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Preparing to Cross Brexit’s Finish Line

Brexit

Preparing to Cross Brexit’s Finish Line

For many, the onset of Brexit’s transitional period, which began on February 1, 2020, probably seems like an eternity ago, particularly considering the global pandemic that has consumed world affairs since that time.

But while the outcome of the transitional period may no longer be top of mind, its final stages are rapidly approaching, and businesses engaged in trade with the UK, the EU or both will need to begin preparing for changes that will take place as early as January 1, 2021. The governments of the UK and EU have now publicized clear guidance on what will be required with the official splitting of ties between the two entities – guidance that will determine how enterprises will trade, and what processes they will be required to follow in a post-Brexit landscape.

In February 2020, the UK’s government said it would implement full border controls on imports coming into Great Britain from the European Union. This statement has now been eased with the UK taking the decision to introduce the new border controls in three stages ending July 1, 2021. Downing Street has also published the “Border Operating Model,” which provides visibility and instruction to traders.

The details of these three stages of border controls for imports are as follows:

IMPORTS

1st January 2021

-Importers of non-controlled goods will need to prepare for basic customs requirements, such as keeping sufficient records of imported goods and completing customs declarations within six months of the date of import.

-Importers of controlled goods, however, will need to prepare for full customs declarations at the point of importation.

-There will be physical checks by the authorities at the point of U.K. destination (or other approved premises) on all high-risk live animals and plants where there is a biosecurity risk.

1st April 2021

-All Products of Animal Origin (POAO) will require pre-notification to British customs authorities along with the requisite health documentation. This includes meat, pet food, honey, milk or egg products.

-Physical checks will continue to be conducted at point of U.K. destination until July 1st

-All regulated plants and plant products require pre-notification to British customs authorities along with the requisite health documentation. A full listing of products will be published by the authorities prior to implementation.

-High-risk food and feed, which is not of animal origin will also require import pre-notifications to British Customs Authorities in advance of the goods’ arrival.

-For any high-risk food and feed, which is not of animal origin, importers will need to submit pre-notifications via the Import of Products, Animals, Food and Feed System (IPAFFS)

1st July 2021

-Importers moving goods will have to make pre-lodged notice to HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC), complete full declarations and pay tariffs at the point of importation directly or via their nominated representatives.

-The pre-lodged model requires all goods coming into Great Britain to have been declared to HM Revenue & Customs prior to export, the carrier normally undertakes this declaration on behalf of traders. Pre-lodgement allows HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) to complete risk-assessments and clear many imports and transit movements prior to their arrival in the UK.

-To support the pre-lodgement requirement of HMRC the UK Government will also be implementing the Goods Vehicle Movement System (GVMS). The GVMS system is an IT platform that will support pre-lodgement. This will enable the linking of goods, customs brokers and customs through a referencing system, allowing the shipment to be customs cleared enroute to the UK or providing notification of a customs inspection upon arrival.

-Full Safety and Security declarations are required.

-For Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) commodities, there will be an increase in physical checks that will now take place at Great Britain Border Control Posts.

EXPORTS

Any exports from Great Britain after January 1, 2021 to European Union destinations will be treated as third-country exports and, as such, full export customs processes and declarations will be required by HM Revenue and Customs.  This includes a full Safety and Security declaration prior to exit from the UK and an export entry declaration.

When declaring goods for export, an organization will require the following:

-An Economic Operator Registration and Identification Number (also known as an EORI number), which is a unique ID code used to track and register customs information.

-Commodity Code for the goods

-Correct Customs Procedure Code (CPC)

-If required, an Advanced Customs Ruling on the commodity code or country of origin.

-License validation and application as required.

-All paperwork (including any licenses) to be submitted to customs, usually via an intermediary, such as a customs broker.

If export customs formalities are to be completed by the organization rather than an intermediary, the following steps must additionally be implemented:

-Setup the organization for making customs declarations:

–Register for National Export System (NES)

–Apply for CHIEF badges from HMRC

–If applicable, register to export plants or controlled goods

-Complete internal training in the completion of export declarations and record-keeping requirements

-Submit all export declarations through NES

Understanding these requirements and preparing for them in advance will allow exporters to the UK — and those trans-shipping goods to the EU via the UK to avoid border delays and/or penalties for incomplete or inaccurate customs documentation.

__________________________________________________________________

Paul Woodward is a Senior Consultant in the Global Trade Consulting division of trade services firm Livingston International. He can be reached at PWoodward@livingstonintl.com.

egg

Despite Ranking only Fifth in Terms of Market Size, the Netherlands Leads European Chicken Egg Exports

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Hen Eggs – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

In 2019, the EU chicken egg market decreased by -2.1% to $12.7B for the first time since 2016, thus ending a two-year rising trend. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 with an increase of 8.7% against the previous year. The level of consumption peaked at $15.8B in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2019, consumption failed to regain the momentum.

In physical terms, the volume of consumption amounted to 6.3M tonnes which remained relatively stable against the previous year; over the last decade, it increased gradually with some slight fluctuations in certain years.

Consumption by Country

The countries with the highest volumes of chicken egg consumption in 2019 were Germany (1.1M tonnes), France (881K tonnes) and Spain (761K tonnes), together accounting for 44% of total consumption. Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Belgium, Austria, Portugal, Hungary and Sweden lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 44%.

