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Wood Kitchenware And Tableware Market in the EU – A Ban on Single-Use Plastics Drives Demand for Wooden Products

Wood Kitchenware And Tableware Market in the EU – A Ban on Single-Use Plastics Drives Demand for Wooden Products

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Tableware And Kitchenware Of Wood – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The European parliament has voted to ban single-use plastic cutlery, cotton buds, straws and stirrers as part of a sweeping law against plastic waste that despoils beaches and pollutes oceans. The vote by MEPs paves the way for a ban on single-use plastics to come into force by 2021 in all EU member states.

Against this background, there is an increase in the consumption of wooden cutlery and tableware instead of disposable plastic ones. Growing demand is supported by both expanding domestic production and accelerated growth in imports.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, the wood kitchenware and tableware imports in the European Union amounted to 117K tonnes, surging by 3.3% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.2% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2014 with an increase of 14% against the previous year. Over the period under review, wood kitchenware and tableware imports attained their peak figure in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, wood kitchenware and tableware imports totaled $528M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total imports indicated a resilient expansion from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +1.2% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, wood kitchenware and tableware imports increased by +18.6% against 2014 indices. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2014 when imports increased by 24% y-o-y. The level of imports peaked in 2018 and are likely to continue their growth in the near future.

Imports by Country

In 2018, Germany (26K tonnes), distantly followed by the UK (17K tonnes), France (15K tonnes), the Netherlands (14K tonnes), Italy (8.5K tonnes) and Belgium (6.8K tonnes) were the major importers of tableware and kitchenware of wood, together making up 75% of total imports. The following importers – Poland (4,740 tonnes), Sweden (3,802 tonnes), the Czech Republic (3,462 tonnes), Denmark (2,749 tonnes), Spain (2,325 tonnes) and Portugal (2,265 tonnes) – together made up 17% of total imports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by the Czech Republic, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest wood kitchenware and tableware importing markets in the European Union were Germany ($112M), the UK ($78M) and France ($72M), together accounting for 50% of total imports. These countries were followed by the Netherlands, Italy, Belgium, Sweden, Denmark, Poland, Spain, Portugal and the Czech Republic, which together accounted for a further 41%.

The Netherlands recorded the highest rates of growth with regard to imports, among the main importing countries over the last eleven years, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the wood kitchenware and tableware import price in the European Union amounted to $4,518 per tonne, picking up by 8.2% against the previous year. Over the last eleven years, it increased at an average annual rate of +2.7%. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 an increase of 10% y-o-y. The level of import price peaked in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Denmark ($6,814 per tonne), while the Czech Republic ($2,322 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Spain, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, approx. 42K tonnes of tableware and kitchenware of wood were exported in the European Union; lowering by -5.4% against the previous year. In general, wood kitchenware and tableware exports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 when exports increased by 21% against the previous year. Over the period under review, wood kitchenware and tableware exports reached their peak figure at 49K tonnes in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, exports remained at a lower figure.

In value terms, wood kitchenware and tableware exports totaled $223M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total exports indicated a tangible expansion from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +0.8% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, wood kitchenware and tableware exports decreased by -6.0% against 2016 indices. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2014 with an increase of 23% year-to-year. Over the period under review, wood kitchenware and tableware exports reached their peak figure at $238M in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, exports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Exports by Country

In 2018, Germany (8,014 tonnes), the Netherlands (6,656 tonnes) and Romania (5,687 tonnes) were the major exporters of tableware and kitchenware of wood in the European Union, generating 48% of total export. Poland (3,622 tonnes) held an 8.6% share (based on tonnes) of total exports, which put it in second place, followed by Italy (6.2%) and Belgium (5%). Spain (1,844 tonnes), Slovenia (1,652 tonnes), France (1,602 tonnes), Portugal (1,491 tonnes), the Czech Republic (1,276 tonnes) and Sweden (1,206 tonnes) held a little share of total exports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Slovenia, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Germany ($39M), the Netherlands ($34M) and Italy ($22M) appeared to be the countries with the highest levels of exports in 2018, together comprising 42% of total exports.

Among the main exporting countries, the Netherlands experienced the highest growth rate of exports, over the last eleven years, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the wood kitchenware and tableware export price in the European Union amounted to $5,306 per tonne, therefore, remained relatively stable against the previous year. Over the period from 2007 to 2018, it increased at an average annual rate of +2.2%. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2011 an increase of 12% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the export prices for tableware and kitchenware of wood attained their peak figure in 2018 and is likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Italy ($8,408 per tonne), while Romania ($2,803 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

EU Citrus Fruit Market Reached to $12B in 2018

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Citrus Fruit – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the citrus fruit market in the European Union amounted to $12B in 2018, increasing by 2.8% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price).

The market value increased at an average annual rate of +1.2% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed in certain years.

The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2008, with an increase of 22% against the previous year. In that year, the citrus fruit market attained its peak level of $12.7B. From 2009 to 2018, the growth of the citrus fruit market remained at a lower figure.

Production in the EU

The citrus fruit production stood at 11M tonnes in 2018, stabilizing at the previous year. Over the period under review, citrus fruit production continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, approx. 4.8M tonnes of citrus fruits were exported in the European Union; coming down by -9.1% against the previous year. Overall, citrus fruit exports continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. In value terms, citrus fruit exports stood at $5.1B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

Spain prevails in citrus fruit exports structure, recording 3.2M tonnes, which was approx. 66% of total exports in 2018. It was distantly followed by Greece (357K tonnes), the Netherlands (296K tonnes) and Italy (252K tonnes), together generating 19% share of total exports. Germany (215K tonnes), Portugal (174K tonnes) and France (105K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

Exports from Spain decreased at an average annual rate of -1.3% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, Portugal (+16.9%), Germany (+7.3%), Greece (+3.4%) and France (+2.9%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Portugal emerged as the fastest growing exporter in the European Union, with a CAGR of +16.9% from 2007-2018. The Netherlands and Italy experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. Spain (10%) significantly strengthened its position in terms of the global exports, while Greece, Germany and Portugal saw its share reduced by -2.3%, -2.4% and -3% from 2007 to 2018, respectively. The shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, Spain ($3.5B) remains the largest citrus fruit supplier in the European Union, comprising 69% of total citrus fruit exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the Netherlands ($354M), with a 7% share of total exports. It was followed by Germany, with a 5.3% share.

Export Prices by Country

The citrus fruit export price in the European Union stood at $1,046 per tonne in 2018, picking up by 9% against the previous year. Over the period from 2007 to 2018, it increased at an average annual rate of +1.3%. There were significant differences in the average export prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest export price was Germany ($1,245 per tonne), while Greece ($557 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of export prices was attained by Portugal, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

The imports stood at 6.7M tonnes in 2018, dropping by -6% against the previous year. Over the period under review, citrus fruit imports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. In value terms, citrus fruit imports totaled $6.3B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

The countries with the highest levels of citrus fruit imports in 2018 were France (1.2M tonnes), Germany (1.1M tonnes) and the Netherlands (1.1M tonnes), together reaching 51% of total import. The UK (602K tonnes) took the next position in the ranking, followed by Italy (369K tonnes), Poland (357K tonnes) and Spain (349K tonnes). All these countries together took near 25% share of total imports. Romania (269K tonnes), Portugal (183K tonnes), Sweden (160K tonnes), the Czech Republic (145K tonnes) and Belgium (141K tonnes) occupied a minor share of total imports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Portugal, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, France ($1.2B), Germany ($1.1B) and the Netherlands ($979M) appeared to be the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2018, with a combined 52% share of total imports. These countries were followed by the UK, Italy, Poland, Spain, Romania, Sweden, Belgium, Portugal and the Czech Republic, which together accounted for a further 37%.

Import Prices by Country

The citrus fruit import price in the European Union stood at $933 per tonne in 2018, flattening at the previous year. In general, the citrus fruit import price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. There were significant differences in the average import prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest import price was Belgium ($1,135 per tonne), while Romania ($745 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of import prices was attained by Sweden, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform