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Global Direct Dye Market Decreased by -3.6% to $1.9B in 2019

dye

Global Direct Dye Market Decreased by -3.6% to $1.9B in 2019

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘World – Direct Dyes And Preparations Based Thereon – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

After two years of growth, the global direct dye market decreased by -3.6% to $1.9B in 2019. Overall, consumption, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern in the past decade. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2014 when the market value increased by 13% year-to-year. As a result, consumption reached a peak level of $2.2B. From 2015 to 2019, the growth of the global market failed to regain momentum.

Consumption by Country

China ($460M), the U.S. ($333M) and India ($144M) were the countries with the largest market size in 2019, with a combined 48% share of the global market. Japan, Brazil, Indonesia, Pakistan, Mexico, France, Canada, Germany, and the UK lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 27%.

The countries with the highest levels of direct dye per capita consumption in 2019 were the U.S. (265 kg per 1000 persons), Canada (253 kg per 1000 persons), and the UK (235 kg per 1000 persons).

From 2009 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of direct dye per capita consumption, amongst the key consuming countries, was attained by China, while direct dye per capita consumption for the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Global Trade of Direct Dyes 2009-2019

In 2019, global trade of direct dyes and preparations based thereon increased by 1% to 110K tonnes, rising for the fourth year in a row after two years of decline. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +4.5% from 2009 to 2019. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2010 with an increase of 32% against the previous year. Over the period under review, global exports attained the peak figure in 2019 and are likely to see gradual growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, direct dye exports fell modestly to $398M (IndexBox estimates) in 2019.

Exports by Country

In 2019, India (38K tonnes) represented the largest exporter of direct dyes and preparations based thereon, achieving 34% of total exports. Spain (18K tonnes) ranks second in terms of the total exports with a 16% share, followed by China (9.7%) and Germany (6.9%). Taiwan, Chinese (4.8K tonnes), the U.S. (4.7K tonnes), the UK (4.2K tonnes), France (4.1K tonnes), Mexico (3.1K tonnes), Turkey (2.7K tonnes), Poland (2.5K tonnes) and Italy (1.9K tonnes) took a little share of total exports.

From 2009 to 2019, the average annual rates of growth with regard to direct dye exports from India stood at +14.5%. At the same time, Turkey (+27.1%), Poland (+12.8%), Spain (+9.4%), France (+8.8%), the U.S. (+4.6%), the UK (+4.5%), Mexico (+3.6%) and Italy (+2.8%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Turkey emerged as the fastest-growing exporter exported in the world, with a CAGR of +27.1% from 2009-2019. China and Taiwan experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. By contrast, Germany (-4.2%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period. India (+25 p.p.), Spain (+9.5 p.p.), Turkey (+2.2 p.p.), France (+2.1 p.p.), Poland (+1.6 p.p.) and the U.S. (+1.5 p.p.) significantly strengthened its position in terms of the global exports, while Germany saw its share reduced by -3.6% from 2009 to 2019, respectively. The shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, India ($110M) remains the largest direct dye supplier worldwide, comprising 28% of global exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by China ($44M), with an 11% share of global exports. It was followed by Spain, with a 10% share.

In India, direct dye exports expanded at an average annual rate of +13.2% over the period from 2009-2019. In other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: China (+3.2% per year) and Spain (+7.3% per year).

Export Prices by Country

In 2019, the average direct dye export price amounted to $3,610 per tonne, dropping by -4.5% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the export price recorded a slight contraction. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2014 when the average export price increased by 13% y-o-y. As a result, the export price reached a peak level of $4,684 per tonne. From 2015 to 2019, the growth in terms of the average export prices remained at a somewhat lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2019, the country with the highest price was the UK ($6,110 per tonne), while France ($1,724 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2009 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by China, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports by Country

In 2019, Germany (12K tonnes), followed by Italy (7.2K tonnes), Japan (6.2K tonnes), France (6.1K tonnes), China (4.8K tonnes), the UK (4.7K tonnes) and Indonesia (4.5K tonnes) were the largest importers of direct dyes and preparations based thereon, together generating 45% of total imports. The following importers – the U.S. (4.1K tonnes), Taiwan, Chinese (3.4K tonnes), the Netherlands (3.4K tonnes), Poland (3.2K tonnes) and Spain (3.1K tonnes) – together made up 17% of total imports.

From 2009 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of purchases, amongst the key importing countries, was attained by Poland, while imports for the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest direct dye importing markets worldwide were Germany ($36M), Japan ($35M) and Italy ($31M), together accounting for 26% of global imports. China, Indonesia, the U.S., France, Spain, the Netherlands, the UK, Taiwan, Chinese and Poland lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 35%.

Import Prices by Country

In 2019, the average direct dye import price amounted to $3,933 per tonne, surging by 2.8% against the previous year.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Japan ($5,749 per tonne), while Poland ($2,290 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2009 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Indonesia, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

maize

Asia’s Maize Market – Imports Will Grow Due to Rising Feed Demand

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘Asia – Maize – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

In 2019, the Asian maize market was finally on the rise to reach $204.4B after two years of decline. The total consumption indicated buoyant growth from 2009 to 2019: its value increased at an average annual rate of +5.1% over the last decade. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2016 with an increase of 25% against the previous year. As a result, consumption reached a peak level of $215.8B. From 2017 to 2019, the growth of the market remained at a lower figure.

Maize Consumption by Country

The country with the largest volume of maize consumption was China (274M tonnes), comprising approx. 60% of the total volume. Moreover, maize consumption in China exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest consumer, Indonesia (33M tonnes), eightfold. India (28M tonnes) ranked third in terms of total consumption with a 6.3% share.

From 2009 to 2019, the average annual growth rate of volume in China stood at +5.2%. In other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: Indonesia (+6.4% per year) and India (+7.3% per year).

In value terms, China ($130.1B) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Indonesia ($15.2B). It was followed by India.

The countries with the highest levels of maize per capita consumption in 2019 were South Korea (223 kg per person), China (188 kg per person), and Viet Nam (159 kg per person).

From 2009 to 2019, the biggest increases were in Viet Nam, while maize per capita consumption for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Production in Asia

In 2019, approx. 379M tonnes of maize were produced in Asia; rising by 4.8% on the year before. The total production indicated a noticeable increase from 2009 to 2019: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +4.9% over the last decade. Based on 2019 figures, production increased by +61.8% against 2009 indices. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2015 when the production volume increased by 16% against the previous year. The volume of production peaked in 2019 and is expected to retain growth in years to come.

Production By Country in Asia

China (270M tonnes) constituted the country with the largest volume of maize production, accounting for 71% of total volume. Moreover, maize production in China exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest producer, Indonesia (33M tonnes), eightfold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by India (29M tonnes), with a 7.6% share.

In China, maize production increased at an average annual rate of +5.1% over the period from 2009-2019. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: Indonesia (+6.3% per year) and India (+5.6% per year).

Amid concerns about the impact of COVID-19 on grain supplies, the Chinese government has taken a number of measures to preserve the area sown with corn, which canceled previous measures. As a result, production in the country in 2020 is projected at 260-265 million tons. In India, after record yields in 2019, a return to normal yields is expected to lead to a slight decrease in corn production, which is currently projected at 28.0 million tons.

Harvested Area in Asia

The maize harvested area rose modestly to 69M ha in 2019, increasing by 2.7% on 2018 figures. The harvested area increased at an average annual rate of +2.6% from 2009 to 2019; the trend pattern remained consistent, with only minor fluctuations being observed throughout the analyzed period. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2015 with an increase of 12% year-to-year. Over the period under review, the harvested area dedicated to maize production reached the maximum at 69M ha in 2016; afterward, it flattened through to 2019.

Yield in Asia

In 2019, the average maize yield in Asia rose slightly to 5.5 tonnes per ha, picking up by 2.1% against the previous year’s figure. The yield figure increased at an average annual rate of +2.3% over the period from 2009 to 2019; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations in certain years. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2010 when the yield increased by 5.2% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the maize yield hit record highs in 2019 and is expected to retain growth in the near future.

Maize Imports in Asia

In 2019, overseas purchases of maize increased by 7.7% to 77M tonnes, rising for the second consecutive year after two years of decline. Total imports indicated resilient growth from 2009 to 2019: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +5.3% over the last decade. Based on 2019 figures, imports increased by +45.3% against 2017 indices. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2018 with an increase of 35% against the previous year. The volume of imports peaked in 2019 and is expected to retain growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, maize imports expanded notably to $15.5B (IndexBox estimates) in 2019.

Imports by Country

In 2019, Japan (18M tonnes), distantly followed by South Korea (11M tonnes), Viet Nam (11M tonnes), Iran (10M tonnes), Taiwan (4.2M tonnes), Malaysia (4M tonnes) and China (3.9M tonnes) represented the main importers of maize, together generating 80% of total imports.

From 2009 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of purchases, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Viet Nam, while imports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Japan ($3.5B), South Korea ($2.4B) and Viet Nam ($1.9B) constituted the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2019, together comprising 50% of total imports.

In 2020, the increases in imports are expected mainly due to rising feed demand. China’s (mainland) purchases from abroad can grow to 7 million tonnes amid relatively high domestic maize prices. It is expected that increased demand for maize imports in 2020 will be met by larger supplies from the United States, supported by sufficient domestic supplies from a projected record crop in 2020 and low prices.

Import Prices by Country

In 2019, the maize import price in Asia amounted to $200 per tonne, remaining constant against the previous year.

Average prices varied somewhat amongst the major importing countries. In 2019, major importing countries recorded the following prices: in China ($222 per tonne) and Malaysia ($213 per tonne), while Viet Nam ($177 per tonne) and Iran ($182 per tonne) were amongst the lowest.

From 2009 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Iran, while the other leaders experienced a decline in the import price figures.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

poultry

Global Poultry Production to Reach 137M tonnes in 2020, Mainly Driven by Growth in China, the EU, and the UK

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘World – Poultry – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

In 2019, the global poultry market increased by 6% to $231.5B, rising for the third consecutive year after two years of decline. The market value increased at an average annual rate of +4.4% from 2009 to 2019. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2011 with an increase of 11% y-o-y. Global consumption peaked in 2019 and is expected to retain growth in the near future.

Poultry Consumption by Country

The countries with the highest volumes of poultry consumption in 2019 were China (20M tonnes), the U.S. (19M tonnes), and Brazil (12M tonnes), with a combined 40% share of global consumption. These countries were followed by Russia, Mexico, India, Japan, Indonesia, Iran, South Africa, Malaysia, and Myanmar, which together accounted for a further 21%.

In value terms, China ($53.4B) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the U.S. ($21.3B). It was followed by Brazil.

The countries with the highest levels of poultry per capita consumption in 2019 were Malaysia (63 kg per person), the U.S. (58 kg per person), and Brazil (57 kg per person).

From 2009 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of poultry per capita consumption, amongst the leading consuming countries, was attained by Myanmar, while poultry per capita consumption for the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Market Forecast 2020-2030

Driven by increasing demand for poultry worldwide, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next decade. Market performance is forecast to decelerate, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +2.3% for the period from 2019 to 2030, which is projected to bring the market volume to 166M tonnes by the end of 2030.

According to FAO forecasts, global poultry meat production will reach 137 million tonnes in 2020. Growth is expected in China, the EU, Britain, Brazil, and Mexico, while production decline is possible in India, Thailand, Turkey, and the U.S.

In China, poultry production is projected to grow, albeit slowly, due to relatively steady demand amid high pork prices. Although the discovery of new HPAI cases at the beginning of the year in some European countries forced China to ban imports of live birds from these suppliers. However, the impact on domestic production is likely to be limited, since the measure coincided with the lifting of the 2015 ban on imports of live poultry from the United States.

New investments in processing capacity are expected to increase poultry production in the EU and the UK. However, a positive outlook could become negative if the recent fall in prices associated with COVID-19 continues. Slaughter of birds in countries where new cases of HPAI have been diagnosed may also hinder production growth in the EU this year.

In Brazil, poultry production is projected to increase driven by growing demand for imports, especially in China, as well as in other countries that are attracted by Brazil’s status as a supplier of products with high biosafety standards.

Growth in poultry meat production is also projected to continue in South Africa due to strong consumer demand, and in Mexico because of competitive feed prices.

In contrast, poultry meat production in India is likely to decline as the outflow of labor from cities after the COVID-19 lockdown reduced the availability of workforce in this sector, which also led to a decrease in consumer demand.

Similarly, in Thailand, a sharp drop in demand for poultry meat from the food retail sector, including street food, is driving the expected decline in production. However, the prospects for production in 2020 could be positive if efforts by the government to persuade Asian countries, especially China, Japan and the Republic of Korea, to import more poultry meat are successful.

In the United States, declining food sales and labor shortages have led the sector to abandon expansion plans and reduce the share of large poultry production preferred by HoReCa. It is also reported that the requirements for maintaining distances between workspaces in processing plants reduce the efficiency of meat processing, which leads to a drop in production.

Global Poultry Production

In 2019, the amount of poultry produced worldwide expanded to 130M tonnes, growing by 3.7% against the previous year’s figure. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +3.4% from 2009 to 2019; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed throughout the analyzed period. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2010 with an increase of 4.7% against the previous year. Global production peaked in 2019 and is expected to retain growth in years to come. The generally positive trend in terms output was largely conditioned by a perceptible increase in the number of producing animals and a relatively flat trend pattern in yield figures.

Production By Country

The countries with the highest volumes of poultry production in 2019 were the U.S. (23M tonnes), China (20M tonnes), and Brazil (16M tonnes), with a combined 45% share of global production. Russia, India, Mexico, Indonesia, Turkey, Japan, Iran, Argentina, and Myanmar lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 20%.

From 2009 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of poultry production, amongst the key producing countries, was attained by Russia, while poultry production for the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Exports

For the fourth year in a row, the global market recorded growth in overseas shipments of poultry, which increased by 2.2% to 17M tonnes in 2019. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +3.3% over the period from 2009 to 2019.

In value terms, poultry exports rose to $27.3B (IndexBox estimates) in 2019. Over the period under review, global exports reached the maximum at $28.5B in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2019, exports remained at a lower figure.

Exports by Country

Brazil (4M tonnes) and the U.S. (3.6M tonnes) represented the main exporters of poultry in 2019, resulting in at approx. 24% and 22% of total exports, respectively. It was distantly followed by the Netherlands (1.5M tonnes) and Poland (1.5M tonnes), together generating an 18% share of total exports. Belgium (509K tonnes), Turkey (493K tonnes), Germany (473K tonnes), France (398K tonnes), Ukraine (361K tonnes), the UK (359K tonnes), Hong Kong  (328K tonnes) and Thailand (295K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2009 to 2019, the biggest increases were in Ukraine, while shipments for the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest poultry supplying countries worldwide were Brazil ($6.5B), the U.S. ($3.7B), and Poland ($2.9B), with a combined 48% share of global exports. These countries were followed by the Netherlands, Germany, France, Belgium, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, Hong Kong, and the UK, which together accounted for a further 31%.

Export Prices by Country

The average poultry export price stood at $1,644 per tonne in 2019, remaining relatively unchanged against the previous year. In general, the export price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 when the average export price increased by 11% year-to-year. The global export price peaked at $1,893 per tonne in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2019, export prices remained at a lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2019, the country with the highest price was Thailand ($2,683 per tonne), while the U.S. ($1,045 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2009 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Thailand, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

coal

The Asian-Pacific Coal Market Grows Markedly for the Third Consecutive Year

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘Asia-Pacific – Coal – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

In 2019, the Asia-Pacific coal market increased by 6.1% to $751.8B, rising for the third consecutive year after four years of decline. The total market indicated buoyant growth from 2007 to 2019: its value increased at an average annual rate of +3.8% over the last twelve-year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Over the period under review, the market attained the maximum level in 2019 and is expected to retain growth in years to come.

Consumption by Country

China (4,136M tonnes) constituted the country with the largest volume of coal consumption, accounting for 69% of total volume. Moreover, coal consumption in China exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest consumer, India (1,012M tonnes), fourfold. Japan (186M tonnes) ranked third in terms of total consumption with a 3.1% share.

From 2007 to 2019, the average annual growth rate of volume in China amounted to +3.7%. In India, the average annual rate of growth amounted to +5.2% per year, while in and Japan, the volume of consumption remained relatively unchanged against its outset level.

In value terms, China ($572.6B) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by India ($90.7B). It was followed by Japan.

The countries with the highest levels of coal per capita consumption in 2019 were Australia (4.85 tonne per person), China (2.84 tonne per person) and South Korea (2.78 tonne per person).

From 2007 to 2019, the biggest increases were in Indonesia, while coal per capita consumption for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Production in Asia-Pacific

In 2019, production of coal increased by 3% to 5,771M tonnes, rising for the third consecutive year after three years of decline. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +3.3% from 2007 to 2019; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2010 with an increase of 12% year-to-year. The volume of production peaked in 2019 and is expected to retain growth in the immediate term.

Production by Country

China (3,842M tonnes) constituted the country with the largest volume of coal production, comprising approx. 67% of total volume. Moreover, coal production in China exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest producer, India (760M tonnes), fivefold. Indonesia (536M tonnes) ranked third in terms of total production with a 9.3% share.

In China, coal production expanded at an average annual rate of +3.0% over the period from 2007-2019. The remaining producing countries recorded the following average annual rates of production growth: India (+3.7% per year) and Indonesia (+7.8% per year).

Imports in Asia-Pacific

In 2019, supplies from abroad of coal increased by 2.2% to 1,093M tonnes, rising for the fourth consecutive year after two years of decline. Total imports indicated a resilient expansion from 2007 to 2019: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +6.7% over the last twelve years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2019 figures, imports increased by +24.1% against 2015 indices. The volume of import peaked in 2019 and is likely to see gradual growth in years to come.

In value terms, coal imports contracted to $102B (IndexBox estimates) in 2019. In general, imports posted a buoyant expansion. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2008 with an increase of 79% y-o-y. The level of import peaked at $110.7B in 2018, and then shrank in the following year.

Imports by Country

In 2019, China (300M tonnes), India (254M tonnes), Japan (186M tonnes) and South Korea (141M tonnes) were the main importers of coal in Asia-Pacific, creating 81% of total import. They were distantly followed by Taiwan, Chinese (67M tonnes), committing a 6.1% share of total imports. The following importers – Malaysia (34M tonnes) and the Philippines (27M tonnes) – together made up 5.6% of total imports.

From 2007 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of purchases, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by China, while imports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, China ($23.4B), Japan ($23.3B) and India ($23B) appeared to be the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2019, together accounting for 68% of total imports.

China saw the highest growth rate of the value of imports, among the main importing countries over the period under review, while purchases for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

The coal import price in Asia-Pacific stood at $93 per tonne in 2019, waning by -9.9% against the previous year. Import price indicated tangible growth from 2007 to 2019: its price increased at an average annual rate of +2.4% over the last twelve-year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2008 when the import price increased by 71% y-o-y. Over the period under review, import prices reached the maximum at $130 per tonne in 2011; however, from 2012 to 2019, import prices stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Japan ($125 per tonne), while the Philippines ($70 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Malaysia, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

beet sugar

Global Sugar Beet Demand Is Expected to Hit 332M Tonnes by 2030

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘World – Sugar Beet – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The global sugar beet market stood at $657.6B in 2019, with an increase of 2.1% against the previous year. World consumption indicated a notable expansion from 2009 to 2019: its value increased at an average annual rate of +2.1% over the last decade. The trend line, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2011 when the market value increased by 52% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the global market reached a maximum level of $805.2B in 2017; however, from 2018 to 2019, consumption failed to regain the momentum. Based on 2019 figures, consumption decreased by -18.3% against 2017 indices.

Consumption by Country

The countries with the highest volumes of sugar beet consumption in 2019 were Russia (44M tonnes), France (40M tonnes), and the U.S. (30M tonnes), with a combined 42% share of global consumption. These countries were followed by Germany, Turkey, Poland, Ukraine, China, Egypt, the Netherlands, Belgium, and Belarus, which together accounted for a further 42%.

From 2009 to 2019, the biggest increases were in Egypt, while sugar beet consumption for the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Russia ($340.4B) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the U.S. ($151.2B). It was followed by Turkey.

The countries with the highest levels of sugar beet per capita consumption in 2019 were France (612 kg per person), Belarus (521 kg per person), and Belgium (432 kg per person).

Market Forecast to 2030

Driven by increasing demand for sugar beet worldwide, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next decade. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +1.9% for the period from 2019 to 2030, which is projected to bring the market volume to 332M tonnes by the end of 2030.

Sugar Beet Production

In 2019, global production of sugar beet totaled 271M tonnes, approximately equating 2018. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.2% over the period from 2009 to 2019; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed in certain years. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2011 with an increase of 22% against the previous year. Over the period under review, global production attained the maximum volume at 299M tonnes in 2017; however, from 2018 to 2019, production stood at a somewhat lower figure. The generally positive trend in terms output was largely conditioned by a pronounced increase of the harvested area and modest growth in yield figures.

Production by Country

The countries with the highest volumes of sugar beet production in 2019 were Russia (44M tonnes), France (40M tonnes), and the U.S. (30M tonnes), with a combined 42% share of global production. These countries were followed by Germany, Turkey, Poland, Ukraine, China, Egypt, the Netherlands, Belgium, and Belarus, which together accounted for a further 42%.

From 2009 to 2019, the biggest increases were in Egypt, while sugar beet production for the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Harvested Area

In 2019, the global harvested area of sugar beet shrank slightly to 4.7M ha, standing approx. at 2018 figures. The harvested area increased at an average annual rate of +1.2% from 2009 to 2019; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations throughout the analyzed period. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2010 with an increase of 9.5% y-o-y. The global harvested area peaked at 5M ha in 2011; however, from 2012 to 2019, the harvested area stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Yield

In 2019, the global average yield of sugar beet stood at 58 tonnes per ha, picking up by 1.6% against the previous year’s figure. In general, the yield saw a mild increase. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2011 with an increase of 12% year-to-year. Over the period under review, the average sugar beet yield hit record highs at 62 tonne per ha in 2017; however, from 2018 to 2019, the yield stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Exports

For the fourth year in a row, the global market recorded growth in overseas shipments of sugar beet, which increased by 42% to 503K tonnes in 2019.

In value terms, sugar beet exports rose sharply to $50M (IndexBox estimates) in 2019. Over the period under review, exports saw a noticeable shrinkage. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2011 with an increase of 34% against the previous year. Global exports peaked at $91M in 2012; however, from 2013 to 2019, exports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Exports by Country

Germany ($16M) remains the largest sugar beet supplier worldwide, comprising 32% of global exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the Netherlands ($6.9M), with a 14% share of global exports. It was followed by Belgium, with a 6.3% share.

In Germany, sugar beet exports expanded at an average annual rate of +12.8% over the period from 2009-2019. In other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: the Netherlands (-7.1% per year) and Belgium (+106.1% per year).

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

honey

HONEY BEES POLLINATE TRADE OPPORTUNITIES

Harvesting season in the Central Valley

Stretched across some 500 miles throughout California’s Central Valley, almond hulls are splitting open, signaling the beginning of harvesting season.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is forecasting that California’s almond growers are set to produce a bumper crop this year of about 2.5 billion pounds, about 70 percent of which will be exported around the world.

It’s an industry that drives about one-quarter of California’s farm exports and generates about $21.5 billion in economic output for the region including growing, processing and manufacturing activities.

A productive crop must be nourished

California is blessed with the perfect climate for almond production, but it must import one of its most important ingredients: pollinators for the almond blooms.

Every February, two out of every three commercial bee hives in the United States are transported to California, their bee residents pressed into service of the almond bloom.

In fact, it’s just the start of an annual food pollinating bee tour. Anywhere from 60 to 75 percent of the bee population kept as livestock crisscross the United States foraging on the blooms of crops that will eventually make their way into our grocery stores and into overseas markets.

Pollinated crop acreage

First stop, almond orchards

For most commercial bees, the pollinating season begins with almonds, California’s largest crop. To provide a sense of scale, Scientific American estimates it takes some two million hives – more than 31 billion honeybees – to pollinate the Central Valley’s 90 million almond trees during their two-week bloom. It’s a symbiotic relationship: the bees gather nectar and pollen to feed their colonies, enabling them to triple their population.

Once almonds bloom in January, hives are moved to other spring-blooming orchards such as cherries and plums in California or apples in the Pacific Northwest. Some head to Texas to pollinate squashes, others to citrus fruit orchards in Florida, and others are dispatched to pollinate cranberries in Wisconsin and cherries in Michigan.

In all, these busy bee travelers pollinate over 90 different crops and then sweeten the deal by shifting into delicious honey production by the end of summer, which they will nourish themselves on over winter while we get to consume the rest. Americans consume a staggering 1.6 pounds of honey per person every year. Even though U.S. beekeepers produced 148 million pounds of honey in 2017 and exported 9.9 million pounds, we imported 447.5 million pounds to keep up with demand from consumers and food producers.

Mobile beehive on trucks
Millions of bees are “exported” state to state to pollinate 90 different American crops.

One in every three bites of food

From cucumbers and citrus fruits to watermelon, kiwis, berries, cherries, apples, melons, peaches, figs, tomatoes, pumpkins and almonds, one-third of the U.S. food supply relies on pollination by the hard-working honey bee.

And, of course, since the United States is a major exporter of agricultural crops, we could say that honey bees help pollinate our trade opportunities. That’s true globally for hundreds of billions worth of crop production and internationally traded food that depends on pollinators.

$15 billion in value for 90 crops

Healthy bees, healthy trade in food

When bees get sick, the health of the U.S. agriculture economy and agricultural exports is imperiled.

Although honey bees are not the only pollinators supporting U.S. agriculture, they are the most important, adding more than $15 billion in value to U.S. agricultural crops each year according to the U.S. Pollinator Health Task Force.

Colony collapse disorder over the last few years drew widespread attention, but the decline in North American honey bees is a long-term trend. In 1947, there were about six million colonies but today we are down to about 2.5 million.

Sharp declines were seen following the introduction in 1987 of an external parasitic mite, aptly named Varroa destructor, that feeds on the blood of honey bees. Loss rates over the winter have been averaging around 31 percent since 2006, far exceeding the 15-17 percent that commercial bee keepers say is economically sustainable.

The rise of monoculture agriculture with increased reliance on pesticides and reduced use of cover crops is thought to add stress on bee health. The bees are struggling to maintain a varied and high-quality diet – they need protein from pollen and carbohydrates from the nectar of flowering plants. Without adequate nutrition, they are also more vulnerable to viruses.

1 in 3 bites

Experts have organized into research consortia, working groups and task forces to try to determine what can be done. The factors negatively impacting bee health are multiple, complex, and interacting, requiring a similarly comprehensive approach to combat them, including restoration of habitats, dissemination of best practices in hive management, and investments in research to better understand how to prevent colony loss.

We are all invested in their success, and when you see honey bees buzzing around your garden this summer, think about the humble but essential role their busywork plays in U.S. food production and agricultural exports.

This article is adapted from “Honey Bee Health is Serious Business” by Andrea Durkin for Progressive Economy.

_________________________________________________________________

Andrea Durkin is the Editor-in-Chief of TradeVistas and Founder of Sparkplug, LLC. Ms. Durkin previously served as a U.S. Government trade negotiator and has proudly taught international trade policy and negotiations for the last fifteen years as an Adjunct Professor at Georgetown University’s Master of Science in Foreign Service program.

This article originally appeared on TradeVistas.org. Republished with permission.

goat meat

The Asian-Pacific Goat Meat Market to Retain Robust Growth

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘Asia-Pacific – Goat Meat – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The Asia-Pacific goat meat market expanded rapidly to $30.1B in 2019, growing by 9.9% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The total market indicated a prominent expansion from 2007 to 2019: its value increased at an average annual rate of +1.8% over the last twelve-year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2019 figures, consumption increased by +56.7% against 2014 indices. The level of consumption peaked in 2019 and is expected to retain growth in years to come.

Consumption by Country

The country with the largest volume of goat meat consumption was China (2.4M tonnes), comprising approx. 61% of total volume. Moreover, goat meat consumption in China exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest consumer, India (502K tonnes), fivefold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Pakistan (352K tonnes), with a 9.1% share.

In China, goat meat consumption increased at an average annual rate of +1.9% over the period from 2007-2019. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: India (-0.5% per year) and Pakistan (+2.8% per year).

In value terms, China ($22.7B) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by India ($2.4B). It was followed by Pakistan.

The countries with the highest levels of goat meat per capita consumption in 2019 were Nepal (2.47 kg per person), Myanmar (1.89 kg per person) and Pakistan (1.72 kg per person).

Market Forecast 2019-2030

Driven by increasing demand for goat meat in Asia-Pacific, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next decade. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +1.5% for the period from 2019 to 2030, which is projected to bring the market volume to 4.6M tonnes by the end of 2030.

Production in Asia-Pacific

In 2019, goat meat production in Asia-Pacific rose to 3.9M tonnes, with an increase of 2% on 2018 figures. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.8% from 2007 to 2019; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed in certain years. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2016 with an increase of 3.4% y-o-y. Over the period under review, production reached the peak volume in 2019 and is likely to see gradual growth in the immediate term. The general positive trend in terms output was largely conditioned by a mild expansion of the number of producing animals and a relatively flat trend pattern in yield figures.

In value terms, goat meat production soared to $36.8B in 2019 estimated in export prices. Overall, production posted a remarkable increase. Over the period under review, production hit record highs in 2019 and is expected to retain growth in the immediate term.

Production by Country

China (2.4M tonnes) remains the largest goat meat producing country in Asia-Pacific, accounting for 61% of total volume. Moreover, goat meat production in China exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest producer, India (502K tonnes), fivefold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Pakistan (353K tonnes), with a 9.1% share.

In China, goat meat production increased at an average annual rate of +1.9% over the period from 2007-2019. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: India (-0.5% per year) and Pakistan (+2.7% per year).

Producing Animals in Asia-Pacific

In 2019, the number of animals slaughtered for goat meat production in Asia-Pacific expanded to 291M heads, picking up by 1.6% compared with the previous year. This number increased at an average annual rate of +1.5% over the period from 2007 to 2019; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations in certain years. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2009 when the number of producing animals increased by 5.3% year-to-year. Over the period under review, this number hit record highs at 291M heads in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2019, producing animals failed to regain the momentum.

Yield in Asia-Pacific

The average goat meat yield amounted to 13 kg per head in 2019, leveling off at the year before. Over the period under review, the yield saw a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 with an increase of 5.1% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the goat meat yield hit record highs in 2019 and is likely to see steady growth in years to come.

Imports in Asia-Pacific

In 2019, the amount of goat meat imported in Asia-Pacific contracted to 8.8K tonnes, waning by -9.2% on 2018. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.2% from 2007 to 2019; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2014 when imports increased by 25% against the previous year. As a result, imports reached the peak of 12K tonnes. From 2015 to 2019, the growth imports remained at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, goat meat imports declined to $43M (IndexBox estimates) in 2019. Overall, imports, however, recorded buoyant growth. The level of import peaked at $57M in 2017; however, from 2018 to 2019, imports yet failed to regain the momentum.

Imports by Country

The purchases of the four major importers of goat meat, namely Taiwan, Viet Nam, South Korea and Hong Kong SAR, represented more than two-thirds of total import. It was distantly followed by Japan (460 tonnes), making up a 5.2% share of total imports. China (317 tonnes), Macao SAR (292 tonnes), India (209 tonnes), Sri Lanka (185 tonnes), Malaysia (177 tonnes) and the Philippines (169 tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of purchases, amongst the key importing countries, was attained by India, while imports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest goat meat importing markets in Asia-Pacific were Taiwan ($12M), South Korea ($9.4M) and Hong Kong SAR ($6.4M), together comprising 64% of total imports. These countries were followed by Japan, Viet Nam, Macao SAR, China, Malaysia, Sri Lanka, the Philippines and India, which together accounted for a further 32%.

Among the main importing countries, India recorded the highest growth rate of the value of imports, over the period under review, while purchases for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

In 2019, the goat meat import price in Asia-Pacific amounted to $4,887 per tonne, waning by -2.2% against the previous year. Import price indicated a perceptible increase from 2007 to 2019: its price increased at an average annual rate of +4.5% over the last twelve years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2019 figures, goat meat import price decreased by -15.8% against 2017 indices. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2016 when the import price increased by 22% year-to-year. Over the period under review, import prices reached the peak figure at $5,802 per tonne in 2017; however, from 2018 to 2019, import prices failed to regain the momentum.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2019, the country with the highest price was Macao SAR ($7,657 per tonne), while Viet Nam ($1,613 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Macao SAR, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

fig

Global Fig Market Posts Solid Gains

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘World – Figs – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

Exports 2007-2019

In 2019, shipments abroad of figs increased by 4% to 130K tonnes, rising for the fourth consecutive year after two years of decline. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +3.6% over the period from 2007 to 2019; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2010 with an increase of 13% year-to-year. Over the period under review, global exports attained the maximum in 2019 and are expected to retain growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, fig exports shrank to $467M (IndexBox estimates) in 2019. The total export value increased at an average annual rate of +3.9% over the period from 2007 to 2019; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period.

Exports by Country

Turkey dominates fig exports structure, amounting to 85K tonnes, which was near 65% of total exports in 2019. It was distantly followed by Spain (7.6K tonnes), making up a 5.8% share of total exports. Germany (3.8K tonnes), the Netherlands (3.8K tonnes), Syrian Arab Republic (3.7K tonnes), Greece (3.6K tonnes), the U.S. (2.3K tonnes), France (2K tonnes) and Iran (2K tonnes) occupied a relatively small share of total exports.

From 2007 to 2019, average annual rates of growth with regard to fig exports from Turkey stood at +5.0%. At the same time, Greece (+6.5%), Germany (+5.3%), Spain (+3.9%), Syrian Arab Republic (+3.7%) and the Netherlands (+2.3%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Greece emerged as the fastest-growing exporter exported in the world, with a CAGR of +6.5% from 2007-2019. France experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. By contrast, the U.S. (-2.3%) and Iran (-7.0%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period. From 2007 to 2019, the share of Turkey and Spain increased by +29% and +2.2% percentage points, while Iran (-2.1 p.p.) saw their share reduced. The shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, Turkey ($287M) remains the largest fig supplier worldwide, comprising 61% of global exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the Netherlands ($21M), with a 4.5% share of global exports. It was followed by Spain, with a 4.4% share.

From 2007 to 2019, the average annual rate of growth in terms of value in Turkey totaled +4.5%. The remaining exporting countries recorded the following average annual rates of exports growth: the Netherlands (+3.2% per year) and Spain (+7.7% per year).

Export Prices by Country

The average fig export price stood at $3,591 per tonne in 2019, dropping by -6.4% against the previous year. In general, the export price, however, saw a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2008 an increase of 20% year-to-year. As a result, export price attained the peak level of $4,138 per tonne. From 2009 to 2019, the growth in terms of the average export prices failed to regain the momentum.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2019, the country with the highest price was the U.S. ($5,855 per tonne), while Iran ($2,269 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Syrian Arab Republic, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports 2007-2019

Global fig imports rose notably to 162K tonnes in 2019, surging by 10% compared with the previous year’s figure. In general, total imports indicated a tangible expansion from 2007 to 2019: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +4.7% over the last twelve years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2019 figures, imports increased by +25.8% against 2017 indices. Global imports peaked in 2019 and are likely to see gradual growth in the near future.

In value terms, fig imports rose sharply to $603M (IndexBox estimates) in 2019. Overall, total imports indicated a strong increase from 2007 to 2019: its value increased at an average annual rate of +4.7% over the last twelve-year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Over the period under review, global imports hit record highs in 2019 and are expected to retain growth in the near future.

Imports by Country

In 2019, India (27K tonnes), followed by Germany (18K tonnes), France (15K tonnes), the U.S. (12K tonnes) and the UK (7.5K tonnes) were the key importers of figs, together making up 49% of total imports. The following importers – Russia (5.6K tonnes), Austria (5.5K tonnes), Italy (5.2K tonnes), the Netherlands (4.7K tonnes), Canada (4.1K tonnes), Viet Nam (3.6K tonnes) and Switzerland (3.6K tonnes) – together made up 20% of total imports.

From 2007 to 2019, the biggest increases were in India, while purchases for the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, India ($96M), Germany ($63M) and France ($57M) appeared to be the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2019, together accounting for 36% of global imports. These countries were followed by the U.S., the UK, Austria, Canada, Italy, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Viet Nam and Russia, which together accounted for a further 33%.

Viet Nam saw the highest rates of growth with regard to the value of imports, among the main importing countries over the period under review, while purchases for the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

The average fig import price stood at $3,725 per tonne in 2019, waning by -4.4% against the previous year. In general, the import price, however, saw a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2008 an increase of 24% against the previous year. As a result, import price reached the peak level of $4,294 per tonne. From 2009 to 2019, the growth in terms of the average import prices failed to regain the momentum.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2019, the country with the highest price was Canada ($5,675 per tonne), while Russia ($1,529 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the U.S., while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

EXIM'S

CHAIRMAN REED UNDERSCORES EXIM’S SUPPORT FOR AMERICAN INNOVATION GLOBALLY TO COUNCIL ON COMPETITIVENESS

Export-Import Bank of the United States (EXIM) President and Chairman Kimberly A. Reed participated in a Council on Competitiveness virtual dialogue with more than 40 members of the Council’s “Technology Leadership and Strategy Initiative” on June 8. Attendees represented a range of businesses, universities, and research institutions from across the country.

During the event, Reed highlighted EXIM’s role in advancing American innovation by helping U.S. businesses export their “Made in the USA” products around the world. She also discussed EXIM’s new Program on China and Transformational Exports, established in EXIM’s historic reauthorization, which is intended to help level the playing field for U.S. exporters and workers by directly neutralizing export subsidies for competing goods and services offered by the People’s Republic of China.

“The Council on Competitiveness has worked for many years to jump-start American productivity, and I was honored to join this esteemed group to focus on how the U.S. government can support innovation on the global stage,” Reed said.

Speaking of innovation, four days later Reed hosted a teleconference with 140 business leaders and stakeholders in the artificial intelligence, quantum computing, and high-performance computing sectors. On the call, Reed highlighted how EXIM’s partnership with the private sector can support and accelerate the success of American companies in of these transformative industries.

“These transformational exports drive growth in the United States economy, enhance our economic and national security, and improve our quality of life,” said Reed.

electrical insulator

The EU Electrical Insulator Market Slipped Back Slightly

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Electrical Insulators – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

For the third consecutive year, the EU electrical insulator market recorded decline in sales value, which decreased by -6.8% to $692M in 2019. In general, consumption recorded a perceptible contraction. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 with an increase of 3.1% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the market attained the peak level at $1.1B in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2019, consumption remained at a lower figure.

Consumption by Country

The countries with the highest volumes of electrical insulator consumption in 2019 were Germany (17M units), Italy (12M units) and Spain (12M units), with a combined 36% share of total consumption. Romania, France, Poland, the Netherlands, the Czech Republic, the UK, Belgium, Sweden and Austria lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 50%.

From 2007 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of electrical insulator consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Romania, while electrical insulator consumption for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Germany ($168M) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Belgium ($64M). It was followed by France.

The countries with the highest levels of electrical insulator per capita consumption in 2019 were Romania (575 units per 1000 persons), the Czech Republic (564 units per 1000 persons) and the Netherlands (384 units per 1000 persons).

From 2007 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of electrical insulator per capita consumption, amongst the leading consuming countries, was attained by Romania, while electrical insulator per capita consumption for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Market Forecast 2019-2030

Driven by rising demand for electrical insulator in the European Union, the market is expected to start an upward consumption trend over the next decade. The performance of the market is forecast to increase slightly, with an anticipated CAGR of +0.1% for the period from 2019 to 2030, which is projected to bring the market volume to 115M units by the end of 2030.

Production in the EU

In 2019, after three years of decline, there was growth in production of electrical insulators, when its volume increased by 3% to 132M units. In general, production, however, recorded a slight decrease. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2015 with an increase of 9.2% y-o-y. The volume of production peaked at 166M units in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2019, production failed to regain the momentum.

In value terms, electrical insulator production amounted to $967M in 2019 estimated in export prices. Overall, production, however, continues to indicate a pronounced reduction. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 when the production volume increased by 4.4% against the previous year. The level of production peaked at $1.4B in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2019, production remained at a lower figure.

Production by Country

The countries with the highest volumes of electrical insulator production in 2019 were Italy (23M units), Spain (21M units) and Germany (20M units), together accounting for 49% of total production. Romania, Poland, Portugal, France, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, the Netherlands, Belgium and Austria lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 47%.

From 2007 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of electrical insulator production, amongst the leading producing countries, was attained by Romania, while electrical insulator production for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Exports in the EU

In 2019, after three years of decline, there was growth in shipments abroad of electrical insulators, when their volume increased by 2.1% to 100M units. Over the period under review, exports, however, showed a mild contraction. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2014 with an increase of 4.7% y-o-y. The volume of export peaked at 123M units in 2015; however, from 2016 to 2019, exports remained at a lower figure.

In value terms, electrical insulator exports declined to $890M (IndexBox estimates) in 2019. In general, exports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

Exports by Country

In 2019, Italy (24M units), distantly followed by Spain (15M units), Germany (15M units), Poland (7.3M units), Portugal (6.6M units), Romania (6.3M units), Slovakia (5.3M units) and the Czech Republic (4.6M units) represented the major exporters of electrical insulators, together making up 84% of total exports.

From 2007 to 2019, the biggest increases were in Poland, while shipments for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Germany ($250M), Italy ($150M) and Portugal ($48M) constituted the countries with the highest levels of exports in 2019, together comprising 50% of total exports. These countries were followed by Spain, the Czech Republic, Poland, Romania and Slovakia, which together accounted for a further 18%.

Poland saw the highest growth rate of the value of exports, among the main exporting countries over the period under review, while shipments for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

The electrical insulator export price in the European Union stood at $8.9 per unit in 2019, declining by -5.9% against the previous year. Overall, the export price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2018 an increase of 14% year-to-year. As a result, export price reached the peak level of $9.5 per unit, and then fell in the following year.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Germany ($17 per unit), while Slovakia ($2.8 per unit) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Germany, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

In 2019, approx. 82M units of electrical insulators were imported in the European Union; which is down by -6.4% against 2018 figures. Over the period under review, imports recorded a slight curtailment. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2010 when imports increased by 13% y-o-y. Over the period under review, imports hit record highs at 95M units in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2019, imports failed to regain the momentum.

In value terms, electrical insulator imports contracted to $600M (IndexBox estimates) in 2019. In general, imports continue to indicate a mild decline. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2018 with an increase of 11% year-to-year.

Imports by Country

In 2019, Italy (13M units), Germany (11M units), France (8.4M units), Sweden (6.5M units), Spain (5.3M units), the UK (4.9M units), the Czech Republic (4.7M units), Poland (4.1M units), the Netherlands (2.9M units), Portugal (2.7M units), Romania (2.3M units) and Austria (2.2M units) represented the major importer of electrical insulators in the European Union, mixing up 83% of total import.

From 2007 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of purchases, amongst the key importing countries, was attained by Romania, while imports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Germany ($116M), Italy ($59M) and the UK ($56M) constituted the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2019, together accounting for 38% of total imports. These countries were followed by France, Spain, Poland, the Netherlands, the Czech Republic, Austria, Sweden, Portugal and Romania, which together accounted for a further 46%.

Austria recorded the highest rates of growth with regard to the value of imports, among the main importing countries over the period under review, while purchases for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

The electrical insulator import price in the European Union stood at $7.3 per unit in 2019, approximately mirroring the previous year. In general, the import price showed a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2008 an increase of 9.3% year-to-year. As a result, import price reached the peak level of $8 per unit. From 2009 to 2019, the growth in terms of the import prices failed to regain the momentum.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2019, the country with the highest price was Austria ($12 per unit), while Sweden ($3.9 per unit) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform