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SEPTEMBER ISSUE: FASHION & TRADE IN A SHIFTING GLOBAL LANDSCAPE

fashion

SEPTEMBER ISSUE: FASHION & TRADE IN A SHIFTING GLOBAL LANDSCAPE

As any devoted reader of Vogue knows, September is usually the time for a wardrobe refresh. This year, the new season may not be looking so good for the fashion industry which faces tariffs, changing consumer demand, and of course, fallout from the pandemic.

Going into 2020, fashion’s global leaders were already apprehensive about a difficult year ahead. They feared external economic shocks and were feeling pressure to adapt quickly to digitization and embrace the push for sustainability. Then, the COVID-19 pandemic upended their industry, cutting demand and disrupting supply chains. Meanwhile, escalating global tensions including the U.S.-China trade war added to the burden of trade barriers.

Though fashion can be seen as a luxury or even a hobby, the apparel industry is one of the largest in the world. Disruptions to this trillion dollar industry have meaningful impacts across the globe for the millions involved in making the world look good while clothing it.

The Big Players in the Global Fashion Trade

Fashion is a global business with global supply chains so tariffs, trade disputes, and transportation disruptions all play an important role in determining what we can buy and how much we pay for it. The global apparel market is valued at over one trillion U.S. dollars. The United States is currently the world’s biggest market for imports of apparel and footwear, importing around $85 billion worth of clothing, accessories and footwear in 2018.

“Knit apparel” is defined as any clothing made from the weaving of fibres. It’s the largest single apparel designation. The United States buys 18.95 percent of total knit apparel imports, twice that of the second-largest importer, Germany. Other top destinations for knit apparel around the globe include European countries such as Spain, the UK and France, and fashion-conscious Asian powerhouses like Japan and Hong Kong.

China remains at the top when it comes to exports of apparel. In 2018, China’s exports of knit apparel made up just shy of 31 percent of total world exports. Bangladesh and Vietnam take the number two and three spots, but with market shares of 7.52 and 5.66 percent respectively.

Top Ten Knit Apparel

A look at longer term trends reveals that China’s market share has been slipping. In 2012, China commanded 41 percent of total knit apparel exports, meaning in the past six years it has lost ten percent of its market share. The below graph shows this decline, as well as the increasing share claimed by rising South and Southeast Asian competitors Bangladesh, Vietnam, and Cambodia. This can be explained partially by the escalating trade war between the United States and China, prompting businesses to shift all or part of their production away from China and to neighboring Asian countries to avoid the Made in China label and the tariffs that come with it.

Asian country share of knit apparel exports v China (1)

An Industry at the Whims of International Policy – and Trends

Even before the pandemic hit, the industry was expecting a shake-up as both global relations and trends were shifting. Global value chains are morphing and new industrializing markets emerging. At the same time, e-commerce continues to accelerate; and expectations for brands to be sustainable and socially conscious are growing. The global pandemic, social movements and international relations of 2020 have forced the fashion industry to be more innovative than ever before to stay in business.

Trade Disputes & Barriers

The fashion industry has long suffered from tariffs — global average import tariff rates for clothing products stood at 17 percent in 2018, about twice as much as that for all other manufactured goods.

In the United States, tariffs are as high as 32 percent for clothing and 65 percent for footwear. In fact, around 75 percent of the total tariff burden on American households comes from apparel products. U.S. tariffs generally vary widely, but those on clothing tend to be higher than in almost any other category and affect a larger portion of U.S. imports, translating into higher prices paid by U.S. consumers.

Given China’s textile and apparel export dominance, it is unsurprising that tariffs on clothing originating in China have been significantly affected by the U.S.-China trade war. The United States levied tariffs ranging from 7 to 25 percent on knitted and non-knitted apparel; textiles including silk and cotton; fabrics such as lace and embroidery; and a whole host of other inputs the fashion industry relies on (like rubberized textiles). China retaliated with its own list of tariffs against American products, including U.S.-produced apparel. The existence of these tariffs, and the constant threat of more, make China a less appealing location for production. If they can find the right mix of cheap-but-skilled labor, manufacturers are likely to relocate factories. Those Made in China labels may instead read Made in VietnamBangladesh or Turkey.

COVID 19: Decreased Demand & Shaky Supply Chains

The COVID-19 pandemic dealt a major blow to the fashion industry worldwide. The one-two punch of disrupted supply chains and a global population reining in luxury expenses hit designers, manufacturers and retailers of clothing and footwear particularly hard.

While people self-quarantined at home, retailers who rely on sales at their brick-and-mortar stores were impacted immediately. During the first six months of 2020, the sales of clothing and accessories at stores in the United States were close to 40 percent lower than one year prior. Department store Nordstrom has suffered a 53 percent dip in sales, and many retailers, including household names like Brooks Brothers, JC Penney and Neiman Marcus, have filed for bankruptcy. Tangentially, a whole population staying home did not demand the same types of clothes as before. No vacation meant no new summer wardrobe. No special events cut down on the need for fancy outfits, causing demand to fall even further.

Resilient and nimble supply chains are vital to any fashion house, as they must be able to react quickly to changing trends and draw on skills and resources spread throughout the world. This resilience was put to the test during the coronavirus pandemic as major production and transportation faltered. The clothing retailers that seem to be weathering the storm best are online-focused stores in a position to pivot quickly to the stay-at-home demand for comfy clothes and “athleisure” wear.

For Some Countries, Fashion Means Everything

Fashion houses and retailers are obviously struggling. Unraveling the threads of trade in fashion reveals the much larger number of people involved in the global fashion industry who have been impacted worldwide. They include millions of people employed as manufacturers of apparel and footwear, as well as producers of textiles and other materials, and farmers who produce raw materials, as well as myriad designers, creators and marketers who are part of the innovative “orange economy”.

Many countries are involved in apparel production, but for some South and Southeast Asian countries it forms a significant part, even the vast majority, of their total revenue. For example, 44 percent of national export revenue in Sri Lanka comes from apparel. That number is even higher for Cambodia, at 58.45 percent. Apparel is also Vietnam’s third-largest export sector, bringing in over $36 billion annually and accounting for 16 percent of GDP.

And nowhere is the apparel industry more important than Bangladesh, where 83 percent of total export revenue comes from the garment industry. The apparel industry, and more specifically the ability to trade the clothing and accessories manufactured in Bangladesh, has been a huge driver of economic development in the country and has given many the opportunity to earn a living beyond subsistence farming. About 80 percent of jobs are held by women, providing not only employment but autonomy and education to one of the world’s poorest and most vulnerable populations.

However, this specialization comes at a cost. Although trade in apparel has brought much needed revenue into the country, the heavy reliance on a single industry has also been a source of concern. For example, worldwide orders dried up at the height of the coronavirus pandemic, risking millions of Bangladeshi jobs and even prompting fears of starvation.

Bangladesh Garment Sector (1)

Trends in Fashion and Trends in Trade – Where Next?

Trends rule in the world of fashion. In this especially uncertain time, who knows what will win out as new autumn fashion appears on our shelves (and in our feeds)?

Will the growing shift to more sustainable and ethical fashion continue with a slow down of “fast fashion” in favor of investing in long-lasting pieces with a low environmental footprint? If so, we might expect a shift away from clothing produced in far-flung destinations to cut down on carbon footprints or to trace the origin of clothing made with free and fair practices. Or, as the world opens up post-COVID will the return of traveling and social events spur a worldwide shopping-spree and a desire for more clothing, more quickly? In that case, suppliers who can utilize large and diverse – yet agile – supply chains will come out on top.

Two things are certain: fashion will continue to be a global industry and trade will continue to play a vital role in shaping what we wear.

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Alice Calder

Alice Calder received her MA in Applied Economics at GMU. Originally from the UK, where she received her BA in Philosophy and Political Economy from the University of Exeter, living and working internationally sparked her interest in trade issues as well as the intersection of economics and culture.

This article originally appeared on TradeVistas.org. Republished with permission.

curtains

Affected by the Pandemic, the Global Curtain Market to Lose Growth Momentum

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘World – Curtains And Interior Blinds – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The Growth of the Global Curtains Market Softened by 2020

The global curtains market was estimated at $15.3B in 2019 (IndexBox estimates), remaining constant against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price).

In 2019, the curtain and interior blind market increased to 2.2M tonnes, which remained relatively unchanged against the year before. Overall, there was an upward trend of curtain and interior blind consumption – the average annual growth rate stood at +1.0% per year from 2007-2019. After 2015, the growth of consumption accelerated amid lower prices for blind and shades and strong construction growth worldwide, particularly in the U.S. and Europe. In 2019, however, the market growth lost its previous strong momentum, hampered by a slowdown in the global economy and rising both political and trade tensions in the world.

China (338K tonnes) constituted the country with the largest volume of curtains consumption, accounting for 16% of total volume. Moreover, curtains consumption in China exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest consumer, India (140K tonnes), twofold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by the U.S. (137K tonnes), with a 6.3% share.

From 2007 to 2019, the average annual growth rate of volume in China totaled +1.8%. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: India (+1.6% per year) and the U.S. (-0.1% per year).

In value terms, China ($2.1B), the U.S. ($1.4B) and the UK ($1.3B) were the countries with the highest levels of market value in 2019, with a combined 31% share of the global market. These countries were followed by Japan, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Indonesia, India, Nigeria, Brazil, Ethiopia and Mexico, which together accounted for a further 20%.

The countries with the highest levels of curtains per capita consumption in 2019 were the UK (967 kg per 1000 persons), Japan (560 kg per 1000 persons) and the U.S. (416 kg per 1000 persons).

From 2007 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of curtains per capita consumption, amongst the key consuming countries, was attained by Brazil, while curtains per capita consumption for the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

The Severe Effect of the COVID Pandemic Puts a Drag on the Market Growth

Fundamentally, curtain and interior blind consumption is to follow the growth of global construction and consumer incomes, which both more broadly depend on general economic development.

Until 2020, the global economy has been developing steadily for five years, although at a slower pace than in the previous decade. In early 2020, however, the global economy entered a period of the crisis caused by the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. According to World Bank forecasts, despite the gradual relaxing of restrictive measures and unprecedented government support in countries that faced the pandemic in early 2020, the annual decline of global GDP could amount to -5.2%, which is the deepest global recession being seen over the past eight decades.

The construction sector is to suffer heavily from the pandemic as falling incomes make mortgage loans less affordable. On the other hand, many countries are taking unprecedented measures of state support for the economy and household income, which is to support the recovery of construction. In addition, prolonged isolation can cause people to change something in their home interiors, which can increase consumer interest in curtains.

Taking into account the above, it is expected that in 2020 the global consumption of curtains will stagnate at about the level of 2019. In the medium term, as the global economy recovers from the effects of the pandemic, the market is expected to grow gradually. Overall, market performance is forecast to pursue a slightly upward trend over the next decade, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +0.3% for the period from 2019 to 2030, which is projected to bring the market volume to 2.2M tonnes by the end of 2030.

The U.S. Remains the Largest Market for Imported Curtain and Interior Blinds

In 2019, supplies from abroad of curtains and interior blinds decreased by -7.9% to 517K tonnes for the first time since 2012, thus ending a six-year rising trend. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.6% over the period from 2007 to 2019; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2010 when imports increased by 15% against the previous year. Over the period under review, global imports attained the peak figure at 562K tonnes in 2018, and then declined in the following year.

In value terms, curtains imports contracted to $4.6B (IndexBox estimates) in 2019. The total import value increased at an average annual rate of +1.8% from 2007 to 2019; however, the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2010 with an increase of 13% against the previous year. Over the period under review, global imports reached the peak figure at $4.7B in 2018, and then declined in the following year.

In 2019, the U.S. (131K tonnes) was the key importer of curtains and interior blinds, making up 25% of total imports. It was distantly followed by Germany (45K tonnes), the UK (34K tonnes), Japan (28K tonnes) and France (25K tonnes), together generating a 25% share of total imports. The following importers – Belgium (14K tonnes), Canada (12K tonnes), Spain (10K tonnes), Russia (10K tonnes), the Philippines (9.6K tonnes), Italy (9.5K tonnes) and Sweden (9.4K tonnes) – together made up 15% of total imports.

The U.S. experienced a relatively flat trend pattern with regard to volume of imports of curtains and interior blinds. At the same time, the Philippines (+33.1%), Russia (+8.4%), Germany (+4.8%), Spain (+3.3%), Belgium (+2.6%), Canada (+1.8%), France (+1.5%) and Japan (+1.1%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, the Philippines emerged as the fastest-growing importer imported in the world, with a CAGR of +33.1% from 2007-2019. Sweden experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. By contrast, the UK (-1.5%) and Italy (-1.6%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period.

In value terms, the U.S. ($1.4B) constitutes the largest market for imported curtains and interior blinds worldwide, comprising 30% of global imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Germany ($485M), with a 11% share of global imports. It was followed by the UK, with a 5.6% share.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

fashion

Post-COVID-19: Slowing Down Fast Fashion and the Retail Sector

As brands and retailers scramble to adapt to the post-COVID-19 world, one thing is clear – the fast fashion trend that has dominated the sector as we know it is no longer sustainable.

The race to get ahead of the competition has ended up distorting fashion’s seasonality – whereas once the bi-annual fashion shows were held 4-5 months ahead of the upcoming season in order to allow brands and buyers time to create forward-orders and produce stock, these days retailers rush the latest trends from the catwalk to the stores within a question of days. It’s no longer unusual to see Summer dresses on the shelves in February and Winter coats in the stores before August is out. And yet consumers, bombarded with the latest fashion trends at all hours of the day via social media influencers and celebrities, want fashion they can wear now, not in months’ time. So in order to stay relevant, retailers are pressured to buy stock months in advance of when it’s needed, and then end up having to sell it off at sale prices just as it’s coming into season so they can introduce the never-ending round of latest trends.

This problem has confounded the industry for some time, but there seemed to be no way out of it – nobody wanted to be the first to “slow down.” And yet here we are, after months of enforced factory lock-downs and store closures, with an unexpected opportunity to rethink the way the industry works.

Gucci announced in late March that it would lead the way into a more mindful future, abandoning “the worn-out ritual of seasonalities” by reducing their number of yearly shows from five to just two. Other major brands were quick to follow suit, with a focus on less season-influenced and gender-exclusive collections, creating more fluid styles designed to last for months and years as opposed to the buy-wear-throwaway designs that have taken such a toll on our environment. It’s not just the brands themselves who are calling for change, consumers are becoming more aware of the impact the fashion industry has on our planet and demand for sustainable fashion has never been higher.

However, sustainable fashion production itself is still in its infancy and there are still a limited number of brands that are wholly dedicated to reducing the social and environmental impact of clothing production. But by changing the way retailers buy and sell their products we may see a real change in the reduction of waste before the product even reaches the consumer, and help end the practice of brands destroying unsold stock in order to maintain a fabricated “exclusivity.” It’s a case of changing the industry mindset, from fast fashion to fast provisioning, in which retailers can react quickly to new trends and only buy what they actually need. Those retailers who have embraced this new “test and repeat” model are among the few to have come out of the crisis with increased profits, as they were able to respond almost immediately to the changing demands of the consumer and weren’t stuck trying to offload months’ worth of dead stock to a public for whom it was no longer relevant.

For small retailers, the benefits are obvious – purchasing small amounts of stock regularly based on customer demand frees up storage space, reduces forward investment, and minimizes financial risk. Plus, they are still able to offer regular stock updates and variety which continues to be a major attraction in a social media influenced society with a notoriously short attention span.

Wholesale brands are looking for new ways to reach their buyers, offering livestock that can be delivered in a matter of days. With TradeGala – the B2B online marketplace, B2B fashion is simplified for both brands and buyers, with a retail-like, user-friendly e-commerce platform that allows buyers to go from order to receipt in less than a week.

The Coronavirus has forced an entire industry to stop, take stock of its problems,, and start looking for solutions. Amid the suffering and struggle that undoubtedly still lays ahead for the industry, this crisis offers us an unprecedented opportunity to change, hopefully for the better.

textile

Nonwoven Textile Market in Asia Amounted to $16.1B

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘Asia – Nonwoven Textiles – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the nonwoven textile market in Asia amounted to $16.1B in 2018, increasing by 3.9% against the previous year.

Consumption By Country in Asia

In value terms, China ($7.8B) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Japan ($1.4B). It was followed by Indonesia.

The countries with the highest levels of nonwoven textile per capita consumption in 2018 were Saudi Arabia (4.28 square meters per person), South Korea (4.21 square meters per person) and Japan (3.37 square meters per person).

From 2014 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of nonwoven textile per capita consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by India, while nonwoven textile per capita consumption for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Market Forecast to 2019-2030

Driven by increasing demand for nonwoven textile in Asia, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next decade. Market performance is forecast to decelerate, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +1.1% for the period from 2018 to 2030, which is projected to bring the market volume to 5.3B square meters by the end of 2030.

Exports in Asia

In 2018, Asia’s nonwoven textile exports stood at $6.6B (IndexBox estimates). The total export value increased at an average annual rate of +5.5% from 2014 to 2018; however, the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations over the period under review. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2018 with an increase of 13% y-o-y. In that year, nonwoven textile exports reached their peak and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

Exports by Country

China represented the key exporter of nonwoven textiles in Asia, with the volume of exports resulting at 1B square meters, which was approx. 53% of total exports in 2018. Turkey (211M square meters) took the second position in the ranking, followed by Taiwan, Chinese (110M square meters). All these countries together held near 17% share of total exports. The following exporters – Thailand (81M square meters), Malaysia (75M square meters), Japan (71M square meters), Israel (71M square meters), Saudi Arabia (70M square meters), South Korea (60M square meters), China, Hong Kong SAR (55M square meters) and India (55M square meters) – together made up 28% of total exports.

Exports from China increased at an average annual rate of +11.9% from 2014 to 2018. At the same time, Saudi Arabia (+24.5%), Turkey (+17.6%), India (+15.6%), Thailand (+12.2%), Malaysia (+7.1%), China, Hong Kong SAR (+6.8%), Japan (+6.1%) and Taiwan, Chinese (+4.3%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Saudi Arabia emerged as the fastest-growing exporter exported in Asia, with a CAGR of +24.5% from 2014-2018. Israel experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. By contrast, South Korea (-5.4%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period. While the share of China (+19 p.p.), Turkey (+5.2 p.p.), Saudi Arabia (+2.1 p.p.) and Thailand (+1.5 p.p.) increased significantly, the shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, China ($3.1B) remains the largest nonwoven textile supplier in Asia, comprising 46% of total nonwoven textile exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Japan ($768M), with a 12% share of total exports. It was followed by Turkey, with a 9% share.

Export Prices by Country

The nonwoven textile export price in Asia stood at $3.4 per square meter in 2018, approximately mirroring the previous year.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Japan ($11 per square meter), while Saudi Arabia ($1.5 per square meter) was amongst the lowest.

From 2014 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Israel, while the other leaders experienced mixed trends in the export price figures.

Imports in Asia

Asia’s nonwoven textile imports amounted to $4.8B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total import value increased at an average annual rate of +3.9% from 2014 to 2018; however, the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2018 with an increase of 8.8% against the previous year. In that year, nonwoven textile imports reached their peak and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

Imports by Country

In 2018, Japan (268M square meters), distantly followed by China (144M square meters), South Korea (129M square meters), Viet Nam (122M square meters) and India (77M square meters) represented the largest importers of nonwoven textiles, together mixing up 62% of total imports. The following importers – Indonesia (53M square meters), Turkey (49M square meters), Pakistan (42M square meters), Thailand (37M square meters), Saudi Arabia (35M square meters), Malaysia (31M square meters) and Taiwan, Chinese (27M square meters) – together made up 23% of total imports.

From 2014 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Pakistan, while imports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, China ($905M), Japan ($858M) and Viet Nam ($525M) constituted the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2018, with a combined 47% share of total imports. South Korea, Indonesia, India, Turkey, Thailand, Malaysia, Taiwan, Chinese, Saudi Arabia and Pakistan lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 37%.

Import Prices by Country

The nonwoven textile import price in Asia stood at $4.1 per square meter in 2018, approximately mirroring the previous year.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was China ($6.3 per square meter), while Pakistan ($1.9 per square meter) was amongst the lowest.

From 2014 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Indonesia, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

fashion

TradeGala Set to Revolutionize Wholesale Fashion

TradeGala is the brainchild of Mina Melikova and Kuganeswaran Thangarajan, built to support the ever-changing wholesale market, and provide fashion suppliers the chance to meet new heights at a click of a button, especially through these more challenging times in retail.

TradeGala is a simple concept, a seamless service that connects wholesale fashion vendors and buyers from all over the world. It is an online marketplace that helps retailers find innovative styles at competitive prices from the best suppliers in the business while helping sellers expand their reach and increase sales.

Companies no longer need to invest the time, money and resource in traveling to appointments or attending trade fairs in order to make new business connections. The advance of technology has allowed TradeGala to create a cutting-edge platform which in turn allows brands to showcase their products, analyze trends and adapt to maximize business growth; while introducing a huge range of international fashion brands and suppliers to buyers, with products constantly updated to reflect the latest in fashion.

The site launches with 24 brands across accessories, activewear, casual dress, evening wear, and footwear, including Goddiva, City Goddess, Marc Angelo, KDK London, Gypsy Clothing, Conquista Fashion, Gold Lunar, Haus of Deck, Hugz Jeans, Lindy Bop, Looking Glam, Geniris Paris, Glitz Shoes and Versa Forma.

This sophisticated platform has a dedicated web platform and app to ensure orders or new content can be updated even when you are on the move.

How it works? Suppliers simply sign up to TradeGala and register online, then choose a platform that suits their needs. They have the option to choose one of the three plans – basic, premium or exclusive, and once registered upload their products and list them for sale. The quickest process to sell yet.

Our wholesale buyers place orders via the website and app, and receive order notifications via SMS, app alerts and email. The order is then packed and shipped directly from the seller, saving on time and shipping costs.

The TradeGala.com platform offers new suppliers the chance to reach 40,000 sales leads and 3,000 registered wholesale buyers immediately in over 90 countries.

Each buyer is 100% pre-screened and the team behind this platform already boasts an 87% customer satisfaction rating. With over 15 years of B2B experience in fashion and a network that is extensive and continuously growing, this platform is one of the best new opportunities for brands to establish a new business in the UK and internationally through a simple registration process and stock upload.

Other benefits include extensive marketing budgets, international SEO campaigns, heavy pay per click investment both nationally and internationally, presence at trade shows, tailored marketing campaigns, and seasonal photo shoots and fashion shows featuring your products. Plus, weekly and monthly newsletters, popular products and featured suppliers, not forgetting educational blog and vlog posts for wholesalers and retailers.

This is a new wave business tool that helps both young and well-established suppliers reach clients and markets beyond their means, it improves and fast-tracks their visibility to market and supports steady brand growth, taking away much of the traditional overhead costs.

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For further information on working with TradeGala please contact:
Yathu Kanagaratham – Yathu@citygoddess.co.uk
New Business Development Manager

Amber Domenech Patey – Amber@Citygoddess.co.uk
Project Manager

winter

Cozy up to Trade this Winter

There’s nothing like curling up next to a roaring fire wrapped up in a warm sweater, soft blankets and furry pillows on a cold day. As we bundle up for the remainder of the winter season, we can give thanks to global trade for gifting us with some of today’s trendiest and coziest items – Sherpa wool coats, Mongolian lamb fur pillows and cashmere sweaters, Giza cotton sheets, and Turkish towels.

The United States imported $110 billion worth of textiles and apparel last year, with China, Vietnam and India as the lead exporters. These larger economies dominate overall textile and apparel imports, but specialty products from smaller economies are making a name for themselves with American consumers this holiday season. Before you buy “faux” versions, read on to get the skinny on the originals.

Sherpa from Nepal

Sherpa wool coats, sweaters, and scarves are everywhere this holiday season. Once a high-end statement piece, trendy Sherpa items are now available at varying price points at your local mall. While most of the Sherpa in your closet is likely the faux variety made from polyester, acrylic or cotton, the real deal is inspired by wool clothing worn by the Sherpa people living in the Himalayas.

There are some 150,000 Sherpas residing in the mountainous regions of Nepal, India and Tibet. Many make their living today guiding climbers and tourists up the dangerous summit of Mount Everest as expert mountaineers. But they’re also well-known traders of salt, wool and rice.

The United States is Nepal’s second-largest export market. Top imports include carpets, handicrafts and antiques, animal feed, textiles and apparel. In 2015, the United States established a stand-alone trade preference program with Nepal as part of the Trade Facilitation and Trade Enforcement Act to help support Nepal’s economic recovery following disastrous earthquakes that year. The program established duty-free access for 77 categories of products including carpets, shawls, scarves, handbags and suitcases through 2025.

Although Nepal may have started the Sherpa trend, we get most of our wool products from elsewhere today. U.S. wool apparel imports topped $3.1 billion in 2018. China was the top source at over 42 percent, followed by Italy, Canada and Vietnam.

U.S. wool imports 3 billion

Fur pillows and cashmere sweaters from Mongolia

Fluff up your indoor space by throwing a trendy Mongolian lamb fur pillows on your sofa. (These pillows are all the rage with teens and millennials.) While faux versions are likely a mix of acrylic and polyester, the real ones are made from sheared sheep wool from Mongolia.

Mongolia is home to some 14 million sheep. They graze year-round on Mongolia’s vast plains, accustomed to severe winters, steep mountains and poor vegetation.

Mongolia’s sheep aren’t the only grazers sought after for their soft coats. Mongolia is also home to some 27 million goats that produce 9,400 tons of soft cashmere each year, making Mongolia the world’s second-largest producer of cashmere behind China. Top destinations for Mongolian cashmere include Italy and England. It’s the country’s third-largest exporting industry and employs over 100,000 people, the majority of whom are women.

Exports account for more than half of Mongolia’s GDP. Its economy has traditionally relied on herding and agriculture, but in recent years has gotten a big boost of foreign direct investment in its mining sector which seeks to extract rich deposits of copper, gold, coal, uranium, tungsten and more.

Mongolia second-largest producer of cashmere

Giza cotton sheets from Egypt

If you’ve ever been up late skimming the TV channels over the holiday break, you’ve likely come across a mustached man happily hugging his “MyPillow”. Mike Lindell is now legendary for his infomercial success, and his company has expanded its product line beyond its namesake pillows to offer dog beds, towels and more.

One of the latest product lines from MyPillow is “Giza Dream” sheets and pillowcases made with 100 percent Giza cotton. In one of his infomercials, Lindell explains how he made his signature sheets: “I started by using the world’s best cotton called Giza. It’s only grown in a region between the Sahara Desert, the Mediterranean Sea and the Nile River. It’s ultra-soft and breathable, but extremely durable”.

MyPillow’s first infomercial aired in 2011, but Giza cotton has been around for centuries. Known for being both extra fine and extra long, Giza cotton is planted in Egypt every April and harvested in September. It’s then hand-picked to ensure its properly matured. But issues with deteriorating quality of privately produced Giza cotton led the Egyptian government to intervene in recent years to help restore the reputation of Egyptian cotton.

In 2017, the Egyptian government unveiled a 19-step plan which included taking control of the production and distribution of cottonseed. It’s already led to increased yield and quality, according to a 2019 report by the U.S. Foreign Agriculture Service. The plan also seeks to prevent seed mixing, enforce bans on prohibited varieties, and develop Egypt’s local spinning and weaving industries.

In 2018, Egypt’s total lint cotton exports were estimated at 220,000 bales. India was the top importer of Egyptian cotton, responsible for over 50 percent of total exports. Other top importers include Pakistan, China and Turkey.

World cotton production

Turkish towels

Turkish towels are a summer must-have for sunbathing, but they’ve also made their way into American homes for use after showering, as tablecloths, and as blankets. Usually striped with fringes on the end, these trendy towels are known for being super absorbent, lightweight and getting softer with each wash.

Turkish towels are made with premium Aegean Cotton, known for its extra long fibers. Called “Peshtemal” in Turkey, Turkish towels have a long history dating over 600 years. Turkey is widely credited with inventing the first towels as part of a ceremonial bathing routine for new brides in Turkish hammams.

The Turkish textile industry is one of the leading sectors in its economy, accounting for 16 percent of exports in 2018. According to its Ministry of Trade, Turkey was the world’s third-largest supplier of bed sheets, fourth-largest supplier of towels and bathrobes, and fifth-largest supplier of bedspreads in 2016. Of its top exports markets for home textiles, the United States ranks second behind Germany.

Turkish towels exports

Unwrapping gratitude for trade

Nepal, Mongolia, Egypt and Turkey are inspiring some of the coziest products we’ll unwrap this holiday season.

Even if these products are enjoying the fruits of a fad-induced surge in American demand, their histories date back centuries while also representing an important source of employment and exports for their respective economies today.

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Lauren Kyger

Lauren Kyger is Associate Editor for TradeVistas. Prior to joining TradeVistas, she was a Research Associate at the Hinrich Foundation focused on international trade issues. She is a Hinrich Foundation Global Trade Leader Scholar alumna, earning her Master’s degree in Global Business Journalism from Tsinghua University in Beijing. She received her Bachelor’s degree from the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University.

This article originally appeared on TradeVistas.org. Republished with permission.

trade

Holiday Gift-Giving in the Trade Spirit

FOR THE ROMANTIC

Tea Sampler:

Whether you favor green, black, oolong or white tea, all originate from the plant Camellia sinensis. It’s the soil, atmosphere and method of processing that confer different tastes, colors and scents. Tea traded globally is grown on large plantations in more than 30 countries. The four biggest producers are China, India, Kenya and Sri Lanka. This sampler of dissolvable “tea drops” includes citrus ginger, blueberry acai, rose earl grey, sweet peppermint, and matcha green tea made from teas sourced around the world but hand assembled by in Los Angeles, California.

FOR THE GOURMAND

Artisinal Chocolate Bars:

Cacao grows close to the equator in places like Brazil, Ecuador, Peru and Madagascar. Askinosie, a family-owned chocolatier in Springfield, Missouri offers dark chocolate bars sourced from women farmers in Tanzania. Harper Macaw of Washington, DC blends Brazilian cacao and Brazilian coffee beans roasted in Annapolis, Maryland to produce its milk chocolate Coffee Bar. Madecasse was founded by former American Peace Corps volunteers. It makes 92 percent pure dark bars in Madagascar from local cacao. Marou is truly small artisanal chocolate maker that works with small farmers to help Vietnam become the newest producer of cacao in the world.

Cashmere Sweater:

Your sweater begins as the coat of a cashmere goat. Named for their origin in the Himalayan region of Kashmir, cashmere-producing breeds also thrive in Australia and throughout China. Among the most famous are the Zalaa Ginst white goat of Mongolia and the Tibetan Plateau goat. Some $1.4 billion in cashmere garments are traded globally each year. Top manufacturers hail from Scotland and Italy, but these days you can find “cashmere-blends” on discount racks in U.S. fast fashion stores.

Homemade Hot Sauce:

If you’re going to try your hand at it, you’ll need two key ingredients – chili peppers and spices. Chili peppers grow in the United States but Capsicum annuum was originally domesticated in Mesoamerica, a region that extends from Central Mexico to Central America. After Spanish colonists returned with it to Europe, hot peppers traveled the globe swiftly on Portuguese trade routes to spice-loving India through the Portuguese-controlled port of Goa, and from there, over the Himalayas to Sichuan, China.

FOR THE PRAGMATIST

A Pair of Necessities:

Some people like receiving the essentials – from underwear to appliances. Many of our undergarments come to the United States from Sri Lanka, an island nation off the southern coast of India. Home to some 22 million people, Sri Lanka produces for major global brands like Victoria’s Secret, Gap, Nike, Tommy Hilfiger, H&M and more. The (still) popular Instant Pot is manufactured in China but was invented by Robert Wang, a former software engineer from Canada who applied his knowledge of microprocessors and sensors to the science of not burning dinner.

FOR THE TRENDY

A Small-Batch, Globe-Trotting Bourbon:

Why not support American whiskey, which has been hard hit in overseas markets by retaliatory tariffs. Jefferson’s Ocean is the brainchild of Jefferson’s, a Kentucky artisan distillery. Barrels of bourbon hitch a boat ride on a shark-tagging research vessel, crossing the equator four times, visiting over 30 ports on five continents. The temperature fluctuations, salt water air exposure, and constant motion of the ship during the journey renders a thick, dark bourbon with caramel flavors and a briny scent.

FOR THE RE-USER

Silicone Lunch Boxes and Nylon Bags:

We’ve written before about the silicon in sand which can be made into the tiny individual semiconductor chips that get embedded into our globally trade devices. Silicone, on the other hand, is a rubberlike plastic increasingly used in food storage, transportation and reheating, due to its low toxicity and high heat resistance. Food52 makes a colorful container with a silicone sleeve that is, according to the manufacturer, “just right for layering miso salmon and spinach over black rice.” No bag lunch for the modern hipster.

Baggu is a re-usable shopping bag made from lightweight ripstop nylon that comes in a variety of bold colors and prints. The synthetic polymer known as nylon was first produced in United States, born of the need to find alternatives to silk and hemp for parachutes in World War II. Today, China is the largest exporter of nylon.

FOR THE “VSCO GIRL”

If you’re not familiar with the term, you probably don’t have a teenager in your home. VSCO is a popular photo editing app that many social sharers use before posting on Instagram or other platforms. The term “VSCO girl” has been adopted to describe some of the latest teen fashion trends and must-haves for the middle and high school hallways.

Here are some of the essentials you might give the VSCO girl in your life, beginning with a Fjullraven Swedish backpack to put it all in. Add to it some Glossier Lip Balms if you care about transparency in the global supply chain of your makeup, a Hydroflask made of pro-grade 18/8 stainless steel (are there tariffs on that stainless steel?), some Pura Vida jewelry from Costa Rica, and an Instax camera from Japanese maker Fujifilm. Where do VSCO girls hang out when they aren’t in school? On TikTok, of course. There are some 422.4 million videos on Chinese app TikTok tagged #vscogirl.

Whatever you buy for the holidays this year, chances are, there’s a global trade aspect to your gift-gifting. As we like to say at TradeVistas, “see the trade in everything.” Happy holidays.

Note: Neither the author nor TradeVistas’ sponsor endorses the above-mentioned products. We merely seek to illustrate the global trade dimension in popular gifts this season.

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Andrea Durkin is the Editor-in-Chief of TradeVistas and Founder of Sparkplug, LLC. Ms. Durkin previously served as a U.S. Government trade negotiator and has proudly taught international trade policy and negotiations for the last fourteen years as an Adjunct Professor at Georgetown University’s Master of Science in Foreign Service program.

This article originally appeared on TradeVistas.org. Republished with permission.

fabric

U.S. Broadwoven Fabric Imports Bounced Back in 2018 Due to Rising Supply from India

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘U.S. Broadwoven Fabric Market. Analysis And Forecast to 2025’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the broadwoven fabric market in the U.S. amounted to $3.6B in 2018, remaining constant against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Over the period under review, broadwoven fabric consumption continues to indicate a measured drop. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2014 with an increase of 3.7% y-o-y. In that year, the broadwoven fabric market attained its peak level of $4.3B. From 2015 to 2018, the growth of the broadwoven fabric market remained at a somewhat lower figure.

Broadwoven Fabric Production in the U.S.

In value terms, broadwoven fabric production amounted to $3.5B in 2018. In general, broadwoven fabric production continues to indicate a measured downturn. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2014 with an increase of 3.9% against the previous year. In that year, broadwoven fabric production reached its peak level of $4.1B. From 2015 to 2018, broadwoven fabric production growth failed to regain its momentum.

Exports from the U.S.

In 2018, the amount of broadwoven fabric exported from the U.S. stood at 251 tonnes, shrinking by -56.1% against the previous year. Over the period under review, broadwoven fabric exports continue to indicate a drastic contraction. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 with an increase of 191% year-to-year. In that year, broadwoven fabric exports reached their peak of 571 tonnes, and then declined slightly in the following year.

In value terms, broadwoven fabric exports amounted to $2.8M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Over the period under review, broadwoven fabric exports continue to indicate a drastic shrinkage. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2017 with an increase of 100% year-to-year. In that year, broadwoven fabric exports attained their peak of $5.2M, and then declined slightly in the following year.

Exports by Country

Viet Nam (212 tonnes) was the main destination for broadwoven fabric exports from the U.S., accounting for a 85% share of total exports. Moreover, broadwoven fabric exports to Viet Nam exceeded the volume sent to the second major destination, China (13 tonnes), more than tenfold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Chile (5 tonnes), with a 2% share.

From 2013 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume to Viet Nam totaled +255.8%. Exports to the other major destinations recorded the following average annual rates of exports growth: China (+17.8% per year) and Chile (+186.0% per year).

In value terms, Viet Nam ($2.1M) remains the key foreign market for broadwoven fabric exports from the U.S., comprising 74% of total broadwoven fabric exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by China ($238K), with a 8.6% share of total exports. It was followed by Colombia, with a 3.5% share.

From 2013 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of value to Viet Nam totaled +157.6%. Exports to the other major destinations recorded the following average annual rates of exports growth: China (+20.4% per year) and Colombia (+63.4% per year).

Export Prices by Country

The average broadwoven fabric export price stood at $11 per kg in 2018, surging by 21% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the broadwoven fabric export price, however, continues to indicate a moderate shrinkage. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2018 when the average export price increased by 21% against the previous year. The export price peaked at $13 per kg in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, export prices remained at a lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Colombia ($22 per kg), while the average price for exports to Chile ($7.5 per kg) was amongst the lowest.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was recorded for supplies to China, while the prices for the other major destinations experienced a decline.

Imports into the U.S.

Broadwoven fabric imports into the U.S. amounted to 9.2K tonnes in 2018, surging by 2.9% against the previous year. Overall, broadwoven fabric imports, however, continue to indicate a drastic reduction. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2015 when imports increased by 7.1% year-to-year. In that year, broadwoven fabric imports attained their peak of 13K tonnes. From 2016 to 2018, the growth of broadwoven fabric imports failed to regain its momentum.

In value terms, broadwoven fabric imports totaled $69M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. In general, broadwoven fabric imports, however, continue to indicate a deep contraction. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2018 when imports increased by 3.7% y-o-y. Over the period under review, broadwoven fabric imports attained their peak figure at $97M in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, imports remained at a lower figure.

Imports by Country

China (3.3K tonnes), Pakistan (2.6K tonnes) and India (2.6K tonnes) were the main suppliers of broadwoven fabric imports to the U.S., together accounting for 93% of total imports.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main suppliers, was attained by India, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest broadwoven fabric suppliers to the U.S. were China ($22M), Italy ($17M) and India ($12M), together comprising 73% of total imports.

In terms of the main suppliers, Italy recorded the highest rates of growth with regard to imports, over the last five-year period, while the other leaders experienced a decline.

Import Prices by Country

The average broadwoven fabric import price stood at $7,535 per tonne in 2018, remaining constant against the previous year. Over the period under review, the broadwoven fabric import price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2017 when the average import price increased by 17% y-o-y. The import price peaked at $8,246 per tonne in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, import prices failed to regain their momentum.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major supplying countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Italy ($61,521 per tonne), while the price for Pakistan ($4,146 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by China, while the prices for the other major suppliers experienced a decline.

Companies Mentioned in the Report

Milliken & Company, Tk Holdings, BGF Industries, BP Amoco Chemical Company, Glen Raven, Albany International, Polartec, Astenjohnson, National Presto Industries, Culp, Burlington Industries, Xerium Technologies, Propex Operating Company, Westpoint Home, Jay Franco & Sons, Cone Denim, The Hallwood Group Incorporated, Galey & Lord, Hyosung Usa, R B Pamplin, Westpoint International, Collins & Aikman Products Co., Nvh, Nouveau Verre Holdings, Itg Holdings

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

textile bag

U.S. Textile Bag And Canvas Market – China’s Imports Bounces Back after Two Years of Decline

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘U.S. Textile Bag And Canvas Market. Analysis And Forecast to 2025’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the textile bag and canvas market in the U.S. amounted to $7B in 2018, increasing by 7.8% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +6.4% over the period from 2013 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed throughout the analyzed period. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2014 with an increase of 18% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the textile bag and canvas market attained its maximum level in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Production of Textile Bags And Canvases in the U.S.

In value terms, textile bag and canvas production amounted to $4B in 2018. The total output value increased at an average annual rate of +8.3% from 2013 to 2018; the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2014 when production volume increased by 20% against the previous year. Textile bag and canvas production peaked in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

Exports from the U.S.

In 2018, the amount of textile bags and canvases exported from the U.S. stood at 6.5K tonnes, growing by 51% against the previous year. Over the period under review, textile bag and canvas exports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2018 with an increase of 51% y-o-y. Over the period under review, textile bag and canvas exports reached their peak figure at 7K tonnes in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, exports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, textile bag and canvas exports totaled $47M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Overall, textile bag and canvas exports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 when exports increased by 36% against the previous year. Exports peaked at $59M in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, exports failed to regain their momentum.

Exports by Country

Thailand (578 tonnes), Australia (567 tonnes) and Trinidad and Tobago (464 tonnes) were the main destinations of textile bag and canvas exports from the U.S., with a combined 25% share of total exports. These countries were followed by Viet Nam, Poland, China, India, Russia, Malaysia, Nicaragua, the Dominican Republic and Costa Rica, which together accounted for a further 46%.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main countries of destination, was attained by Viet Nam (+1,030.1% per year), while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest markets for textile bag and canvas exported from the U.S. were Poland ($7.6M), Australia ($6.7M) and the Dominican Republic ($4.4M), with a combined 40% share of total exports. Costa Rica, China, Trinidad and Tobago, India, Nicaragua, Viet Nam, Thailand, Malaysia and Russia lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 18%.

In terms of the main countries of destination, Viet Nam (+393.6% per year) recorded the highest rates of growth with regard to exports, over the last five years, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

The average textile bag and canvas export price stood at $7,219 per tonne in 2018, waning by -45.8% against the previous year. Overall, the export price indicated a slight increase from 2013 to 2018: its price increased at an average annual rate of +1.3% over the last five years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2017 when the average export price increased by 52% against the previous year. In that year, the average export prices for textile bags and canvases reached their peak level of $13,329 per tonne, and then declined slightly in the following year.

There were significant differences in the average prices for the major foreign markets. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Poland ($17,736 per tonne), while the average price for exports to Russia ($272 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was recorded for supplies to the Dominican Republic (+55.6% per year), while the prices for the other major destinations experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports into the U.S.

In 2018, the textile bag and canvas imports into the U.S. totaled 351K tonnes, rising by 8% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.1% over the period from 2013 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations in certain years. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2018 with an increase of 8% against the previous year. Over the period under review, textile bag and canvas imports attained their maximum at 360K tonnes in 2015; however, from 2016 to 2018, imports remained at a lower figure.

In value terms, textile bag and canvas imports totaled $1.5B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Overall, textile bag and canvas imports continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2018 with an increase of 8.9% against the previous year. Imports peaked at $1.6B in 2015; however, from 2016 to 2018, imports failed to regain their momentum.

Imports by Country

In 2018, China (197K tonnes) constituted the largest supplier of textile bag and canvas to the U.S., with a 56% share of total imports. Moreover, textile bag and canvas imports from China exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest supplier, India (83K tonnes), twofold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Bangladesh (25K tonnes), with a 7.1% share.

From 2013 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of volume from China amounted to -2.2%. The remaining supplying countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: India (+13.0% per year) and Bangladesh (+7.4% per year).

In value terms, China ($905M) constituted the largest supplier of textile bag and canvas to the U.S., comprising 62% of total textile bag and canvas imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by India ($218M), with a 15% share of total imports. It was followed by Bangladesh, with a 8.4% share.

From 2013 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of value from China stood at -3.0%. The remaining supplying countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: India (+11.5% per year) and Bangladesh (+5.9% per year).

After two years of decline, Chinese imports of textile bag and canvas into the U.S. rebounded in 2018, with an increase of 8.5% y-o-y.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the average textile bag and canvas import price amounted to $4,139 per tonne, standing approx. at the previous year. In general, the textile bag and canvas import price, however, continues to indicate a temperate descent. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2018 an increase of 0.8% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the average import prices for textile bags and canvases attained their maximum at $4,572 per tonne in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, import prices remained at a lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major supplying countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Bangladesh ($4,877 per tonne), while the price for India ($2,627 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Indonesia, while the prices for the other major suppliers experienced a decline.

Companies Mentioned in the Report

Dhs Systems, Rainier Industries, Covercraft Industries, Duluth Trading Company, North Sails Group, J & M Industries, Anchor Industries, Thomas Sign and Awning Company, Holland Awning, Outdoor Research, Hdt Expeditionary Systems, Veada Industries, C. R. Daniels, Bestop, Starr Aircraft Products, ADM Corporation, Kenneth Fox Supply Company, Polytex Fibers, Adco Products, Marine Accessories Corporation, Gleason Corporation, Webasto-Edscha Cabrio USA, Outdoor Venture Corporation, Magna Car Top Systems of America, Mpc Group, Ajr Enterprises, Targus Group International, Bluewater Defense, Mondi Bags Usa

Source: IndexBox AI Platform