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Belgium Increased Polypropylene Supplies to Germany

polypropylene

Belgium Increased Polypropylene Supplies to Germany

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘Belgium – Polypropylene In Primary Forms – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the polypropylene market in Belgium amounted to $1.8B in 2018, jumping by 8.3% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price).

Production in Belgium

In 2018, the amount of polypropylene in primary forms produced in Belgium amounted to 1.7M tonnes, stabilizing at the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.0% from 2012 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations over the period under review. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2015 with an increase of 6.1% against the previous year. In that year, polypropylene production reached its peak volume of 1.7M tonnes; afterwards, it flattened through to 2018.

Exports from Belgium

Polypropylene exports from Belgium amounted to 1.1M tonnes in 2018, standing approx. at the previous year. Overall, polypropylene exports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2016 when exports increased by 7.7% year-to-year. Exports peaked at 1.1M tonnes in 2013; afterwards, it flattened through to 2018.

In value terms, polypropylene exports amounted to $1.8B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

Germany (288K tonnes) was the main destination for polypropylene exports from Belgium, with a 27% share of total exports. Moreover, polypropylene exports to Germany exceeded the volume sent to the second major destination, the Netherlands (99K tonnes), threefold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Italy (98K tonnes), with a 9% share.

From 2012 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of volume to Germany stood at +2.3%. Exports to the other major destinations recorded the following average annual rates of  growth: the Netherlands (-1.6% per year) and Italy (-3.1% per year).

In value terms, Germany ($491M) remains the key foreign market for polypropylene exports from Belgium, comprising 28% of total polypropylene exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by France ($163M), with a 9.3% share of total exports. It was followed by Italy, with a 8.3% share.

Export Prices by Country

The average polypropylene export price stood at $1,618 per tonne in 2018, jumping by 14% against the previous year. Average prices varied somewhat for the major foreign markets. In 2018, the countries with the highest prices were the Czech Republic ($1,876 per tonne) and Spain ($1,826 per tonne), while the average price for exports to Poland ($1,413 per tonne) and the Netherlands ($1,474 per tonne) were amongst the lowest.

From 2012 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was recorded for supplies to the Czech Republic, while the prices for the other major destinations experienced a decline.

Imports into Belgium

In 2018, the imports of polypropylene in primary forms into Belgium totaled 707K tonnes, going down by -5.2% against the previous year. In general, polypropylene imports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2016 when imports increased by 13% year-to-year. Over the period under review, polypropylene imports attained their maximum at 746K tonnes in 2017, and then declined slightly in the following year.

In value terms, polypropylene imports stood at $966M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

France (145K tonnes), the UK (124K tonnes) and the Netherlands (100K tonnes) were the main suppliers of polypropylene imports to Belgium, with a combined 52% share of total imports. Germany, Saudi Arabia, Brazil, South Korea, Russia, Finland, Austria and the U.S. lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 38%.

From 2012 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main suppliers, was attained by Finland, while imports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest polypropylene suppliers to Belgium were France ($227M), the UK ($131M) and the Netherlands ($130M), with a combined 50% share of total imports. These countries were followed by Germany, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, Brazil, Austria, Russia, Finland and the U.S., which together accounted for a further 39%.

Import Prices by Country

The average polypropylene import price stood at $1,366 per tonne in 2018, jumping by 18% against the previous year.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major supplying countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Austria ($1,647 per tonne), while the price for the UK ($1,049 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2012 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the U.S., while the prices for the other major suppliers experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

trade protectionism

Trade Protectionism Won’t Help Fight COVID-19

Countries around the world are limiting international trade and turning inward, seeking to produce nearly everything — especially medical supplies — themselves.

The Trump administration, for instance, is considering a “Buy American” executive order that would require federal agencies to purchase domestically made masks, ventilators, and medicines. And over two dozen countries — including France, Germany, South Korea, and Taiwan — have banned domestic companies from exporting medical supplies.

The scramble for self-sufficiency in medical supplies and medicines needed to fight the coronavirus is make-believe. It is neither feasible nor desirable, and will only deepen the pain felt amidst this pandemic.

Governments around the world have responded to COVID-19 by imposing export restrictions on things like ventilators and masks. In mid-April, Syria became the 76th country to follow suit. The import side of things isn’t much better. The World Trade Organization (WTO) reports that tariffs remain stubbornly high on protective medical gear, averaging 11.5 percent across the 164 members of the Geneva-based institution, and peaking at just under 30 percent.

This is no way to fight a pandemic.

It’s not that COVID-19 caused this bout of trade protectionism. It’s just that COVID-19 offers up a useful narrative to promote trade protectionism.

The Trump administration, for instance, has been touting its “Buy American” executive order as a move to spur local manufacturing. Canada has also considered going it alone in ventilators and masks, but recently acknowledged it can’t possibly achieve self-sufficiency in medicines. No one can.

The way many governments see it, the only thing standing in the way of greater self-reliance in medical equipment and medicines is the will to pay for it. The story is that ventilators might be more expensive if made domestically, but that’s the cost of going it alone. It’s only a matter of getting Bauer and Brooks Brothers, for example, to make personal protective equipment, rather than hockey gear and clothing.

