New Articles

Hermes Logistics Makes Moves to Meet Increased Global Demand

Hermes

Hermes Logistics Makes Moves to Meet Increased Global Demand

Hermes Logistics Technologies has expanded its India and UK teams in an effort to meet the increasing global demand of the H5 cargo management system.

“As Hermes continues to develop its core products to meet the demands of a growing customer base, we are pleased to welcome new members to our global team to provide support and innovation to our digital solution portfolio,” said Alexis Labonne, Chief Technology Officer, HLT.

The team expansions will support the company’s goal to create new platform applications and business analysis while penetrating customer regions. Following its introduction to the Hanoi Airport, Vietnam region in 2018, H5 system has gained notable attention, with planned implementations at Dubai World Central with RSA National and Hyderabad Airport, India.

“We are growing our teams in India and the UK to allow us to continue the development of new applications as part of our Hermes NG suite, which will complement H5’s software as a service (SaaS) Cloud offering,” said Yuval Baruch, Chief Executive Officer, HLT.

“By growing our presence in India, we will be able to strengthen quality assurance and quality control, and in addition, provide a more tailored response to our Asian customers.”

 

Source: Meantime Communications

 

Leadership Shifts to Support Global Logistics Expansion Efforts

Increasing growth in Europe and India is the primary driver behind recent leadership changes for the global innovation and provider of temperature control packaging for life science and logistics company, Softbox.

Kevin Valentine will now hold the title of General Manager for Softbox Europe and brings with him over  25 years of industry experience, specifically pertaining to the leadership experience in the science and production of advanced temperature controlled packaging solutions and thermal covers for pharmaceuticals. Valentine will focus primarily on quality of innovation and client services in his new role.

Additionally, Dharmesh Chauhan, who will report directly to Valentine, will take on the role of Sales Director for Softbox Europe. and will provide support to the newly-combined Softbox and TP3 Global sales teams to further efforts of temperature control packaging and thermal cover portfolios for global pharmaceutical customers.

A third player in the industry, Dinesh Patki, will lead efforts towards growth with the full integration of TP3 Global/CLI and Softbox in India through his role as General Manager of Softbox India. Patki provides strong relationships with the Indian market that will assist in the expansion of company growth in the region.

 “Kevin, Dharmesh and Dinesh are very experienced industry leaders and I’m delighted to welcome them in their new roles within the Softbox leadership team,” Wayne Langlois, President at Softbox, said.  “By leveraging the best possible talent from within our organisation, it enables us to integrate and grow Softbox to further growth success.”

Source: Softbox Systems

 

 

India Trade Barriers ? New USITC Report Says “Yes”; India Says “No”

Washington, D.C. – The U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC) has released a new report slamming India’s trade, investment and industrial policies and detailing their impact on the U.S. economy.

According to the report, tariff and customs procedures as well as taxes and financial regulations “had the most significant effect on U.S. businesses while foreign direct investment caps and intellectual property policies also impacted companies across several sectors.”

If tariff and investment restrictions were fully eliminated and standards of intellectual property (IP) protection were made comparable to U.S. and Western European levels, US exports to India would rise by two-thirds and US investment in India would roughly double, the Trade, Investment, and Industrial Policies in India: Effects on the US Economy report said.

The USITC has been asked by the House Committee on Ways and Means and the Senate Committee on Finance to conduct a second investigation looking at policy changes under the new government. The agency expects to deliver the results to the Committees by September 24.

The report, prepared at the behest of the House Committee on Ways and Means and the Senate Committee on Finance, covers tariffs and customs procedures, foreign direct investment restrictions, local-content requirements, treatment of intellectual property, taxes and financial regulations, regulatory uncertainty, and other non-tariff measures such as unclear legal liability, price controls, and sanitary and phyto-sanitary standards.

India angrily responded to the USITC report, calling it a “unilateral action” that “has no validity.”

A senior official in the New Delhi government told the media that, “India was not party to the investigations and it is the U.S.’ internal decision. The U.S. government has not taken up the matter bilaterally or multilaterally with us. India’s position remains the same as it was last year.”

The USITC report is the second such report released over the past several years by the agency on the tariff and non-tariff trade barriers U.S. companies face while doing business with the Sub-Continent.

The Washington, D.C.-headquartered U.S.-India Business Council, the largest bilateral trade association in the U.S., took a somewhat conciliatory tone when responding to the USITC report.

“There is no doubt that U.S. companies face challenges in India, but many of these issues are institutional in nature and take time and a concerted effort by all stakeholders to resolve,” said Diane Farrell, acting president of the Washington, D.C.-headquartered U.S.-India Business Council.

“As this most recent report suggests, there is a lot of potential for both countries, and we are committed to working alongside our members and both governments to further develop and deepen the two-way commercial relationship,” she said.

President Barack Obama is scheduled to visit India later this month.

01/06/2015

USITC to Probe Changes in Indian Trade Policies

Washington, DC – The US International Trade Commission (ITC) has launched an investigation into significant changes in India’s trade and investment policies by that country’s newly-elected government.

The decision by the agency comes in response to a request made in a September 25 letter sent jointly from the House Ways and Means Committee and the Senate Committee on Finance.

“Given the recent national elections in India and the formation of a new Bharatiya Janata Party-led government, and our interest in receiving the most comprehensive and up-to-date information possible,” the letter read, “we now request that the Commission conduct a second investigation concerning India’s industrial policies that discriminate against US trade and investment since the first ITC investigation.”

As requested, the ITC said it will “provide information about any significant changes by the new Indian government to the trade and investment policies identified in the Commission’s ongoing investigation.”

The agency said it “will also include information on any new relevant trade and investment policies and practices in India, focusing on the period from mid-2014.”

It added that the agency expects to deliver the report to the committees by September 24, 2015, the official statement said, adding that it will hold a public hearing in connection with this investigation on April 7, 2015.

The new investigation is the ITC’s second probe regarding India’s trade and investment policies requested by the two committees.

In 2013, the committees jointly asked the agency to investigate Indian policies that restrict US trade and investment.

The ITC is expected to submit its report in that investigation – Trade, Investment, and Industrial Policies in India: Effects on the US Economy – to both the House and Senate committees on December 15.

10/29/2014

Cirrus Aircraft Expands Into India

Duluth, MN – Cirrus Aircraft has expanded its international sales network into India. Cirrus India joined the company’s authorized sales network in July 2014.

Cirrus India (SRK Aviacom (I) Pvt Ltd) is located in New Delhi, India and offers a team of experienced aircraft sales professionals. SRK is one of the leading providers of flight simulators in India and is also engaged in selling both fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft.

Over the past year, Cirrus Aircraft has added multiple partners to the sales network including Cirrus sales organizations in Australia,New Zealand, Panama,Italy, and the UK.

The company’s growing portfolio will soon include the Vision SF50 Personal Jet and SR22T Special Edition ‘Accelero’, the first all-digital aircraft in the SR-Series, in 2015.

Cirrus Aircraft is a recognized leader in general aviation producing an all-composite line of personal aircraft.

To date, total ‘time’ on the worldwide Cirrus Aircraft SR-series fleet has surpassed five million flight hours. In the near future, the Cirrus Vision SF50 jet, with over 550 production positions reserved, will provide a new personal and regional business transportation solution: the personal jet.

All Cirrus aircraft are made in the US with a direct sales force in North America and authorized sales centers covering export markets in 60 countries around the world.

Cirrus Aircraft is wholly owned by China Aviation Industry General Aircraft Co. Ltd. (CAIGA).

09/08/2014

Economist: India ‘Scuttles’ WTO Trade Talks

Los Angeles, CA – India “has apparently chosen to scuttle the ‘good ship’ WTO-Bali, the first truly multilateral agreement achieved since the founding of the WTO in 1995,” says Dr. Kent Jones, professor of economics at Babson College in Massachusetts.

“This is not the only ship in the WTO fleet, but it is the only one of its kind that has been successfully floated under its multilateral negotiating mandate. It is now taking on water, thereby endangering the entire multilateral trading system,” says Jones, a published author and an acknowledged expert on trade and policy issues who served as a senior economist for trade policy at the US State Department.

India, said Jones, “agreed last December to accept a deal in Bali that combined new rules on trade facilitation with a 2017 timeline on reconciling WTO agricultural rules with India’s food security policies.”

Trade facilitation provisions, he said, “would combine reductions in red tape and improvements in customs logistics with aid for developing countries’ trade infrastructure. The lion’s share of economic welfare gains, estimated at $1 trillion, would flow to developing countries, most of which are not amused at India’s decision to renege on the deal at the last minute.”

India’s system of food subsidies and stockpiling, Jones asserts, “currently runs afoul of WTO agricultural rules, but beyond that requires a wasteful domestic bureaucracy and market distortions that cannot help the poor in a sustainable manner. In addition, it cannot improve agricultural productivity, which is what is really needed for a lasting solution to its food security problem.”

Nonetheless, he adds, “the Bali deal set a moratorium on challenges to such policies until 2017, by which time negotiations on reforming the rules could take place. In the interim, alternatives and compromises could be considered that could allow India’s food security policies to coexist with WTO rules for global markets.”

The new government “feels that this timeline is not good enough, and hopes to hold the globally popular trade facilitation deal hostage in order to force a global agricultural deal immediately that will make its current policy legal under WTO rules. India professes to support trade facilitation, which only lays bare its cynical strategy to renege on its earlier commitments and blame everyone else for failing to re-negotiate,” Jones says.

“DESTRUCTIVE BRINKMANSHIP”

India’s “strategy of brinkmanship appears not only destructive to the WTO’s credibility as a negotiating forum, but to India’s global interests as well. Most major trading countries are so furious at India for breaking its word at Bali that many are planning to implement trade facilitation outside the regular WTO framework, through bilateral, regional or ‘pluritaleral’ agreements,” he says. “Global WTO agreements are the best way to expand trade, but countries have already shown that they will strike their own deals if WTO negotiations break down.”

According to Jones, “These initiatives outside the WTO would deprive India of any leverage in pursuing agricultural rules reform in its favor, while forfeiting its potential leadership role among developing and emerging economies. Brazil and China, in particular, reportedly criticized India’s veto.”

Without a deal forged in Bali, the “peace clause” preventing disputes against India’s agricultural policies would be suspended, which could lead to trade sanctions. India’s export industries would also suffer from abandoning the WTO negotiations. It stands to lose a lot from this misadventure,” he asserts.

“Indian trade diplomats insist that they have presented viable compromise measures that could lead to a new deal in September,” says Jones.

“Diplomats can always walk back from the brink, but it seems clear that there will be no fundamental renegotiation of what was agreed in Bali last December. By throwing rocks in its own harbors, India’s economy will remain tethered to a costly protectionist regime, while the rest of the world will seek other shores—and negotiating venues.”

08/07/2014

BRICs Meet in Brazil, Create Bloc Development Bank

Los Angeles, CA – Leaders of the BRICS group of emerging powers – Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa – have decided to create their own development bank as a counterweight to what they perceive are “western-dominated” financial organizations like the US-based World Bank and International Monetary Fund.

The move came during the BRICS Summit earlier this week in Fortaleza, Brazil. The summit comes as the five countries, whose economies together represent 18 percent of the world total, are experiencing sharp slowdowns in their once fast-paced rates of growth.

The new development bank will reportedly be based in Shanghai and is expected to be functional within two years. It will be capitalized at $50 billion, a figure that could grow to $100 billion to fund infrastructure projects. The fund would also have $100 billion at its disposal to weather economic hard times.

The new development bank’s first director will reportedly be from India.

“We remain disappointed and seriously concerned with the current non-implementation of the 2010 International Monetary Fund (IMF) reforms, which negatively impacts on the IMF’s legitimacy, credibility and effectiveness,” the group said in a joint press release.

The BRICs leaders are now in the Brazilian capital of Brasilia, meeting with their counterparts from Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Venezuela and several other Latin American nations to discuss future economic and trade cooperation.

BRIC giant China is particularly interested in Latin America. After this week’s discussions, Chinese President Xi Jinping will stay in Brazil to launch a China-Latin America forum with the leaders of several regional countries including Cuba, Argentina, Ecuador, and Venezuela.

China is growing in influence in the region. Last year, the country, two-way trade with the region amounted to more than $261 billion.

07/17/2014

UK Joins US, China as Top Global Tech Markets

Santa Clara, CA – Technology industry leaders are most bullish on revenue growth in the US, China, and the United Kingdom, according to the results of the annual Technology Business Outlook survey of US-based technology executives conducted by business consultancy KPMG LLP.

The UK ranking is one of the biggest surprises in this year’s survey with 42 percent of the technology leaders projecting that market as their first, second or third highest revenue growth rate for their companies in the next 12 to 24 months, compared to only 18 percent in last year’s survey.

The US remains the No. 1 market, selected among the top three by 81 percent of the respondents – higher than results in the prior three annual surveys – followed by China at 47 percent. The executives were each asked to select their top three markets.

“The jump by the UK is the result of strong economic recovery in the country combined with the effects of tax incentives which have encouraged investment in the tech sector,” said Tudor Aw, head of KPMG Technology Europe.

The findings, he said, “reflect KPMG’s most recent local technology report showing UK tech sector business activity growth at its highest for almost 10 years supported by steep rises in incoming new work and the lowest rate of cost inflation for over four years.”

Interest in Brazil, Mexico and South Korea Declines

Unlike a year ago when Brazil, Mexico, and South Korea appeared on the rise, fewer survey respondents see those three countries as their biggest revenue and employment growth markets.

Brazil’s position as a revenue growth market declined 10 percentage points to 23 percent and as an employment growth market 5 percentage points to 21 percent.

Tech executives’ expectations for their company’s revenue growth in South Korea declined from 14 percent in 2013 to 7 percent in this year’s survey, and for employment growth it slipped two percentage points to 10 percent.

The outlook for Mexico dipped six percentage points to 9 percent for revenue growth, and fell six percentage points to 15 percent for employment growth.

Technology executives believe the US, India, and China will be the leading markets for tech employment growth between now and 2016.

Other countries with higher tech company expectations for employment growth are Canada, at 30 percent up from 23 percent, the UK 28 percent up from 21 percent, and Germany 15 percent up from 7 percent.

Offshoring Outgaining Onshoring

While 58 percent of those surveyed don’t plan to make any changes in how they deploy their manufacturing in the next two years, 24 percent are either moving more manufacturing offshore or incrementally adding new offshore manufacturing.

Eleven percent are either moving manufacturing back or adding new manufacturing operations in the US.

At the same time, 61 percent of the technology executives say their companies are not planning to re-shore non-manufacturing functions. Sixteen percent say they will, and 23 percent say maybe.

The KPMG survey was conducted in the US in March among executives from companies based in the US and overseas with 74 percent represent companies with revenues of $1 billion or more and 26 percent represent companies with revenues in the $100 million to less than $1 billion range.

06/11/2014