New Articles

The Netherlands and China Are the Main Suppliers of Ginger into Russia

ginger

The Netherlands and China Are the Main Suppliers of Ginger into Russia

Demand and prices for ginger have skyrocketed in recent weeks, driven by the faith of Russian citizens in its miraculous properties to fight coronavirus.

According to the IndexBox’s report ‘Russian Federation – Ginger – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’, the revenue of the ginger market in Russia was estimated at $26M in 2018. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Since ginger is not grown in Russia, demand in the local market was fully covered by import supplies.

Imports into the Russian Federation

In 2018, the ginger imports into Russia amounted to 11K tonnes, going up by 2.5% against the previous year. Overall, ginger imports continue to indicate skyrocketing growth. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2009 when imports increased by 91% against the previous year. Over the period under review, ginger imports reached their peak figure in 2018 and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, ginger imports amounted to $26M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

The Netherlands (3.9K tonnes), China (2.5K tonnes) and Brazil (1.1K tonnes) were the main suppliers of ginger imports to Russia, together comprising 70% of total imports. Belgium, Belarus, Nigeria and Thailand lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 22%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main suppliers, was attained by Belarus (+127.0% per year), while imports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest ginger suppliers to Russia were China ($9.4M), the Netherlands ($8.5M) and Brazil ($2.9M), together comprising 80% of total imports. Belgium, Thailand, Nigeria and Belarus lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 13%.

Belarus (+105.5% per year) recorded the highest growth rate of the value of imports, in terms of the main suppliers over the period under review, while imports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the average ginger import price amounted to $2,444 per tonne, falling by -7% against the previous year. In general, the import price indicated a remarkable increase from 2007 to 2018: its price increased at an average annual rate of +6.8% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2010 an increase of 79% year-to-year. The import price peaked at $3,359 per tonne in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, import prices failed to regain their momentum.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major supplying countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was China ($3,842 per tonne), while the price for Belarus ($449 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by China, while the prices for the other major suppliers experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

frozen crustacean

The Growth Of Frozen Crustaceans Market in the EU Slowed Down

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Frozen Crustaceans – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the frozen crustaceans market in the European Union amounted to $7.3B in 2018, remaining stable against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +1.8% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2014 with an increase of 12% y-o-y. In that year, the frozen crustaceans market reached its peak level of $7.3B. From 2015 to 2018, the growth of the frozen crustaceans market practically regained its momentum.

Consumption By Country

The countries with the highest volumes of frozen crustaceans consumption in 2018 were Germany (214K tonnes), Spain (172K tonnes) and France (104K tonnes), with a combined 58% share of total consumption. These countries were followed by Italy, Poland, the UK and the Netherlands, which together accounted for a further 29%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of frozen crustaceans consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by the UK, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Germany ($1.8B), Spain ($1.3B) and France ($927M) constituted the countries with the highest levels of market value in 2018, together comprising 56% of the total market.

The countries with the highest levels of frozen crustaceans per capita consumption in 2018 were Spain (3,692 kg per 1000 persons), Germany (2,611 kg per 1000 persons) and the Netherlands (2,511 kg per 1000 persons).

Production in the EU

In 2018, the frozen crustaceans production in the European Union amounted to 435K tonnes, jumping by 3.5% against the previous year. Overall, frozen crustaceans production, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

Production By Country

Germany (188K tonnes) constituted the country with the largest volume of frozen crustaceans production, comprising approx. 43% of total production. Moreover, frozen crustaceans production in Germany exceeded the figures recorded by the region’s second-largest producer, Poland (65K tonnes), threefold. Spain (39K tonnes) ranked third in terms of total production with a 9% share.

In Germany, frozen crustaceans production remained relatively stable over the period from 2007-2018. The remaining producing countries recorded the following average annual rates of production growth: Poland (+0.1% per year) and Spain (-1.5% per year).

