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Frozen Fruit and Nut Market in the EU Grew Slightly to $2.4B

frozen fruit

Frozen Fruit and Nut Market in the EU Grew Slightly to $2.4B

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Frozen Fruit And Nuts – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the frozen fruit and nuts market in the European Union amounted to $2.4B in 2018, growing by 1.5% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +1.5% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with only minor fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Over the period under review, the frozen fruit and nuts market attained its maximum level in 2018 and is likely to see steady growth in the near future.

Consumption By Country

The country with the largest volume of frozen fruit and nuts consumption was Germany (369K tonnes), comprising approx. 25% of total volume. Moreover, frozen fruit and nuts consumption in Germany exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest consumer, France (184K tonnes), twofold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Italy (149K tonnes), with a 10% share.

In Germany, frozen fruit and nuts consumption expanded at an average annual rate of +2.2% over the period from 2007-2018. The remaining consuming countries recorded the following average annual rates of consumption growth: France (+1.8% per year) and Italy (-5.0% per year).

In value terms, Germany ($632M), France ($389M) and Italy ($272M) constituted the countries with the highest levels of market value in 2018, with a combined 54% share of the total market. These countries were followed by Poland, the UK, Belgium, the Netherlands, Sweden, Austria, Spain, Hungary and Romania, which together accounted for a further 37%.

The countries with the highest levels of frozen fruit and nuts per capita consumption in 2018 were Belgium (6,286 kg per 1000 persons), Austria (5,257 kg per 1000 persons) and Germany (4,509 kg per 1000 persons).

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in the EU

Driven by increasing demand for frozen fruit and nuts in the European Union, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven-year period. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +1.2% for the period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 1.6M tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in the EU

In 2018, approx. 951K tonnes of frozen fruit and nuts were produced in the European Union; shrinking by -5.9% against the previous year. Overall, frozen fruit and nuts production continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. Over the period under review, frozen fruit and nuts production attained its maximum volume at 1.1M tonnes in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, production stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Production By Country

Poland (351K tonnes) remains the largest frozen fruit and nuts producing country in the European Union, comprising approx. 37% of total volume. It was followed by Spain (127K tonnes) and Italy (122K tonnes), with the combined share of 26%.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume in Poland stood at +1.5%. The remaining producing countries recorded the following average annual rates of production growth: Spain (-1.2% per year) and Italy (-5.8% per year).

Exports in the EU

In 2018, the exports of frozen fruit and nuts in the European Union stood at 885K tonnes, rising by 2.6% against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.3% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. In value terms, frozen fruit and nuts exports totaled $1.7B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

Poland represented the key exporter of frozen fruit and nuts exported in the European Union, with the volume of exports recording 349K tonnes, which was near 39% of total exports in 2018. The Netherlands (117K tonnes) held a 13% share (based on tonnes) of total exports, which put it in second place, followed by Belgium (9.3%), Spain (5.9%) and Germany (5.8%). Italy (34K tonnes), Greece (32K tonnes), France (18K tonnes), Bulgaria (17K tonnes), Austria (17K tonnes), Portugal (15K tonnes) and Lithuania (15K tonnes) occupied a little share of total exports.

From 2007 to 2018, average annual rates of growth with regard to frozen fruit and nuts exports from Poland stood at +2.2%. At the same time, Portugal (+10.7%), France (+7.4%), Bulgaria (+5.0%), the Netherlands (+4.3%), Germany (+3.5%), Italy (+3.3%), Lithuania (+2.0%), Spain (+1.7%) and Greece (+1.4%) displayed positive paces of growth.

Moreover, Portugal emerged as the fastest-growing exporter exported in the European Union, with a CAGR of +10.7% from 2007-2018. Belgium experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. By contrast, Austria (-3.6%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period.

In value terms, Poland ($563M) remains the largest frozen fruit and nuts supplier in the European Union, comprising 33% of total frozen fruit and nuts exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the Netherlands ($229M), with a 13% share of total exports. It was followed by Belgium, with a 11% share.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the frozen fruit and nuts export price in the European Union amounted to $1,931 per tonne, surging by 5.8% against the previous year. Overall, the frozen fruit and nuts export price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 an increase of 27% year-to-year. The level of export price peaked at $2,304 per tonne in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, export prices stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Lithuania ($3,052 per tonne), while Greece ($1,450 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, approx. 1.4M tonnes of frozen fruit and nuts were imported in the European Union; surging by 2.5% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.8% over the period from 2007 to 2018. The volume of imports peaked in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future. In value terms, frozen fruit and nuts imports amounted to $2.6B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

Germany represented the largest importer of frozen fruit and nuts imported in the European Union, with the volume of imports finishing at 396K tonnes, which was approx. 28% of total imports in 2018. It was distantly followed by France (183K tonnes), the Netherlands (154K tonnes), Belgium (136K tonnes), Poland (93K tonnes), the UK (89K tonnes) and Austria (63K tonnes), together committing a 52% share of total imports.

In value terms, the largest frozen fruit and nuts importing markets in the European Union were Germany ($671M), France ($386M) and the Netherlands ($257M), together comprising 50% of total imports. Belgium, the UK, Poland and Austria lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 28%.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the frozen fruit and nuts import price in the European Union amounted to $1,903 per tonne, jumping by 5.4% against the previous year. Overall, the frozen fruit and nuts import price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

Average prices varied somewhat amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, major importing countries recorded the following prices: in the UK ($2,256 per tonne) and France ($2,102 per tonne), while the Netherlands ($1,664 per tonne) and Germany ($1,696 per tonne) were amongst the lowest.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

pear

Global Pear Market – Russia, Indonesia, and Germany Are the Largest Importers in the World

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘World – Pears – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The global pear market revenue amounted to $27.3B in 2018, increasing by 4.7% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +2.7% over the period from 2008 to 2018; the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2013 with an increase of 14% year-to-year. Over the period under review, the global pear market attained its maximum level at $30.8B in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, consumption failed to regain its momentum.

Consumption By Country

The country with the largest volume of pear consumption was China (16M tonnes), accounting for 66% of total consumption. Moreover, pear consumption in China exceeded the figures recorded by the world’s second-largest consumer, Italy (689K tonnes), more than tenfold. The U.S. (658K tonnes) ranked third in terms of total consumption with a 2.7% share.

From 2008 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume in China stood at +2.1%. The remaining consuming countries recorded the following average annual rates of consumption growth: Italy (+0.2% per year) and the U.S. (+0.9% per year).

In value terms, China ($17.5B) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Italy ($887M). It was followed by the U.S..

The countries with the highest levels of pear per capita consumption in 2018 were Argentina (14,247 kg per 1000 persons), Italy (11,598 kg per 1000 persons) and China (11,233 kg per 1000 persons).

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of pear per capita consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Argentina, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Market Forecast 2019-2025

Driven by increasing demand for pear worldwide, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven years. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +1.9% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 28M tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production 2007-2018

In 2018, the global pear production stood at 25M tonnes, surging by 1.8% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.5% over the period from 2008 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being observed throughout the analyzed period. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 when production volume increased by 6.2% year-to-year. The global pear production peaked at 26M tonnes in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, production stood at a somewhat lower figure. The general positive trend in terms of pear output was largely conditioned by a mild increase of the harvested area and measured growth in yield figures.

In value terms, pear production amounted to $27.7B in 2018 estimated in export prices. The total output value increased at an average annual rate of +3.1% over the period from 2008 to 2018; the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 with an increase of 16% against the previous year. The global pear production peaked at $31.3B in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, production stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Production By Country

China (17M tonnes) remains the largest pear producing country worldwide, comprising approx. 68% of total production. Moreover, pear production in China exceeded the figures recorded by the world’s second-largest producer, Argentina (954K tonnes), more than tenfold. Italy (767K tonnes) ranked third in terms of total production with a 3.1% share.

In China, pear production increased at an average annual rate of +2.2% over the period from 2008-2018. The remaining producing countries recorded the following average annual rates of production growth: Argentina (+2.6% per year) and Italy (-0.0% per year).

Harvested Area 2007-2018

In 2018, the global pear harvested area stood at 1.4M ha, approximately mirroring the previous year. Overall, the pear harvested area continues to indicate a slight contraction. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 with an increase of 2% against the previous year. The global pear harvested area peaked at 1.6M ha in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, harvested area stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Yield 2007-2018

Global average pear yield amounted to 18 tonne per ha in 2018, going up by 2.8% against the previous year. The yield figure increased at an average annual rate of +2.8% over the period from 2008 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with only minor fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2017 with an increase of 7.2% against the previous year. The global pear yield peaked in 2018 and is likely to continue its growth in the near future.

Exports 2007-2018

Global exports amounted to 2.8M tonnes in 2018, jumping by 4.6% against the previous year. Overall, pear exports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2014 when exports increased by 5.7% y-o-y. The global exports peaked at 2.8M tonnes in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, exports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, pear exports stood at $2.7B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Overall, pear exports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 when exports increased by 11% year-to-year. In that year, global pear exports reached their peak of $2.8B. From 2014 to 2018, the growth of global pear exports failed to regain its momentum.

Exports by Country

In 2018, China (544K tonnes), distantly followed by the Netherlands (337K tonnes), Argentina (317K tonnes), South Africa (302K tonnes), Belgium (288K tonnes), Italy (158K tonnes), Chile (156K tonnes), Spain (145K tonnes) and the U.S. (132K tonnes) represented the major exporters of pears, together achieving 86% of total exports.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by South Africa, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, China ($602M), the Netherlands ($381M) and Argentina ($294M) were the countries with the highest levels of exports in 2018, with a combined 48% share of global exports.

China experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to exports, in terms of the main exporting countries over the last decade, while the other global leaders experienced mixed trends in the exports figures.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the average pear export price amounted to $962 per tonne, approximately reflecting the previous year. Over the period under review, the pear export price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2013 an increase of 15% y-o-y. In that year, the average export prices for pears reached their peak level of $1,127 per tonne. From 2014 to 2018, the growth in terms of the average export prices for pears failed to regain its momentum.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Italy ($1,299 per tonne), while South Africa ($636 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by China, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports 2007-2018

Global imports amounted to 2.7M tonnes in 2018, rising by 3% against the previous year. In general, pear imports, however, continue to indicate a mild contraction. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2017 with an increase of 7.3% year-to-year. Over the period under review, global pear imports reached their peak figure at 3.1M tonnes in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, imports failed to regain their momentum.

In value terms, pear imports amounted to $2.7B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Over the period under review, pear imports, however, continue to indicate a measured drop. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2017 with an increase of 13% y-o-y. Over the period under review, global pear imports attained their peak figure at $3.3B in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, imports failed to regain their momentum.

Imports by Country

The countries with the highest levels of pear imports in 2018 were Russia (271K tonnes), Indonesia (187K tonnes), Germany (185K tonnes), Brazil (158K tonnes), the UK (138K tonnes), the Netherlands (129K tonnes), the U.S. (123K tonnes), France (116K tonnes), Viet Nam (100K tonnes), Belarus (83K tonnes), China, Hong Kong SAR (82K tonnes) and Italy (80K tonnes), together accounting for 61% of total import.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Belarus, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Germany ($244M), Russia ($202M) and Indonesia ($147M) were the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2018, together accounting for 22% of global imports. Brazil, Viet Nam, the U.S., the UK, the Netherlands, France, Italy, Belarus and China, Hong Kong SAR lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 37%.

Belarus recorded the highest rates of growth with regard to imports, in terms of the main importing countries over the last decade, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the average pear import price amounted to $994 per tonne, stabilizing at the previous year. Overall, the pear import price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 an increase of 7.4% against the previous year. In that year, the average import prices for pears attained their peak level of $1,108 per tonne. From 2014 to 2018, the growth in terms of the average import prices for pears remained at a lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Viet Nam ($1,414 per tonne), while China, Hong Kong SAR ($577 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Viet Nam, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

EU Citrus Fruit Market Reached to $12B in 2018

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Citrus Fruit – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the citrus fruit market in the European Union amounted to $12B in 2018, increasing by 2.8% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price).

The market value increased at an average annual rate of +1.2% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed in certain years.

The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2008, with an increase of 22% against the previous year. In that year, the citrus fruit market attained its peak level of $12.7B. From 2009 to 2018, the growth of the citrus fruit market remained at a lower figure.

Production in the EU

The citrus fruit production stood at 11M tonnes in 2018, stabilizing at the previous year. Over the period under review, citrus fruit production continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, approx. 4.8M tonnes of citrus fruits were exported in the European Union; coming down by -9.1% against the previous year. Overall, citrus fruit exports continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. In value terms, citrus fruit exports stood at $5.1B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

Spain prevails in citrus fruit exports structure, recording 3.2M tonnes, which was approx. 66% of total exports in 2018. It was distantly followed by Greece (357K tonnes), the Netherlands (296K tonnes) and Italy (252K tonnes), together generating 19% share of total exports. Germany (215K tonnes), Portugal (174K tonnes) and France (105K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

Exports from Spain decreased at an average annual rate of -1.3% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, Portugal (+16.9%), Germany (+7.3%), Greece (+3.4%) and France (+2.9%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Portugal emerged as the fastest growing exporter in the European Union, with a CAGR of +16.9% from 2007-2018. The Netherlands and Italy experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. Spain (10%) significantly strengthened its position in terms of the global exports, while Greece, Germany and Portugal saw its share reduced by -2.3%, -2.4% and -3% from 2007 to 2018, respectively. The shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, Spain ($3.5B) remains the largest citrus fruit supplier in the European Union, comprising 69% of total citrus fruit exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the Netherlands ($354M), with a 7% share of total exports. It was followed by Germany, with a 5.3% share.

Export Prices by Country

The citrus fruit export price in the European Union stood at $1,046 per tonne in 2018, picking up by 9% against the previous year. Over the period from 2007 to 2018, it increased at an average annual rate of +1.3%. There were significant differences in the average export prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest export price was Germany ($1,245 per tonne), while Greece ($557 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of export prices was attained by Portugal, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

The imports stood at 6.7M tonnes in 2018, dropping by -6% against the previous year. Over the period under review, citrus fruit imports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. In value terms, citrus fruit imports totaled $6.3B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

The countries with the highest levels of citrus fruit imports in 2018 were France (1.2M tonnes), Germany (1.1M tonnes) and the Netherlands (1.1M tonnes), together reaching 51% of total import. The UK (602K tonnes) took the next position in the ranking, followed by Italy (369K tonnes), Poland (357K tonnes) and Spain (349K tonnes). All these countries together took near 25% share of total imports. Romania (269K tonnes), Portugal (183K tonnes), Sweden (160K tonnes), the Czech Republic (145K tonnes) and Belgium (141K tonnes) occupied a minor share of total imports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Portugal, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, France ($1.2B), Germany ($1.1B) and the Netherlands ($979M) appeared to be the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2018, with a combined 52% share of total imports. These countries were followed by the UK, Italy, Poland, Spain, Romania, Sweden, Belgium, Portugal and the Czech Republic, which together accounted for a further 37%.

Import Prices by Country

The citrus fruit import price in the European Union stood at $933 per tonne in 2018, flattening at the previous year. In general, the citrus fruit import price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. There were significant differences in the average import prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest import price was Belgium ($1,135 per tonne), while Romania ($745 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of import prices was attained by Sweden, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

pomegranates

Pomegranates Are Symbolic Even for Trade

613 Seeds

It’s the Jewish New Year, a time for introspection and atonement and of course every Jewish holiday has its food customs. Celebrants dip apples in honey to symbolize hopes for a sweet year ahead. Pomegranates also figure in celebrations at this time of year. Its many seeds are associated with the 613 commandments in the Torah. Before eating the pomegranate seeds, Jews traditionally say, “May we be as full of mitzvot (commandments) as the pomegranate is full of seeds.”

The pomegranate is one of the seven species of Israel listed in the Torah, along with grapes, figs and dates. They’ve been cultivated throughout the Middle East for thousands of years and remain a staple in the cuisine. Outside the United States, consumers can enjoy dozens of varieties, from those with sweeter pink seeds to yellow-green Golden Globes. The only kind I’ve ever seen in my grocery store are the ruby red Wonderful variety, which make up 90 to 95 percent of the U.S. market.

Ancient and Modern Purveyor of Good Fortune

Pomegranates are drought tolerant so they can grow in tropical to warm climates, but they do best in regions with cool winters and hot, dry summers. They thrive throughout Latin America, southern Europe, Asia, Africa and Fresno, California. Due to this heartiness, there’s almost always a season for pomegranates somewhere in the world and – thanks to trade – we can enjoy them nearly all year-round. Recently, the U.S. Department of Agriculture approved imports of Peruvian-grown pomegranates, which U.S. retailers say won’t compete directly with California production because they’ll be harvested and shipped as California’s season ends.

Known to be a good source of antioxidants and vitamin C, pomegranates are more popular than ever, finding their way into juices, fruit strips and other processed foods. Higher demand has been especially great for exporters from developing countries. Pomegranate exports are even playing a role in moving farmers in Afghanistan from opium poppy or coca farms to growing legal as well as profitable crops.

Where efforts to shift into other crops have failed, the pomegranate holds promise. Afghan varietals are prized for being especially delicious, creating demand for Afghan farmers to supply pomegranates to buyers around the world. Last year, Afghan farmers exported nearly 23,000 tons of pomegranates, up 35 percent over the previous year. Non-profit organizations have provided startup seeds and planted hundreds of thousands of pomegranate saplings in Afghan fields. If successful, Afghan producers could also move into finished products like fruit bars. More than a symbol, pomegranates are a tangible vehicle for renewal in Afghanistan.

Global Seed Trade

Sowing Trade Seeds

Although pomegranates no longer seem “exotic” to us, Americans are increasingly open to trying new varieties of fruits and vegetables in pursuit of innovative flavors, in response to health trends, and out of affinity for local growers who often produce heirloom and other varieties we can’t find in the grocery store. To enjoy a variety of foods – and importantly, to sustain basic crop production – growers must have access to a variety of high-quality seeds.

Founded in 1883, the American Seed Trade Association (ASTA) represents over 700 companies involved in seed production, plant breeding and related industries in North America. According to ASTA, a seed can cross up to six borders between the breeder to the farmer who plants it in the field. The United States exported $1.8 billion in seeds in 2017, $610 million of which went to Canada and Mexico.

The global seed market was an estimated $66.9 billion in 2018 and expected to reach $98.1 billion by 2024. According to the International Seed Federation, the Eastern European countries of Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, and Poland are the largest exporters of seeds for field crops after France and the United States.
Food supply and seed trade

Good Genes

Despite a robust seed trade, the Food and Agriculture Organization worries about the steady loss of biodiversity for food and agriculture. Through a network of more than 1,750 gene banks, the Global Crop Diversity Trust supports a global seed conversation system to ensure a diversity of genetic resources from the ancient, traditional and heirloom varieties to the raw genetic material needed to breed nutrition-packed, high yield, weather- and pest-resistant modern crops.

Seeds can be made available from the gene banks to help farmers recover from natural disasters. After Hurricane Maria devasted 80 percent of Puerto Rico’s crop value, farmers turned to the Tropical Agriculture Research Station run by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for seeds and tree grafts to replenish their farms.

One of the largest seed collections resides in the Svalbard Global Seed Vault, nestled inside a mountain on an island halfway between mainland Norway and the North Pole. It houses over 983,500 seeds with room to conserve 4.5 million varieties.
Svalbard
Seed conservation is about more than saving for a rainy day. Food production around the world depends on the availability and international trade in seeds. According to the Global Crop Diversity Trust, many countries strongly depend on crops whose genetic diversity originates from foreign regions, both in their food supply and in their production systems.

So while we should all be thankful that gene banks preserve our food heritage, it’s the free movement of seeds in trade that helps protect today’s food production and supply. Now, if we can only get the stores to carry those Golden Globe pomegranates.

________________________________________________________________

Andrea Durkin is the Editor-in-Chief of TradeVistas and Founder of Sparkplug, LLC. Ms. Durkin previously served as a U.S. Government trade negotiator and has proudly taught international trade policy and negotiations for the last fourteen years as an Adjunct Professor at Georgetown University’s Master of Science in Foreign Service program.

This article originally appeared on TradeVistas.org. Republished with permission.

grape

Global Dried Grapes Market 2019 – the UK is the Leading Import Market

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘World – Dried Grapes – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The global dried grapes market revenue amounted to $6B in 2018, going down by -3.5% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +3.3% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2010 when the market value increased by 15% y-o-y. The global dried grapes consumption peaked at $6.7B in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, consumption stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Consumption By Country

China (512K tonnes) constituted the country with the largest volume of dried grapes consumption, comprising approx. 18% of total consumption. Moreover, dried grapes consumption in China exceeded the figures recorded by the world’s second-largest consumer, India (208K tonnes), twofold. The U.S. (160K tonnes) ranked third in terms of total consumption with a 5.6% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume in China stood at +6.6%. The remaining consuming countries recorded the following average annual rates of consumption growth: India (+8.1% per year) and the U.S. (-5.4% per year).

In value terms, China ($896M), the U.S. ($454M) and India ($444M) were the countries with the highest levels of market value in 2018, with a combined 30% share of the global market.

The countries with the highest levels of dried grapes per capita consumption in 2018 were the UK (1,470 kg per 1000 persons), Germany (831 kg per 1000 persons) and Japan (825 kg per 1000 persons).

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of dried grapes per capita consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by India, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Market Forecast 2019-2025

Driven by increasing demand for dried grapes worldwide, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven-year period. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +0.1% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 3M tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production 2007-2018

In 2018, approx. 2.9M tonnes of dried grapes were produced worldwide; lowering by -5.8% against the previous year. Over the period under review, dried grapes production, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2013 when production volume increased by 8.7% y-o-y. The global dried grapes production peaked at 3.2M tonnes in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, production remained at a lower figure.

In value terms, dried grapes production stood at $7.1B in 2018 estimated in export prices. The total output value increased at an average annual rate of +3.5% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 when production volume increased by 12% against the previous year. The global dried grapes production peaked at $7.3B in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, production stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Production By Country

The countries with the highest volumes of dried grapes production in 2018 were China (516K tonnes), Turkey (285K tonnes) and India (230K tonnes), with a combined 36% share of global production.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of dried grapes production, amongst the main producing countries, was attained by India, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Exports 2007-2018

In 2018, the amount of dried grapes exported worldwide amounted to 773K tonnes, falling by -4.7% against the previous year. Over the period under review, dried grapes exports continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2010 when exports increased by 3.5% y-o-y. Over the period under review, global dried grapes exports attained their maximum at 848K tonnes in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, exports failed to regain their momentum.

In value terms, dried grapes exports amounted to $1.7B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total export value increased at an average annual rate of +3.6% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2010 with an increase of 30% year-to-year. Over the period under review, global dried grapes exports reached their peak figure at $2B in 2011; however, from 2012 to 2018, exports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Exports by Country

Turkey represented the key exporter of dried grapes in the world, with the volume of exports reaching 279K tonnes, which was near 36% of total exports in 2018. The U.S. (85K tonnes) occupied the second position in the ranking, followed by Chile (63K tonnes), South Africa (61K tonnes), Uzbekistan (43K tonnes), Iran (42K tonnes) and Argentina (41K tonnes). All these countries together took approx. 43% share of total exports. Afghanistan (26K tonnes), India (23K tonnes), Greece (17K tonnes), China (17K tonnes) and the Netherlands (13K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

Exports from Turkey increased at an average annual rate of +1.4% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, Afghanistan (+4.7%), South Africa (+3.7%), India (+3.6%), Argentina (+3.3%) and Uzbekistan (+3.1%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Afghanistan emerged as the fastest-growing exporter in the world, with a CAGR of +4.7% from 2007-2018. The Netherlands and Chile experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. By contrast, Greece (-2.8%), the U.S. (-3.2%), China (-3.6%) and Iran (-11.4%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period. From 2007 to 2018, the share of Turkey, South Africa, Argentina and Uzbekistan increased by +5%, +2.6%, +1.6% and +1.6% percentage points, while the U.S. (-4.7 p.p.) and Iran (-15.2 p.p.) saw their share reduced. The shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, Turkey ($490M), the U.S. ($284M) and Chile ($156M) were the countries with the highest levels of exports in 2018, with a combined 56% share of global exports. These countries were followed by South Africa, Afghanistan, Argentina, Iran, Uzbekistan, Greece, India, the Netherlands and China, which together accounted for a further 36%.

Afghanistan recorded the highest rates of growth with regard to exports, among the main exporting countries over the last eleven years, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the average dried grapes export price amounted to $2,145 per tonne, increasing by 17% against the previous year. In general, the export price indicated a resilient increase from 2007 to 2018: its price increased at an average annual rate of +4.5% over the last eleven-year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2008 an increase of 26% year-to-year. Over the period under review, the average export prices for dried grapes attained their maximum at $2,351 per tonne in 2011; however, from 2012 to 2018, export prices failed to regain their momentum.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Afghanistan ($3,794 per tonne), while Uzbekistan ($1,236 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Afghanistan, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports 2007-2018

Global imports stood at 744K tonnes in 2018, declining by -5.9% against the previous year. Overall, dried grapes imports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2010 with an increase of 8.2% against the previous year. The global imports peaked at 851K tonnes in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, imports remained at a lower figure.

In value terms, dried grapes imports stood at $1.6B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total import value increased at an average annual rate of +3.2% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2010 with an increase of 27% y-o-y. The global imports peaked at $1.8B in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, imports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Imports by Country

The UK (99K tonnes), Germany (77K tonnes) and the Netherlands (55K tonnes) represented roughly 31% of total imports of dried grapes in 2018. It was distantly followed by Japan (35K tonnes), mixing up a 4.8% share of total imports. Kazakhstan (29K tonnes), France (26K tonnes), Brazil (26K tonnes), Russia (24K tonnes), Canada (24K tonnes), Belgium (22K tonnes), Italy (21K tonnes) and Australia (18K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Kazakhstan, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest dried grapes importing markets worldwide were the UK ($199M), Germany ($163M) and Japan ($116M), together accounting for 31% of global imports. The Netherlands, Canada, France, Brazil, Italy, Russia, Australia, Belgium and Kazakhstan lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 29%.

In terms of the main importing countries, Kazakhstan recorded the highest growth rate of imports, over the last eleven-year period, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

The average dried grapes import price stood at $2,094 per tonne in 2018, growing by 15% against the previous year. Over the last eleven-year period, it increased at an average annual rate of +3.1%. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2008 when the average import price increased by 23% y-o-y. The global import price peaked at $2,390 per tonne in 2012; however, from 2013 to 2018, import prices stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Japan ($3,274 per tonne), while Kazakhstan ($592 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Japan, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

cherry

Global Cherry Market 2019: Chile Emerged As The Largest Exporter

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘World – Cherries – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The global cherry market revenue amounted to $12.3B in 2018, increasing by 11% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price).

The market value increased at an average annual rate of +3.8% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2016, when the market value increased by 18% against the previous year. Global cherry consumption peaked in 2018, and is expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

Production 2007-2018

In 2018, the amount of cherries produced worldwide stood at 3.9M tonnes, going up by 4.2% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.1% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed in certain years.

Exports 2007-2018

In 2018, the global cherry exports amounted to 558K tonnes, declining by -3.2% against the previous year. In general, cherry exports, however, continue to indicate a strong expansion. In value terms, cherry exports stood at $2.1B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Over the period under review, cherry exports, however, continue to indicate a strong expansion. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2016, with an increase of 53% against the previous year. In that year, global cherry exports attained their peak of $2.8B. From 2017 to 2018, the growth of global cherry exports remained at a lower figure.

Exports by Country

In 2018, Chile (146K tonnes), distantly followed by the U.S. (87K tonnes), Turkey (60K tonnes), Uzbekistan (36K tonnes) and Spain (31K tonnes) represented the main exporters of cherries, together constituting 64% of total exports. Azerbaijan (24K tonnes), Greece (21K tonnes), Australia (19K tonnes), Moldova (15K tonnes), Italy (13K tonnes), Serbia (13K tonnes) and Poland (11K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Australia, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest cherry markets worldwide were Chile ($760M), the U.S. ($522M) and Turkey ($166M), with a combined 70% share of global exports. These countries were followed by Spain, Uzbekistan, Australia, Italy, Greece, Azerbaijan, Moldova, Serbia and Poland, which together accounted for a further 19%.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the average cherry export price amounted to $3,691 per tonne, lowering by -8% against the previous year. Over the period from 2007 to 2018, it increased at an average annual rate of +1.4%. There were significant differences in the average export prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest export price was the U.S. ($5,986 per tonne), while Poland ($910 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of export prices was attained by Moldova, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports 2007-2018

In 2018, approx. 789K tonnes of cherries were imported worldwide; increasing by 30% against the previous year. Over the period under review, cherry imports continue to indicate a strong increase. In value terms, cherry imports amounted to $3.4B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

China represented the key importing country with an import of around 324K tonnes, which resulted at 41% of total imports. Russia (92K tonnes) held a 12% share (based on tonnes) of total imports, which put it in second place, followed by China, Hong Kong SAR (11%) and Germany (5.9%). The following importers – Canada (28K tonnes), Kazakhstan (25K tonnes), South Korea (19K tonnes), Belarus (14K tonnes), Taiwan, Chinese (14K tonnes) and the U.S. (13K tonnes) – together made up 14% of total imports.

From 2007 to 2018, average annual rates of growth with regard to cherry imports into China stood at +49.3%. At the same time, Kazakhstan (+91.7%), Belarus (+29.9%), China, Hong Kong SAR (+23.6%), South Korea (+14.7%), Russia (+3.7%) and Taiwan, Chinese (+2.1%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Kazakhstan emerged as the fastest growing importer in the world, with a CAGR of +91.7% from 2007-2018. Germany and Canada experienced a relatively flat trend pattern.

By contrast, the U.S. (-1.6%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period. Belarus (-1.7%), South Korea (-1.9%), Kazakhstan (-3.2%), Russia (-3.8%), China, Hong Kong SAR (-9.5%) and China (-40.6%) significantly weakened its position in terms of the global imports, while the shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, China ($1.8B) constitutes the largest market for imported cherries worldwide, comprising 52% of global imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by China, Hong Kong SAR ($409M), with a 12% share of global imports. It was followed by South Korea, with a 4.6% share.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the average cherry import price amounted to $4,298 per tonne, remaining relatively unchanged against the previous year. Over the last eleven year period, it increased at an average annual rate of +2.5%. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2016, when the average import price increased by 20% year-to-year. In that year, the average import prices for cherries attained their peak level of $4,492 per tonne. From 2017 to 2018, the growth in terms of the average import prices for cherries failed to regain its momentum.

Import prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest import price was South Korea ($8,002 per tonne), while Russia ($1,345 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of import prices was attained by Taiwan, Chinese, while the other global leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

persimmon

Persimmon Market in the Middle East – Key Insights

IndexBox has just published a new report, the Middle East – Persimmons – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the persimmon market in Middle East amounted to $75M in 2017, growing by 10% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The total market indicated a remarkable expansion from 2012 to 2017: its value increased at an average annual rate of +9.4% over the last five years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period.

Based on 2017 figures, the persimmon consumption increased by +72.2% against 2012 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013, when it surged by 32% year-to-year. Over the period under review, the persimmon market reached its peak figure level in 2017, and is likely to see steady growth in the immediate term.

Production in the Middle East

In 2017, the amount of persimmons produced in Middle East stood at 60K tonnes, growing by 2.4% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +4.4% from 2012 to 2017; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years.

Persimmon Exports

The exports totaled 7.6K tonnes in 2017, rising by 21% against the previous year. The persimmon exports continue to indicate a drastic decrease. In value terms, persimmon exports stood at $12M (IndexBox estimates) in 2017.

Exports by Country

Israel was the key exporting countries with an export of around 5.5K tonnes, which amounted to 72% of total exports. It was distantly followed by Iran (1.1K tonnes) and the United Arab Emirates (572 tonnes), together constituting 21% share of total exports. Lebanon (300 tonnes) held the minor share of total exports.

From 2012 to 2017, average annual rates of growth with regard to persimmon exports from Israel stood at -13.3%. At the same time, the United Arab Emirates (+285.1%) and Iran (+43.6%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, the United Arab Emirates emerged as the fastest growing exporter in Middle East, with a CAGR of +285.1% from 2012-2017. By contrast, Lebanon (-30.0%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period. While the share of Israel (75%) and Lebanon (19%) increased significantly in terms of the global exports from 2012-2017, the share of the United Arab Emirates (-7.5%) and Iran (-11.7%) displayed negative dynamics.

In value terms, Israel ($11M) remains the largest persimmon supplier in Middle East, comprising 91% of global exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the United Arab Emirates ($406K), with a 3.5% share of global exports. It was followed by Iran, with a 3.2% share.

Export Prices by Country

In 2017, the persimmon export price in Middle East amounted to $1.5 per kg, increasing by 13% against the previous year. The the persimmon export price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

Export prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest export price was Israel ($1.9 per kg), while Iran ($353 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2012 to 2017, the most notable rate of growth in terms of export prices was attained by Israel (+3.1% per year), while the other leaders experienced mixed trends in the export price figures.

Persimmon Imports

In 2017, persimmon imports in Middle East amounted to 9K tonnes, rising by 2.5% against the previous year. The persimmon imports continue to indicate a strong expansion. In value terms, persimmon imports stood at $13M (IndexBox estimates) in 2017.

Imports by Country

Saudi Arabia was the largest importer of persimmons in Middle East, with the volume of imports accounting for 3.9K tonnes, which was approx. 43% of total imports in 2017. Jordan (2.5K tonnes) held the second position in the ranking, followed by Palestine (1.9K tonnes). All these countries together occupied approx. 50% share of total imports. The following importers – the United Arab Emirates (255 tonnes) and Bahrain (193 tonnes) together made up 5% of total imports.

From 2012 to 2017, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Bahrain (+55.3% per year), while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Saudi Arabia ($5.1M), Jordan ($3.7M) and Palestine ($2.7M) constituted the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2017, together comprising 92% of total imports. These countries were followed by the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain, which together accounted for a further 6.2%.

Import Prices by Country

In 2017, the persimmon import price in Middle East amounted to $1.4 per kg, coming down by -2.1% against the previous year. The import price indicated a strong increase from 2012 to 2017: its price increased at an average annual rate of +12.9% over the last five year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2017 figures, the persimmon import price decreased by -3.8% against 2015 indices.

There were significant differences in the average import prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2017, the country with the highest import price was the United Arab Emirates ($2 per kg), while Saudi Arabia ($1.3 per kg) was amongst the lowest.

From 2012 to 2017, the most notable rate of growth in terms of import prices was attained by Saudi Arabia (+23.0% per year), while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform