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TeleSense Addresses Global Grain Ecosystem Challenges

TeleSense Addresses Global Grain Ecosystem Challenges

Grain spoilage may soon be a thing of the past for global grain operators and transporters. IoT tech innovator TeleSense recently announced its acquisition of Danish wireless sensor technology company, Webstech. Through this acquisition, TeleSense announced it will amp up IoT efforts as it now has access to the largest global remote-sensed dataset and plans on integrating Webstech’s industrial automation capabilities, solar/battery power functionality and sensor spears to its current solution.

“Spoilage and energy optimization in drying grain continue to be multi-billion dollar issues; TeleSense provides the data insights needed for players throughout the global grain ecosystem to improve safety and profitability,” TeleSense CEO Naeem Zafar said. “The acquisition of Webstech greatly accelerates our entry into the European market and provides millions of additional historical data points to further refine our machine learning technology and predictive algorithms.” 

The TeleSense GrainSafe™ AI platform serves the grain supply chain as a scalable solution through monitoring temperature and humidity levels and providing real-time view of the stored grain to ensure quality conditions are maintained. With this innovative, portable, and wireless solution, the company is ready to expand its presence beyond the U.S. and Australia and make its entry in the European regions.

“How grain is stored, handled and traded in the years to come will change as new IoT-enabled technologies take hold throughout the supply chain,” added Peter Votkjaer Jorgensen of Maersk Growth Ventures. “We think that this acquisition by TeleSense will accelerate the mission of higher sustainability and efficiency in the grain supply chain.”

The company also confirmed it will expand with a new Denmark office and onboard two new additions to the team. Maersk Growth Ventures’ Peter Votkjaer Jorgensen will serve on the Board of Directors of the newly created TeleSense Europe ApS subsidiary and Webstech’s CEO Thomas Kylling will serve as managing director for TeleSense’s European team.

“After operating in the European remote sensing space for almost a decade, I was absolutely blown away by TeleSense’s integration of data science with an IoT solution for grain,” noted Kylling. “I think that TeleSense will help drive the automation of the grain supply chain, and I’m excited to help lead the effort in Europe.” 

Case Study Reveals Bulk Terminal Pest Challenges

Information released in a case study by bulk terminal operator, HSE at Terminales Marítimos de Galicia (TMGA), is urging other terminal operators to reconsider their approach to effective pest control, as cargo fumigation isn’t making the cut and leaving too much risk for infestation. One of the causes identified is the presence of Weevils left behind long after lots have been shipped.

“We are finding that the pupae and larvae inside maize kernels in various consignments, and which were subjected to in-transit fumigation, are not affected by phosphine or phosphine generating fumigants and growing into weevils while cargoes are in storage,” said Javier Quintero Saavedra, head of HSE at Terminales Marítimos de Galicia (TMGA).

“Bulk terminals need to implement a fully integrated pest management plan. Operators must monitor silo temperatures and moisture and be able to spot insect and larvae infestations in large storage premises. They should also carry out regular cleaning of empty stores and better understand the use of different pesticides and their effects,” Saavedra added.

Balancing pest management while ensuring safety measures are in place is another challenge identified in the case study – which will be presented by Saavedra at this year’s  Association of Bulk Terminal Operator’s (ABTO) conference – Bulk Terminals,  in October.

“While grain cargoes are usually fumigated at origin or in-transit if larvae survive and evolve it can be a real issue for terminal operators,” ABTO CE Simon Gutteridge said. “It can write-off the whole consignment. There is obviously a strong case for fumigating cargoes stored in silos at discharge ports, especially where maize kernels are stored, but this is not without its own problems.”

As phosphine and methyl bromide are known as top chemical choices for fumigation, both are linked to high-risk health hazards including acute intoxication, hypoxia, asphyxiation, seafarer fatalities, and run the risk of leaks to other facilities. This risks and more will be discussed in detail during Saavedra’s presentation covering port-side fumigation.

“There are IMO guidelines for the use of pesticides in-transit, but the rules governing their use in storage facilities ashore is at national level. Although the European Commission oversees the approval of active substances, it is the individual state that decides whether to allow their use or not,” said Saavedra. “What the bulk terminals industry needs is more globally-focused best practice guidelines, an initiative supported both by ICHCA and ABTO.”