But there’s a reason Bauer makes skates instead of surgical masks. It’s better at it, and skates are a much more lucrative business. Bauer didn’t misread the market. It’s heartwarming to hear that Bauer is stepping in to help out, but the company knows that making surgical masks in the US is five times more expensive than making them in China. That’s why 95 percent of the surgical masks in the US are imported.

The absurdity of self-sufficiency in medicines is even more glaring. The US is a major exporter of medicines, but the raw chemicals used to make them are imported. Nearly three-quarters of the facilities that manufacture America’s “active pharmaceutical ingredients” are overseas. To reorient supply chains to produce these ingredients domestically would take up to 10 years and cost $2 billion for each new facility.  Consumers would pay at least 30 percent more at the pharmacy.

The last plug for self-sufficiency in medical equipment and medicines is that it’s not a good idea to depend on adversaries to keep us healthy. We don’t. What’s striking about medicines, medical equipment, and personal protective products is that market share is highly concentrated among allies. For example, Germany, the US, and Switzerland supply 35 percent of medical products sold worldwide. True, China leads the top ten list of personal protective products, at 17 percent market share, but the other nine, including the US at number three, are all longstanding allies. To be sure, the untold story of China is that it depends on Germany and the United States for nearly 40 percent of its medical products.

This past week, the WTO and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) called for an end to the folly of trade restrictions during this pandemic. The communique should have — but obviously couldn’t — call out governments around the world for maintaining, on average, a 17 percent tariff on soap. That tariffs on face masks average nearly 10 percent is baffling. That 20 countries in the WTO have no legal ceiling on the tariffs they impose on medicines is unforgivable.

Self-sufficiency in medical supplies and medicines is a political sop. It’s a narrative that can’t deliver anything but misery. If governments want to fight COVID-19, they should spend more time looking at how they’re denying themselves access to medical necessities, and less time on how to deny others the tools to save lives.

______________________________________________________________________

Marc L. Busch is the Karl F. Landegger professor of international business diplomacy at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University and a nonresident senior fellow in the Atlantic Council.

frozen fruit

Frozen Fruit and Nut Market in the EU Grew Slightly to $2.4B

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Frozen Fruit And Nuts – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the frozen fruit and nuts market in the European Union amounted to $2.4B in 2018, growing by 1.5% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +1.5% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with only minor fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Over the period under review, the frozen fruit and nuts market attained its maximum level in 2018 and is likely to see steady growth in the near future.

Consumption By Country

The country with the largest volume of frozen fruit and nuts consumption was Germany (369K tonnes), comprising approx. 25% of total volume. Moreover, frozen fruit and nuts consumption in Germany exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest consumer, France (184K tonnes), twofold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Italy (149K tonnes), with a 10% share.

In Germany, frozen fruit and nuts consumption expanded at an average annual rate of +2.2% over the period from 2007-2018. The remaining consuming countries recorded the following average annual rates of consumption growth: France (+1.8% per year) and Italy (-5.0% per year).

In value terms, Germany ($632M), France ($389M) and Italy ($272M) constituted the countries with the highest levels of market value in 2018, with a combined 54% share of the total market. These countries were followed by Poland, the UK, Belgium, the Netherlands, Sweden, Austria, Spain, Hungary and Romania, which together accounted for a further 37%.

The countries with the highest levels of frozen fruit and nuts per capita consumption in 2018 were Belgium (6,286 kg per 1000 persons), Austria (5,257 kg per 1000 persons) and Germany (4,509 kg per 1000 persons).

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in the EU

Driven by increasing demand for frozen fruit and nuts in the European Union, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven-year period. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +1.2% for the period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 1.6M tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in the EU

In 2018, approx. 951K tonnes of frozen fruit and nuts were produced in the European Union; shrinking by -5.9% against the previous year. Overall, frozen fruit and nuts production continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. Over the period under review, frozen fruit and nuts production attained its maximum volume at 1.1M tonnes in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, production stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Production By Country

Poland (351K tonnes) remains the largest frozen fruit and nuts producing country in the European Union, comprising approx. 37% of total volume. It was followed by Spain (127K tonnes) and Italy (122K tonnes), with the combined share of 26%.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume in Poland stood at +1.5%. The remaining producing countries recorded the following average annual rates of production growth: Spain (-1.2% per year) and Italy (-5.8% per year).

Exports in the EU

In 2018, the exports of frozen fruit and nuts in the European Union stood at 885K tonnes, rising by 2.6% against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.3% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. In value terms, frozen fruit and nuts exports totaled $1.7B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

Poland represented the key exporter of frozen fruit and nuts exported in the European Union, with the volume of exports recording 349K tonnes, which was near 39% of total exports in 2018. The Netherlands (117K tonnes) held a 13% share (based on tonnes) of total exports, which put it in second place, followed by Belgium (9.3%), Spain (5.9%) and Germany (5.8%). Italy (34K tonnes), Greece (32K tonnes), France (18K tonnes), Bulgaria (17K tonnes), Austria (17K tonnes), Portugal (15K tonnes) and Lithuania (15K tonnes) occupied a little share of total exports.

From 2007 to 2018, average annual rates of growth with regard to frozen fruit and nuts exports from Poland stood at +2.2%. At the same time, Portugal (+10.7%), France (+7.4%), Bulgaria (+5.0%), the Netherlands (+4.3%), Germany (+3.5%), Italy (+3.3%), Lithuania (+2.0%), Spain (+1.7%) and Greece (+1.4%) displayed positive paces of growth.