Exports in the EU

In 2018, the amount of frozen crustaceans exported in the European Union stood at 261K tonnes, picking up by 6.8% against the previous year. Over the period under review, frozen crustaceans exports, however, continue to indicate a slight descent.

In value terms, frozen crustaceans exports amounted to $2.3B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total export value increased at an average annual rate of +1.5% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. Over the period under review, frozen crustaceans exports attained their peak figure in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

Exports by Country

The exports of the four major exporters of frozen crustaceans, namely Denmark, Spain, Belgium and the Netherlands, represented more than two-thirds of total export. The UK (23K tonnes) occupied the next position in the ranking, followed by France (13K tonnes). All these countries together took near 14% share of total exports. Ireland (11K tonnes) took a relatively small share of total exports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Spain, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Denmark ($434M), Spain ($418M) and the Netherlands ($373M) constituted the countries with the highest levels of exports in 2018, together accounting for 52% of total exports.

Export Prices by Country

The frozen crustaceans export price in the European Union stood at $8,976 per tonne in 2018, declining by -3.9% against the previous year. Over the last decade, it increased at an average annual rate of +2.6%. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2011 when the export price increased by 17% year-to-year. The level of export price peaked at $9,340 per tonne in 2017, and then declined slightly in the following year.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was France ($11,146 per tonne), while Belgium ($7,334 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Denmark, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, the frozen crustaceans imports in the European Union totaled 674K tonnes, growing by 2.5% against the previous year. Over the period under review, frozen crustaceans imports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. In value terms, frozen crustaceans imports stood at $6B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total import value increased at an average annual rate of +2.3% over the period from 2007 to 2018.

Imports by Country

In 2018, Spain (177K tonnes), distantly followed by France (112K tonnes), Italy (87K tonnes), Belgium (53K tonnes), the Netherlands (48K tonnes), the UK (48K tonnes), Germany (36K tonnes) and Portugal (32K tonnes) were the major importers of frozen crustaceans, together comprising 88% of total imports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Spain ($1.4B), France ($1B) and Italy ($737M) were the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2018, with a combined 52% share of total imports. These countries were followed by Belgium, the UK, the Netherlands, Germany and Portugal, which together accounted for a further 37%.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the frozen crustaceans import price in the European Union amounted to $8,975 per tonne, approximately equating the previous year. Over the last eleven-year period, it increased at an average annual rate of +2.6%. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2014 when the import price increased by 16% against the previous year. In that year, the import prices for frozen crustaceans reached their peak level of $9,037 per tonne. From 2015 to 2018, the growth in terms of the import prices for frozen crustaceans remained at a lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Belgium ($11,996 per tonne), while Spain ($7,794 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Belgium, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

The Netherlands Emerges as Key Supplier of Potato Chips into the UK

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘United Kingdom – Potato Chips – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the potato chips market in the UK amounted to $686M in 2018, dropping by -4.6% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). In physical terms, however, the volume of consumption stood at 197K tonnes in 2018, flattening against the previous year. Over the last five years, the market was relatively stable, fluctuating mildly from 189K tonnes in 2013 to the mentioned level of 2018.

Production in the UK

Potato chips production in the UK amounted to 194K tonnes in 2018, coming down by -3.8% against the previous year. Despite this, the total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.5% over the period from 2013 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed throughout the analyzed period.

Exports from the UK

In 2018, exports of potato chips from the UK stood at 56K tonnes, remaining stable against the previous year. Over the period under review, the total exports indicated a buoyant expansion from 2013 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +11.1% over the last five-year period.

The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 when exports increased by 18% y-o-y. Over the period under review, potato chips exports reached their peak figure in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, potato chips exports totaled $216M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total export value increased at an average annual rate of +4.0% over the period from 2013 to 2018; the trend pattern generally reflected that of the volume of exports.

Exports by Country

Ireland (17K tonnes), Nigeria (11K tonnes) and the Netherlands (3.4K tonnes) were the main destinations of potato chips exports from the UK, with a combined 55% share of total exports. These countries were followed by France, the United Arab Emirates, Pakistan, Belgium, Germany, the U.S., and Sierra Leone, which together accounted for a further 24%.

In value terms, Ireland ($65M) remains the key foreign market for potato chips exports from the UK, comprising 30% of total potato chips exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Nigeria ($30M), with a 14% share of total exports. It was followed by France, with an 8.6% share.

From 2013 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of value to Ireland totaled +1.3%. Exports to the other major destinations recorded the following average annual rates of export growth: Nigeria (-4.3% per year) and France (+17.3% per year).

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the average potato chips export price amounted to $3,869 per tonne, jumping by 5.6% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the potato chips export price, however, experience a noticeable decline. Over the period under review, the average export prices for potato chips attained their maximum at $5,384 per tonne in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, export prices stood at a somewhat lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average prices for the major foreign markets. In 2018, the country with the highest price was France ($5,752 per tonne), while the average price for exports to Ireland ($3,919 per tonne) was amongst the middle-level destinations.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was recorded for supplies to France, while the prices for the other major destinations experienced a decline.

Imports into the UK

In 2018, potato chips imports into the UK stood at 59K tonnes, growing by 14% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +3.2% over the period from 2013 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations over the period under review. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2018 with an increase of 14% year-to-year. In that year, potato chips imports reached their peak and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term. In value terms, potato chips imports amounted to $116M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

The Netherlands (31K tonnes), Belgium (16K tonnes) and Germany (3.7K tonnes) were the main suppliers of potato chips imports to the UK, with a combined 85% share of total imports. Spain, Ireland, France and Poland lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 11%.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main suppliers, was attained by Spain, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the average potato chips import price amounted to $1,948 per tonne, going up by 9.9% against the previous year. Over the period from 2013 to 2018, it increased at an average annual rate of +2.2%.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major supplying countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was France ($5,244 per tonne), while the price for the Netherlands ($1,246 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by France, while the prices for the other major suppliers experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

technical textiles

Technical Textiles Market in the EU – Poland Emerges as the Fastest-growing Exporter

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Textile Products And Articles For Technical Uses – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the technical textiles market in the European Union amounted to $1.6B in 2018, stabilizing at the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price).

Overall, technical textiles consumption continues to indicate a slight descent. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2016 when the market value increased by 6.6% year-to-year. Over the period under review, the technical textiles market attained its maximum level at $1.9B in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, consumption stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Consumption By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of technical textiles consumption in 2018 were the UK (19K tonnes), Germany (12K tonnes) and France (12K tonnes), together accounting for 36% of total consumption. These countries were followed by Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, the Czech Republic, Romania, Poland, Sweden, Belgium and Portugal, which together accounted for a further 47%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of technical textiles consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest technical textiles markets in the European Union were Germany ($311M), France ($248M) and the UK ($170M), with a combined 47% share of the total market. Sweden, Italy, the Czech Republic, Romania, the Netherlands, Belgium, Poland, Spain and Portugal lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 27%.

The countries with the highest levels of technical textiles per capita consumption in 2018 were the Netherlands (582 kg per 1000 persons), the Czech Republic (536 kg per 1000 persons) and Sweden (415 kg per 1000 persons).

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of technical textiles per capita consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in the EU

Driven by increasing demand for technical textiles in the European Union, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven years. Market performance is forecast to decelerate, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +0.2% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 121K tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in the EU

In 2018, technical textiles production in the European Union stood at 140K tonnes, reducing by -3.2% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.9% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2009 with an increase of 15% against the previous year. The volume of technical textiles production peaked at 161K tonnes in 2011; however, from 2012 to 2018, production remained at a lower figure.

In value terms, technical textiles production totaled $1.9B in 2018 estimated in export prices. Overall, technical textiles production, however, continues to indicate a mild deduction. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2016 with an increase of 3.8% y-o-y. The level of technical textiles production peaked at $2.3B in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, production failed to regain its momentum.

Production By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of technical textiles production in 2018 were Germany (32K tonnes), Italy (18K tonnes) and the UK (15K tonnes), with a combined 47% share of total production. These countries were followed by the Netherlands, Spain, Belgium, France, the Czech Republic, Sweden, Poland, Hungary and Romania, which together accounted for a further 43%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of technical textiles production, amongst the main producing countries, was attained by Romania, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, the amount of textile products and articles for technical uses exported in the European Union stood at 138K tonnes, declining by -5.6% against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.5% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2010 when exports increased by 30% year-to-year. The volume of exports peaked at 152K tonnes in 2011; however, from 2012 to 2018, exports remained at a lower figure.

In value terms, technical textiles exports amounted to $2.8B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. In general, technical textiles exports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 with an increase of 14% year-to-year. Over the period under review, technical textiles exports reached their peak figure at $2.9B in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, exports remained at a lower figure.

Exports by Country

Germany represented the major exporting country with an export of about 41K tonnes, which amounted to 30% of total exports. It was distantly followed by Italy (18K tonnes), the Netherlands (9.6K tonnes), Belgium (9.6K tonnes), Poland (8.4K tonnes), the Czech Republic (7K tonnes), Spain (6.9K tonnes) and France (6.5K tonnes), together mixing up a 48% share of total exports. The following exporters – the UK (5.8K tonnes), Sweden (4.2K tonnes), Austria (3.8K tonnes) and Slovakia (3K tonnes) – together made up 12% of total exports.

Exports from Germany increased at an average annual rate of +2.4% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, Poland (+11.3%), the Czech Republic (+7.9%), Slovakia (+6.6%), the Netherlands (+5.5%) and Italy (+2.5%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Poland emerged as the fastest-growing exporter in the European Union, with a CAGR of +11.3% from 2007-2018. Sweden, France and Austria experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. By contrast, Belgium (-1.8%), Spain (-4.7%) and the UK (-5.7%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period. From 2007 to 2018, the share of Germany, Poland, Italy, the Netherlands and the Czech Republic increased by +6.7%, +4.2%, +3.1%, +3.1% and +2.9% percentage points, while Belgium (-1.6 p.p.), Spain (-3.5 p.p.) and the UK (-3.9 p.p.) saw their share reduced. The shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, Germany ($1B) remains the largest technical textiles supplier in the European Union, comprising 37% of total technical textiles exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Italy ($297M), with a 10% share of total exports. It was followed by France, with a 5.9% share.

In Germany, technical textiles exports expanded at an average annual rate of +1.2% over the period from 2007-2018. The remaining exporting countries recorded the following average annual rates of exports growth: Italy (+1.1% per year) and France (-1.6% per year).

Export Prices by Country

The technical textiles export price in the European Union stood at $21 per kg in 2018, jumping by 12% against the previous year. Overall, the technical textiles export price, however, continues to indicate a slight downturn. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2018 when the export price increased by 12% year-to-year. Over the period under review, the export prices for textile products and articles for technical uses attained their peak figure at $23 per kg in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, export prices failed to regain their momentum.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Austria ($36 per kg), while Spain ($13 per kg) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the Czech Republic, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, technical textiles imports in the European Union amounted to 116K tonnes, dropping by -2.9% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.0% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being observed in certain years. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2010 when imports increased by 19% y-o-y. The volume of imports peaked at 120K tonnes in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, imports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, technical textiles imports totaled $2.1B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total import value increased at an average annual rate of +1.2% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations in certain years. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 with an increase of 16% y-o-y. Over the period under review, technical textiles imports reached their maximum in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Imports by Country

In 2018, Germany (21K tonnes), distantly followed by Italy (12K tonnes), France (11K tonnes), the Netherlands (10K tonnes), the UK (9.1K tonnes), Poland (7.5K tonnes), the Czech Republic (5.7K tonnes) and Spain (5.4K tonnes) represented the major importers of textile products and articles for technical uses, together creating 70% of total imports. The following importers – Belgium (4.5K tonnes), Romania (3.9K tonnes), Austria (3.1K tonnes) and Sweden (3K tonnes) – together made up 12% of total imports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Germany ($497M) constitutes the largest market for imported textile products and articles for technical uses in the European Union, comprising 24% of total technical textiles imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by France ($223M), with a 11% share of total imports. It was followed by the Netherlands, with a 8.9% share.

In Germany, technical textiles imports increased at an average annual rate of +1.3% over the period from 2007-2018. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: France (+1.5% per year) and the Netherlands (+7.6% per year).

Import Prices by Country

The technical textiles import price in the European Union stood at $18 per kg in 2018, jumping by 9.9% against the previous year. Overall, the technical textiles import price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 an increase of 15% year-to-year. The level of import price peaked in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Germany ($24 per kg), while Romania ($11 per kg) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Romania, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

DHL Supply Chain Recognized by Top Employers Institute

Contract logistics market leader DHL Supply Chain received multi-faceted recognition from the Top Employers Institute including praise for their outstanding human resources policy and taking the spot for Top Employer on the international stage in Spain, Portugal, the Netherlands, UK, Canada, USA, Brazil and China.

“We are delighted to be awarded as a Top Employer for the third year in a row. This certification demonstrates that our efforts to create a sustainable HR strategy at DHL Supply Chain are paying off,” said Rob Rosenberg, Global Head of Human Resources at DHL Supply Chain. “Especially in the field of contract logistics, a motivated and well-trained workforce is key to offering customers optimal solutions. Which is why we take a proactive and multi-layered approach to both attracting and retaining employees. And this approach is proving successful, as shown by this renewed certification from the Top Employers Institute.”

This year’s Top Employer certification established the third year in a row the company has been recognized. Additionally, the company received high recognition for Leadership Development, Career & Succession Management and Learning & Development.

“Talent is the most critical piece in meeting our customers’ ever-changing needs and exceeding their expectations,” said Tim Sprosty, Senior Vice President of Human Resources at DHL Supply Chain North America. “That is why we place such a strong emphasis on creating a quality work environment that enables our employees’ success and promotes operational excellence. It is central to our culture, and we’re proud to accept this recognition for our continued efforts.”

Source: DHL

Standardization Strategy impacting Flower Supply Chain Prepares for Second Trial Phase

Europe’s fourth largest air cargo hub, Amsterdam Airport Schiphol teams up with the Holland Flower Alliance to support efforts surrounding the Ideal Flowerbox initiative. The goal of the initiative is to create a system of standardization and space efficiencies in shipping flowers, benefiting the flower supply chain in the region.

“The shipment of flowers is an important activity at Amsterdam Airport Schiphol, so we are very supportive of the Ideal Flowerbox project and we are excited about the initial trial results showing how the box can improve sustainability in the supply chain,” said Roos Bakker, Director Business Development, Amsterdam Airport Schiphol.

“We actively encourage innovation within the air cargo community, and we believe that collaboration with the HFA partners will continue to yield positive results for all stakeholders involved in the shipment of flowers.”

After a successful first trial run led by Royal FloraHolland’s Senior Consultant Christo van der Meer,  a second phase for the trial period is in the works and could lead to future implementation of the strategy on additional flower routes in 2019.

“The initial trial was very successful with a 15 per cent increase of weight on airline pallets and boxes on the Nairobi to Amsterdam route, which demonstrates the value of collaboration between Amsterdam Airport Schiphol, KLM Cargo, and Royal FloraHolland,” said van der Meer.

“The results show that with the use of the Ideal Flowerbox we are able to optimise the aircraft’s load factor, which is beneficial for a sustainable and efficient operation.”

Source: Schiphol

Europe Takes the Lead in 2019 E-commerce Index

UNCTAD’s B2C E-commerce index for 2018 confirms The Netherlands as the most prepared country in the world for e-commerce with Singapore and Switzerland in second and third. The United Kingdom ranked fourth on the index, but placed as the highest B2C spending per shopper in Europe and the world’s highest proportion of B2C revenues to GDP.

This year, The Netherlands beat Luxembourg  – previously ranking among some of the highest but due to its poor postal reliability score dropped out of the top ten list. Postal reliability is one of the key factors taken into consideration for ranking and overall score.

“The Netherlands has high values for most indicators, particularly in secure servers – a proxy for e-commerce shops – where it is top-ranked among all 151 countries included in the index,” Shamika N. Sirimanne, director of UNCTAD’s division on technology and logistics, said. “The country also has the second highest proportion of online shoppers in the world – 76% of the population aged 15 and older.”

This year’s index provided information related to improving measurement efforts:

“The 2018 UNCTAD B2C E-commerce Index, which measures an economy’s preparedness to support online shopping, has expanded its coverage to include 151 economies, up seven from the 2017 edition. The index consists of four indicators that are highly related to online shopping and for which there is wide country coverage (box 1).

“The release of new account ownership data from the World Bank’s 2017 Global Findex survey has increased the number of countries included and allows for an estimation of account data for the intervening years since the last survey in 2014,” (UNCTAD).

 

Source: UNCTAD

Apple, Starbucks Targeted by EU Tax Authorities

Los Angeles, CA – European Commission (EC) competition regulators are investigating tax breaks for Apple Inc. and Starbucks Corp. in Ireland and The Netherlands, respectively, that it suspects are in violation of European Union tax codes.

The investigation comes as governments around the world are cracking down on tax-avoidance and evasion by scrutinizing the financial practices of a growing number of multi-national companies such as Hewlett-Packard, Google, Microsoft, McDonalds, and Amazon.com.

According to the EC, tax avoidance and evasion by foreign companies operating in the EU amounts to more than $1.4 trillion a year.

The EC reportedly began gathering information about accords between Apple and Ireland, and Starbucks and the Netherlands last year following reports that some companies received “significant” tax reductions.

“We need to fight against aggressive tax planning,” said Joaquin Almunia, the EU’s competition commissioner at a recent press conference in Brussels, adding that it is “still too soon to anticipate” possible recovery if the EU finds the tax rulings to be illegal.”

Apple Responds

While Starbuck’s didn’t respond to requests for a statement on the EC investigation, California-based Apple issued a response saying that the company “pays every euro of every tax that we owe. We have received no selective treatment from Irish officials. Apple is subject to the same tax laws as scores of other international companies doing business in Ireland.”

Ireland’s Finance Ministry said it is “confident that there is no state-aid-rule breach” and will “defend all aspects vigorously.”

The EC said that it is “concerned that current arrangements could underestimate the taxable profit and grant an advantage to the respective companies by allowing them to pay less tax.”

Apple, the company said in a public statement, “pays every euro of every tax that we owe. We have received no selective treatment from Irish officials. Apple is subject to the same tax laws as scores of other international companies doing business in Ireland.”

Ireland’s Finance Ministry said it is “confident that there is no state-aid-rule breach” and will “defend all aspects vigorously.” The EU probe targets “a very technical tax issue in a specific case” and covers 2004 to 2014, it said in an e-mailed statement.

 “Patent Boxes” Under the Microscope

Widening the scope of its investigation, the EC is also seeking details from Belgium, Spain, France, Hungary, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, the UK, Cyprus and Malta on so-called “patent boxes,”  a mechanism that allows tax reductions on income derived from patents.

The EC said in March it has indications that the programs mainly benefit highly mobile businesses without triggering significant additional research and development.

The UK, for example, patent box phases in a lower corporation tax on some profits from patented inventions and certain other innovations, according to the EC website.

Changes to EU tax rules require unanimous approval among the bloc’s 28-member nations,  rendering major changes to individual county’s tax regulations difficult, if not impossible as even the most enthusiastic members of the bloc cling to their right to set corporate tax rates.

The opening of an in-depth investigation by the commission allows third parties, as well as the three countries concerned, an opportunity to submit comments.

06/16/2014