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Hurricane Dorian Leaves GT USA’s Canaveral Cargo Terminal Damage-Free

hurricane dorian

Hurricane Dorian Leaves GT USA’s Canaveral Cargo Terminal Damage-Free

The only reported undamaged container terminal at Port Canaveral will once again begin operations on Friday morning. The Canaveral Cargo Terminal (CCT) was confirmed as “cleared” following an inspection revealing no damages left behind by Hurricane Dorian.

“Although Hurricane Dorian packed quite a punch in Port Canaveral, the hard work of the Emergency Response Team, Brevard County Sheriff’s Department, USCG, Canaveral Port Authority and GT USA personnel allowed GT USA to open the Canaveral Cargo Terminal and be fully operational less than 24 hours after the storm passed,” said Peter Richards, CEO, GT USA.

“I want to extend my thanks to all parties that assisted in getting the facility up and running so quickly.  Our thoughts and prayers are with all the Bahamian people who have been affected by the devastation that Dorian brought to the north of their country.”

The multi-purpose cargo terminal was confirmed for an “expedited reopening” during the arrival of the M/V OCEAN GIANT from its resupply voyage. Proactive storm preparations between Port Canaveral and GT USA are being attributed for minimizing the time between Dorian and the continuation of operations.

Hurricane Dorian is currently being reported as a Category 2 as it approaches the North Carolina coast with reports anticipating the strongest winds to impact the region. Additional reports confirm parts of Canada are under alert including Atlantic Canada, Novia Scotia.

Holiday Imports Decline as Port Issues Linger

Los Angeles – Import cargo volume at the nation’s major retail container ports is expected to continue to slow down this month as cargo congestion and other issues continue to impact port operations on the U.S. West Coast.

The volume slide is a result of “far-sighted retailers instituting costly contingency plans early on to ensure that holiday merchandise would be on the shelves or sitting in a warehouse ready to go,” according to National Retail Federation Vice President for Supply Chain and Customs Policy Jonathan Gold.

“However, we are still hearing from retailers experiencing delays at West Coast ports, and retailers are also looking ahead to the spring season,” he said, commenting on the most recent Global Port Tracker report released today by the NRF.

“We believe it’s imperative for President Obama to encourage the parties to seek the help of a federal mediator to resolve the ongoing contract negotiations so serious solutions to address the ongoing issues can be discussed and the uncertainty that has plagued our nation’s busiest ports for months can finally be brought to an end.”

A major transpacific shipping alliance – the G6 – has reacted to the congestion problem by suspending eastbound calls at the Port of Los Angeles for the next four sailings of its Asia-U.S. West Coast service, due to “ongoing congestion.”

The G6 is comprised of APL, Hapag-Lloyd, Hyundai Merchant Marine, MOL, NYK Line and OOCL.
It’s also been reported that G6 will skip other calls at APL’s Global Gateway South terminal in Los Angeles in order to “remain fluid,” according to an APL customer advisory.

Carriers calling Los Angeles and other U.S. West Coast ports have been significantly impacted by chronic backlogs that have plagued the Los Angeles/Long Beach port complex over the past few months.

The congestion in Southern California is due to a combination of chronic issues plaguing both Los Angeles and the neighboring Port of Long Beach that include a shortage of the chassis need to move containers in and out of the ports; unrest amongst truckers required to meet what they feel are increasingly burdensome environmental regulations; and labor negotiations between the Pacific Maritime Association (PMA) and the International Longshore & Warehouse Union (ILWU) that have dragged on for months with, some feel, no end in sight.

The contract between the PMA and the ILWU expired on July 1, prompting ongoing concerns about the potential shift of cargo to ports on the U.S. East Coast.

The NRF report was researched by business consultancy Hackett Associates.

According to Hackett Associates President Ben Hackett, “The question is whether cargo currently being diverted to the East Coast will shift back to the West Coast once congestion in Los Angeles/Long Beach ends or are we experiencing a longer-term shift?” Hackett said. “Time will tell.”

12/09/2014