Moreover, Portugal emerged as the fastest-growing exporter exported in the European Union, with a CAGR of +10.7% from 2007-2018. Belgium experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. By contrast, Austria (-3.6%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period.

In value terms, Poland ($563M) remains the largest frozen fruit and nuts supplier in the European Union, comprising 33% of total frozen fruit and nuts exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the Netherlands ($229M), with a 13% share of total exports. It was followed by Belgium, with a 11% share.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the frozen fruit and nuts export price in the European Union amounted to $1,931 per tonne, surging by 5.8% against the previous year. Overall, the frozen fruit and nuts export price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 an increase of 27% year-to-year. The level of export price peaked at $2,304 per tonne in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, export prices stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Lithuania ($3,052 per tonne), while Greece ($1,450 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, approx. 1.4M tonnes of frozen fruit and nuts were imported in the European Union; surging by 2.5% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.8% over the period from 2007 to 2018. The volume of imports peaked in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future. In value terms, frozen fruit and nuts imports amounted to $2.6B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

Germany represented the largest importer of frozen fruit and nuts imported in the European Union, with the volume of imports finishing at 396K tonnes, which was approx. 28% of total imports in 2018. It was distantly followed by France (183K tonnes), the Netherlands (154K tonnes), Belgium (136K tonnes), Poland (93K tonnes), the UK (89K tonnes) and Austria (63K tonnes), together committing a 52% share of total imports.

In value terms, the largest frozen fruit and nuts importing markets in the European Union were Germany ($671M), France ($386M) and the Netherlands ($257M), together comprising 50% of total imports. Belgium, the UK, Poland and Austria lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 28%.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the frozen fruit and nuts import price in the European Union amounted to $1,903 per tonne, jumping by 5.4% against the previous year. Overall, the frozen fruit and nuts import price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

Average prices varied somewhat amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, major importing countries recorded the following prices: in the UK ($2,256 per tonne) and France ($2,102 per tonne), while the Netherlands ($1,664 per tonne) and Germany ($1,696 per tonne) were amongst the lowest.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

cheese

European Fresh Cheese Market – Italy’s Output Doubled Over the Last Five Years

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Fresh Cheese – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the fresh cheese market in the European Union amounted to $12.6B in 2018, remaining stable against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Overall, fresh cheese consumption continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2014 with an increase of 15% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the fresh cheese market attained its maximum level at $14B in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, consumption remained at a lower figure.

Consumption By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of fresh cheese consumption in 2018 were Italy (967K tonnes), France (585K tonnes) and Germany (548K tonnes), together accounting for 52% of total consumption. These countries were followed by the UK, Poland, Spain, Belgium, the Netherlands, the Czech Republic and Sweden, which together accounted for a further 37%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of fresh cheese consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Italy ($3.8B) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the UK ($1.7B). It was followed by France.

The countries with the highest levels of fresh cheese per capita consumption in 2018 were Italy (16,290 kg per 1000 persons), Belgium (13,307 kg per 1000 persons) and Poland (10,450 kg per 1000 persons).

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of fresh cheese per capita consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in the EU

Driven by increasing demand for fresh cheese in the European Union, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven-year period. Market performance is forecast to decelerate, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +0.7% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 4.3M tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in the EU

In 2018, approx. 4.4M tonnes of fresh cheese were produced in the European Union; going up by 1.6% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.1% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 when production volume increased by 11% y-o-y. Over the period under review, fresh cheese production attained its peak figure volume in 2018 and is likely to see steady growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, fresh cheese production amounted to $11.2B in 2018 estimated in export prices. Over the period under review, fresh cheese production continues to indicate a mild shrinkage. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2014 with an increase of 15% y-o-y. Over the period under review, fresh cheese production attained its peak figure level at $14.3B in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, production remained at a lower figure.

Production By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of fresh cheese production in 2018 were Germany (928K tonnes), Italy (927K tonnes) and France (688K tonnes), with a combined 58% share of total production. Poland, the UK, Denmark, Belgium, Spain and Lithuania lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 32%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of fresh cheese production, amongst the main producing countries, was attained by Belgium, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, the fresh cheese exports in the European Union totaled 1.6M tonnes, growing by 2.1% against the previous year. The total exports indicated resilient growth from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +6.1% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, fresh cheese exports increased by +91.0% against 2007 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 with an increase of 11% against the previous year. Over the period under review, fresh cheese exports attained their maximum in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, fresh cheese exports amounted to $5.6B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total exports indicated remarkable growth from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +6.1% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, fresh cheese exports increased by +30.3% against 2015 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 when exports increased by 23% y-o-y. Over the period under review, fresh cheese exports reached their peak figure in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the immediate term.

Exports by Country

Germany was the largest exporting country with an export of about 516K tonnes, which resulted at 32% of total exports. It was distantly followed by France (221K tonnes), Denmark (183K tonnes), Italy (181K tonnes), Poland (96K tonnes) and Belgium (86K tonnes), together achieving a 48% share of total exports. The UK (67K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

Exports from Germany increased at an average annual rate of +5.5% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, Belgium (+15.3%), Poland (+7.9%), Italy (+6.9%), Denmark (+6.4%), the UK (+5.9%) and France (+2.2%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Belgium emerged as the fastest-growing exporter in the European Union, with a CAGR of +15.3% from 2007-2018. From 2007 to 2018, the share of Germany, Italy, Denmark, Belgium, Poland, France and the UK increased by +14%, +5.9%, +5.7%, +4.3%, +3.4%, +3% and +2% percentage points, while the shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, the largest fresh cheese markets in the European Union were Germany ($1.6B), Italy ($964M) and Denmark ($638M), with a combined 58% share of total exports. France, Belgium, Poland and the UK lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 25%.

In terms of the main exporting countries, Belgium experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to exports, over the last eleven years, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

The fresh cheese export price in the European Union stood at $3,504 per tonne in 2018, picking up by 2.4% against the previous year. In general, the fresh cheese export price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2008 an increase of 18% y-o-y. In that year, the export prices for fresh cheese reached their peak level of $4,179 per tonne. From 2009 to 2018, the growth in terms of the export prices for fresh cheese failed to regain its momentum.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Italy ($5,330 per tonne), while France ($2,660 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced mixed trends in the export price figures.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, the amount of fresh cheese imported in the European Union stood at 1.3M tonnes, increasing by 5.4% against the previous year. The total imports indicated remarkable growth from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +5.3% over the last eleven-year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, fresh cheese imports increased by +76.1% against 2007 indices. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2011 with an increase of 10% against the previous year. The volume of imports peaked in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, fresh cheese imports amounted to $4.4B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total imports indicated a strong increase from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +5.3% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, fresh cheese imports increased by +29.3% against 2016 indices. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2011 with an increase of 21% year-to-year. The level of imports peaked in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the near future.

Imports by Country

The countries with the highest levels of fresh cheese imports in 2018 were Italy (221K tonnes), the UK (189K tonnes), Germany (137K tonnes), the Netherlands (127K tonnes), France (118K tonnes), Spain (95K tonnes) and Belgium (77K tonnes), together resulting at 74% of total import. Austria (39K tonnes), Poland (33K tonnes), Romania (33K tonnes), the Czech Republic (26K tonnes) and Ireland (25K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Ireland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest fresh cheese importing markets in the European Union were Italy ($778M), the UK ($573M) and Germany ($507M), with a combined 42% share of total imports. France, the Netherlands, Spain, Belgium, Austria, Poland, Romania, Ireland and the Czech Republic lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 44%.

In terms of the main importing countries, Poland experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to imports, over the last eleven years, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the fresh cheese import price in the European Union amounted to $3,409 per tonne, rising by 3.7% against the previous year. Overall, the fresh cheese import price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2008 an increase of 17% against the previous year. In that year, the import prices for fresh cheese attained their peak level of $3,996 per tonne. From 2009 to 2018, the growth in terms of the import prices for fresh cheese failed to regain its momentum.

Average prices varied somewhat amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, major importing countries recorded the following prices: in France ($3,885 per tonne) and Austria ($3,750 per tonne), while the Netherlands ($2,750 per tonne) and the UK ($3,029 per tonne) were amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

Global Cheese Market 2019 – Germany Emerges As the Largest Exporter

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘World – Cheese – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The global cheese market revenue amounted to $111.7B in 2018, going up by 3.2% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price).

The market value increased at an average annual rate of +2.2% from 2008 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being observed throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2010, when the market value increased by 19% y-o-y. Global cheese consumption peaked at $117B in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, consumption failed to regain its momentum.

Production 2007-2018

In 2018, approx. 24M tonnes of cheese were produced worldwide; growing by 2.5% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.1% over the period from 2008 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with only minor fluctuations being recorded in certain years.

Exports 2007-2018

In 2018, the global exports of cheese totaled 6.7M tonnes, going up by 2.8% against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.6% from 2008 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations over the period under review. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2014, when the exports increased by 13% y-o-y. Global exports peaked in 2018, and are expected to retain its growth in the near future.

In value terms, cheese exports totaled $30.9B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total export value increased at an average annual rate of +1.4% over the period from 2008 to 2018; the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2011, with an increase of 16% against the previous year. Over the period under review, global cheese exports reached their peak figure at $33.1B in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, exports failed to regain their momentum.

Exports by Country

In 2018, Germany (1.3M tonnes), distantly followed by the Netherlands (780K tonnes), France (689K tonnes), Italy (416K tonnes), Denmark (340K tonnes), the U.S. (325K tonnes) and Poland (325K tonnes) were the major exporters of cheese, together mixing up 61% of total exports. New Zealand (295K tonnes), Belgium (272K tonnes), Ireland (219K tonnes), Belarus (196K tonnes) and the UK (194K tonnes) took a little share of total exports.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by the U.S., while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Germany ($4.6B), France ($3.7B) and the Netherlands ($3.6B) appeared to be the countries with the highest levels of exports in 2018, with a combined 38% share of global exports. Italy, Denmark, the U.S., New Zealand, Belgium, Ireland, Poland, the UK and Belarus lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 40%.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the average cheese export price amounted to $4,591 per tonne, approximately reflecting the previous year. In general, the cheese export price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

Export prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest export price was Italy ($7,856 per tonne), while Poland ($2,864 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of export prices was attained by Italy, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports 2007-2018

In 2018, the global imports of cheese totaled 7M tonnes, going up by 5.7% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.8% over the period from 2008 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review.

In value terms, cheese imports amounted to $32B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

In 2018, Germany (821K tonnes), followed by the UK (535K tonnes), Italy (480K tonnes), France (371K tonnes), the Netherlands (370K tonnes) and Belgium (315K tonnes) represented the key importers of cheese, together making up 41% of total imports. Japan (293K tonnes), Spain (287K tonnes), the U.S. (261K tonnes), Russia (247K tonnes), Saudi Arabia (152K tonnes) and Mexico (124K tonnes) held a minor share of total imports.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by the Netherlands, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Germany ($4.4B), the UK ($2.2B) and Italy ($2B) appeared to be the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2018, together accounting for 27% of global imports. France, Belgium, the Netherlands, the U.S., Japan, Spain, Russia, Saudi Arabia and Mexico lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 34%.

Import Prices by Country

The average cheese import price stood at $4,581 per tonne in 2018, standing approx. at the previous year. In general, the cheese import price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2017, an increase of 10% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the average import prices for cheese attained their maximum at $5,237 per tonne in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, import prices remained at a lower figure.

Average import prices varied somewhat amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, major importing countries recorded the following import prices: in Germany ($5,395 per tonne) and the U.S. ($5,092 per tonne), while the Netherlands ($4,035 per tonne) and Russia ($4,064 per tonne) were amongst the lowest.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of import prices was attained by Japan, while the other global leaders experienced mixed trends in the import price figures.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

EU Citrus Fruit Market Reached to $12B in 2018

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Citrus Fruit – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the citrus fruit market in the European Union amounted to $12B in 2018, increasing by 2.8% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price).

The market value increased at an average annual rate of +1.2% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed in certain years.

The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2008, with an increase of 22% against the previous year. In that year, the citrus fruit market attained its peak level of $12.7B. From 2009 to 2018, the growth of the citrus fruit market remained at a lower figure.

Production in the EU

The citrus fruit production stood at 11M tonnes in 2018, stabilizing at the previous year. Over the period under review, citrus fruit production continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, approx. 4.8M tonnes of citrus fruits were exported in the European Union; coming down by -9.1% against the previous year. Overall, citrus fruit exports continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. In value terms, citrus fruit exports stood at $5.1B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

Spain prevails in citrus fruit exports structure, recording 3.2M tonnes, which was approx. 66% of total exports in 2018. It was distantly followed by Greece (357K tonnes), the Netherlands (296K tonnes) and Italy (252K tonnes), together generating 19% share of total exports. Germany (215K tonnes), Portugal (174K tonnes) and France (105K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

Exports from Spain decreased at an average annual rate of -1.3% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, Portugal (+16.9%), Germany (+7.3%), Greece (+3.4%) and France (+2.9%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Portugal emerged as the fastest growing exporter in the European Union, with a CAGR of +16.9% from 2007-2018. The Netherlands and Italy experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. Spain (10%) significantly strengthened its position in terms of the global exports, while Greece, Germany and Portugal saw its share reduced by -2.3%, -2.4% and -3% from 2007 to 2018, respectively. The shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, Spain ($3.5B) remains the largest citrus fruit supplier in the European Union, comprising 69% of total citrus fruit exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the Netherlands ($354M), with a 7% share of total exports. It was followed by Germany, with a 5.3% share.

Export Prices by Country

The citrus fruit export price in the European Union stood at $1,046 per tonne in 2018, picking up by 9% against the previous year. Over the period from 2007 to 2018, it increased at an average annual rate of +1.3%. There were significant differences in the average export prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest export price was Germany ($1,245 per tonne), while Greece ($557 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of export prices was attained by Portugal, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

The imports stood at 6.7M tonnes in 2018, dropping by -6% against the previous year. Over the period under review, citrus fruit imports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. In value terms, citrus fruit imports totaled $6.3B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

The countries with the highest levels of citrus fruit imports in 2018 were France (1.2M tonnes), Germany (1.1M tonnes) and the Netherlands (1.1M tonnes), together reaching 51% of total import. The UK (602K tonnes) took the next position in the ranking, followed by Italy (369K tonnes), Poland (357K tonnes) and Spain (349K tonnes). All these countries together took near 25% share of total imports. Romania (269K tonnes), Portugal (183K tonnes), Sweden (160K tonnes), the Czech Republic (145K tonnes) and Belgium (141K tonnes) occupied a minor share of total imports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Portugal, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, France ($1.2B), Germany ($1.1B) and the Netherlands ($979M) appeared to be the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2018, with a combined 52% share of total imports. These countries were followed by the UK, Italy, Poland, Spain, Romania, Sweden, Belgium, Portugal and the Czech Republic, which together accounted for a further 37%.

Import Prices by Country

The citrus fruit import price in the European Union stood at $933 per tonne in 2018, flattening at the previous year. In general, the citrus fruit import price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. There were significant differences in the average import prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest import price was Belgium ($1,135 per tonne), while Romania ($745 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of import prices was attained by Sweden, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

vinegar

Germany’s Vinegar Market to Continue Moderate But Robust Growth

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘Germany – Vinegar – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the vinegar market in Germany amounted to $137M in 2018, remaining relatively unchanged against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Over the period under review, the market revenue continues to indicate a slight decline. However, the volume of consumption in physical terms continues to increase robustly. The volume of the vinegar market in Germany amounted to 232M liters in 2018, rising by +5.6% against the previous year.

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in Germany

Driven by increasing demand for vinegar in Germany, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend in the medium term. The market volume is forecast to continue moderate growth, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +0.9% for the period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 247M liters by the end of 2025.

Production in Germany

Vinegar production in Germany totaled 211M litres in 2018, rising by 5.4% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.1% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed in certain years. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2009 with an increase of 9% y-o-y. Over the period under review, vinegar production attained its maximum volume in 2018 and is likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

Imports into Germany

In 2018, the amount of vinegar imported into Germany stood at 60M litres, growing by 4.9% against the previous year. In value terms, vinegar imports amounted to $86M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Overall, the total imports indicated a prominent increase from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +4.9% over the last eleven-year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, vinegar imports increased by +43.9% against 2015 indices. Thus, vinegar imports attained their maximum in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Imports by Country

In 2018, Italy (38M litres) constituted the largest vinegar supplier to Germany, with a 63% share of total imports. Moreover, vinegar imports from Italy exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest supplier, Austria (6.8M litres), sixfold. Greece (3.6M litres) ranked third in terms of total imports with a 6% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of volume from Italy amounted to +2.4%. The remaining supplying countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: Austria (+15.2% per year) and Greece (+13.1% per year).

In value terms, Italy ($65M) also constituted the largest supplier of vinegar to Germany, comprising 76% of total vinegar imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Austria ($7.4M), with a 8.6% share of total imports. It was followed by the Netherlands, with a 2.8% share.

Import Prices by Country

The average vinegar import price stood at $1.4 per litre in 2018, surging by 7.9% against the previous year. In general, the vinegar import price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2009 when the average import price increased by 14% against the previous year. The import price peaked at $1.8 per litre in 2012; however, from 2013 to 2018, import prices remained at a lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Italy ($1.7 per litre), while the price for Greece ($0.4 per litre) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Italy, while the prices for the other major suppliers experienced a decline.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

germany

Germany’s Soup and Broth Market Is Estimated at $576M in 2018

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘Germany – Soups And Broths – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the soups market in Germany amounted to $576M in 2018, falling by -8.6% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Overall, soups consumption continues to indicate a drastic descent. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 when the market value increased by 6.4% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the soups market reached its maximum level at $872M in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, consumption failed to regain its momentum.

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in Germany

Driven by rising demand for soups in Germany, the market is expected to start an upward consumption trend over the next seven-year period. The performance of the market is forecast to increase slightly, with an anticipated CAGR of +0.8% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 207K tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in Germany

Soups production in Germany totaled 211K tonnes in 2018, leveling off at the previous year. In general, soups production, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2010 with an increase of 2.5% year-to-year. Over the period under review, soups production reached its maximum volume at 221K tonnes in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, production stood at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, soups production amounted to $604M in 2018 estimated in export prices. Overall, soups production, however, continues to indicate a drastic descent. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 with an increase of 3.5% year-to-year. Soups production peaked at $937M in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, production failed to regain its momentum.

 

Exports from Germany

In 2018, approx. 58K tonnes of soups and broths were exported from Germany; picking up by 15% against the previous year. In general, soups exports continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2013 when exports increased by 19% year-to-year. In that year, soups exports attained their peak of 59K tonnes. From 2014 to 2018, the growth of soups exports failed to regain its momentum.

In value terms, soups exports stood at $181M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. In general, soups exports continue to indicate a mild contraction. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2011 with an increase of 14% year-to-year. Exports peaked at $200M in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, exports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Exports by Country

The Netherlands (23K tonnes), France (12K tonnes) and Poland (4K tonnes) were the main destinations of soups exports from Germany, with a combined 67% share of total exports. These countries were followed by Belgium, Austria, the UK, Spain, the U.S. and Switzerland, which together accounted for a further 23%.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main countries of destination, was attained by the U.S., while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest markets for soups exported from Germany were the Netherlands ($53M), France ($40M) and Poland ($15M), with a combined 59% share of total exports.

Poland recorded the highest growth rate of exports, in terms of the main countries of destination over the last decade, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the average soups export price amounted to $3,112 per tonne, dropping by -6.3% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the soups export price continues to indicate a slight slump. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2009 when the average export price increased by 10% against the previous year. In that year, the average export prices for soups and broths reached their peak level of $4,155 per tonne. From 2010 to 2018, the growth in terms of the average export prices for soups and broths failed to regain its momentum.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Switzerland ($5,732 per tonne), while the average price for exports to the U.S. ($1,612 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was recorded for supplies to the UK, while the prices for the other major destinations experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports into Germany

In 2018, the amount of soups and broths imported into Germany amounted to 43K tonnes, declining by -4.6% against the previous year. In general, soups imports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2012 when imports increased by 44% y-o-y. Over the period under review, soups imports attained their maximum at 60K tonnes in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, imports remained at a lower figure.

In value terms, soups imports totaled $124M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Overall, the total imports indicated a slight expansion from 2008 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +0.5% over the last decade. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, soups imports increased by +4.2% against 2016 indices. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2012 with an increase of 23% year-to-year. Over the period under review, soups imports reached their peak figure at $166M in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, imports failed to regain their momentum.

Imports by Country

In 2018, the Netherlands (15K tonnes) constituted the largest supplier of soups to Germany, with a 36% share of total imports. Moreover, soups imports from the Netherlands exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest supplier, Switzerland (4.9K tonnes), threefold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Hungary (4.7K tonnes), with an 11% share.

From 2008 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume from the Netherlands was relatively modest. The remaining supplying countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: Switzerland (-3.2% per year) and Hungary (+15.3% per year).

In value terms, the Netherlands ($32M), Hungary ($17M) and Switzerland ($13M) were the largest soups suppliers to Germany, together accounting for 50% of total imports. These countries were followed by Belgium, the Czech Republic, Austria, Italy, Poland, Turkey, Thailand, France and China, which together accounted for a further 41%.

In terms of the main suppliers, the Czech Republic experienced the highest growth rate of imports, over the last decade, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the average soups import price amounted to $2,905 per tonne, standing approx. at the previous year. Over the period under review, the soups import price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2011 an increase of 14% against the previous year. In that year, the average import prices for soups and broths attained their peak level of $3,642 per tonne. From 2012 to 2018, the growth in terms of the average import prices for soups and broths remained at a lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major supplying countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was the Czech Republic ($4,447 per tonne), while the price for China ($1,918 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Belgium, while the prices for the other major suppliers experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

potato starch

Germany’s Production of Potato Starch Is Continuously Decreasing Due to Exports Contraction

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘Germany – Potato Starch – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

Production in Germany

Potato starch production in Germany stood at 345K tonnes in 2018, coming down by -6.7% against the previous year. Overall, potato starch production continues to indicate a significant contraction. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2014 when production volume increased by 7.2% year-to-year. Potato starch production peaked at 464K tonnes in 2009; however, from 2010 to 2018, production failed to regain its momentum.

In value terms, potato starch production totaled $229M in 2018 estimated in export prices. In general, potato starch production continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2011 with an increase of 39% against the previous year. In that year, potato starch production reached its peak level of $302M. From 2012 to 2018, potato starch production growth remained at a lower figure.

Exports from Germany

In 2018, the amount of potato starch exported from Germany amounted to 263K tonnes, declining by -6.5% against the previous year. Over the period under review, potato starch exports continue to indicate a deep contraction. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2012 with an increase of 39% y-o-y. Exports peaked at 406K tonnes in 2009; however, from 2010 to 2018, exports remained at a lower figure.

In value terms, potato starch exports totaled $206M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Over the period under review, potato starch exports continue to indicate a slight curtailment. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2011 with an increase of 17% against the previous year. Over the period under review, potato starch exports reached their maximum at $288M in 2012; however, from 2013 to 2018, exports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Exports by Country

The Netherlands (48K tonnes), South Korea (41K tonnes) and the U.S. (19K tonnes) were the main destinations of potato starch exports from Germany, with a combined 41% share of total exports. Malaysia, China, Italy, Japan, the UK, Thailand, China, Hong Kong SAR, the Philippines and Spain lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 33%.

From 2009 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main countries of destination, was attained by Malaysia, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the Netherlands ($36M), South Korea ($34M) and the U.S. ($19M) were the largest markets for potato starch exported from Germany worldwide, together comprising 44% of total exports. These countries were followed by the UK, Japan, Italy, Malaysia, China, Thailand, the Philippines, Spain and China, Hong Kong SAR, which together accounted for a further 30%.

Japan recorded the highest growth rate of exports, among the main countries of destination over the last nine-year period, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

The average potato starch export price stood at $782 per tonne in 2018, increasing by 8.4% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the export price indicated noticeable growth from 2009 to 2018: its price increased at an average annual rate of +3.9% over the last nine years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, potato starch export price increased by +20.3% against 2015 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 an increase of 78% year-to-year. In that year, the average export prices for potato starch attained their peak level of $968 per tonne. From 2012 to 2018, the growth in terms of the average export prices for potato starch failed to regain its momentum.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was the U.S. ($996 per tonne), while the average price for exports to China ($520 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2009 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was recorded for supplies to Spain, while the prices for the other major destinations experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports into Germany

In 2018, the amount of potato starch imported into Germany amounted to 70K tonnes, growing by 40% against the previous year. In general, potato starch imports continue to indicate a remarkable expansion. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2018 when imports increased by 40% y-o-y. In that year, potato starch imports attained their peak and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, potato starch imports stood at $49M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Over the period under review, potato starch imports continue to indicate a remarkable increase. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2011 when imports increased by 95% year-to-year. Imports peaked in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

Imports by Country

France (25K tonnes), Denmark (15K tonnes) and the Netherlands (12K tonnes) were the main suppliers of potato starch imports to Germany, together accounting for 74% of total imports. Poland, Austria, Finland and Belgium lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 24%.

From 2009 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main suppliers, was attained by Poland (+57.6% per year), while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, France ($15M), Denmark ($11M) and the Netherlands ($9.4M) were the largest potato starch suppliers to Germany, together comprising 72% of total imports. Poland, Austria, Finland and Belgium lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 26%.

Among the main suppliers, Poland (+53.4% per year) recorded the highest growth rate of imports, over the last nine-year period, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the average potato starch import price amounted to $704 per tonne, surging by 2.9% against the previous year. In general, the potato starch import price, however, continues to indicate a slight shrinkage. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2011 when the average import price increased by 84% against the previous year. In that year, the average import prices for potato starch attained their peak level of $940 per tonne. From 2012 to 2018, the growth in terms of the average import prices for potato starch failed to regain its momentum.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Poland ($863 per tonne), while the price for Belgium ($563 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2009 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by France, while the prices for the other major suppliers experienced a decline.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

leather

Italy’s Exports of Composition Leather Declined for the Fourth Consecutive Year

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘Italy – Composition Leather – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the composition leather market in Italy amounted to $17M in 2018, reducing by -2.8% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Overall, composition leather consumption continues to indicate a deep drop.

Production in Italy

In 2018, approx. 9.8K tonnes of composition leather were produced in Italy; reducing by -5.9% against the previous year. In general, composition leather production continues to indicate an abrupt setback. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2011 when production volume increased by 3.4% year-to-year. Over the period under review, composition leather production attained its peak figure volume at 16K tonnes in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, production remained at a lower figure.

In value terms, composition leather production totaled $11M in 2018 estimated in export prices. Overall, composition leather production continues to indicate a deep reduction. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 with an increase of 99% against the previous year. In that year, composition leather production reached its peak level of $96M. From 2012 to 2018, composition leather production growth remained at a somewhat lower figure.

Exports from Italy

In 2018, the exports of composition leather from Italy totaled 6.9K tonnes, falling by -7.2% against the previous year. Over the period under review, composition leather exports continue to indicate a measured decline. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2010 with an increase of 43% y-o-y. Exports peaked at 10K tonnes in 2011; however, from 2012 to 2018, exports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, composition leather exports totaled $21M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. In general, composition leather exports continue to indicate a perceptible descent. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 when exports increased by 31% year-to-year. In that year, composition leather exports reached their peak of $34M. From 2012 to 2018, the growth of composition leather exports remained at a somewhat lower figure.

Exports by Country

China, Hong Kong SAR (1.6K tonnes) was the main destination for composition leather exports from Italy, accounting for a 23% share of total exports. Moreover, composition leather exports to China, Hong Kong SAR exceeded the volume sent to the second major destination, China (673 tonnes), twofold. Portugal (500 tonnes) ranked third in terms of total exports with a 7.2% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of volume to China, Hong Kong SAR amounted to -2.4%. Exports to the other major destinations recorded the following average annual rates of exports growth: China (+4.2% per year) and Portugal (+1.9% per year).

In value terms, Cambodia ($3.6M), China ($2.4M) and China, Hong Kong SAR ($2.4M) appeared to be the largest markets for composition leather exported from Italy worldwide, together comprising 41% of total exports.

Cambodia experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to exports, among the main countries of destination over the last eleven-year period, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

The average composition leather export price stood at $2,972 per tonne in 2018, rising by 3.8% against the previous year. Overall, the composition leather export price, however, continues to indicate a slight decline. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2008 when the average export price increased by 11% against the previous year. In that year, the average export prices for composition leather attained their peak level of $3,767 per tonne. From 2009 to 2018, the growth in terms of the average export prices for composition leather failed to regain its momentum.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Cambodia ($12,765 per tonne), while the average price for exports to Poland ($885 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was recorded for supplies to Cambodia, while the prices for the other major destinations experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports into Italy

Composition leather imports into Italy stood at 3.4K tonnes in 2018, stabilizing at the previous year. Overall, composition leather imports continue to indicate a perceptible downturn. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2010 with an increase of 54% against the previous year. Over the period under review, composition leather imports attained their maximum at 5.1K tonnes in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, imports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, composition leather imports amounted to $12M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Over the period under review, composition leather imports continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2010 when imports increased by 46% y-o-y. Over the period under review, composition leather imports attained their maximum at $12M in 2011; however, from 2012 to 2018, imports remained at a lower figure.

Imports by Country

In 2018, Germany (2.3K tonnes) constituted the largest supplier of composition leather to Italy, accounting for a 67% share of total imports. Moreover, composition leather imports from Germany exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest supplier, Slovenia (499 tonnes), fivefold. China (261 tonnes) ranked third in terms of total imports with a 7.6% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of volume from Germany stood at -3.7%. The remaining supplying countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: Slovenia (-8.0% per year) and China (+42.8% per year).

In value terms, Germany ($7.6M) constituted the largest supplier of composition leather to Italy, comprising 63% of total composition leather imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the UK ($1M), with a 8.3% share of total imports. It was followed by Slovenia, with a 8.1% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of value from Germany stood at -1.2%. The remaining supplying countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: the UK (+10.9% per year) and Slovenia (-4.3% per year).

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the average composition leather import price amounted to $3,545 per tonne, increasing by 11% against the previous year. Over the last eleven-year period, it increased at an average annual rate of +3.7%. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 when the average import price increased by 17% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the average import prices for composition leather attained their maximum in 2018 and is likely to see steady growth in the near future.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was the UK ($8,990 per tonne), while the price for Slovenia ($1,985 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Hungary, while the prices for the other major suppliers experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform