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The Netherlands Emerges as Key Supplier of Potato Chips into the UK

The Netherlands Emerges as Key Supplier of Potato Chips into the UK

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘United Kingdom – Potato Chips – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the potato chips market in the UK amounted to $686M in 2018, dropping by -4.6% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). In physical terms, however, the volume of consumption stood at 197K tonnes in 2018, flattening against the previous year. Over the last five years, the market was relatively stable, fluctuating mildly from 189K tonnes in 2013 to the mentioned level of 2018.

Production in the UK

Potato chips production in the UK amounted to 194K tonnes in 2018, coming down by -3.8% against the previous year. Despite this, the total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.5% over the period from 2013 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed throughout the analyzed period.

Exports from the UK

In 2018, exports of potato chips from the UK stood at 56K tonnes, remaining stable against the previous year. Over the period under review, the total exports indicated a buoyant expansion from 2013 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +11.1% over the last five-year period.

The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 when exports increased by 18% y-o-y. Over the period under review, potato chips exports reached their peak figure in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, potato chips exports totaled $216M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total export value increased at an average annual rate of +4.0% over the period from 2013 to 2018; the trend pattern generally reflected that of the volume of exports.

Exports by Country

Ireland (17K tonnes), Nigeria (11K tonnes) and the Netherlands (3.4K tonnes) were the main destinations of potato chips exports from the UK, with a combined 55% share of total exports. These countries were followed by France, the United Arab Emirates, Pakistan, Belgium, Germany, the U.S., and Sierra Leone, which together accounted for a further 24%.

In value terms, Ireland ($65M) remains the key foreign market for potato chips exports from the UK, comprising 30% of total potato chips exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Nigeria ($30M), with a 14% share of total exports. It was followed by France, with an 8.6% share.

From 2013 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of value to Ireland totaled +1.3%. Exports to the other major destinations recorded the following average annual rates of export growth: Nigeria (-4.3% per year) and France (+17.3% per year).

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the average potato chips export price amounted to $3,869 per tonne, jumping by 5.6% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the potato chips export price, however, experience a noticeable decline. Over the period under review, the average export prices for potato chips attained their maximum at $5,384 per tonne in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, export prices stood at a somewhat lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average prices for the major foreign markets. In 2018, the country with the highest price was France ($5,752 per tonne), while the average price for exports to Ireland ($3,919 per tonne) was amongst the middle-level destinations.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was recorded for supplies to France, while the prices for the other major destinations experienced a decline.

Imports into the UK

In 2018, potato chips imports into the UK stood at 59K tonnes, growing by 14% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +3.2% over the period from 2013 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations over the period under review. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2018 with an increase of 14% year-to-year. In that year, potato chips imports reached their peak and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term. In value terms, potato chips imports amounted to $116M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

The Netherlands (31K tonnes), Belgium (16K tonnes) and Germany (3.7K tonnes) were the main suppliers of potato chips imports to the UK, with a combined 85% share of total imports. Spain, Ireland, France and Poland lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 11%.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main suppliers, was attained by Spain, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the average potato chips import price amounted to $1,948 per tonne, going up by 9.9% against the previous year. Over the period from 2013 to 2018, it increased at an average annual rate of +2.2%.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major supplying countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was France ($5,244 per tonne), while the price for the Netherlands ($1,246 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by France, while the prices for the other major suppliers experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

cabbage

Global Cabbage Market to Reach 80M Tonnes by 2025

IndexBox published a report: ‘World – Cabbage And Other Brassicas – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The global cabbage market revenue amounted to $39.4B in 2018, dropping by -3% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +3.1% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2010 when the market value increased by 14% year-to-year. Global cabbage consumption peaked at $43.7B in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, consumption failed to regain its momentum.

Consumption By Country

The country with the largest volume of cabbage consumption was China (33M tonnes), comprising approx. 45% of total consumption. Moreover, cabbage consumption in China exceeded the figures recorded by the world’s second-largest consumer, India (9.2M tonnes), fourfold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Russia (3.7M tonnes), with a 5.2% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of volume in China was relatively modest. The remaining consuming countries recorded the following average annual rates of consumption growth: India (+4.7% per year) and Russia (+2.6% per year).

In value terms, China ($13.9B) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by India ($5.7B). It was followed by Japan.

The countries with the highest levels of cabbage per capita consumption in 2018 were Romania (57 kg per person), South Korea (46 kg per person) and Ukraine (39 kg per person).

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of cabbage per capita consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by India, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Market Forecast 2019-2025

Driven by increasing demand for cabbage worldwide, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven-year period. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +1.4% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 80M tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production 2007-2018

In 2018, the amount of cabbage and other brassicas produced worldwide stood at 73M tonnes, picking up by 1.7% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.4% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being observed in certain years. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 with an increase of 6.8% against the previous year. Global cabbage production peaked in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future. The general positive trend in terms of cabbage output was largely conditioned by slight growth of the harvested area and a relatively flat trend pattern in yield figures.

In value terms, cabbage production totaled $40.5B in 2018 estimated in export prices. In general, the total output indicated prominent growth from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +1.4% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, cabbage production decreased by -11.0% against 2016 indices. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2010 when production volume increased by 26% year-to-year. Global cabbage production peaked at $45.5B in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, production failed to regain its momentum.

Production By Country

China (34M tonnes) constituted the country with the largest volume of cabbage production, accounting for 47% of total production. Moreover, cabbage production in China exceeded the figures recorded by the world’s second-largest producer, India (9.2M tonnes), fourfold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Russia (3.6M tonnes), with a 5% share.

In China, cabbage production expanded at an average annual rate of +1.1% over the period from 2007-2018. The remaining producing countries recorded the following average annual rates of production growth: India (+4.7% per year) and Russia (+2.9% per year).

Harvested Area 2007-2018

In 2018, approx. 2.5M ha of cabbage and other brassicas were harvested worldwide; therefore, remained relatively stable against the previous year. The harvested area increased at an average annual rate of +1.3% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 when harvested area increased by 5.6% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the harvested area dedicated to cabbage production reached its peak figure in 2018 and is likely to see steady growth in the near future.

Yield 2007-2018

In 2018, the global average cabbage yield totaled 29 tonne per ha, approximately reflecting the previous year. Overall, the cabbage yield continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2008 with an increase of 2.2% y-o-y. The global cabbage yield peaked at 29 tonne per ha in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, yield stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Exports 2007-2018

In 2018, the global exports of cabbage and other brassicas totaled 2.5M tonnes, surging by 7.2% against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +3.4% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 when Exports increased by 16% y-o-y. Over the period under review, global cabbage exports reached their maximum in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the near future.

In value terms, cabbage exports amounted to $1.7B in 2018. Over the period under review, the total exports indicated a resilient expansion from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +3.4% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, cabbage exports increased by +85.8% against 2007 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 when Exports increased by 18% against the previous year. Over the period under review, global cabbage exports attained their peak figure in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Exports by Country

China was the largest exporter of cabbage and other brassicas in the world, with the volume of exports reaching 990K tonnes, which was near 39% of total exports in 2018. The U.S. (220K tonnes) ranks second in terms of the total exports with a 8.7% share, followed by the Netherlands (8.3%), Spain (6.2%) and Mexico (5.7%). Canada (85K tonnes), Poland (84K tonnes), Italy (72K tonnes), Germany (66K tonnes) and Macedonia (57K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

Exports from China increased at an average annual rate of +7.0% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, Macedonia (+11.5%), Spain (+9.3%), Mexico (+6.1%), Canada (+5.6%) and the Netherlands (+3.1%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Macedonia emerged as the fastest growing exporter in the world, with a CAGR of +11.5% from 2007-2018. The U.S. and Italy experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. By contrast, Germany (-2.2%) and Poland (-3.7%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period. While the share of China (+21 p.p.), Spain (+3.9 p.p.), Mexico (+2.7 p.p.), the Netherlands (+2.4 p.p.), Macedonia (+1.6 p.p.) and Canada (+1.5 p.p.) increased significantly in terms of the global exports from 2007-2018, the share of Poland (-1.7 p.p.) displayed negative dynamics. The shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, the largest cabbage markets worldwide were China ($398M), the U.S. ($344M) and the Netherlands ($194M), with a combined 54% share of global exports. Spain, Mexico, Italy, Canada, Poland, Germany and Macedonia lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 32%.

Macedonia recorded the highest growth rate of exports, in terms of the main exporting countries over the last eleven years, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the average cabbage export price amounted to $682 per tonne, coming down by -5.4% against the previous year. Over the last eleven-year period, it increased at an average annual rate of +2.3%. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2008 when the average export price increased by 10% against the previous year. The global export price peaked at $722 per tonne in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, export prices remained at a lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was the U.S. ($1,567 per tonne), while Macedonia ($391 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the U.S., while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports 2007-2018

In 2018, approx. 2.3M tonnes of cabbage and other brassicas were imported worldwide; dropping by -10.3% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.4% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2015 with an increase of 24% y-o-y. Over the period under review, global cabbage imports reached their peak figure at 2.6M tonnes in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, imports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, cabbage imports totaled $1.5B in 2018. Overall, the total imports indicated a conspicuous increase from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +2.4% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, cabbage imports decreased by -12.2% against 2016 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 with an increase of 16% against the previous year. Global imports peaked at $1.7B in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, imports failed to regain their momentum.

Imports by Country

In 2018, China, Hong Kong SAR (546K tonnes), distantly followed by the U.S. (225K tonnes), Canada (189K tonnes), Malaysia (176K tonnes), Russia (113K tonnes), Germany (112K tonnes) and Thailand (105K tonnes) represented the main importers of cabbage and other brassicas, together mixing up 64% of total imports. Singapore (64K tonnes), Japan (60K tonnes), the Czech Republic (53K tonnes), France (50K tonnes) and the UK (42K tonnes) occupied a minor share of total imports.

Imports into China, Hong Kong SAR increased at an average annual rate of +6.3% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, Thailand (+32.5%), Malaysia (+9.8%), France (+2.5%), the U.S. (+2.2%), Canada (+2.0%) and the Czech Republic (+1.2%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Thailand emerged as the fastest growing importer in the world, with a CAGR of +32.5% from 2007-2018. Singapore experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. By contrast, Japan (-1.2%), Germany (-1.3%), Russia (-3.5%) and the UK (-5.5%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period. From 2007 to 2018, the share of China, Hong Kong SAR, Malaysia, Thailand, the U.S. and Canada increased by +12%, +4.9%, +4.3%, +2.1% and +1.6% percentage points, while the UK (-1.6 p.p.) and Russia (-2.3 p.p.) saw their share reduced. The shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, Canada ($302M), China, Hong Kong SAR ($223M) and the U.S. ($167M) were the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2018, with a combined 47% share of global imports. These countries were followed by Germany, Malaysia, France, Thailand, Singapore, the UK, Japan, Russia and the Czech Republic, which together accounted for a further 30%.

Among the main importing countries, Thailand experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to imports, over the last eleven-year period, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

The average cabbage import price stood at $641 per tonne in 2018, approximately reflecting the previous year. Over the period from 2007 to 2018, it increased at an average annual rate of +1.1%. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2013 when the average import price increased by 18% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the average import prices for cabbage and other brassicas attained their maximum at $692 per tonne in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, import prices failed to regain their momentum.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Canada ($1,597 per tonne), while Russia ($315 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Canada, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

pulp

U.S. Pulp Market – Exports to China Fell 9.4% in 2018, U.S Companies Lost $78M

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘U.S. Pulp Market. Analysis And Forecast to 2025’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the pulp market in the U.S. amounted to $4.8B in 2018, going up by 9% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +2.5% from 2013 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations throughout the analyzed period. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2014 with an increase of 19% against the previous year. In that year, the pulp market attained its peak level of $5.1B. From 2015 to 2018, the growth of the pulp market remained at a lower figure.

Pulp Production in the U.S.

In value terms, pulp production totaled $7.2B in 2018. Overall, pulp production, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2014 with an increase of 8.9% year-to-year. In that year, pulp production reached its peak level of $7.7B. From 2015 to 2018, pulp production growth failed to regain its momentum.

Exports from the U.S.

In 2018, approx. 6M tonnes of pulp were exported from the U.S.; going down by -4.7% against the previous year. Over the period under review, pulp exports continue to indicate a mild shrinkage. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2015 with an increase of 3.1% against the previous year. Exports peaked at 6.4M tonnes in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, exports remained at a lower figure.

In value terms, pulp exports amounted to $4.5B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total export value increased at an average annual rate of +1.7% from 2013 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being observed over the period under review. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2018 when exports increased by 11% against the previous year. In that year, pulp exports reached their peak and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

Exports by Country

China (1.6M tonnes) was the main destination for pulp exports from the U.S., with a 26% share of total exports. Moreover, pulp exports to China exceeded the volume sent to the second major destination, Japan (479K tonnes), threefold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Italy (391K tonnes), with a 6.6% share.

From 2013 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume to China stood at -3.2%. Exports to the other major destinations recorded the following average annual rates of exports growth: Japan (+3.1% per year) and Italy (-3.4% per year).

In value terms, China ($1.2B) remains the key foreign market for pulp exports from the U.S., comprising 26% of total pulp exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Japan ($410M), with a 9.1% share of total exports. It was followed by Italy, with a 6.3% share.

From 2013 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of value to China amounted to +1.0%. Exports to the other major destinations recorded the following average annual rates of exports growth: Japan (+6.9% per year) and Italy (-1.5% per year).

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the average pulp export price amounted to $759 per tonne, going up by 16% against the previous year. Over the period from 2013 to 2018, it increased at an average annual rate of +3.1%. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2018 an increase of 16% against the previous year. In that year, the average export prices for pulp reached their peak level and is likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Japan ($855 per tonne), while the average price for exports to Germany ($554 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was recorded for supplies to South Korea, while the prices for the other major destinations experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports into the U.S.

In 2018, the amount of pulp imported into the U.S. totaled 2.5M tonnes, increasing by 4.2% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +3.5% from 2013 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2018 when imports increased by 4.2% year-to-year. In that year, pulp imports reached their peak and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, pulp imports totaled $1.5B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total import value increased at an average annual rate of +4.8% over the period from 2013 to 2018; the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2018 with an increase of 23% year-to-year. In that year, pulp imports attained their peak and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

Imports by Country

In 2018, Brazil (2.1M tonnes) constituted the largest pulp supplier to the U.S., accounting for a 85% share of total imports. Moreover, pulp imports from Brazil exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest supplier, Chile (248K tonnes), ninefold.

From 2013 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume from Brazil amounted to +1.7%. The remaining supplying countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: Chile (+20.8% per year) and Sweden (+19.7% per year).

In value terms, Brazil ($1.4B) constituted the largest supplier of pulp to the U.S., comprising 90% of total pulp imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Chile ($75M), with a 4.8% share of total imports.

From 2013 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of value from Brazil totaled +4.0%. The remaining supplying countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: Chile (+16.9% per year) and Sweden (+14.9% per year).

Import Prices by Country

The average pulp import price stood at $619 per tonne in 2018, growing by 18% against the previous year. Over the period from 2013 to 2018, it increased at an average annual rate of +1.2%. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2018 an increase of 18% y-o-y. In that year, the average import prices for pulp reached their peak level and is likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major supplying countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Brazil ($655 per tonne), while the price for Chile ($300 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Brazil, while the prices for the other major suppliers experienced a decline.

Companies Mentioned in the Report

Profile Products, Domtar Industries, Georgia-Pacific Brewton, Woodland Pulp, Cascade Pacific Pulp, Northwest Capital Appreciation, Forest Resolute Products, American Paper Recycling, Cascades Tissue Group-Oregon, A Division of Cascades Holding US, Parsons & Whittemore, St Paper, Alabama River Cellulose, Buckeye Technologies, Brunswick Cellulose, Parsons & Whittemore Enterprises, Fibrek Inc., Port Townsend Holdings Company, Buckeye Mt. Holly, Lest Distributors, Southern Cellulose Products, DOMTAR A.W., Alabama River Group, GP Cellulose, Buckeye Florida Limited Partnership, Pratt Paper (ny), Fibrek Recycling U.S. , Cosmo Specialty Fibers, Ox Paperboard

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

Global Wine Market 2019 – Spain Retains Leadership in Exports Amid Buoyant Market Growth

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘World – Wine – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The global wine market revenue amounted to $130.3B in 2018, going down by -3.3% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +1.4% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2010, when the market value increased by 11% y-o-y. Global wine consumption peaked at $134.7B in 2017, and then declined slightly in the following year.

Production 2007-2018

Global wine production totaled 32B litres in 2018, surging by 2.3% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.4% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with only minor fluctuations being observed in certain years.

Exports 2007-2018

In 2018, the global exports of wine totaled 11B litres, going down by -4.5% against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.1% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations in certain years. In value terms, wine exports amounted to $35.5B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

In 2018, Italy (2B litres), France (1.9B litres) and Spain (1.7B litres) represented the main exporters of wine in the world, achieving 52% of total export. Australia (815M litres) held a 7.7% share (based on tonnes) of total exports, which put it in second place, followed by Chile (6.2%). South Africa (442M litres), Germany (383M litres), the U.S. (351M litres), New Zealand (319M litres), Portugal (303M litres), Argentina (271M litres) and China (244M litres) occupied a relatively small share of total exports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by China, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest wine markets worldwide were France ($11B), Italy ($7.3B) and Spain ($3.2B), with a combined 61% share of global exports. Australia, Chile, the U.S., New Zealand, Germany, Portugal, Argentina, South Africa and China lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 30%.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the average wine export price amounted to $3,332 per thousand litres, rising by 7.8% against the previous year. Overall, the wine export price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. There were significant differences in the average export prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest export price was France ($5,740 per thousand litres), while China ($1,464 per thousand litres) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of export prices was attained by the U.S., while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports 2007-2018

In 2018, approx. 9.4B litres of wine were imported worldwide; going down by -20.1% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.2% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. In value terms, wine imports amounted to $33.7B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

The countries with the highest levels of wine imports in 2018 were the UK (1.3B litres), the U.S. (1.2B litres), Germany (1B litres) and China (681M litres), together amounting to 44% of total import. Canada (409M litres), the Netherlands (382M litres), Belgium (327M litres), China, Hong Kong SAR (300M litres), Japan (290M litres), Russia (278M litres), France (244M litres) and Sweden (209M litres) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by China, Hong Kong SAR, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest wine importing markets worldwide were the U.S. ($5.4B), the UK ($4B) and Germany ($2.7B), together accounting for 36% of global imports. These countries were followed by China, Canada, Japan, China, Hong Kong SAR, the Netherlands, Belgium, France, Russia and Sweden, which together accounted for a further 36%.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the average wine import price amounted to $3,589 per thousand litres, rising by 18% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the wine import price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. There were significant differences in the average import prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest import price was Japan ($5,777 per thousand litres), while Russia ($2,497 per thousand litres) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of import prices was attained by France, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

Kuehne + Nagel

Kuehne + Nagel Steps Up Environmental Protection Efforts

Kuehne + Nagel has established itself as the first logistics company to join the Development and Climate Alliance, one year after the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development originally launched it, according to a recent announcement. This move creates a new standard for competing international logistics companies to actively take part in environmental protection initiatives.

“Climate change has long been the question of human survival. The industrialized countries, in particular, have a special responsibility,” said German Federal Minister Dr. Gerd Müller. “It is not only politics that is called upon to act, but also the private sector. With the Development and Climate Alliance, we have created a platform for this. I am very pleased that Kuehne + Nagel, one of the world’s leading logistics providers, has decided to join the alliance. This is a major step and shows that environmental protection and entrepreneurial action go hand in hand.”

With the Net Zero Carbon programme by Kuehne + Nagel as the forerunner for joining the alliance, the company confirmed issues associated with CO2 – specifically through transportation options including their supplier airlines, shipping lines and haulage companies, will be addressed through a three-step process of detection, reduction, and compensation of CO2.

“With its Net Zero Carbon programme, Kuehne + Nagel acknowledges – as a first mover in the logistics industry – the responsibility it has for the environment, for the ecosystem and essentially for the people, added Otto Schacht, Member of the Management Board of Kuehne + Nagel International AG.

“By joining the Development and Climate Alliance, we support the goals of the German Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development. As a globally operating company, we are convinced that the private sector must also make its contribution to environmental protection.”

How to Avoid Bottlenecks in Your Global Operations

You can’t just turn around a giant cargo ship. Even at some of the world’s best supply chains, redirecting chemicals and other products is a Herculean effort. And when shipping to volatile countries, it becomes even harder. For U.S. companies with global operations, one of the most effective ways to mitigate risk is to ship smarter.

In the current political climate, U.S. companies should be looking to partner with more stable countries where tariff changes aren’t expected. Take the Netherlands, for example. In 2017, the U.S. had a trade surplus of $24.5 billion.

I’ve been in supply chain management for more than a decade now. Supply chain flow has a lot of one-way check valves. Once cargo has shipped, there are no “backsies.” This is why supply chain managers are always stressing over demand forecasts — something that tops the list of most critical inventory management practices. And considering that our international tariff laws have been more dynamic in the past three years, shipping U.S. goods is more complex than it used to be.

Shipping Overseas

Anyone who has shipped freight by air or sea can attest to the fact that international shipping is complex — in no small part because of the rules and regulations around certain goods. Hazardous materials, obviously, can pose some problems. So can live cultures, a number of metals, and even telecommunication devices.

But it isn’t just international law that complicates matters. Everything from custom duties to cargo inspections can create bottlenecks within the supply chain. If even one item in a container is flagged, it could stop an entire ship’s worth of containers from making it past the terminal gates. It could then be held until a more thorough inspection can be made, which can come with an additional expense.

Complicating matters further, some countries will hold U.S. shipments for the sole reason that they’re coming from America. And in countries like Saudi Arabia, every container must go through inspection. Needless to say, these situations can add a significant amount of time to your shipment, creating inefficiencies in the supply chain that can sometimes be the equivalent of an additional tariff on your goods.

Being a former geo-marketing manager, I can tell you that a global view of operations can help you appreciate the people and logistics necessary to get goods from one location to another. It takes a great deal of coordination — and a great number of trucks, ships, and planes — to keep a supply chain running smoothly.

That’s why it’s so important to have some level of global operations knowledge as a U.S. supply chain professional. It can help you identify the potential “watering holes” of many products you need to buy for your operations. After all, the more you know about an item’s origin — and what it takes to get it to your warehouse — the easier it becomes to identify any middlemen that might be artificially elevating the price of goods.

This isn’t to say you should avoid international sources for goods. On the contrary, you should be exploring all your procurement options globally, nationally, and locally. Maybe you wouldn’t need to consider upheaving your operations and relocating your warehouse as a result of shifting trade patterns, like 48% of supply chain and transportation executives are doing now.

Getting a Global Perspective

The question then remains: What should U.S. manufacturers do to better understand global supply chain operations when exporting goods abroad? The following strategies should get you started:

Travel. To find the best prices for raw materials and the cheapest places to manufacture goods, the most logical answer is to travel. Knowing the origins of your raw materials can provide you with greater appreciation for the effort necessary to get an item to the production line. It also helps put the importance of quality in perspective. You understand why everything can’t be scrapped and reworked on a whim.

Study the local competition. Business is extremely competitive. The more you understand about local competitors, the easier it is to respond to changes. The U.S. e-commerce market has grown to $561 billion, making it the second-largest in the world. It didn’t take my first boss long to realize the value consumers place on U.S. brands, as they are willing to pay a premium for these goods — even over local ones.

Ask about tax reassessment and international ‘doing business as’ discounts.Many countries offer incentives for U.S. companies to do business in their lands. Free Trade Agreementsmake it much easier and cheaper to export goods to myriad foreign markets. The only problem: Most U.S. manufacturers never inquire about discounts on port duties or refunds for certain sales. Look at national government incentives for doing business in other countries.


Secure backup buyers. Regime changes, political turmoil, and bankruptcy are just a few events that can affect sales. In case your first buyer cannot purchase your goods, you need a backup buyer. Even at a price reduction, you salvage quarterly net income. To avoid tariffs on Chinese goods, companies bought all sorts of goods towards the end of last year. By February, all that changed. U.S. ocean imports fell 4.5%, and overall U.S. imports from China dropped 9.9%.

Chances are that the supply chain will become more central — and more global — to everything. In fact, activities associated with transportation and logistics account for anywhere between 10% and 12% of global GDP. As imports and exports ebb, it could disrupt not only the U.S. economy, but also the global one. But if you get to know the local competition, leverage business incentives from other countries, and take the time to formulate contingency plans for fluctuating demands, you’re more likely to weather the next storm.

___________________________________________________________

Ali Hasan R. is the co-founder and CEO of ThroughPut Inc., the artificial intelligence supply chain pioneer that enables companies to detect, prioritize, and alleviate dynamic operational bottlenecks. Ali’s unique experiences in onshore and offshore supply chain management in the United States, Russia, United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, Bahrain, and Yemen have produced results for customers’ ongoing work, which is now featured at some of the world’s most recognized brands.

fresh chicken market

European Fresh Chicken Cut Market – Output Doubled over the Last Decade

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Fresh Or Chilled Cuts Of Chicken – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the fresh chicken cut market in the European Union is estimated at $18B in 2018. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The total market indicated a buoyant increase from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +7.1% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period.

Based on 2018 figures, fresh chicken cut consumption increased by +15.2% against 2015 indices. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2011 with an increase of 14% year-to-year. The level of fresh chicken cut consumption peaked in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Consumption By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of fresh chicken cut consumption in 2018 were the Netherlands (1.1M tonnes), Poland (947K tonnes) and the UK (911K tonnes), with a combined 45% share of total consumption.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of fresh chicken cut consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the UK ($3.7B), the Netherlands ($2.6B) and France ($2.2B) constituted the countries with the highest levels of market value in 2018, together accounting for 47% of the total market.

In 2018, the highest levels of fresh chicken cut per capita consumption was registered in the Netherlands (64 kg per person), followed by Poland (25 kg per person), the UK (14 kg per person) and Spain (11 kg per person), while the world average per capita consumption of fresh chicken cut was estimated at 13 kg per person.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of the fresh chicken cut per capita consumption in the Netherlands stood at +13.8%. The remaining consuming countries recorded the following average annual rates of per capita consumption growth: Poland (+10.1% per year) and the UK (+2.4% per year).

Production in the EU

The fresh chicken cut production totaled 6.8M tonnes in 2018, growing by 7.8% against the previous year. The total output indicated a prominent expansion from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +7.0% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, fresh chicken cut production increased by +110.1% against 2007 indices. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2016 with an increase of 13% y-o-y. The volume of fresh chicken cut production peaked in 2018 and is likely to continue its growth in the near future.

In value terms, fresh chicken cut production amounted to $17.2B in 2018 estimated in export prices. The total output value increased at an average annual rate of +4.1% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 with an increase of 18% against the previous year. Over the period under review, fresh chicken cut production reached its maximum level in 2018 and is likely to continue its growth in the near future.

Production By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of fresh chicken cut production in 2018 were Poland (1.4M tonnes), the Netherlands (1.3M tonnes) and the UK (835K tonnes), together comprising 51% of total production.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of fresh chicken cut production, amongst the main producing countries, was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, approx. 1.9M tonnes of fresh or chilled cuts of chicken were exported in the European Union; rising by 4% against the previous year. Over the period under review, fresh chicken cut exports continue to indicate a buoyant increase. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 with an increase of 25% against the previous year. Over the period under review, fresh chicken cut exports reached their maximum in 2018 and are likely to continue its growth in the near future.

In value terms, fresh chicken cut exports totaled $4.6B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total exports indicated prominent growth from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +8.2% over the last eleven-year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, fresh chicken cut exports increased by +20.5% against 2014 indices. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 when exports increased by 25% against the previous year. Over the period under review, fresh chicken cut exports reached their maximum in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

Exports by Country

The Netherlands (542K tonnes), Poland (430K tonnes) and Belgium (292K tonnes) represented roughly 67% of total exports of fresh or chilled cuts of chicken in 2018. Germany (167K tonnes) held an 8.9% share (based on tonnes) of total exports, which put it in second place, followed by the UK (7%). The following exporters – France (53K tonnes) and Spain (40K tonnes) – together made up 4.9% of total exports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the Netherlands ($1.4B), Poland ($1.2B) and Belgium ($637M) constituted the countries with the highest levels of exports in 2018, with a combined 69% share of total exports.

Among the main exporting countries, Poland experienced the highest growth rate of exports, over the last eleven-year period, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the fresh chicken cut export price in the European Union amounted to $2,466 per tonne, surging by 11% against the previous year. In general, the fresh chicken cut export price, however, continues to indicate a mild downturn. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2018 an increase of 11% against the previous year. The level of export price peaked at $3,023 per tonne in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, export prices remained at a lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was France ($2,819 per tonne), while the UK ($780 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Spain, while the other leaders experienced a decline in the export price figures.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, approx. 1.6M tonnes of fresh or chilled cuts of chicken were imported in the European Union; jumping by 4.9% against the previous year. Over the period under review, fresh chicken cut imports continue to indicate buoyant growth. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2009 with an increase of 23% year-to-year. Over the period under review, fresh chicken cut imports reached their maximum in 2018 and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, fresh chicken cut imports amounted to $4.1B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total imports indicated buoyant growth from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +9.2% over the last eleven-year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, fresh chicken cut imports increased by +29.5% against 2015 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 when imports increased by 31% year-to-year. Over the period under review, fresh chicken cut imports reached their maximum in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the near future.

Imports by Country

In 2018, Germany (319K tonnes) and the Netherlands (316K tonnes) were the largest importers of fresh or chilled cuts of chicken in the European Union, together accounting for approx. 39% of total imports. It was followed by France (210K tonnes), the UK (207K tonnes) and Belgium (143K tonnes), together comprising a 34% share of total imports. Ireland (46K tonnes), the Czech Republic (45K tonnes), Hungary (43K tonnes), Slovakia (30K tonnes), Bulgaria (28K tonnes), Austria (26K tonnes) and Greece (25K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Bulgaria, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest fresh chicken cut importing markets in the European Union were Germany ($762M), the UK ($743M) and France ($641M), together comprising 53% of total imports. The Netherlands, Belgium, Ireland, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Austria, Slovakia, Greece and Bulgaria lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 36%.

Among the main importing countries, Bulgaria experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to imports, over the last eleven-year period, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

The fresh chicken cut import price in the European Union stood at $2,498 per tonne in 2018, jumping by 10% against the previous year. In general, the fresh chicken cut import price, however, continues to indicate a slight setback. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2010 an increase of 11% y-o-y. The level of import price peaked at $3,092 per tonne in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, import prices failed to regain their momentum.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Ireland ($4,079 per tonne), while Bulgaria ($1,517 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Hungary, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

winter

Cozy up to Trade this Winter

There’s nothing like curling up next to a roaring fire wrapped up in a warm sweater, soft blankets and furry pillows on a cold day. As we bundle up for the remainder of the winter season, we can give thanks to global trade for gifting us with some of today’s trendiest and coziest items – Sherpa wool coats, Mongolian lamb fur pillows and cashmere sweaters, Giza cotton sheets, and Turkish towels.

The United States imported $110 billion worth of textiles and apparel last year, with China, Vietnam and India as the lead exporters. These larger economies dominate overall textile and apparel imports, but specialty products from smaller economies are making a name for themselves with American consumers this holiday season. Before you buy “faux” versions, read on to get the skinny on the originals.

Sherpa from Nepal

Sherpa wool coats, sweaters, and scarves are everywhere this holiday season. Once a high-end statement piece, trendy Sherpa items are now available at varying price points at your local mall. While most of the Sherpa in your closet is likely the faux variety made from polyester, acrylic or cotton, the real deal is inspired by wool clothing worn by the Sherpa people living in the Himalayas.

There are some 150,000 Sherpas residing in the mountainous regions of Nepal, India and Tibet. Many make their living today guiding climbers and tourists up the dangerous summit of Mount Everest as expert mountaineers. But they’re also well-known traders of salt, wool and rice.

The United States is Nepal’s second-largest export market. Top imports include carpets, handicrafts and antiques, animal feed, textiles and apparel. In 2015, the United States established a stand-alone trade preference program with Nepal as part of the Trade Facilitation and Trade Enforcement Act to help support Nepal’s economic recovery following disastrous earthquakes that year. The program established duty-free access for 77 categories of products including carpets, shawls, scarves, handbags and suitcases through 2025.

Although Nepal may have started the Sherpa trend, we get most of our wool products from elsewhere today. U.S. wool apparel imports topped $3.1 billion in 2018. China was the top source at over 42 percent, followed by Italy, Canada and Vietnam.

U.S. wool imports 3 billion

Fur pillows and cashmere sweaters from Mongolia

Fluff up your indoor space by throwing a trendy Mongolian lamb fur pillows on your sofa. (These pillows are all the rage with teens and millennials.) While faux versions are likely a mix of acrylic and polyester, the real ones are made from sheared sheep wool from Mongolia.

Mongolia is home to some 14 million sheep. They graze year-round on Mongolia’s vast plains, accustomed to severe winters, steep mountains and poor vegetation.

Mongolia’s sheep aren’t the only grazers sought after for their soft coats. Mongolia is also home to some 27 million goats that produce 9,400 tons of soft cashmere each year, making Mongolia the world’s second-largest producer of cashmere behind China. Top destinations for Mongolian cashmere include Italy and England. It’s the country’s third-largest exporting industry and employs over 100,000 people, the majority of whom are women.

Exports account for more than half of Mongolia’s GDP. Its economy has traditionally relied on herding and agriculture, but in recent years has gotten a big boost of foreign direct investment in its mining sector which seeks to extract rich deposits of copper, gold, coal, uranium, tungsten and more.

Mongolia second-largest producer of cashmere

Giza cotton sheets from Egypt

If you’ve ever been up late skimming the TV channels over the holiday break, you’ve likely come across a mustached man happily hugging his “MyPillow”. Mike Lindell is now legendary for his infomercial success, and his company has expanded its product line beyond its namesake pillows to offer dog beds, towels and more.

One of the latest product lines from MyPillow is “Giza Dream” sheets and pillowcases made with 100 percent Giza cotton. In one of his infomercials, Lindell explains how he made his signature sheets: “I started by using the world’s best cotton called Giza. It’s only grown in a region between the Sahara Desert, the Mediterranean Sea and the Nile River. It’s ultra-soft and breathable, but extremely durable”.

MyPillow’s first infomercial aired in 2011, but Giza cotton has been around for centuries. Known for being both extra fine and extra long, Giza cotton is planted in Egypt every April and harvested in September. It’s then hand-picked to ensure its properly matured. But issues with deteriorating quality of privately produced Giza cotton led the Egyptian government to intervene in recent years to help restore the reputation of Egyptian cotton.

In 2017, the Egyptian government unveiled a 19-step plan which included taking control of the production and distribution of cottonseed. It’s already led to increased yield and quality, according to a 2019 report by the U.S. Foreign Agriculture Service. The plan also seeks to prevent seed mixing, enforce bans on prohibited varieties, and develop Egypt’s local spinning and weaving industries.

In 2018, Egypt’s total lint cotton exports were estimated at 220,000 bales. India was the top importer of Egyptian cotton, responsible for over 50 percent of total exports. Other top importers include Pakistan, China and Turkey.

World cotton production

Turkish towels

Turkish towels are a summer must-have for sunbathing, but they’ve also made their way into American homes for use after showering, as tablecloths, and as blankets. Usually striped with fringes on the end, these trendy towels are known for being super absorbent, lightweight and getting softer with each wash.

Turkish towels are made with premium Aegean Cotton, known for its extra long fibers. Called “Peshtemal” in Turkey, Turkish towels have a long history dating over 600 years. Turkey is widely credited with inventing the first towels as part of a ceremonial bathing routine for new brides in Turkish hammams.

The Turkish textile industry is one of the leading sectors in its economy, accounting for 16 percent of exports in 2018. According to its Ministry of Trade, Turkey was the world’s third-largest supplier of bed sheets, fourth-largest supplier of towels and bathrobes, and fifth-largest supplier of bedspreads in 2016. Of its top exports markets for home textiles, the United States ranks second behind Germany.

Turkish towels exports

Unwrapping gratitude for trade

Nepal, Mongolia, Egypt and Turkey are inspiring some of the coziest products we’ll unwrap this holiday season.

Even if these products are enjoying the fruits of a fad-induced surge in American demand, their histories date back centuries while also representing an important source of employment and exports for their respective economies today.

_______________________________________________________________

Lauren Kyger

Lauren Kyger is Associate Editor for TradeVistas. Prior to joining TradeVistas, she was a Research Associate at the Hinrich Foundation focused on international trade issues. She is a Hinrich Foundation Global Trade Leader Scholar alumna, earning her Master’s degree in Global Business Journalism from Tsinghua University in Beijing. She received her Bachelor’s degree from the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University.

This article originally appeared on TradeVistas.org. Republished with permission.

Global Cinnamon Market 2019 – Imports to India Grow Robustly

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘World – Cinnamon (Canella) – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The global cinnamon market revenue amounted to $1.1B in 2018, dropping by -9% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). In general, the total market indicated a remarkable expansion from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +2.0% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, the cinnamon consumption decreased by -19.8% against 2014 indices. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2010, when the market value increased by 36% y-o-y. Global cinnamon consumption peaked at $1.3B in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, consumption failed to regain its momentum.

Production 2007-2018

Global cinnamon production totaled 237K tonnes in 2018, going up by 4% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.7% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period.

Exports 2007-2018

In 2018, approx. 145K tonnes of cinnamon (canella) were exported worldwide; declining by -18.1% against the previous year. In general, the total exports indicated a moderate increase from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.2% over the last eleven year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. In value terms, cinnamon exports totaled $580M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Over the period under review, cinnamon exports, however, continue to indicate a remarkable expansion. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011, when exports increased by 33% against the previous year. Over the period under review, global cinnamon exports reached their peak figure at $605M in 2017, and then declined slightly in the following year.

Exports by Country

In 2018, Viet Nam (44K tonnes) and Indonesia (41K tonnes) were the major exporters of cinnamon (canella) around the world, together accounting for near 59% of total exports. It was distantly followed by China (25K tonnes) and Sri Lanka (17K tonnes), together creating 29% share of total exports. The Netherlands (5.2K tonnes), Madagascar (2.7K tonnes) and the U.S. (2.3K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Madagascar, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest cinnamon markets worldwide were Sri Lanka ($191M), Indonesia ($141M) and Viet Nam ($118M), together accounting for 78% of global exports. These countries were followed by China, the Netherlands, the U.S. and Madagascar, which together accounted for a further 15%.

Export Prices by Country

The average cinnamon export price stood at $4,003 per tonne in 2018, surging by 17% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the export price indicated a remarkable increase from 2007 to 2018: its price increased at an average annual rate of +7.7% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, the cinnamon export price increased by +104.6% against 2010 indices. There were significant differences in the average export prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest export price was Sri Lanka ($11,358 per tonne), while China ($1,843 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of export prices was attained by Indonesia, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports 2007-2018

In 2018, the global cinnamon imports stood at 167K tonnes, lowering by -4.7% against the previous year.In value terms, cinnamon imports stood at $587M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

In 2018, India (39K tonnes), distantly followed by the U.S. (20K tonnes), Mexico (11K tonnes) and the Netherlands (7.7K tonnes) were the key importers of cinnamon (canella), together making up 47% of total imports. Bangladesh (7K tonnes), Saudi Arabia (5.5K tonnes), the United Arab Emirates (4.6K tonnes), Pakistan (4.4K tonnes), Iran (3.9K tonnes), Brazil (3.2K tonnes), Germany (3K tonnes) and Viet Nam (3K tonnes) held a relatively small share of total imports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Viet Nam, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest cinnamon importing markets worldwide were Mexico ($97M), India ($84M) and the U.S. ($72M), together accounting for 43% of global imports. The Netherlands, Bangladesh, Germany, Brazil, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Viet Nam, Pakistan and Iran lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 17%.

Import Prices by Country

The average cinnamon import price stood at $3,510 per tonne in 2018, surging by 3.6% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the import price indicated a remarkable increase from 2007 to 2018: its price increased at an average annual rate of +6.8% over the last eleven year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, the cinnamon import price increased by +39.1% against 2013 indices. Import prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest import price was Mexico ($8,610 per tonne), while Bangladesh ($1,717 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of import prices was attained by Brazil, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

knit fabric

U.S. Knit Fabric Market Rose 2.6% and Reached $2B

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘U.S. Knit Fabric Market. Analysis And Forecast to 2025’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

In 2018, the revenue of the U.S. knit fabric market rose 2.6% and reached $2B, due to accelerated growth of imports. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price).

Over the period under review, knit fabric consumption, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2014 with an increase of 19% year-to-year. In that year, the knit fabric market reached its peak level of $2.3B. From 2015 to 2018, the growth of the knit fabric market remained at a somewhat lower figure.

Knit Fabric Production in the U.S.

U.S. knit fabric production amounted to 144K tonnes in 2018,  -2.4% against the previous year. Overall, knit fabric production continues to indicate an abrupt downturn. Over the period under review, knit fabric production attained its maximum volume at 206K tonnes in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, production stood at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, knit fabric production totaled $1.2B in 2018.

Exports from the U.S.

In 2018, approx. 9.3K tonnes of knit fabrics were exported from the U.S.; declining by -5.9% against the previous year. In general, knit fabric exports continue to indicate a dramatic slump. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2018 when exports decreased by -5.9% year-to-year. Over the period under review, knit fabric exports reached their maximum at 42K tonnes in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, exports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, knit fabric exports stood at $93M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. In general, knit fabric exports continue to indicate a drastic decrease. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2018 when exports decreased by -5.6% y-o-y. Exports peaked at $276M in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, exports failed to regain their momentum.

Exports by Country

Nicaragua (2K tonnes), Honduras (1.5K tonnes) and Guatemala (1.1K tonnes) were the main destinations of knit fabric exports from the U.S., together accounting for 50% of total exports. Mexico, France, El Salvador, the Dominican Republic, Colombia, Australia, Chile and China lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 33%.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main countries of destination, was attained by Australia, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Honduras ($18M), Nicaragua ($13M) and Mexico ($8M) were the largest markets for knit fabric exported from the U.S. worldwide, with a combined 43% share of total exports. These countries were followed by Guatemala, El Salvador, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Australia, France, China and Chile, which together accounted for a further 35%.

Among the main countries of destination, Australia experienced the highest growth rate of exports, over the last five-year period, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

The average knit fabric export price stood at $9,974 per tonne in 2018, remaining constant against the previous year. Over the last five years, it increased at an average annual rate of +8.8%. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2014 when the average export price increased by 22% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the average export prices for knit fabrics reached their peak figure in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future.

There were significant differences in the average prices for the major foreign markets. In 2018, the country with the highest price was China ($16,066 per tonne), while the average price for exports to France ($5,365 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was recorded for supplies to El Salvador, while the prices for the other major destinations experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports into the U.S.

In 2018, approx. 108K tonnes of knit fabrics were imported into the U.S.; increasing by 9.1% against the previous year. Over the period under review, knit fabric imports, however, continue to indicate a mild decline. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2014 when imports increased by 14% year-to-year. Over the period under review, knit fabric imports attained their peak figure at 130K tonnes in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, imports failed to regain their momentum.

In value terms, knit fabric imports totaled $501M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Overall, knit fabric imports, however, continue to indicate a temperate deduction. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2014 with an increase of 11% year-to-year. Imports peaked at $647M in 2015; however, from 2016 to 2018, imports failed to regain their momentum.

Imports by Country

China (46K tonnes), India (25K tonnes) and Israel (14K tonnes) were the main suppliers of knit fabric imports to the U.S., together accounting for 79% of total imports.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main suppliers, was attained by India, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, China ($195M) constituted the largest supplier of knit fabric to the U.S., comprising 39% of total knit fabric imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Israel ($80M), with a 16% share of total imports. It was followed by India, with a 15% share.

From 2013 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of value from China totaled -6.6%. The remaining supplying countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: Israel (+6.0% per year) and India (+25.0% per year).

Import Prices by Country

The average knit fabric import price stood at $4,631 per tonne in 2018, dropping by -1.9% against the previous year. Overall, the knit fabric import price continues to indicate a mild curtailment. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2015 when the average import price increased by 2.4% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the average import prices for knit fabrics attained their maximum at $5,073 per tonne in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, import prices remained at a lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major supplying countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Taiwan, Chinese ($7,981 per tonne), while the price for India ($2,979 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2013 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Taiwan, Chinese, while the prices for the other major suppliers experienced more modest paces of growth.

Companies Mentioned in the Report

Guilford Mills, Siny Corp., McMurray Fabrics, Ssm Industries, Fisher Textiles, Hornwood, Jif-Pak Manufacturing, Adele Knits, Commonwealth Home Fashion, Fab Industries Corp., Metritek Corporation, The Tenenblatt Corporation, Gehring Tricot Corporation, Rebtex, Westchester Lace & Textiles, Mocaro Industries, Albahealth, McComb Mill Manufacturing Company, Lace Lastics Company, Clover Knits, Mohican Mills, Sas Textiles, Somerset Industries, Charbert, Hampton Industries

Source: IndexBox AI Platform