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The Employment System Was Broken Long Before COVID-19 – Can tilr Lead a Workforce Revolution?

employment

The Employment System Was Broken Long Before COVID-19 – Can tilr Lead a Workforce Revolution?

Young people make up a disproportionate share of what is a low-wage workforce and recent studies argue that they will be the hardest hit by the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic. 

What are your projections for their job-market recovery, post-COVID-19?

 Co-Founder and CEO Stephen Shefsky

Unfortunately, a lot of entry-level positions affecting younger, lower skilled workers were the first and hardest-hit at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Many employers during the pandemic, fired or furloughed many of their workers, that were deemed necessary for their survival. Given the above, it is no surprise that U.S. low-wage unemployment has skyrocketed at its peak to roughly 40%.

As businesses start to come back, there may be some subtle advantages for those low-skilled / low-wage workers. Some companies will inevitably gravitate towards hiring or re-hiring their lower-wage earners, instead of turning to an older, more expensive and more-skilled workforce.

Not all young people will immediately find employment; some must be prepared to accept the fact that their jobs won’t come back. When that happens, ‘up-skilling’ will become very important. Giving direction to those looking to re-enter the workforce is something very top of mind at tilr.

We at tilr believe there is a better way to bring job-seekers back into the workforce; a better way for employers to save both time and money in their on-boarding process.

tilr’s technology will help solve some of those challenges for both job-seekers and employers.

The country is going to be in a place of rebuilding and recovery over the next several years. We realize that this is the moment that companies and job-seekers alike will need us most.

How will tilr’s technology be applicable to what is today, an American workforce in crisis?

til’s algorithmic-hiring platform offers an alternative to traditional resume databases and key word search technology. We have developed ‘an on-demand marketplace’, one that matches pre-registered workers’ skills with employers, not based on keywords that may or may not be included in their resumes.

This will give job-seekers a better opportunity to find employment and jobs best suited to their skills, because it will no longer come down to who wrote a better resume, be subject to bias or cause candidates to play the waiting game, while employers sift through countless resumes before they happen to come upon the one they like, costing the company time and money.

For employers (and tilr has worked with hundreds of client companies), the way we’ve developed our technology is, in many ways, revolutionary. We have built the technology that is able to define the deliverable (skills) that a company needs in real-time and then quickly unlock a pool of workers that have the specific, necessary tools to accomplish the job at hand. We provide a platform for locating immediately available, local talent who can be employed in a matter of hours or days.

COVID-19 has hurt many; we’re witnessing presently an historically high unemployment rate. We want to offer people relief by way of giving them a better chance to find work, to take care of their families, and to do so based on their previous job experience and relevant skills obtained; not by having to take many months or years to reinvent themselves (which some people will inevitably have to do).

Today, many unemployed men and women will need time to be reabsorbed into the marketplace. Our technology further directs those people to training platforms capable of helping them ‘up-skill’ and to prepare them for work; to be as good or better than they were before.

As companies pivot to teleconferencing, their employees working from home in the spirit of ‘social distancing’, how can modern technology benefit those looking to employ and/or up-skill future workers?

Many companies are going to continue to employ their workers, and having some of them working from home as opposed to an office environment.

Today’s technology gives companies the option to have many members of their workforce contribute remotely. There are many software solutions that will allow more and more work to be done virtually, affording workers the opportunity to keep in constant contact with their organizations.

However, I’ve always believed that for employers, knowing what human resources (HR) / skills they don’t have in the organization is as important as knowing what you currently have at any given moment.

tilr has built the technology that will assist the job-matching and skills matching for those companies, which can expedite the process of hiring workers, both for in-office positions and from home.

Our ‘marketplace’ technology can support employers in real-time, razor focused on understanding and interpreting aggregated skill-sets, offering access to a more focused labor market, while also preparing future employees for a virtual workforce-environment.

Companies can access the platform from the web on any computer or handheld device.

Workers can access tilr opportunities via an app on IOS and Android mobile devices.

tilr’s technology can assist job-seekers to identify their own present skill-gaps and offer opportunities or suggestions on how to ‘up-skill’ to match the jobs they want. We will introduce new employment opportunities matching their skill-sets which they may not have thought of.

Learning will become much more technology-driven in the near term. Even after we return to a semblance of normalcy, more learning and work will take place online. As an example, technology that drives telemedicine today may very well become the first line of interaction between a patient and a doctor long after COVID-19.

We are currently in discussions with several companies (States and Provincial Governments in the U.S. and Canada) to offer our skill mapping technology and create a database of human resources (skills).

Lastly, is embracing technology the future of the Employment Agency?

Employment agencies are going to need to do things a little differently in the future.

tilr technology can assist the 80-85% of workers who are currently registered with an agency, but not always working.

tilr offers employment agency businesses an additional way of helping those registered with the agency to find work, who are not currently working, providing a more efficient use of human resources.

It’s safe to say that the current workforce is in an awful state of disarray. Technology can help usher in a workforce revolution, and help propel an economic recovery.

tilr automates the recruitment process by using skills to connect companies with job seekers, enhancing workers’ lives and companies’ bottom lines.

HR tech

The Real Digital Transformation In HR Tech: How Global Leaders Can Manage

All executives across the globe should embrace HR technology to represent a complete answer to the need for innovation and continuous learning in today’s global market environment. In doing this, first executives must have an understanding of the concept of knowledge in companies. To analyze knowledge in organizations, there is an important taxonomy of organizational knowledge that needs to be discussed. The following section addresses this taxonomy in depth to set the record straight upon the importance of HR Technology.

Human, Social, and Structured Knowledge

Two prominent scholars that are well known in the Academy of Management, one of the largest leadership and management organizations in the world by the names of David De Long and Liam Fahey argue that knowledge can also be classified using individual, social, and structured dimensions. Executives can categorize followers based on their human knowledge which focuses on individual knowledge and manifests itself in an individual’s competencies and skills. This type of knowledge includes both tacit and explicit knowledge. David De Long and Liam Fahey suggest that this form of knowledge comprises the skills gained by individual experiences, and learned as rules and instructions formulated by executives for followers to use as a guide.

Social knowledge, on the other hand, is categorized as tacit knowledge that is shared so that it can become collective knowledge. Executives can use structured knowledge that emerges informal language from annual reports, memos, and other means of communication to be represented as statements, and is considered explicit knowledge. Therefore, consultants can classify knowledge in this way so that it emerges at three levels—-individual (i.e. human), group (i.e. social) and organizational (i.e. structured).

Executives can implement HR technology to create conducive organizational climates that foster organizational learning in which individual knowledge is shared and utilized. Unshared individual knowledge is like lettuce in the refrigerator—if shared, everyone enjoys it, if not, it could not have any use. In the next section, I present a factor that executives have embraced—–HR technology.   

Managing Knowledge and Innovation through HR Technology

HR technology is an internal resource that increasingly facilitates HR business processes and improves the search for information and knowledge around the company. For example, HRIS (Human Resource Information System) software enables companies to overcome space constraints in communications and promotes the depth and range of knowledge access. HRIS software can be also employed to enhance the conversations and knowledge exchanges between organizational members. Three prominent scholars in the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill by the names of Andrew Gold, Arvind Malhotra and Albert Segars argue that this knowledge shared through technology could positively contribute to knowledge integration. Executives can apply HRIS software to develop and disseminate information throughout the company which can improve the search for information in order to adapt to today’s uncertain business environment.

HCM (Human Capital Management) software is an important resource for strategic planning for knowledge integration. Robert Grant highlights knowledge integration as a major reason for the existence of a company. This software enhances learning and sharing information by providing access to accurate information and knowledge. HCM software also stimulates new knowledge generation, through transferring knowledge to other members and departments. Knowledge sharing itself can in turn develop more innovative climates and facilitate knowledge creation in organizations. HCM software can, therefore, play a crucial role in improving knowledge creation and transference. Executives can use HCM software to develop an effective learning culture that disseminates knowledge around the company.

HRMS (Human Resource Management System) software can be also used by executives to facilitate of the knowledge creation process through providing the essential infrastructures to store and retrieve organizational knowledge. HRMS software encourages executives to embark on technological facilities to provide new and possible solutions for solving organizational problems and transferring individuals’ knowledge to other members and departments and improving knowledge capturing, storing, and accumulating to achieve organizational goals.

In Conclusion

This article advances the current literature on HR technology and knowledge management by offering novel insights into how better HR technology leads to better knowledge management. Executives can apply HR technology in their decision-making processes in order to investigate various alternatives and options.

Success in today’s global business environment can be more effective when HR technology is effectively applied and widely used to achieve a higher degree of competitiveness. Importantly, knowledge management performance at all levels of the company is positively associated with using HR technology and setting up useful software and systems to enhance strategic decision-making. Executives can implement HR technology by employing IT professionals and allocating more budgetary resources to share and utilize knowledge within companies.

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References

Gold, A.H., Malhotra, A. and Segars, A.H. 2001. Knowledge management: An organizational capabilities perspective. Journal of Management Information Systems, 18(1), 185-214.

Grant, R.M. 1996. Toward a knowledge-based theory of the firm. Strategic Management Journal, 17(S2), 109-122.

Long, D.W.D., & Fahey, L. (2000). Diagnosing cultural barriers to knowledge management. The Academy of Management Executive, 14(4), 113-127.

talent acquisition

What’s Next For You? How Knowledge Management is Transforming Talent Management in Global Markets

Knowledge management seeks to apply organizational knowledge in order to satisfy and exceed employee’s expectations. All executives need to be aware of how to better control knowledge management which coincides with talent management and to do this, they should understand the strong correlation between two important factors. The focus of this article is based upon the critical role of knowledge management which allows a rich basis for understanding the mechanisms by which talent management is influenced.

6 Key Practices to Integrate Talent Management and Knowledge Management

Since executives are constantly dealing with employee development, talent management is something they pay a great deal of attention to. Of course, this is not new but worth mentioning. A mistake in this area may be vital to the organizations and executives must choose their practices wisely. This article addresses these knowledge management practices in depth to set the record straight upon the importance of talent management.

1. Prioritize Candidate Experience

Knowledge is a collection of meaningful experiences. The key take-away for executives is that prioritizing candidate experience can enable organizations to solve problems and create value through improved performance and it is this point that will narrow the gaps of success and failure leading to more successful decision-making.

2. Tailor Talent Acquisition Strategy to Business Goals

Executives must determine their business goals for the next three years and develop a talent acquisition strategy that focuses on planning the work and technically supporting newly-hired employees to achieve the business goals. A talent acquisition strategy helps companies to achieve their business goals that reflect excellence and some kind of higher-order effectiveness. This is where executives can attempt to achieve business goals—stemming from a talent acquisition strategy across pivotal areas on the organization.

3. Educate the Hiring Manager

Hiring managers can become familiar with employee recruitment practices through education. Education is more active, broad, flexible, experimental, synthetic, and strategic compared to training. Why is this, you may ask? Because education is a process that leads to acquiring new insights and knowledge, and potentially to correct sub-optimal or ineffective actions and behaviors that cause companies to spiral out of control.

4. Enhance Training Efficiency

Executives must provide work-related training programs for newly-hired employees when beginning onboarding and must be aware of their training efficiency programs. As executive trainers, I agree with Jennifer Rowley who suggests training courses as an effective way to share knowledge. Most importantly, applying knowledge aimed at providing better decision-making and work-related practices and creating new knowledge through innovation. Knowledge has to be measured in some way, many trainers talk about return-on-investment of training which is hard to measure, training satisfaction measurement by participants and their desire to apply it to the workplace is an excellent barometer of learning new skills or building upon old ones. The key point in the training is the knowledge use coupled with testing and re-testing to ensure that the knowledge is actually helping the organization grow professionally for employees and profitably for all stakeholders.

 5. Write No Strict Job Descriptions

When newly-hired employees come on board, they are given job descriptions. But how can executives write no strict job descriptions? The answer to this question lies in an executive’s demonstration to motivate employees to approach organizational problems in a more novel approach. In doing this, executives can inspire employees to rethink problems and challenge their current personal attitudes and values. Most importantly, executives can transform organizations by attempting to change the basic values, beliefs, and attitudes of employees so that they are willing to perform beyond their previous or originally level specified by the organization in their job description.

6. Be More Flexible

Flexibility in the workplace may enable executives to improve departmental and managerial interactions and develop relationships among managers, business units, and departments. Through flexibility in the workplace, executives can also shift the power of decision-making to the lower levels and inspire newly-hired employees to create new ideas and implement them, which can in turn propel interdepartmental communications and improve knowledge exchange.

In Conclusion

This article can offer several implications for practice. First, this article highlights that there is a strong correlation between knowledge management and talent management within organizations. Importantly, this approach advances the current business literature on talent management by offering novel insights into how knowledge management affects talent identification, satisfaction and retention. This article suggests new insights to identify knowledge management as a primary driver of effective talent management for companies. Therefore, I suggest that executives embrace knowledge management. My primary focus is on one factor (talent management) but there are many more important components of the managerial function that can be enhanced when knowledge management is embraced. The key here is that there are positive effects of knowledge management on talent management.

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Rowley, J. (2001). Knowledge management in pursuit of learning: the learning with knowledge cycle. Journal of Information Science, Vol. 27, No. 4, pp. 227-237.