From 2007 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of chicken egg consumption, amongst the key consuming countries, was attained by Belgium, while chicken egg consumption for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest chicken egg markets in the European Union were Germany ($2.3B), France ($2B) and Spain ($1.4B), together comprising 45% of the total market. These countries were followed by Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Hungary, Sweden, Romania, Austria, Portugal and Belgium, which together accounted for a further 40%.

The countries with the highest levels of chicken egg per capita consumption in 2019 were the Netherlands (31 kg per person), Austria (17 kg per person) and Spain (16 kg per person).

Market Forecast to 2030

Driven by increasing demand for chicken egg in the European Union, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next decade. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +1.0% for the period from 2019 to 2030, which is projected to bring the market volume to 7M tonnes by the end of 2030.

Production in the EU

Chicken egg production reached 6.4M tonnes in 2019, stabilizing at 2018 figures. Over the period under review, production, however, showed a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2013 when the production volume increased by 9.2% y-o-y. As a result, production reached the peak volume of 6.6M tonnes. From 2014 to 2019, production growth remained at a somewhat lower figure.

Production by Country

The countries with the highest volumes of chicken egg production in 2019 were Germany (852K tonnes), France (845K tonnes) and Spain (841K tonnes), with a combined 39% share of total production. Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Belgium, Portugal, Hungary, Austria and Sweden lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 48%.

From 2007 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of chicken egg production, amongst the leading producing countries, was attained by Austria, while chicken egg production for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Producing Animals in the EU

The total number of hens for egg production stood at 458M heads in 2019, approximately equating 2018 figures. Over the period under review, the number of producing animals continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2010 with an increase of 5.5% y-o-y. As a result, the number of producing animals attained the peak level of 461M heads. From 2011 to 2019, the growth of this number failed to regain the momentum.

Yield in the EU

The average chicken egg yield dropped slightly to 14 kg per head in 2019, approximately equating the year before. Over the period under review, the yield saw a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 when the yield increased by 7.2% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the chicken egg yield reached the peak level at 15 kg per head in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2019, the yield failed to regain the momentum.

Exports in the EU

In 2019, the amount of chicken eggs exported in the European Union fell modestly to 1.1M tonnes, declining by -2% against the year before. Overall, exports saw a abrupt curtailment. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2018 with an increase of 2.4% year-to-year.

In value terms, chicken egg exports dropped modestly to $2.1B (IndexBox estimates) in 2019. Over the period under review, exports saw a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2013 with an increase of 17% year-to-year. The level of export peaked at $2.3B in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2019, exports failed to regain the momentum.

Exports by Country

The Netherlands was the largest exporting country with an export of around 396K tonnes, which accounted for 34% of total exports. It was distantly followed by Poland (214K tonnes), Germany (130K tonnes), Spain (87K tonnes) and Belgium (85K tonnes), together mixing up a 45% share of total exports. France (34K tonnes), Latvia (22K tonnes), Italy (19K tonnes), Bulgaria (18K tonnes) and the Czech Republic (18K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2019, the biggest increases were in Spain, while shipments for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the Netherlands ($743M) remains the largest chicken egg supplier in the European Union, comprising 35% of total exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Poland ($284M), with a 13% share of total exports. It was followed by Germany, with a 13% share.

In the Netherlands, chicken egg exports plunged by an average annual rate of -3.0% over the period from 2007-2019. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: Poland (+13.0% per year) and Germany (-1.6% per year).

Export Prices by Country

The chicken egg export price in the European Union stood at $1,845 per tonne in 2019, approximately mirroring the previous year. In general, the export price recorded strong growth. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 when the export price increased by 28% against the previous year. Over the period under review, export prices reached the maximum at $1,875 per tonne in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2019, export prices stood at a somewhat lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2019, the country with the highest price was the Czech Republic ($2,582 per tonne), while Latvia ($1,259 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2019, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Belgium, while the other leaders experienced mixed trends in the export price figures.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

section 232

Commerce Commences Section 232 Investigation on Imports of Vanadium

The Commerce Department announced on June 2, 2020, that it is starting another Section 232 investigation that could result in the imposition of tariffs or potentially other restrictions on imports of vanadium. The agency stated that it will review and determine “whether the present quantities or circumstances of vanadium imports into the United States threaten to impair the national security.”

Vanadium is a chemical element with the symbol “V” and is assigned atomic number 23.  A general description of it is a hard, silvery-grey, malleable transition metal. It is an artificially isolated element, which is rarely found in its natural state, but one of its key properties once isolated artificially is to prevent oxidation. Various applications that rely on vanadium include use in the production of ferrovanadium, which is a steel additive. The chemical properties of vanadium also increase the strength of the steel and it is therefore used in products such as high-carbon steel alloys and high-speed tool steels for use “aircraft, jet en­gines, ballistic missiles, energy storage, bridges, buildings, and pipelines. Vanadium is a key component in aerospace applications due to its strength-to-weight ratio, the best of any engineered material,” Commerce said and “U.S. demand is supplied entirely through imports.”

This new 232 investigation is the result of the filing of a request by two domestic U.S. vanadium producers, AMG Vanadium and U.S. Vanadium, in November 2019. The allegation claims that the “domestic industry is adversely impacted by unfairly traded low-priced im­ports, limited export markets due to value-added tax regimes in other vanadium producing countries, and the distortionary effect of Chinese and Russian industrial policies,” according to Commerce’s press release.

The notice of initiation, of the 232 investigation was published in the Federal Register on June 3rd. Comments must be filed by July 20, 2020, and any rebuttal comments are due by August 17, 2020.  Those interested in submitting comments should ensure that it addresses the following:

-the quantity of imports,

-domestic production and capacity needed to meet national defense requirements, and

-the impact of foreign competition on the vanadium industry, among other things.

Husch Blackwell continues to monitor the Section 232 investigations and will provide further updates as more information becomes available.

_______________________________________________________________________

Nithya Nagarajan is a Washington-based partner with the law firm Husch Blackwell LLP. She practices in the International Trade & Supply Chain group of the firm’s Technology, Manufacturing & Transportation industry team.

Turner Kim is an Assistant Trade Analyst in Husch Blackwell LLP’s Washington D.C. office.

paper dishes

The EU Paper Dishes And Cups Imports Soar, Boosted by Rising Demand in Western Europe

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Paper Trays, Dishes, Plates And Cups – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the paper dishes and cups market in the European Union amounted to $1.4B in 2018. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +1.1% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period.

Consumption by Country

The countries with the highest volumes of paper dishes and cups consumption in 2018 were the UK (111K tonnes), Germany (71K tonnes) and France (36K tonnes), together accounting for 51% of total consumption.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of paper dishes and cups consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by the UK, while paper dishes and cups consumption for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest paper dishes and cups markets in the European Union were the UK ($376M), Germany ($238M) and France ($128M), with a combined 54% share of the total market. Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Belgium, Sweden, Romania, Hungary, Poland and the Czech Republic lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 33%.

The countries with the highest levels of paper dishes and cups per capita consumption in 2018 were the UK (1,667 kg per 1000 persons), the Netherlands (1,396 kg per 1000 persons) and Sweden (1,157 kg per 1000 persons).

Exports in the EU

In 2018, the amount of paper trays, dishes, plates and cups exported in the European Union stood at 202K tonnes, going up by 9.9% against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +4.2% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. In value terms, paper dishes and cups exports stood at $791M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

Italy represented the largest exporter of paper trays, dishes, plates and cups exported in the European Union, with the volume of exports resulting at 64K tonnes, which was approx. 32% of total exports in 2018. Germany (22K tonnes) took an 11% share (based on tonnes) of total exports, which put it in second place, followed by Poland (10%), the UK (9.5%), Finland (6.8%), Spain (6.4%) and the Netherlands (4.8%).

From 2007 to 2018, average annual rates of growth with regard to paper dishes and cups exports from Italy stood at +3.1%. At the same time, the Netherlands (+15.4%), Poland (+10.0%), Spain (+8.4%), the UK (+2.5%) and Germany (+1.1%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, the Netherlands emerged as the fastest-growing exporter exported in the European Union, with a CAGR of +15.4% from 2007-2018. By contrast, Finland (-1.4%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period. From 2007 to 2018, the share of Italy, Poland, Spain, the Netherlands and the UK increased by +9.1%, +6.7%, +3.8%, +3.8% and +2.2% percentage points, while the shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, Italy ($276M) remains the largest paper dishes and cups supplier in the European Union, comprising 35% of total paper dishes and cups exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Germany ($86M), with a 11% share of total exports. It was followed by the UK, with a 10% share.

Export Prices by Country

The paper dishes and cups export price in the European Union stood at $3,914 per tonne in 2018, increasing by 3.3% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the paper dishes and cups export price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was the Netherlands ($4,651 per tonne), while Finland ($2,981 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Italy, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, approx. 288K tonnes of paper trays, dishes, plates and cups were imported in the European Union; picking up by 11% against the previous year. In general, paper dishes and cups imports continue to indicate resilient growth. The volume of imports peaked in 2018 and are likely to continue its growth in the near future. In value terms, paper dishes and cups imports amounted to $912M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

The imports of the four major importers of paper trays, dishes, plates and cups, namely the UK, Germany, the Netherlands and France, represented more than half of total import. Sweden (14K tonnes) took a 4.9% share (based on tonnes) of total imports, which put it in second place, followed by Spain (4.9%). The following importers – Belgium (13K tonnes), Ireland (9K tonnes), Italy (8.5K tonnes), Greece (8.2K tonnes), Austria (8.1K tonnes) and Romania (7K tonnes) – together made up 19% of total imports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Romania, while imports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Germany ($147M), the UK ($134M) and France ($113M) were the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2018, together accounting for 43% of total imports. These countries were followed by the Netherlands, Sweden, Belgium, Spain, Ireland, Italy, Austria, Romania and Greece, which together accounted for a further 42%.

Import Prices by Country

The paper dishes and cups import price in the European Union stood at $3,160 per tonne in 2018, growing by 1.6% against the previous year. In general, the paper dishes and cups import price, however, continues to indicate a mild deduction.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Belgium ($3,706 per tonne), while the UK ($2,354 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Italy, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

pasta

Stuffed Pasta Market in the EU Slows Down, Levelling Off at $2.8B

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Pasta Stuffed With Meat, Fish And Cheese – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the market for pasta stuffed with meat, fish and cheese in the European Union amounted to $2.8B in 2018, remaining stable against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Over the period under review, consumption of pasta stuffed with meat, fish and cheese continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

Consumption By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of consumption of pasta stuffed with meat, fish and cheese in 2018 were Germany (263K tonnes), France (207K tonnes) and Italy (138K tonnes), with a combined 60% share of total consumption. These countries were followed by the UK, Poland, Spain, Belgium and Hungary, which together accounted for a further 27%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of consumption of pasta stuffed with meat, fish and cheese, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Hungary, while consumption of pasta stuffed with meat, fish and cheese for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, France ($672M), Germany ($579M) and Italy ($493M) were the countries with the highest levels of market value in 2018, together comprising 61% of the total market. The UK, Belgium, Spain, Poland and Hungary lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 25%.

The countries with the highest levels of meat, fish and cheese pasta per capita consumption in 2018 were Belgium (4,007 kg per 1000 persons), Germany (3,206 kg per 1000 persons) and France (3,161 kg per 1000 persons).

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in the EU

Driven by increasing demand for meat, fish and cheese pasta in the European Union, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next decade. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +0.7% for the period from 2018 to 2030, which is projected to bring the market volume to 1.1M tonnes by the end of 2030.

Production in the EU

In 2018, the production of pasta stuffed with meat, fish and cheese in the European Union totaled 1M tonnes, standing approx. at the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.4% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations over the period under review. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2017 when production volume increased by 8.4% year-to-year. In that year, production of pasta stuffed with meat, fish and cheese attained its peak volume of 1M tonnes, and then declined slightly in the following year.

Production By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of production of pasta stuffed with meat, fish and cheese in 2018 were Italy (277K tonnes), Germany (208K tonnes) and France (185K tonnes), together accounting for 65% of total production.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of production of pasta stuffed with meat, fish and cheese, amongst the main producing countries, was attained by Germany, while production of pasta stuffed with meat, fish and cheese for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Exports in the EU

The exports totaled 359K tonnes in 2018, rising by 4.9% against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +3.0% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Over the period under review, exports of pasta stuffed with meat, fish and cheese reached their peak figure in 2018 and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term. In value terms, exports of pasta stuffed with meat, fish and cheese totaled $1.2B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

Italy was the largest exporter of pasta stuffed with meat, fish and cheese exported in the European Union, with the volume of exports finishing at 144K tonnes, which was approx. 40% of total exports in 2018. Belgium (53K tonnes) ranks second in terms of the total exports with a 15% share, followed by France (9.8%), Austria (9.1%), Germany (5.4%) and the Netherlands (4.6%). Luxembourg (11K tonnes) occupied a minor share of total exports.

From 2007 to 2018, average annual rates of growth with regard to meat, fish and cheese pasta exports from Italy stood at +1.9%. At the same time, Austria (+11.6%), the Netherlands (+10.0%), Germany (+3.0%), Luxembourg (+2.5%) and France (+1.3%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Austria emerged as the fastest-growing exporter exported in the European Union, with a CAGR of +11.6% from 2007-2018. Belgium experienced a relatively flat trend pattern.

In value terms, Italy ($544M) remains the largest meat, fish and cheese pasta supplier in the European Union, comprising 45% of total exports of pasta stuffed with meat, fish and cheese. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Belgium ($159M), with a 13% share of total exports. It was followed by France, with a 8.8% share.

Export Prices by Country

The export price for pasta stuffed with meat, fish and cheese in the European Union stood at $3,365 per tonne in 2018, going up by 10% against the previous year.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was the Netherlands ($4,021 per tonne), while Luxembourg ($2,304 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Italy, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

Stuffed pasta imports in the EU totaled 343K tonnes in 2018, going up by 11% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +3.2% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with only minor fluctuations being observed throughout the analyzed period. In value terms, imports of pasta stuffed with meat, fish and cheese totaled $1.1B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

The imports of the three major importers of pasta stuffed with meat, fish and cheese, namely Germany, France and the UK, represented more than half of total import. It was distantly followed by Belgium (25K tonnes), Spain (25K tonnes), the Netherlands (21K tonnes) and Austria (16K tonnes), together generating a 25% share of total imports. Portugal (14,869 tonnes), Sweden (7,481 tonnes), Denmark (6,532 tonnes), Ireland (6,312 tonnes) and Italy (5,260 tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Portugal, while imports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Germany ($194M), France ($187M) and the UK ($136M) were the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2018, together accounting for 49% of total imports. Belgium, Spain, the Netherlands, Austria, Portugal, Sweden, Denmark, Italy and Ireland lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 42%.

Import Prices by Country

The import price for pasta stuffed with meat, fish and cheese in the European Union stood at $3,089 per tonne in 2018, rising by 2.4% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the import price for pasta stuffed with meat, fish and cheese continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

Average prices varied somewhat amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, major importing countries recorded the following prices: in Italy ($3,871 per tonne) and Belgium ($3,628 per tonne), while Germany ($2,609 per tonne) and Ireland ($2,783 per tonne) were amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

Homogenized Food Preparations

The Market for Homogenized Food Preparations in the EU Increased Slightly to $2B

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Homogenized Composite Food Preparations – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the homogenized food preparations market in the European Union amounted to $2B in 2018, stabilizing at the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +1.0% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with only minor fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The level of homogenized food preparations consumption peaked at $2.2B in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, consumption stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Consumption By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of homogenized food preparations consumption in 2018 were Germany (92K tonnes), the UK (86K tonnes) and France (78K tonnes), together accounting for 50% of total consumption. These countries were followed by Spain, Italy, the Czech Republic, Romania, Sweden, Portugal, Belgium, Greece and Poland, which together accounted for a further 37%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of homogenized food preparations consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Portugal, while homogenized food preparations consumption for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Germany ($357M), France ($352M) and the UK ($307M) were the countries with the highest levels of market value in 2018, with a combined 50% share of the total market. Spain, Italy, Sweden, Belgium, Romania, Greece, Portugal, Poland and the Czech Republic lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 40%.

The countries with the highest levels of homogenized food preparations per capita consumption in 2018 were Sweden (1,583 kg per 1000 persons), the Czech Republic (1,578 kg per 1000 persons) and Portugal (1,513 kg per 1000 persons).

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in the EU

Driven by increasing demand for homogenized food preparations in the European Union, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next decade. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +0.6% for the period from 2018 to 2030, which is projected to bring the market volume to 546K tonnes by the end of 2030.

Production in the EU

In 2018, approx. 541K tonnes of homogenized composite food preparations were produced in the European Union; jumping by 1.6% against the previous year. Overall, homogenized food preparations production continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. Over the period under review, homogenized food preparations production reached its peak figure volume in 2018 and is likely to see steady growth in the near future.

Production By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of homogenized food preparations production in 2018 were France (91K tonnes), Germany (90K tonnes) and the UK (79K tonnes), with a combined 48% share of total production. Spain, Italy, Poland, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Romania, Greece, Portugal and Sweden lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 41%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of homogenized food preparations production, amongst the main producing countries, was attained by Portugal, while homogenized food preparations production for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, the exports of homogenized composite food preparations in the European Union amounted to 127K tonnes, growing by 15% against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.7% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed in certain years. In value terms, homogenized food preparations exports amounted to $453M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

The countries with the highest levels of homogenized food preparations exports in 2018 were Poland (19K tonnes), France (18K tonnes), Spain (13K tonnes), Germany (12K tonnes), the UK (12K tonnes), Italy (9.4K tonnes), Belgium (8K tonnes), the Netherlands (7.6K tonnes), Hungary (7.5K tonnes), the Czech Republic (5.7K tonnes) and Slovakia (5.4K tonnes), together resulting at 92% of total export.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Slovakia, while exports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, France ($69M), Poland ($61M) and Germany ($54M) appeared to be the countries with the highest levels of exports in 2018, with a combined 41% share of total exports. The UK, Spain, the Netherlands, Belgium, Italy, Slovakia, Hungary and the Czech Republic lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 52%.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the homogenized food preparations export price in the European Union amounted to $3,555 per tonne, leveling off at the previous year. Over the period under review, the export prices for homogenized composite food preparations reached their peak figure at $3,955 per tonne in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, export prices failed to regain their momentum.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Germany ($4,487 per tonne), while Hungary ($2,717 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, homogenized food preparations imports in the European Union stood at 92K tonnes, picking up by 7.1% against the previous year. Over the period under review, homogenized food preparations imports, however, continue to indicate a mild contraction. In value terms, homogenized food preparations imports amounted to $329M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

The imports of the twelve major importers of homogenized composite food preparations, namely the UK, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Austria, France, Sweden, Ireland, Portugal, the Czech Republic, Belgium and Spain, represented more than two-thirds of total import.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Austria, while imports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest homogenized food preparations importing markets in the European Union were the UK ($65M), Italy ($45M) and Germany ($42M), with a combined 46% share of total imports. The Netherlands, Austria, France, Sweden, Belgium, Ireland, Spain, the Czech Republic and Portugal lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 41%.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the homogenized food preparations import price in the European Union amounted to $3,552 per tonne, jumping by 4.5% against the previous year.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Italy ($4,605 per tonne), while Germany ($3,068 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by France, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

bread

Fresh Bread And Miscellaneous Bakery Market in the EU Stands at $68.7B

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Bakers’ Wares (No Added Sweetening) – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the market for fresh bread and miscellaneous bakery in the European Union amounted to $68.7B in 2018, standing approx. at the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Over the period under review, consumption of fresh bread and miscellaneous bakery, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

Consumption By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of consumption of fresh bread and miscellaneous bakery in 2018 were the UK (4.8M tonnes), Germany (4.6M tonnes) and Spain (3M tonnes), with a combined 44% share of total consumption. These countries were followed by France, Italy, Poland, the Netherlands, Romania, Ireland, the Czech Republic, Portugal and Austria, which together accounted for a further 44%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of consumption of fresh bread and miscellaneous bakery, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Ireland, while consumption of fresh bread and miscellaneous bakery for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Germany ($15.7B), the UK ($11.9B) and Italy ($9.8B) constituted the countries with the highest levels of market value in 2018, together accounting for 54% of the total market. France, Spain, the Netherlands, Poland, Austria, Portugal, Romania, Ireland and the Czech Republic lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 36%.

The countries with the highest levels of fresh bread and miscellaneous bakery per capita consumption in 2018 were Ireland (154 kg per person), the Netherlands (81 kg per person) and the UK (72 kg per person).

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in the EU

Driven by increasing demand for fresh bread and miscellaneous bakery in the European Union, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next decade. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +0.5% for the period from 2018 to 2030, which is projected to bring the market volume to 30M tonnes by the end of 2030.

Production in the EU

The volume of production of fresh bread and miscellaneous bakery amounted to 28M tonnes in 2018, going down by -1.9% against the previous year. Over the period under review, production of fresh bread and miscellaneous bakery, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. Over the period under review, production of fresh bread and miscellaneous bakery attained its peak figure volume at 29M tonnes in 2017, and then declined slightly in the following year.

Production By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of production of fresh bread and miscellaneous bakery in 2018 were Germany (5.1M tonnes), the UK (4.3M tonnes) and Spain (3.1M tonnes), together comprising 44% of total production. France, Italy, Poland, the Netherlands, Romania, Ireland, the Czech Republic, Portugal and Belgium lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 44%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of production of fresh bread and miscellaneous bakery, amongst the main producing countries, was attained by Ireland, while production of fresh bread and miscellaneous bakery for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, the amount of fresh bread and miscellaneous bakery exported in the European Union totaled 4.7M tonnes, surging by 5% against the previous year. The total exports indicated a buoyant increase from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +5.3% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Over the period under review, exports of fresh bread and miscellaneous bakery reached their peak figure in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future. In value terms, exports of fresh bread and miscellaneous bakery amounted to $13.5B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

In 2018, Germany (1.1M tonnes), distantly followed by France (596K tonnes), Belgium (479K tonnes), Italy (379K tonnes), Poland (356K tonnes), the Netherlands (333K tonnes), Spain (314K tonnes) and the UK (228K tonnes) represented the main exporters of fresh bread and miscellaneous bakery, together comprising 80% of total exports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Poland, while exports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Germany ($2.8B), France ($1.9B) and Belgium ($1.6B) were the countries with the highest levels of exports in 2018, together accounting for 47% of total exports. Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Spain and the UK lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 36%.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the export price for fresh bread and miscellaneous bakery in the European Union amounted to $2,881 per tonne, jumping by 7.1% against the previous year. In general, the export price for fresh bread and miscellaneous bakery, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Italy ($4,130 per tonne), while Poland ($2,294 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by France, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, the imports of fresh bread and miscellaneous bakery in the European Union totaled 4.2M tonnes, increasing by 5.4% against the previous year. The total imports indicated a strong increase from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +4.8% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, imports of fresh bread and miscellaneous bakery increased by +67.7% against 2007 indices. In value terms, imports of fresh bread and miscellaneous bakery stood at $11.4B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

The UK (706K tonnes), Germany (574K tonnes), France (449K tonnes), the Netherlands (334K tonnes), Belgium (304K tonnes), Italy (225K tonnes), Austria (175K tonnes), Spain (173K tonnes), Ireland (159K tonnes), Sweden (124K tonnes), the Czech Republic (111K tonnes) and Denmark (111K tonnes) represented roughly 82% of total imports of fresh bread and miscellaneous bakery in 2018.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by the Czech Republic, while imports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest fresh bread and miscellaneous bakery importing markets in the European Union were the UK ($1.9B), Germany ($1.6B) and France ($1.4B), together comprising 43% of total imports. The Netherlands, Belgium, Italy, Spain, Austria, Ireland, Sweden, Denmark and the Czech Republic lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 40%.

Import Prices by Country

The import price for fresh bread and miscellaneous bakery in the European Union stood at $2,701 per tonne in 2018, growing by 5.5% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the import price for fresh bread and miscellaneous bakery, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

Average prices varied somewhat amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, major importing countries recorded the following prices: in France ($3,132 per tonne) and Spain ($3,107 per tonne), while the Czech Republic ($2,191 per tonne) and Ireland ($2,258 per tonne) were amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the Czech Republic, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

sweet corn

Preserved Sweet Corn Market in the EU To Continue Moderate Growth

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Sweet Corn Prepared Or Preserved – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the preserved sweet corn market in the European Union amounted to $465M in 2018, remaining relatively unchanged against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +2.2% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed over the period under review.

Consumption By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of preserved sweet corn consumption in 2018 were the UK (69K tonnes), France (67K tonnes) and Germany (66K tonnes), with a combined 59% share of total consumption. Spain, Italy, Sweden, the Netherlands, Poland, Denmark, Austria, Belgium and Romania lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 33%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of preserved sweet corn consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Italy, while preserved sweet corn consumption for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest preserved sweet corn markets in the European Union were the UK ($95M), France ($91M) and Germany ($82M), with a combined 58% share of the total market. Spain, Sweden, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Denmark, Austria, Belgium and Romania lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 34%.

The countries with the highest levels of preserved sweet corn per capita consumption in 2018 were Sweden (1,781 kg per 1000 persons), Denmark (1,267 kg per 1000 persons) and the UK (1,028 kg per 1000 persons).

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in the EU

Driven by increasing demand for preserved sweet corn in the European Union, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven-year period. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +1.8% for the period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 392K tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in the EU

In 2018, the production of sweet corn prepared or preserved in the European Union stood at 369K tonnes, surging by 1.8% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +3.0% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 when production volume increased by 13% year-to-year. Over the period under review, preserved sweet corn production attained its maximum volume in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, the preserved sweet corn exports in the European Union stood at 411K tonnes, rising by 13% against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.9% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. In value terms, preserved sweet corn exports amounted to $522M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

Hungary represented the major exporter of sweet corn prepared or preserved exported in the European Union, with the volume of exports finishing at 203K tonnes, which was near 49% of total exports in 2018. France (132K tonnes) occupied the second position in the ranking, distantly followed by Spain (26K tonnes) and Belgium (20K tonnes). All these countries together took approx. 43% share of total exports. Germany (10K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Spain, while exports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Hungary ($228M), France ($171M) and Spain ($43M) were the countries with the highest levels of exports in 2018, with a combined 85% share of total exports.

Export Prices by Country

The preserved sweet corn export price in the European Union stood at $1,268 per tonne in 2018, remaining constant against the previous year. Over the period under review, the preserved sweet corn export price continues to indicate a slight reduction.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Belgium ($1,692 per tonne), while Hungary ($1,125 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Germany, while the other leaders experienced a decline in the export price figures.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, approx. 387K tonnes of sweet corn prepared or preserved were imported in the European Union; picking up by 13% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.3% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations over the period under review. In value terms, preserved sweet corn imports amounted to $510M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

The imports of the three major importers of sweet corn prepared or preserved, namely Germany, the UK and Spain, represented more than half of total import. France (32K tonnes) occupied the next position in the ranking, followed by Belgium (26K tonnes), Italy (24K tonnes), the Netherlands (19K tonnes), Sweden (18K tonnes) and Poland (18K tonnes). All these countries together occupied near 35% share of total imports. Denmark (7,702 tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by the Netherlands, while imports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest preserved sweet corn importing markets in the European Union were the UK ($97M), Germany ($94M) and Spain ($68M), together accounting for 51% of total imports. These countries were followed by Belgium, Italy, France, Sweden, the Netherlands, Poland and Denmark, which together accounted for a further 38%.

Import Prices by Country

The preserved sweet corn import price in the European Union stood at $1,318 per tonne in 2018, rising by 3.4% against the previous year. Overall, the preserved sweet corn import price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. Over the period under review, the import prices for sweet corn prepared or preserved attained their peak figure at $1,525 per tonne in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, import prices remained at a lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Sweden ($1,624 per tonne), while France ($1,017 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Sweden, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

mango

Long-Term Growth of Mango And Mangosteen Market in the U.S. Is Losing Momentum

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘U.S. – Mangoes, Mangosteens And Guavas – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the mango and mangosteen market in the U.S. amounted to $558M in 2018. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Over the period under review, mango and mangosteen consumption continues to indicate a strong increase. Over the period under review, the mango and mangosteen market attained its peak figure level in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in the U.S.

Driven by increasing demand for mango and mangosteen in the U.S., largely supported by rising Hispanic population, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven years. Market performance is forecast to decelerate, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +2.9% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 579K tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in the U.S.

Mango and mangosteen production in the U.S. amounted to 930 tonnes in 2018, declining by -7.5% against the previous year. Overall, mango and mangosteen production continues to indicate an abrupt contraction, as mangoes are not cultivated largely across the U.S., and mango imports are widely available.

Harvested Area And Yield in the U.S.

In 2018, the total area harvested in terms of mangoes, mangosteens and guavas production in the U.S. stood at 53 ha, falling by -18.5% against the previous year. Average yield of mangoes, mangosteens and guavas in the U.S. amounted to 18 tonne per ha in 2018, jumping by 13% against the previous year.

Exports from the U.S.

In 2018, the mango and mangosteen exports from the U.S. stood at 27K tonnes, declining by -4.7% against the previous year. Overall, mango and mangosteen exports, however, continue to indicate a buoyant expansion. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 when exports increased by 35% y-o-y. Exports peaked at 31K tonnes in 2015; however, from 2016 to 2018, exports failed to regain their momentum. In value terms, mango and mangosteen exports totaled $40M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

Canada (15K tonnes) was the main destination for mango and mangosteen exports from the U.S., accounting for a 55% share of total exports. Moreover, mango and mangosteen exports to Canada exceeded the volume sent to the second major destination, the UK (2.4K tonnes), sixfold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Germany (2.4K tonnes), with a 8.8% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of volume to Canada amounted to +7.4%. Exports to the other major destinations recorded the following average annual rates of exports growth: the UK (+2.4% per year) and Germany (+11.3% per year).

In value terms, Canada ($21M) remains the key foreign market for mango and mangosteen exports from the U.S., comprising 53% of total mango and mangosteen exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Germany ($5.3M), with a 13% share of total exports. It was followed by Mexico, with a 7.6% share.

Export Prices by Country

The average mango and mangosteen export price stood at $1,502 per tonne in 2018, increasing by 2.5% against the previous year. Over the last eleven years, it increased at an average annual rate of +2.1%. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2017 an increase of 14% year-to-year. The export price peaked in 2018 and is likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

There were significant differences in the average prices for the major foreign markets. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Germany ($2,259 per tonne), while the average price for exports to the UK ($1,140 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was recorded for supplies to Germany, while the prices for the other major destinations experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports into the U.S.

In 2018, the mango and mangosteen imports into the U.S. stood at 500K tonnes, stabilizing at the previous year. Over the period under review, the total imports indicated a prominent increase from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +4.6% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Imports peaked in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future. In value terms, mango and mangosteen imports amounted to $637M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

In 2018, Mexico (311K tonnes) constituted the largest mango and mangosteen supplier to the U.S., with a 62% share of total imports. Moreover, mango and mangosteen imports from Mexico exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest supplier, Peru (50K tonnes), sixfold. Ecuador (49K tonnes) ranked third in terms of total imports with a 9.7% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume from Mexico stood at +5.4%. The remaining supplying countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: Peru (+5.6% per year) and Ecuador (+4.7% per year).

In value terms, Mexico ($380M) constituted the largest supplier of mango and mangosteen to the U.S., comprising 60% of total mango and mangosteen imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Peru ($61M), with a 9.5% share of total imports. It was followed by the Philippines, with a 7% share.

Import Prices by Country

The average mango and mangosteen import price stood at $1,273 per tonne in 2018, going up by 17% against the previous year. In general, the mango and mangosteen import price continues to indicate perceptible growth.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major supplying countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Thailand ($2,892 per tonne), while the price for Ecuador ($862 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Mexico, while the prices for the other major suppliers experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

figs

France and Germany Remain The Largest Markets for Imported Figs in the EU

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Figs – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the fig market in the European Union amounted to $431M in 2018, rising by 5.6% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +1.9% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations in certain years. Over the period under review, the fig market attained its peak figure level in 2018 and is likely to continue its growth in the near future.

Consumption By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of fig consumption in 2018 were Spain (32K tonnes), France (18K tonnes) and Germany (13K tonnes), together accounting for 55% of total consumption. Italy, Greece, the UK, Austria, Portugal and Cyprus lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 35%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of fig consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Austria, while fig consumption for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Spain ($111M), France ($61M) and Germany ($51M) appeared to be the countries with the highest levels of market value in 2018, together accounting for 51% of the total market. These countries were followed by Italy, Greece, the UK, Cyprus, Austria and Portugal, which together accounted for a further 38%.

In 2018, the highest levels of fig per capita consumption was registered in Cyprus (3,009 kg per 1000 persons), followed by Greece (751 kg per 1000 persons), Spain (684 kg per 1000 persons) and Austria (568 kg per 1000 persons), while the world average per capita consumption of fig was estimated at 228 kg per 1000 persons.

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in the EU

Driven by increasing demand for fig in the European Union, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven years. Market performance is forecast to accelerate, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +1.5% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 129K tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in the EU

The fig production stood at 73K tonnes in 2018, stabilizing at the previous year. Over the period under review, fig production, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

Production By Country in the EU

Spain (38K tonnes) constituted the country with the largest volume of fig production, accounting for 52% of total volume. Moreover, fig production in Spain exceeded the figures recorded by the second-largest producer, Greece (13K tonnes), threefold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Italy (11K tonnes), with a 15% share.

From 2007 to 2018, the average annual rate of growth in terms of volume in Spain stood at +3.5%. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: Greece (-3.9% per year) and Italy (-4.0% per year).

Harvested Area and Yield in the EU

In 2018, the fig harvested area in the European Union stood at 24K ha, approximately equating the previous year. Overall, the fig harvested area continues to indicate a slight decrease.

In 2018, the average yield of figs in the European Union amounted to 3 tonne per ha, rising by 1.7% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the fig yield continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

Exports in the EU

The exports amounted to 28K tonnes in 2018, approximately mirroring the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +4.4% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The volume of exports peaked in 2018 and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term. In value terms, fig exports amounted to $117M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

The exports of the five major exporters of figs, namely Spain, Greece, the Netherlands, Germany and Italy, represented more than two-thirds of total export. It was distantly followed by France (1,995 tonnes), constituting a 7.1% share of total exports. Belgium (1,247 tonnes) occupied a minor share of total exports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Greece, while exports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest fig markets in the European Union were Spain ($26M), the Netherlands ($21M) and Germany ($18M), with a combined 55% share of total exports.

Export Prices by Country

The figs export price in the European Union stood at $4,194 per tonne in 2018, picking up by 7.4% against the previous year. Over the period from 2007 to 2018, it increased at an average annual rate of +1.1%.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was the Netherlands ($5,523 per tonne), while Italy ($3,137 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Spain, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, approx. 71K tonnes of figs were imported in the European Union; remaining constant against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.6% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The volume of imports peaked at 75K tonnes in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, imports remained at a lower figure. In value terms, fig imports amounted to $277M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

France (17K tonnes) and Germany (17K tonnes) represented roughly 47% of total imports of figs in 2018. The UK (7,521 tonnes) occupied an 11% share (based on tonnes) of total imports, which put it in second place, followed by Austria (7.3%), the Netherlands (6.4%) and Italy (6.1%). Belgium (2,932 tonnes), Poland (1,568 tonnes), Sweden (1,523 tonnes), Spain (1,423 tonnes), Portugal (1,246 tonnes) and Denmark (1,076 tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Austria, while imports for the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Germany ($64M), France ($56M) and the UK ($29M) constituted the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2018, with a combined 54% share of total imports. Austria, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium, Sweden, Poland, Spain, Denmark and Portugal lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 37%.

Import Prices by Country

The fig import price in the European Union stood at $3,875 per tonne in 2018, rising by 1.8% against the previous year. In general, the figs import price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Italy ($4,903 per tonne), while Portugal ($3,073 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Belgium, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform