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TradeGala Set to Revolutionize Wholesale Fashion

fashion

TradeGala Set to Revolutionize Wholesale Fashion

TradeGala is the brainchild of Mina Melikova and Kuganeswaran Thangarajan, built to support the ever-changing wholesale market, and provide fashion suppliers the chance to meet new heights at a click of a button, especially through these more challenging times in retail.

TradeGala is a simple concept, a seamless service that connects wholesale fashion vendors and buyers from all over the world. It is an online marketplace that helps retailers find innovative styles at competitive prices from the best suppliers in the business while helping sellers expand their reach and increase sales.

Companies no longer need to invest the time, money and resource in traveling to appointments or attending trade fairs in order to make new business connections. The advance of technology has allowed TradeGala to create a cutting-edge platform which in turn allows brands to showcase their products, analyze trends and adapt to maximize business growth; while introducing a huge range of international fashion brands and suppliers to buyers, with products constantly updated to reflect the latest in fashion.

The site launches with 24 brands across accessories, activewear, casual dress, evening wear, and footwear, including Goddiva, City Goddess, Marc Angelo, KDK London, Gypsy Clothing, Conquista Fashion, Gold Lunar, Haus of Deck, Hugz Jeans, Lindy Bop, Looking Glam, Geniris Paris, Glitz Shoes and Versa Forma.

This sophisticated platform has a dedicated web platform and app to ensure orders or new content can be updated even when you are on the move.

How it works? Suppliers simply sign up to TradeGala and register online, then choose a platform that suits their needs. They have the option to choose one of the three plans – basic, premium or exclusive, and once registered upload their products and list them for sale. The quickest process to sell yet.

Our wholesale buyers place orders via the website and app, and receive order notifications via SMS, app alerts and email. The order is then packed and shipped directly from the seller, saving on time and shipping costs.

The TradeGala.com platform offers new suppliers the chance to reach 40,000 sales leads and 3,000 registered wholesale buyers immediately in over 90 countries.

Each buyer is 100% pre-screened and the team behind this platform already boasts an 87% customer satisfaction rating. With over 15 years of B2B experience in fashion and a network that is extensive and continuously growing, this platform is one of the best new opportunities for brands to establish a new business in the UK and internationally through a simple registration process and stock upload.

Other benefits include extensive marketing budgets, international SEO campaigns, heavy pay per click investment both nationally and internationally, presence at trade shows, tailored marketing campaigns, and seasonal photo shoots and fashion shows featuring your products. Plus, weekly and monthly newsletters, popular products and featured suppliers, not forgetting educational blog and vlog posts for wholesalers and retailers.

This is a new wave business tool that helps both young and well-established suppliers reach clients and markets beyond their means, it improves and fast-tracks their visibility to market and supports steady brand growth, taking away much of the traditional overhead costs.

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For further information on working with TradeGala please contact:
Yathu Kanagaratham – Yathu@citygoddess.co.uk
New Business Development Manager

Amber Domenech Patey – Amber@Citygoddess.co.uk
Project Manager

winter

Cozy up to Trade this Winter

There’s nothing like curling up next to a roaring fire wrapped up in a warm sweater, soft blankets and furry pillows on a cold day. As we bundle up for the remainder of the winter season, we can give thanks to global trade for gifting us with some of today’s trendiest and coziest items – Sherpa wool coats, Mongolian lamb fur pillows and cashmere sweaters, Giza cotton sheets, and Turkish towels.

The United States imported $110 billion worth of textiles and apparel last year, with China, Vietnam and India as the lead exporters. These larger economies dominate overall textile and apparel imports, but specialty products from smaller economies are making a name for themselves with American consumers this holiday season. Before you buy “faux” versions, read on to get the skinny on the originals.

Sherpa from Nepal

Sherpa wool coats, sweaters, and scarves are everywhere this holiday season. Once a high-end statement piece, trendy Sherpa items are now available at varying price points at your local mall. While most of the Sherpa in your closet is likely the faux variety made from polyester, acrylic or cotton, the real deal is inspired by wool clothing worn by the Sherpa people living in the Himalayas.

There are some 150,000 Sherpas residing in the mountainous regions of Nepal, India and Tibet. Many make their living today guiding climbers and tourists up the dangerous summit of Mount Everest as expert mountaineers. But they’re also well-known traders of salt, wool and rice.

The United States is Nepal’s second-largest export market. Top imports include carpets, handicrafts and antiques, animal feed, textiles and apparel. In 2015, the United States established a stand-alone trade preference program with Nepal as part of the Trade Facilitation and Trade Enforcement Act to help support Nepal’s economic recovery following disastrous earthquakes that year. The program established duty-free access for 77 categories of products including carpets, shawls, scarves, handbags and suitcases through 2025.

Although Nepal may have started the Sherpa trend, we get most of our wool products from elsewhere today. U.S. wool apparel imports topped $3.1 billion in 2018. China was the top source at over 42 percent, followed by Italy, Canada and Vietnam.

U.S. wool imports 3 billion

Fur pillows and cashmere sweaters from Mongolia

Fluff up your indoor space by throwing a trendy Mongolian lamb fur pillows on your sofa. (These pillows are all the rage with teens and millennials.) While faux versions are likely a mix of acrylic and polyester, the real ones are made from sheared sheep wool from Mongolia.

Mongolia is home to some 14 million sheep. They graze year-round on Mongolia’s vast plains, accustomed to severe winters, steep mountains and poor vegetation.

Mongolia’s sheep aren’t the only grazers sought after for their soft coats. Mongolia is also home to some 27 million goats that produce 9,400 tons of soft cashmere each year, making Mongolia the world’s second-largest producer of cashmere behind China. Top destinations for Mongolian cashmere include Italy and England. It’s the country’s third-largest exporting industry and employs over 100,000 people, the majority of whom are women.

Exports account for more than half of Mongolia’s GDP. Its economy has traditionally relied on herding and agriculture, but in recent years has gotten a big boost of foreign direct investment in its mining sector which seeks to extract rich deposits of copper, gold, coal, uranium, tungsten and more.

Mongolia second-largest producer of cashmere

Giza cotton sheets from Egypt

If you’ve ever been up late skimming the TV channels over the holiday break, you’ve likely come across a mustached man happily hugging his “MyPillow”. Mike Lindell is now legendary for his infomercial success, and his company has expanded its product line beyond its namesake pillows to offer dog beds, towels and more.

One of the latest product lines from MyPillow is “Giza Dream” sheets and pillowcases made with 100 percent Giza cotton. In one of his infomercials, Lindell explains how he made his signature sheets: “I started by using the world’s best cotton called Giza. It’s only grown in a region between the Sahara Desert, the Mediterranean Sea and the Nile River. It’s ultra-soft and breathable, but extremely durable”.

MyPillow’s first infomercial aired in 2011, but Giza cotton has been around for centuries. Known for being both extra fine and extra long, Giza cotton is planted in Egypt every April and harvested in September. It’s then hand-picked to ensure its properly matured. But issues with deteriorating quality of privately produced Giza cotton led the Egyptian government to intervene in recent years to help restore the reputation of Egyptian cotton.

In 2017, the Egyptian government unveiled a 19-step plan which included taking control of the production and distribution of cottonseed. It’s already led to increased yield and quality, according to a 2019 report by the U.S. Foreign Agriculture Service. The plan also seeks to prevent seed mixing, enforce bans on prohibited varieties, and develop Egypt’s local spinning and weaving industries.

In 2018, Egypt’s total lint cotton exports were estimated at 220,000 bales. India was the top importer of Egyptian cotton, responsible for over 50 percent of total exports. Other top importers include Pakistan, China and Turkey.

World cotton production

Turkish towels

Turkish towels are a summer must-have for sunbathing, but they’ve also made their way into American homes for use after showering, as tablecloths, and as blankets. Usually striped with fringes on the end, these trendy towels are known for being super absorbent, lightweight and getting softer with each wash.

Turkish towels are made with premium Aegean Cotton, known for its extra long fibers. Called “Peshtemal” in Turkey, Turkish towels have a long history dating over 600 years. Turkey is widely credited with inventing the first towels as part of a ceremonial bathing routine for new brides in Turkish hammams.

The Turkish textile industry is one of the leading sectors in its economy, accounting for 16 percent of exports in 2018. According to its Ministry of Trade, Turkey was the world’s third-largest supplier of bed sheets, fourth-largest supplier of towels and bathrobes, and fifth-largest supplier of bedspreads in 2016. Of its top exports markets for home textiles, the United States ranks second behind Germany.

Turkish towels exports

Unwrapping gratitude for trade

Nepal, Mongolia, Egypt and Turkey are inspiring some of the coziest products we’ll unwrap this holiday season.

Even if these products are enjoying the fruits of a fad-induced surge in American demand, their histories date back centuries while also representing an important source of employment and exports for their respective economies today.

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Lauren Kyger

Lauren Kyger is Associate Editor for TradeVistas. Prior to joining TradeVistas, she was a Research Associate at the Hinrich Foundation focused on international trade issues. She is a Hinrich Foundation Global Trade Leader Scholar alumna, earning her Master’s degree in Global Business Journalism from Tsinghua University in Beijing. She received her Bachelor’s degree from the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University.

This article originally appeared on TradeVistas.org. Republished with permission.

trade

Holiday Gift-Giving in the Trade Spirit

FOR THE ROMANTIC

Tea Sampler:

Whether you favor green, black, oolong or white tea, all originate from the plant Camellia sinensis. It’s the soil, atmosphere and method of processing that confer different tastes, colors and scents. Tea traded globally is grown on large plantations in more than 30 countries. The four biggest producers are China, India, Kenya and Sri Lanka. This sampler of dissolvable “tea drops” includes citrus ginger, blueberry acai, rose earl grey, sweet peppermint, and matcha green tea made from teas sourced around the world but hand assembled by in Los Angeles, California.

FOR THE GOURMAND

Artisinal Chocolate Bars:

Cacao grows close to the equator in places like Brazil, Ecuador, Peru and Madagascar. Askinosie, a family-owned chocolatier in Springfield, Missouri offers dark chocolate bars sourced from women farmers in Tanzania. Harper Macaw of Washington, DC blends Brazilian cacao and Brazilian coffee beans roasted in Annapolis, Maryland to produce its milk chocolate Coffee Bar. Madecasse was founded by former American Peace Corps volunteers. It makes 92 percent pure dark bars in Madagascar from local cacao. Marou is truly small artisanal chocolate maker that works with small farmers to help Vietnam become the newest producer of cacao in the world.

Cashmere Sweater:

Your sweater begins as the coat of a cashmere goat. Named for their origin in the Himalayan region of Kashmir, cashmere-producing breeds also thrive in Australia and throughout China. Among the most famous are the Zalaa Ginst white goat of Mongolia and the Tibetan Plateau goat. Some $1.4 billion in cashmere garments are traded globally each year. Top manufacturers hail from Scotland and Italy, but these days you can find “cashmere-blends” on discount racks in U.S. fast fashion stores.

Homemade Hot Sauce:

If you’re going to try your hand at it, you’ll need two key ingredients – chili peppers and spices. Chili peppers grow in the United States but Capsicum annuum was originally domesticated in Mesoamerica, a region that extends from Central Mexico to Central America. After Spanish colonists returned with it to Europe, hot peppers traveled the globe swiftly on Portuguese trade routes to spice-loving India through the Portuguese-controlled port of Goa, and from there, over the Himalayas to Sichuan, China.

FOR THE PRAGMATIST

A Pair of Necessities:

Some people like receiving the essentials – from underwear to appliances. Many of our undergarments come to the United States from Sri Lanka, an island nation off the southern coast of India. Home to some 22 million people, Sri Lanka produces for major global brands like Victoria’s Secret, Gap, Nike, Tommy Hilfiger, H&M and more. The (still) popular Instant Pot is manufactured in China but was invented by Robert Wang, a former software engineer from Canada who applied his knowledge of microprocessors and sensors to the science of not burning dinner.

FOR THE TRENDY

A Small-Batch, Globe-Trotting Bourbon:

Why not support American whiskey, which has been hard hit in overseas markets by retaliatory tariffs. Jefferson’s Ocean is the brainchild of Jefferson’s, a Kentucky artisan distillery. Barrels of bourbon hitch a boat ride on a shark-tagging research vessel, crossing the equator four times, visiting over 30 ports on five continents. The temperature fluctuations, salt water air exposure, and constant motion of the ship during the journey renders a thick, dark bourbon with caramel flavors and a briny scent.

FOR THE RE-USER

Silicone Lunch Boxes and Nylon Bags:

We’ve written before about the silicon in sand which can be made into the tiny individual semiconductor chips that get embedded into our globally trade devices. Silicone, on the other hand, is a rubberlike plastic increasingly used in food storage, transportation and reheating, due to its low toxicity and high heat resistance. Food52 makes a colorful container with a silicone sleeve that is, according to the manufacturer, “just right for layering miso salmon and spinach over black rice.” No bag lunch for the modern hipster.

Baggu is a re-usable shopping bag made from lightweight ripstop nylon that comes in a variety of bold colors and prints. The synthetic polymer known as nylon was first produced in United States, born of the need to find alternatives to silk and hemp for parachutes in World War II. Today, China is the largest exporter of nylon.

FOR THE “VSCO GIRL”

If you’re not familiar with the term, you probably don’t have a teenager in your home. VSCO is a popular photo editing app that many social sharers use before posting on Instagram or other platforms. The term “VSCO girl” has been adopted to describe some of the latest teen fashion trends and must-haves for the middle and high school hallways.

Here are some of the essentials you might give the VSCO girl in your life, beginning with a Fjullraven Swedish backpack to put it all in. Add to it some Glossier Lip Balms if you care about transparency in the global supply chain of your makeup, a Hydroflask made of pro-grade 18/8 stainless steel (are there tariffs on that stainless steel?), some Pura Vida jewelry from Costa Rica, and an Instax camera from Japanese maker Fujifilm. Where do VSCO girls hang out when they aren’t in school? On TikTok, of course. There are some 422.4 million videos on Chinese app TikTok tagged #vscogirl.

Whatever you buy for the holidays this year, chances are, there’s a global trade aspect to your gift-gifting. As we like to say at TradeVistas, “see the trade in everything.” Happy holidays.

Note: Neither the author nor TradeVistas’ sponsor endorses the above-mentioned products. We merely seek to illustrate the global trade dimension in popular gifts this season.

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Andrea Durkin is the Editor-in-Chief of TradeVistas and Founder of Sparkplug, LLC. Ms. Durkin previously served as a U.S. Government trade negotiator and has proudly taught international trade policy and negotiations for the last fourteen years as an Adjunct Professor at Georgetown University’s Master of Science in Foreign Service program.

This article originally appeared on TradeVistas.org. Republished with permission.

fabric

U.S. Broadwoven Fabric Imports Bounced Back in 2018 Due to Rising Supply from India

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘U.S. Broadwoven Fabric Market. Analysis And Forecast to 2025’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the broadwoven fabric market in the U.S. amounted to $3.6B in 2018, remaining constant against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Over the period under review, broadwoven fabric consumption continues to indicate a measured drop. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2014 with an increase of 3.7% y-o-y. In that year, the broadwoven fabric market attained its peak level of $4.3B. From 2015 to 2018, the growth of the broadwoven fabric market remained at a somewhat lower figure.

Broadwoven Fabric Production in the U.S.

In value terms, broadwoven fabric production amounted to $3.5B in 2018. In general, broadwoven fabric production continues to indicate a measured downturn. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2014 with an increase of 3.9% against the previous year. In that year, broadwoven fabric production reached its peak level of $4.1B. From 2015 to 2018, broadwoven fabric production growth failed to regain its momentum.

Exports from the U.S.

In 2018, the amount of broadwoven fabric exported from the U.S. stood at 251 tonnes, shrinking by -56.1% against the previous year. Over the period under review, broadwoven fabric exports continue to indicate a drastic contraction. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 with an increase of 191% year-to-year. In that year, broadwoven fabric exports reached their peak of 571 tonnes, and then declined slightly in the following year.

In value terms, broadwoven fabric exports amounted to $2.8M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Over the period under review, broadwoven fabric exports continue to indicate a drastic shrinkage. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2017 with an increase of 100% year-to-year. In that year, broadwoven fabric exports attained their peak of $5.2M, and then declined slightly in the following year.

Exports by Country

Viet Nam (212 tonnes) was the main destination for broadwoven fabric exports from the U.S., accounting for a 85% share of total exports. Moreover, broadwoven fabric exports to Viet Nam exceeded the volume sent to the second major destination, China (13 tonnes), more than tenfold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Chile (5 tonnes), with a 2% share.

From 2013 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume to Viet Nam totaled +255.8%. Exports to the other major destinations recorded the following average annual rates of exports growth: China (+17.8% per year) and Chile (+186.0% per year).

In value terms, Viet Nam ($2.1M) remains the key foreign market for broadwoven fabric exports from the U.S., comprising 74% of total broadwoven fabric exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by China ($238K), with a 8.6% share of total exports. It was followed by Colombia, with a 3.5% share.

From 2013 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of value to Viet Nam totaled +157.6%. Exports to the other major destinations recorded the following average annual rates of exports growth: China (+20.4% per year) and Colombia (+63.4% per year).

Export Prices by Country

The average broadwoven fabric export price stood at $11 per kg in 2018, surging by 21% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the broadwoven fabric export price, however, continues to indicate a moderate shrinkage. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2018 when the average export price increased by 21% against the previous year. The export price peaked at $13 per kg in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, export prices remained at a lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Colombia ($22 per kg), while the average price for exports to Chile ($7.5 per kg) was amongst the lowest.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was recorded for supplies to China, while the prices for the other major destinations experienced a decline.

Imports into the U.S.

Broadwoven fabric imports into the U.S. amounted to 9.2K tonnes in 2018, surging by 2.9% against the previous year. Overall, broadwoven fabric imports, however, continue to indicate a drastic reduction. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2015 when imports increased by 7.1% year-to-year. In that year, broadwoven fabric imports attained their peak of 13K tonnes. From 2016 to 2018, the growth of broadwoven fabric imports failed to regain its momentum.

In value terms, broadwoven fabric imports totaled $69M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. In general, broadwoven fabric imports, however, continue to indicate a deep contraction. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2018 when imports increased by 3.7% y-o-y. Over the period under review, broadwoven fabric imports attained their peak figure at $97M in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, imports remained at a lower figure.

Imports by Country

China (3.3K tonnes), Pakistan (2.6K tonnes) and India (2.6K tonnes) were the main suppliers of broadwoven fabric imports to the U.S., together accounting for 93% of total imports.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main suppliers, was attained by India, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest broadwoven fabric suppliers to the U.S. were China ($22M), Italy ($17M) and India ($12M), together comprising 73% of total imports.

In terms of the main suppliers, Italy recorded the highest rates of growth with regard to imports, over the last five-year period, while the other leaders experienced a decline.

Import Prices by Country

The average broadwoven fabric import price stood at $7,535 per tonne in 2018, remaining constant against the previous year. Over the period under review, the broadwoven fabric import price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2017 when the average import price increased by 17% y-o-y. The import price peaked at $8,246 per tonne in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, import prices failed to regain their momentum.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major supplying countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Italy ($61,521 per tonne), while the price for Pakistan ($4,146 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by China, while the prices for the other major suppliers experienced a decline.

Companies Mentioned in the Report

Milliken & Company, Tk Holdings, BGF Industries, BP Amoco Chemical Company, Glen Raven, Albany International, Polartec, Astenjohnson, National Presto Industries, Culp, Burlington Industries, Xerium Technologies, Propex Operating Company, Westpoint Home, Jay Franco & Sons, Cone Denim, The Hallwood Group Incorporated, Galey & Lord, Hyosung Usa, R B Pamplin, Westpoint International, Collins & Aikman Products Co., Nvh, Nouveau Verre Holdings, Itg Holdings

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

textile bag

U.S. Textile Bag And Canvas Market – China’s Imports Bounces Back after Two Years of Decline

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘U.S. Textile Bag And Canvas Market. Analysis And Forecast to 2025’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the textile bag and canvas market in the U.S. amounted to $7B in 2018, increasing by 7.8% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +6.4% over the period from 2013 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed throughout the analyzed period. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2014 with an increase of 18% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the textile bag and canvas market attained its maximum level in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Production of Textile Bags And Canvases in the U.S.

In value terms, textile bag and canvas production amounted to $4B in 2018. The total output value increased at an average annual rate of +8.3% from 2013 to 2018; the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2014 when production volume increased by 20% against the previous year. Textile bag and canvas production peaked in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

Exports from the U.S.

In 2018, the amount of textile bags and canvases exported from the U.S. stood at 6.5K tonnes, growing by 51% against the previous year. Over the period under review, textile bag and canvas exports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2018 with an increase of 51% y-o-y. Over the period under review, textile bag and canvas exports reached their peak figure at 7K tonnes in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, exports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, textile bag and canvas exports totaled $47M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Overall, textile bag and canvas exports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 when exports increased by 36% against the previous year. Exports peaked at $59M in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, exports failed to regain their momentum.

Exports by Country

Thailand (578 tonnes), Australia (567 tonnes) and Trinidad and Tobago (464 tonnes) were the main destinations of textile bag and canvas exports from the U.S., with a combined 25% share of total exports. These countries were followed by Viet Nam, Poland, China, India, Russia, Malaysia, Nicaragua, the Dominican Republic and Costa Rica, which together accounted for a further 46%.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main countries of destination, was attained by Viet Nam (+1,030.1% per year), while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest markets for textile bag and canvas exported from the U.S. were Poland ($7.6M), Australia ($6.7M) and the Dominican Republic ($4.4M), with a combined 40% share of total exports. Costa Rica, China, Trinidad and Tobago, India, Nicaragua, Viet Nam, Thailand, Malaysia and Russia lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 18%.

In terms of the main countries of destination, Viet Nam (+393.6% per year) recorded the highest rates of growth with regard to exports, over the last five years, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

The average textile bag and canvas export price stood at $7,219 per tonne in 2018, waning by -45.8% against the previous year. Overall, the export price indicated a slight increase from 2013 to 2018: its price increased at an average annual rate of +1.3% over the last five years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2017 when the average export price increased by 52% against the previous year. In that year, the average export prices for textile bags and canvases reached their peak level of $13,329 per tonne, and then declined slightly in the following year.

There were significant differences in the average prices for the major foreign markets. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Poland ($17,736 per tonne), while the average price for exports to Russia ($272 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was recorded for supplies to the Dominican Republic (+55.6% per year), while the prices for the other major destinations experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports into the U.S.

In 2018, the textile bag and canvas imports into the U.S. totaled 351K tonnes, rising by 8% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.1% over the period from 2013 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations in certain years. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2018 with an increase of 8% against the previous year. Over the period under review, textile bag and canvas imports attained their maximum at 360K tonnes in 2015; however, from 2016 to 2018, imports remained at a lower figure.

In value terms, textile bag and canvas imports totaled $1.5B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Overall, textile bag and canvas imports continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2018 with an increase of 8.9% against the previous year. Imports peaked at $1.6B in 2015; however, from 2016 to 2018, imports failed to regain their momentum.

Imports by Country

In 2018, China (197K tonnes) constituted the largest supplier of textile bag and canvas to the U.S., with a 56% share of total imports. Moreover, textile bag and canvas imports from China exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest supplier, India (83K tonnes), twofold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Bangladesh (25K tonnes), with a 7.1% share.

From 2013 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of volume from China amounted to -2.2%. The remaining supplying countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: India (+13.0% per year) and Bangladesh (+7.4% per year).

In value terms, China ($905M) constituted the largest supplier of textile bag and canvas to the U.S., comprising 62% of total textile bag and canvas imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by India ($218M), with a 15% share of total imports. It was followed by Bangladesh, with a 8.4% share.

From 2013 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of value from China stood at -3.0%. The remaining supplying countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: India (+11.5% per year) and Bangladesh (+5.9% per year).

After two years of decline, Chinese imports of textile bag and canvas into the U.S. rebounded in 2018, with an increase of 8.5% y-o-y.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the average textile bag and canvas import price amounted to $4,139 per tonne, standing approx. at the previous year. In general, the textile bag and canvas import price, however, continues to indicate a temperate descent. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2018 an increase of 0.8% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the average import prices for textile bags and canvases attained their maximum at $4,572 per tonne in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, import prices remained at a lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major supplying countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Bangladesh ($4,877 per tonne), while the price for India ($2,627 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Indonesia, while the prices for the other major suppliers experienced a decline.

Companies Mentioned in the Report

Dhs Systems, Rainier Industries, Covercraft Industries, Duluth Trading Company, North Sails Group, J & M Industries, Anchor Industries, Thomas Sign and Awning Company, Holland Awning, Outdoor Research, Hdt Expeditionary Systems, Veada Industries, C. R. Daniels, Bestop, Starr Aircraft Products, ADM Corporation, Kenneth Fox Supply Company, Polytex Fibers, Adco Products, Marine Accessories Corporation, Gleason Corporation, Webasto-Edscha Cabrio USA, Outdoor Venture Corporation, Magna Car Top Systems of America, Mpc Group, Ajr Enterprises, Targus Group International, Bluewater Defense, Mondi Bags Usa

Source: IndexBox AI Platform