale food distribution to specialized construction equipment. “Cross-border solutions” include customs clearance for land, rail, air and ocean, LTL, TL, intermodal, rail, air, expedited and specialized freight, contracted lane and spot market, C-TPAT compliance, multimodal programs, a Laredo, Texas, warehouse and distribution facility and 24/7 bilingual, bicultural support.

SURGERE 

Headquartered in North Canton, Ohio, Surgere is a leader in linking OEMs, tier suppliers and logistics providers through an automotive data system that provides visibility on returnable containers at every stage of their movement between supplier and vehicle maker. The supply chain innovators, whose clients include Nissan and CEVA Logistics, recently opened Technologias Avanzadas Surgere de Mexico in Aguascalientes, Mexico, which has more than 1,300 suppliers and automotive plants within 200 kilometers of the location. “Central Mexico is the automotive hub for Latin America—making it a natural progression—and a welcomed challenge for us,” explained David Hampton, Surgere’s vice president for International Operations, in announcing the move. Surgere hopes to have the Mexico office fully staffed before the end of this year.

TQL

Cincinnati, Ohio-based Total Quality Logistics (TQL) was founded in 1997 and is now the second-largest freight brokerage firm in the nation, with more than 5,500 employees in 57 offices across the county. Known for combining industry-leading technology and unmatched customer service, TQL boasts of providing competitive pricing, continuous communication and “a commitment to do it right every time.” They move more than 1.6 million loads across the U.S., Canada and Mexico annually through a broad portfolio of logistics services and a network of more than 75,000 carriers.

USA TRUCK

The Van Buren, Arkansas-based company provides customized truckload, dedicated contract carriage, intermodal and third-party logistics freight management services throughout North America. USA Truck has nearly two decades of experience servicing Mexico, which has allowed the company to expand its presence south of the border and partner with many Mexican carriers. USA Truck’s Capacity Solutions coordinates transportation into and out of Mexico with a vast carrier network, and they service most major Mexican markets and consistently maintain C-TPAT certification. USA Truck also has a select fleet of third-party carriers providing service into the provinces of Ontario and Quebec, Canada.

UTXL

Launched in 1997 by four founders with more than 100 years of combined asset-based trucking experience, UTXL started with this goal: to be the safest, most reliable and cost effective niche capacity resource to customers in support of their core carrier programs. UTXL has served thousands of shippers across the U.S., Canada and Mexico, including some of the largest shippers in the world. One of their mottos is: “Any point in the U.S., Canada or Mexico … any length of haul.”

WERNER ENTERPRISES

“We keep America moving” is the motto of this Omaha, Nebraska-based company that has one of the largest transportation services to and from Mexico and is a premiere long-haul carrier to and from Canada and throughout North America. Werner has offices in Mexico and Canada as well as experienced and knowledgeable staff engineer solutions. PAR documentation allows for quicker access through customs into Canada, and their network of alliance carriers can manage entire supply chains within Canada and Mexico regardless of equipment needs.

WW SOLUTIONS

The unit of Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics participates in Mexico’s automotive industry not only as a carrier and logistics provider. WW Solutions specializes in processing solutions at ports and at OEM plants, providing services that include pre-delivery inspections, accessory fittings, repairs, storage, washing, vehicle preparation, quality control, inventory management and the procurement of technical services.

YRC FREIGHT

Yellow Transportation (founded in 1924 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma) merged with Roadway (founded in 1930 in Akron, Ohio) to create YRC Freight, which is the largest subsidiary of YRC Worldwide Inc. based in Overland Park, Kansas. A leading transporter of industrial, commercial and retail goods, YRC Freight offers solutions for businesses across North America and is the only carrier with on-site, bilingual representatives at border crossing points in Mexico to expedite customs clearance.

dog and cat food

EU Dog And Cat Food Market Is Set to Reach 9.6M Tonnes by 2025

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Dog And Cat Food – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the dog and cat food market in the European Union amounted to $12.1B in 2018, surging by 3.6% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +1.1% over the period from 2008 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being observed over the period under review. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2013 when the market value increased by 8.1% year-to-year. In that year, the dog and cat food market attained its peak level of $12.6B. From 2014 to 2018, the growth of the dog and cat food market remained at a somewhat lower figure.

Consumption By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of dog and cat food consumption in 2018 were the UK (1.5M tonnes), France (1.3M tonnes) and Germany (1.3M tonnes), together accounting for 45% of total consumption. Spain, Italy, Poland, the Netherlands, Portugal, Sweden, Belgium, Romania and Hungary lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 42%.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of dog and cat food consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Romania, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest dog and cat food markets in the European Union were the UK ($2.7B), France ($2.3B) and Germany ($2B), together accounting for 57% of the total market. These countries were followed by Italy, Spain, Sweden, the Netherlands, Poland, Belgium, Hungary, Portugal and Romania, which together accounted for a further 32%.

The countries with the highest levels of dog and cat food per capita consumption in 2018 were Sweden (32 kg per person), Portugal (31 kg per person) and Hungary (25 kg per person).

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of dog and cat food per capita consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Romania, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in the EU

Driven by increasing demand for dog and cat food in the European Union, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven-year period. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +1.1% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 9.6M tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in the EU

In 2018, the production of dog and cat food in the European Union stood at 9.8M tonnes, flattening at the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.8% from 2008 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2010 with an increase of 4.1% against the previous year. Over the period under review, dog and cat food production attained its peak figure volume at 9.8M tonnes in 2017, leveling off in the following year.

In value terms, dog and cat food production amounted to $13.1B in 2018 estimated in export prices. The total output value increased at an average annual rate of +1.4% from 2008 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 when production volume increased by 13% against the previous year. In that year, dog and cat food production attained its peak level of $13.6B. From 2014 to 2018, dog and cat food production growth remained at a somewhat lower figure.

Production By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of dog and cat food production in 2018 were France (1.8M tonnes), Germany (1.4M tonnes) and the UK (1.2M tonnes), with a combined 45% share of total production. Spain, Hungary, the Netherlands, Italy and Poland lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 37%.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of dog and cat food production, amongst the main producing countries, was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, the amount of dog and cat food exported in the European Union amounted to 5.5M tonnes, increasing by 2.9% against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +4.0% over the period from 2008 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2017 when exports increased by 9% against the previous year. The volume of exports peaked in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future.

In value terms, dog and cat food exports stood at $9.2B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total exports indicated a strong expansion from 2008 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +4.0% over the last decade. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, dog and cat food exports increased by +29.5% against 2015 indices. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2013 with an increase of 16% year-to-year. Over the period under review, dog and cat food exports reached their maximum in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the immediate term.

Exports by Country

In 2018, Germany (829K tonnes), France (807K tonnes), the Netherlands (572K tonnes), Poland (527K tonnes) and Hungary (517K tonnes) were the main exporters of dog and cat food in the European Union, comprising 59% of total export. It was distantly followed by Spain (323K tonnes), Ireland (309K tonnes), the UK (272K tonnes), the Czech Republic (266K tonnes), Belgium (260K tonnes) and Italy (252K tonnes), together comprising a 31% share of total exports.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest dog and cat food markets in the European Union were Germany ($1.8B), France ($1.5B) and the Netherlands ($1.1B), together comprising 48% of total exports. Poland, Belgium, Hungary, the UK, the Czech Republic, Italy, Ireland and Spain lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 41%.

Poland recorded the highest rates of growth with regard to exports, in terms of the main exporting countries over the last decade, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

The dog and cat food export price in the European Union stood at $1,668 per tonne in 2018, going up by 7.5% against the previous year. Overall, the dog and cat food export price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2011 an increase of 11% against the previous year. The level of export price peaked at $1,730 per tonne in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, export prices stood at a somewhat lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Germany ($2,124 per tonne), while Spain ($885 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the Czech Republic, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

The imports totaled 4.6M tonnes in 2018, surging by 2.7% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.9% over the period from 2008 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2012 with an increase of 8.1% y-o-y. Over the period under review, dog and cat food imports attained their peak figure in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future.

In value terms, dog and cat food imports totaled $7.7B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total import value increased at an average annual rate of +3.6% from 2008 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2017 when imports increased by 14% against the previous year. Over the period under review, dog and cat food imports reached their peak figure in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the near future.

Imports by Country

The countries with the highest levels of dog and cat food imports in 2018 were Germany (646K tonnes), the UK (528K tonnes), Belgium (392K tonnes), France (374K tonnes), Italy (342K tonnes), Poland (290K tonnes), the Netherlands (288K tonnes), Austria (251K tonnes), Spain (196K tonnes), Romania (186K tonnes) and Portugal (179K tonnes), together resulting at 79% of total import. Greece (109K tonnes) held a little share of total imports.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Romania, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Germany ($1.3B), the UK ($878M) and France ($638M) were the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2018, with a combined 36% share of total imports. Italy, Poland, Belgium, the Netherlands, Austria, Spain, Portugal, Romania and Greece lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 45%.

Among the main importing countries, Poland experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to imports, over the last decade, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the dog and cat food import price in the European Union amounted to $1,654 per tonne, rising by 2.5% against the previous year. Overall, the dog and cat food import price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2011 when the import price increased by 11% y-o-y. The level of import price peaked at $1,718 per tonne in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, import prices stood at a somewhat lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Germany ($1,976 per tonne), while Romania ($874 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform