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EU Cotton Bed Linen Market – Italy, Portugal, and Germany Account for 70% of Total Production

cotton bed

EU Cotton Bed Linen Market – Italy, Portugal, and Germany Account for 70% of Total Production

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Bed Linen Of Cotton – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the cotton bed linen market in the European Union is estimated at $10.4B in 2018, an increase of  12% y-o-y. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Over the period under review, bed linen of cotton consumption, however, continues to indicate a strong expansion. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 with an increase of 35% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the bed linen of cotton market reached its peak figure level in 2018 and is likely to see steady growth in the near future.

Consumption By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of bed linen of cotton consumption in 2018 were Italy (50K tonnes), Germany (46K tonnes) and France (45K tonnes), together accounting for 53% of total consumption. These countries were followed by the UK, Spain, the Netherlands, Sweden, Austria, Portugal, Belgium, Greece and Denmark, which together accounted for a further 37%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of bed linen of cotton consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Austria, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the UK ($7.4B) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by France ($819M). It was followed by Germany.

The countries with the highest levels of bed linen of cotton per capita consumption in 2018 were Austria (970 kg per 1000 persons), Sweden (882 kg per 1000 persons) and Italy (836 kg per 1000 persons).

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of bed linen of cotton per capita consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Austria, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in the EU

The bed linen of cotton market is expected to start a downward consumption trend over the next seven years. The performance of the market is forecast to decrease slightly, with an anticipated CAGR of -0.6% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to depress the market volume to 253K tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in the EU

In 2018, the production of bed linen of cotton in the European Union amounted to 92K tonnes, lowering by -6.1% against the previous year. In general, bed linen of cotton production continues to indicate a moderate descent. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2016 when production volume increased by 9.2% year-to-year. Over the period under review, bed linen of cotton production attained its peak figure volume at 127K tonnes in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, production stood at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, bed linen of cotton production totaled $957M in 2018 estimated in export prices. Over the period under review, bed linen of cotton production continues to indicate a drastic downturn. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2010 with an increase of 3.3% y-o-y. Over the period under review, bed linen of cotton production attained its peak figure level at $1.5B in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, production stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Production By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of bed linen of cotton production in 2018 were Italy (27K tonnes), Portugal (25K tonnes) and Germany (13K tonnes), together accounting for 70% of total production. These countries were followed by Poland, Spain, France and Romania, which together accounted for a further 21%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of bed linen of cotton production, amongst the main producing countries, was attained by Spain, while the other leaders experienced mixed trends in the production figures.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, the bed linen of cotton exports in the European Union amounted to 147K tonnes, surging by 7.9% against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.6% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 when exports increased by 16% year-to-year. The volume of exports peaked in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, bed linen of cotton exports amounted to $1.6B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total export value increased at an average annual rate of +1.7% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 when exports increased by 17% against the previous year. Over the period under review, bed linen of cotton exports attained their maximum at $1.7B in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, exports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Exports by Country

In 2018, Germany (33K tonnes), distantly followed by Portugal (19K tonnes), Poland (17K tonnes), Belgium (16K tonnes), the Netherlands (15K tonnes), Italy (7.9K tonnes), France (7.8K tonnes) and Spain (7.4K tonnes) represented the key exporters of bed linen of cotton, together making up 84% of total exports. The Czech Republic (4,375 tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest bed linen of cotton markets in the European Union were Germany ($357M), Portugal ($300M) and Belgium ($146M), together accounting for 49% of total exports. Poland, the Netherlands, Italy, France, Spain and the Czech Republic lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 38%.

In terms of the main exporting countries, the Netherlands recorded the highest rates of growth with regard to exports, over the last eleven years, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

The bed linen of cotton export price in the European Union stood at $11,134 per tonne in 2018, flattening at the previous year. In general, the bed linen of cotton export price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 an increase of 16% year-to-year. In that year, the export prices for bed linen of cotton reached their peak level of $13,796 per tonne. From 2012 to 2018, the growth in terms of the export prices for bed linen of cotton remained at a lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Portugal ($15,547 per tonne), while Poland ($7,852 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the Czech Republic, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

The imports stood at 319K tonnes in 2018, increasing by 3.3% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.9% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations over the period under review. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 with an increase of 17% y-o-y. The volume of imports peaked in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future.

In value terms, bed linen of cotton imports totaled $2.8B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total import value increased at an average annual rate of +2.1% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 when imports increased by 22% y-o-y. In that year, bed linen of cotton imports reached their peak of $3B. From 2012 to 2018, the growth of bed linen of cotton imports remained at a somewhat lower figure.

Imports by Country

In 2018, Germany (67K tonnes), France (47K tonnes), the UK (32K tonnes), Italy (31K tonnes), the Netherlands (27K tonnes) and Belgium (24K tonnes) were the largest importers of bed linen of cotton in the European Union, creating 71% of total import. Spain (16K tonnes) ranks next in terms of the total imports with a 4.9% share, followed by Poland (4.8%).

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest bed linen of cotton importing markets in the European Union were Germany ($611M), France ($475M) and the UK ($286M), together comprising 48% of total imports. These countries were followed by the Netherlands, Italy, Belgium, Spain and Poland, which together accounted for a further 32%.

Poland experienced the highest growth rate of imports, among the main importing countries over the last eleven-year period, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the bed linen of cotton import price in the European Union amounted to $8,910 per tonne, standing approx. at the previous year. In general, the bed linen of cotton import price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 when the import price increased by 28% against the previous year. In that year, the import prices for bed linen of cotton attained their peak level of $11,299 per tonne. From 2012 to 2018, the growth in terms of the import prices for bed linen of cotton remained at a somewhat lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Spain ($10,560 per tonne), while Italy ($6,906 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Spain, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

european market

European Market for Citrus Fruit Jams and Purees – France Benefits from the Highest Export Price ($4,292 per tonne)

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Citrus Fruit Jams, Marmalades, Jellies, Purees Or Pastes – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The market revenue for citrus fruit preserves (jams, marmalades, jellies, purees, and pastes) in the European Union amounted to $319M in 2018, growing by 8% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). In general, citrus fruit preserves consumption, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2014 with an increase of 22% against the previous year. The level of citrus fruit preserves consumption peaked at $331M in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, consumption failed to regain its momentum.

Consumption By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of citrus fruit preserves consumption in 2018 were the UK (26K tonnes), Italy (24K tonnes) and Spain (18K tonnes), with a combined 56% share of total consumption. France, the Netherlands, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Germany, Romania, Ireland, Poland and Hungary lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 33%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of citrus fruit preserves consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the UK ($83M), Italy ($60M) and France ($42M) appeared to be the countries with the highest levels of market value in 2018, with a combined 58% share of the total market. These countries were followed by Spain, Belgium, the Netherlands, the Czech Republic, Ireland, Romania, Germany, Hungary and Poland, which together accounted for a further 32%.

The countries with the highest levels of citrus fruit preserves per capita consumption in 2018 were Ireland (591 kg per 1000 persons), Italy (412 kg per 1000 persons) and Belgium (410 kg per 1000 persons).

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of citrus fruit preserves per capita consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Production in the EU

In 2018, approx. 125K tonnes of citrus fruit jams, marmalades, jellies, purees or pastes were produced in the European Union; rising by 13% against the previous year. Overall, citrus fruit preserves production, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2014 when production volume increased by 29% y-o-y. The volume of citrus fruit preserves production peaked at 138K tonnes in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, production stood at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, citrus fruit preserves production amounted to $313M in 2018 estimated in export prices. The total output value increased at an average annual rate of +1.1% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations throughout the analyzed period. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2008 when production volume increased by 22% against the previous year. In that year, citrus fruit preserves production attained its peak level of $338M. From 2009 to 2018, citrus fruit preserves production growth remained at a lower figure.

Production By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of citrus fruit preserves production in 2018 were the UK (26K tonnes), Spain (24K tonnes) and Italy (24K tonnes), with a combined 59% share of total production. France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany, the Czech Republic, Romania, Denmark, Hungary and Poland lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 32%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of citrus fruit preserves production, amongst the main producing countries, was attained by Belgium, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, approx. 36K tonnes of citrus fruit jams, marmalades, jellies, purees or pastes were exported in the European Union; surging by 7.5% against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.7% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2017 with an increase of 14% y-o-y. Over the period under review, citrus fruit preserves exports attained their peak figure in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future.

In value terms, citrus fruit preserves exports stood at $87M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total export value increased at an average annual rate of +1.9% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2008 when exports increased by 15% y-o-y. Over the period under review, citrus fruit preserves exports reached their peak figure in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

Exports by Country

The exports of the eight major exporters of citrus fruit jams, marmalades, jellies, purees or pastes, namely Spain, the UK, Germany, France, Denmark, Italy, Belgium and Ireland, represented more than two-thirds of total export.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Spain, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, France ($19M), the UK ($15M) and Spain ($15M) appeared to be the countries with the highest levels of exports in 2018, with a combined 55% share of total exports.

In terms of the main exporting countries, Spain recorded the highest growth rate of exports, over the last eleven years, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

The citrus fruit preserves export price in the European Union stood at $2,436 per tonne in 2018, increasing by 2.5% against the previous year. Overall, the citrus fruit preserves export price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 when the export price increased by 15% y-o-y. In that year, the export prices for citrus fruit jams, marmalades, jellies, purees or pastes reached their peak level of $3,042 per tonne. From 2014 to 2018, the growth in terms of the export prices for citrus fruit jams, marmalades, jellies, purees or pastes remained at a somewhat lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was France ($4,292 per tonne), while Denmark ($1,750 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by France, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, the amount of citrus fruit jams, marmalades, jellies, purees or pastes imported in the European Union amounted to 32K tonnes, going up by 11% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.9% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 with an increase of 36% against the previous year. The volume of imports peaked in 2018 and are likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, citrus fruit preserves imports stood at $69M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total import value increased at an average annual rate of +1.3% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern remained consistent, with only minor fluctuations being observed throughout the analyzed period. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2017 when imports increased by 28% year-to-year. Over the period under review, citrus fruit preserves imports reached their maximum in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the immediate term.

Imports by Country

France (7,472 tonnes) and the UK (6,570 tonnes) represented roughly 43% of total imports of citrus fruit jams, marmalades, jellies, purees or pastes in 2018. Germany (3,454 tonnes) ranks next in terms of the total imports with a 11% share, followed by Italy (9.5%), Ireland (9.1%) and Portugal (6%). Poland (1,196 tonnes), Sweden (1,188 tonnes), Spain (1,175 tonnes), the Netherlands (759 tonnes) and Belgium (565 tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Portugal, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the UK ($14M), France ($13M) and Germany ($10M) were the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2018, with a combined 54% share of total imports. Italy, Portugal, Ireland, Sweden, Spain, Belgium, Poland and the Netherlands lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 37%.

Portugal recorded the highest rates of growth with regard to imports, in terms of the main importing countries over the last eleven-year period, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

The citrus fruit preserves import price in the European Union stood at $2,121 per tonne in 2018, approximately mirroring the previous year. Overall, the citrus fruit preserves import price continues to indicate a mild slump. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2008 an increase of 7% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the import prices for citrus fruit jams, marmalades, jellies, purees or pastes attained their maximum at $2,824 per tonne in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, import prices failed to regain their momentum.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Belgium ($4,655 per tonne), while Ireland ($1,386 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Belgium, while the other leaders experienced mixed trends in the import price figures.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

trade

Peeling Away Trade Protections for Bananas

Simple in appearance, pleasantly sweet, nutritious, and nearly universal in appeal, that Cavendish bunch of bananas on your counter comes off as pretty unassuming. In reality, it has been through jungle wars and trade wars and now sits on the precipice of extinction. More than half of the bananas traded globally are the Cavendish variety. But with two diseases threatening the world’s largest Cavendish plantations, growing to love more varieties could help save trade in bananas.

Still an Important Cash Crop

Grown in more than 150 countries, bananas are the eighth most important food crop in the world – fourth most important in developing countries. Bananas are among the most traded fruit in the world, generating revenues of more than $8 billion a year for the top banana exporters including Ecuador, the Philippines, Costa Rica, Colombia and Guatemala. However, most are produced for local or national consumption.

For example, the Food and Agriculture Organization estimates that between 70 and 80 percent of bananas in Africa are produced by smallholder farmers. Around 114 million tons are produced globally beyond what isn’t too small to be counted, yet only 19 million tons were shipped globally. That said, for the top five exporters, bananas are a major contributor to the total value of their agricultural exports. India and China are among the biggest producers but their output mainly serves the large domestic markets.

global bananas trade

Peeling Away Trade Protections

The Banana Wars, centered on the European Union’s (EU) banana trade regime, spanned 20 years as the longest running series of disputes in the multilateral trading system to date (although the Boeing-Airbus dispute may be on track to take that title). As one of the most significant episodes in trade law, the Banana Wars are deserving of more attention, but here are some abridged highlights.

Europe’s banana regime began as an umbrella for complex arrangements at the individual EU Member State level that were designed to offer exclusive or preferential access to former colonies in Africa, Caribbean and the Pacific (ACP), and at the same time shield EU producers from competition.

Under the EU’s original regime, ACP countries received a zero-tariff rate while imports from other countries were taxed at 20 percent. However, each Member State was allowed to “derogate” and maintain special protective provisions for imports from their overseas departments. For example, France set aside two-thirds of its market for Guadeloupe and Martinique and the remaining third for the ACP Franc Zone states of Cameroon and Cote d’Ivoire. The Spanish market was reserved for shipments from the Canary Islands. Greece banned imports to protect its own production in Crete. Only Germany opened to free trade.

The Single European Act of 1986 mandated an integrated EU market by January 1993, which required that Member States consolidate their programs into a common regime for bananas. As devised, this version still enabled members to discriminate among imports by source, offering better terms to their overseas departments and to imports from ACP countries. Colombia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Nicaragua and Venezuela (supported by the United States) challenged the regime as inconsistent with the EU’s obligations under the GATT.

The EU’s ability to offer tariff preferences was upheld because it had a waiver in the GATT for its general tariff preference program; but the GATT Panel found the EU’s discrimination through tariff quotas to be inconsistent with its obligations. However, prior to the WTO, a GATT member could simply veto the outcome of a panel decision, enabling the EU effectively to ignore the GATT Panel ruling.
EU banana imports

Second Banana

The EU revised its banana regime in 1993 to include new special distribution licenses under a general quota. Licenses were divvied up among primary importers and importers performing secondary activities such as customs clearance, warehousing and storage; licenses were dependent on historical performance, subject to country allocations, market share and other criteria. After yet another challenge by the five Latin American countries, a GATT Panel found in 1994 that the EU’s licensing system was excessively restrictive and not covered by its waiver.

After 1995, with the WTO’s enforceable dispute settlement system in place and additional obligations to avoid discrimination in trade in services, the EU recognized it would face more challenges to its regime. The large multinational producers involved in shipping, warehousing, ripening, marketing and distribution had an even stronger case to make. The EU negotiated with all of the disgruntled Latin American producers but Guatemala to head off the legal challenge. Having offered additional or expanded quotas, they temporarily pleased some countries but further worsened the discriminatory effect for those countries not a part of the negotiation.

A third complaint against the EU’s banana regime was reviewed in the WTO in 1996, this time with the United States as the lead plaintiff in response to complaints from Chiquita and the Hawaiian Banana Association. A WTO decision in 1997 again concluded that, although the EU’s discriminatory tariffs were covered under its historical waiver, its tariff quota allocations and convoluted import licensing administration violated its WTO obligations. The EU’s next version of its banana regime did little to remedy the discriminatory elements, which led to the imposition of tariffs by the United States and Ecuador in response to the EU’s failure to comply with the WTO ruling. By 2001, the EU made another attempt to transition its system, but not until 2006 would the EU decide to phase in a tariff-only system, dispensing with quotas.

Banana Splits

At the end of 2009, after negotiations with non-ACP producers, the EU agreed to reduce the tariff rate it applies to all WTO members. Tariffs would come down from 176 euros per ton to 114 euros per ton by January 2017 (stipulating it could revert to higher rates if exporting countries exceed a “trigger” amount of imports). It wouldn’t be until 2012, that the EU and 10 Latin American countries finalized signed an agreement in the WTO to codify the revised EU banana tariff schedule (“The Geneva Banana Agreement”), officially closing the longstanding legal disputes.

As a prologue, the EU signed trade agreements with Andean and Central American countries in 2013 and Ecuador in 2017. Ecuador has seen a large bump in global export volume as its agreement with the EU is implemented. By next year, the tariff on bananas from Ecuador to the EU will go down to 75 euros per ton with no quota on the amount eligible for this rate. As the EU continues to edge toward “freer” trade in bananas, the ACP producers will face considerable adjustment.

2009 Geneva Banana Agreement

Going Bananas

Having survived the banana trade wars, the popular Cavendish banana faces a new challenge, one that could actually wipe them out.

“Panama disease TR4” has ravaged thousands of acres of Cavendish plantations throughout Southeast Asia and Australia and is spreading to Africa and the Middle East. It can lie dormant in soil for decades and has proven resistant to fungicides and fumigants. It is only a matter of time before TR4 takes hold in Latin America, which supplies nearly the entire U.S. market. Banana plantations in the Caribbean are threatened by another disease called Black Sigatoka, which has been reducing banana yields by 40 percent every year in affected areas.

Before Cavendish was top banana, a banana called the Gros Michel (Big Mike) dominated the banana trade in the early 1900s until the fungus TR1 took it to the brink of extinction in the mid-1950s. At that time, the Cavendish variety from China was discovered to be resistant to TR1 so it replaced Mike. But bananas don’t have seeds. They breed asexually so they cannot recombine their genes to ward off threats. In other words, the Cavendish is ripe for attack because it cannot evolve – every generation is a clone of the previous.

Try Hanging with a New Bunch

If scientists don’t make a breakthrough, TR4 and TR1 could spell the end for the beloved Cavendish. With over 1,000 different varieties of bananas growing around the world, why not get to know some others that might grow more popular through trade – here are a few to get you started.

For your next dessert, try using Niño, Manzano (“apple bananas”) that have a hint of apple and strawberry flavor, or Goldfinger, a newer variety from Honduras. Intriguingly, there’s also Blue Java, named for its blue skin, which has a creamy, ice cream-like texture and purportedly offers a subtle vanilla flavor.

Cooking bananas include the Macho plantain and other fun-sounding varieties like the Burro which has squared sides and a lemon flavor when ripe, and the Rhino Horn from Africa, which can grow up to two feet long. If consumers demand it, perhaps global trade in bananas will finally branch out.

_________________________________________________________________________

Andrea Durkin is the Editor-in-Chief of TradeVistas and Founder of Sparkplug, LLC. Ms. Durkin previously served as a U.S. Government trade negotiator and has proudly taught international trade policy and negotiations for the last fourteen years as an Adjunct Professor at Georgetown University’s Master of Science in Foreign Service program.

This article originally appeared on TradeVistas.org. Republished with permission.

 

cheese

European Fresh Cheese Market – Italy’s Output Doubled Over the Last Five Years

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Fresh Cheese – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the fresh cheese market in the European Union amounted to $12.6B in 2018, remaining stable against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Overall, fresh cheese consumption continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2014 with an increase of 15% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the fresh cheese market attained its maximum level at $14B in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, consumption remained at a lower figure.

Consumption By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of fresh cheese consumption in 2018 were Italy (967K tonnes), France (585K tonnes) and Germany (548K tonnes), together accounting for 52% of total consumption. These countries were followed by the UK, Poland, Spain, Belgium, the Netherlands, the Czech Republic and Sweden, which together accounted for a further 37%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of fresh cheese consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Italy ($3.8B) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the UK ($1.7B). It was followed by France.

The countries with the highest levels of fresh cheese per capita consumption in 2018 were Italy (16,290 kg per 1000 persons), Belgium (13,307 kg per 1000 persons) and Poland (10,450 kg per 1000 persons).

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of fresh cheese per capita consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in the EU

Driven by increasing demand for fresh cheese in the European Union, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven-year period. Market performance is forecast to decelerate, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +0.7% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 4.3M tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in the EU

In 2018, approx. 4.4M tonnes of fresh cheese were produced in the European Union; going up by 1.6% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.1% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 when production volume increased by 11% y-o-y. Over the period under review, fresh cheese production attained its peak figure volume in 2018 and is likely to see steady growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, fresh cheese production amounted to $11.2B in 2018 estimated in export prices. Over the period under review, fresh cheese production continues to indicate a mild shrinkage. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2014 with an increase of 15% y-o-y. Over the period under review, fresh cheese production attained its peak figure level at $14.3B in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, production remained at a lower figure.

Production By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of fresh cheese production in 2018 were Germany (928K tonnes), Italy (927K tonnes) and France (688K tonnes), with a combined 58% share of total production. Poland, the UK, Denmark, Belgium, Spain and Lithuania lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 32%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of fresh cheese production, amongst the main producing countries, was attained by Belgium, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, the fresh cheese exports in the European Union totaled 1.6M tonnes, growing by 2.1% against the previous year. The total exports indicated resilient growth from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +6.1% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, fresh cheese exports increased by +91.0% against 2007 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 with an increase of 11% against the previous year. Over the period under review, fresh cheese exports attained their maximum in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, fresh cheese exports amounted to $5.6B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total exports indicated remarkable growth from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +6.1% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, fresh cheese exports increased by +30.3% against 2015 indices. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 when exports increased by 23% y-o-y. Over the period under review, fresh cheese exports reached their peak figure in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the immediate term.

Exports by Country

Germany was the largest exporting country with an export of about 516K tonnes, which resulted at 32% of total exports. It was distantly followed by France (221K tonnes), Denmark (183K tonnes), Italy (181K tonnes), Poland (96K tonnes) and Belgium (86K tonnes), together achieving a 48% share of total exports. The UK (67K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

Exports from Germany increased at an average annual rate of +5.5% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, Belgium (+15.3%), Poland (+7.9%), Italy (+6.9%), Denmark (+6.4%), the UK (+5.9%) and France (+2.2%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Belgium emerged as the fastest-growing exporter in the European Union, with a CAGR of +15.3% from 2007-2018. From 2007 to 2018, the share of Germany, Italy, Denmark, Belgium, Poland, France and the UK increased by +14%, +5.9%, +5.7%, +4.3%, +3.4%, +3% and +2% percentage points, while the shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, the largest fresh cheese markets in the European Union were Germany ($1.6B), Italy ($964M) and Denmark ($638M), with a combined 58% share of total exports. France, Belgium, Poland and the UK lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 25%.

In terms of the main exporting countries, Belgium experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to exports, over the last eleven years, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

The fresh cheese export price in the European Union stood at $3,504 per tonne in 2018, picking up by 2.4% against the previous year. In general, the fresh cheese export price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2008 an increase of 18% y-o-y. In that year, the export prices for fresh cheese reached their peak level of $4,179 per tonne. From 2009 to 2018, the growth in terms of the export prices for fresh cheese failed to regain its momentum.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Italy ($5,330 per tonne), while France ($2,660 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced mixed trends in the export price figures.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, the amount of fresh cheese imported in the European Union stood at 1.3M tonnes, increasing by 5.4% against the previous year. The total imports indicated remarkable growth from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +5.3% over the last eleven-year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, fresh cheese imports increased by +76.1% against 2007 indices. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2011 with an increase of 10% against the previous year. The volume of imports peaked in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, fresh cheese imports amounted to $4.4B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total imports indicated a strong increase from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +5.3% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, fresh cheese imports increased by +29.3% against 2016 indices. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2011 with an increase of 21% year-to-year. The level of imports peaked in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the near future.

Imports by Country

The countries with the highest levels of fresh cheese imports in 2018 were Italy (221K tonnes), the UK (189K tonnes), Germany (137K tonnes), the Netherlands (127K tonnes), France (118K tonnes), Spain (95K tonnes) and Belgium (77K tonnes), together resulting at 74% of total import. Austria (39K tonnes), Poland (33K tonnes), Romania (33K tonnes), the Czech Republic (26K tonnes) and Ireland (25K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Ireland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest fresh cheese importing markets in the European Union were Italy ($778M), the UK ($573M) and Germany ($507M), with a combined 42% share of total imports. France, the Netherlands, Spain, Belgium, Austria, Poland, Romania, Ireland and the Czech Republic lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 44%.

In terms of the main importing countries, Poland experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to imports, over the last eleven years, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the fresh cheese import price in the European Union amounted to $3,409 per tonne, rising by 3.7% against the previous year. Overall, the fresh cheese import price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2008 an increase of 17% against the previous year. In that year, the import prices for fresh cheese attained their peak level of $3,996 per tonne. From 2009 to 2018, the growth in terms of the import prices for fresh cheese failed to regain its momentum.

Average prices varied somewhat amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, major importing countries recorded the following prices: in France ($3,885 per tonne) and Austria ($3,750 per tonne), while the Netherlands ($2,750 per tonne) and the UK ($3,029 per tonne) were amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

dog and cat food

EU Dog And Cat Food Market Is Set to Reach 9.6M Tonnes by 2025

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Dog And Cat Food – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the dog and cat food market in the European Union amounted to $12.1B in 2018, surging by 3.6% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +1.1% over the period from 2008 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being observed over the period under review. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2013 when the market value increased by 8.1% year-to-year. In that year, the dog and cat food market attained its peak level of $12.6B. From 2014 to 2018, the growth of the dog and cat food market remained at a somewhat lower figure.

Consumption By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of dog and cat food consumption in 2018 were the UK (1.5M tonnes), France (1.3M tonnes) and Germany (1.3M tonnes), together accounting for 45% of total consumption. Spain, Italy, Poland, the Netherlands, Portugal, Sweden, Belgium, Romania and Hungary lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 42%.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of dog and cat food consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Romania, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest dog and cat food markets in the European Union were the UK ($2.7B), France ($2.3B) and Germany ($2B), together accounting for 57% of the total market. These countries were followed by Italy, Spain, Sweden, the Netherlands, Poland, Belgium, Hungary, Portugal and Romania, which together accounted for a further 32%.

The countries with the highest levels of dog and cat food per capita consumption in 2018 were Sweden (32 kg per person), Portugal (31 kg per person) and Hungary (25 kg per person).

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of dog and cat food per capita consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Romania, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in the EU

Driven by increasing demand for dog and cat food in the European Union, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven-year period. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +1.1% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 9.6M tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in the EU

In 2018, the production of dog and cat food in the European Union stood at 9.8M tonnes, flattening at the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.8% from 2008 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2010 with an increase of 4.1% against the previous year. Over the period under review, dog and cat food production attained its peak figure volume at 9.8M tonnes in 2017, leveling off in the following year.

In value terms, dog and cat food production amounted to $13.1B in 2018 estimated in export prices. The total output value increased at an average annual rate of +1.4% from 2008 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 when production volume increased by 13% against the previous year. In that year, dog and cat food production attained its peak level of $13.6B. From 2014 to 2018, dog and cat food production growth remained at a somewhat lower figure.

Production By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of dog and cat food production in 2018 were France (1.8M tonnes), Germany (1.4M tonnes) and the UK (1.2M tonnes), with a combined 45% share of total production. Spain, Hungary, the Netherlands, Italy and Poland lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 37%.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of dog and cat food production, amongst the main producing countries, was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, the amount of dog and cat food exported in the European Union amounted to 5.5M tonnes, increasing by 2.9% against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +4.0% over the period from 2008 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2017 when exports increased by 9% against the previous year. The volume of exports peaked in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future.

In value terms, dog and cat food exports stood at $9.2B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total exports indicated a strong expansion from 2008 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +4.0% over the last decade. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, dog and cat food exports increased by +29.5% against 2015 indices. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2013 with an increase of 16% year-to-year. Over the period under review, dog and cat food exports reached their maximum in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the immediate term.

Exports by Country

In 2018, Germany (829K tonnes), France (807K tonnes), the Netherlands (572K tonnes), Poland (527K tonnes) and Hungary (517K tonnes) were the main exporters of dog and cat food in the European Union, comprising 59% of total export. It was distantly followed by Spain (323K tonnes), Ireland (309K tonnes), the UK (272K tonnes), the Czech Republic (266K tonnes), Belgium (260K tonnes) and Italy (252K tonnes), together comprising a 31% share of total exports.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest dog and cat food markets in the European Union were Germany ($1.8B), France ($1.5B) and the Netherlands ($1.1B), together comprising 48% of total exports. Poland, Belgium, Hungary, the UK, the Czech Republic, Italy, Ireland and Spain lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 41%.

Poland recorded the highest rates of growth with regard to exports, in terms of the main exporting countries over the last decade, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

The dog and cat food export price in the European Union stood at $1,668 per tonne in 2018, going up by 7.5% against the previous year. Overall, the dog and cat food export price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2011 an increase of 11% against the previous year. The level of export price peaked at $1,730 per tonne in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, export prices stood at a somewhat lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Germany ($2,124 per tonne), while Spain ($885 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the Czech Republic, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

The imports totaled 4.6M tonnes in 2018, surging by 2.7% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.9% over the period from 2008 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2012 with an increase of 8.1% y-o-y. Over the period under review, dog and cat food imports attained their peak figure in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future.

In value terms, dog and cat food imports totaled $7.7B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total import value increased at an average annual rate of +3.6% from 2008 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2017 when imports increased by 14% against the previous year. Over the period under review, dog and cat food imports reached their peak figure in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the near future.

Imports by Country

The countries with the highest levels of dog and cat food imports in 2018 were Germany (646K tonnes), the UK (528K tonnes), Belgium (392K tonnes), France (374K tonnes), Italy (342K tonnes), Poland (290K tonnes), the Netherlands (288K tonnes), Austria (251K tonnes), Spain (196K tonnes), Romania (186K tonnes) and Portugal (179K tonnes), together resulting at 79% of total import. Greece (109K tonnes) held a little share of total imports.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Romania, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Germany ($1.3B), the UK ($878M) and France ($638M) were the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2018, with a combined 36% share of total imports. Italy, Poland, Belgium, the Netherlands, Austria, Spain, Portugal, Romania and Greece lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 45%.

Among the main importing countries, Poland experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to imports, over the last decade, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the dog and cat food import price in the European Union amounted to $1,654 per tonne, rising by 2.5% against the previous year. Overall, the dog and cat food import price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2011 when the import price increased by 11% y-o-y. The level of import price peaked at $1,718 per tonne in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, import prices stood at a somewhat lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Germany ($1,976 per tonne), while Romania ($874 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

pork

EU Salt Pork Market Is Estimated at $5.2B

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Pig Meat Salted (Salted, In Brine, Dried Or Smoked) – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The market size for preserved pork in the European Union is estimated at $5.2B (2018), an increase of 3.5% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price).

Over the period under review, preserved pork consumption, however, continues to indicate a temperate setback. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2013 with an increase of 5.6% against the previous year. The level of preserved pork consumption peaked at $6.8B in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, consumption failed to regain its momentum.

Consumption By Country in the EU

The UK (419K tonnes) constituted the country with the largest volume of preserved pork consumption, accounting for 39% of total consumption. Moreover, preserved pork consumption in the UK exceeded the figures recorded by the region’s second-largest consumer, Germany (116K tonnes), fourfold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Italy (94K tonnes), with a 8.8% share.

From 2008 to 2018, the average annual growth rate of volume in the UK totaled -2.7%. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: Germany (-5.0% per year) and Italy (+6.8% per year).

In value terms, the UK ($1.9B) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by France ($748M). It was followed by Germany.

The countries with the highest levels of preserved pork per capita consumption in 2018 were Ireland (12,561 kg per 1000 persons), the UK (6,284 kg per 1000 persons) and Romania (2,789 kg per 1000 persons).

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of preserved pork per capita consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Austria, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Production in the EU

In 2018, the amount of pig meat salted (salted, in brine, dried or smoked) produced in the European Union totaled 1.1M tonnes, remaining constant against the previous year. Over the period under review, preserved pork production, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2009 with an increase of 11% y-o-y. In that year, preserved pork production attained its peak volume of 1.3M tonnes. From 2010 to 2018, preserved pork production growth remained at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, preserved pork production stood at $4.8B in 2018 estimated in export prices. Overall, preserved pork production, however, continues to indicate a measured setback. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 with an increase of 6.8% year-to-year. The level of preserved pork production peaked at $6.4B in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, production failed to regain its momentum.

Production By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of preserved pork production in 2018 were the UK (247K tonnes), Germany (151K tonnes) and Italy (141K tonnes), with a combined 48% share of total production.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of preserved pork production, amongst the main producing countries, was attained by Italy, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, the preserved pork exports in the European Union totaled 398K tonnes, stabilizing at the previous year. In general, preserved pork exports continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2016 with an increase of 5.7% y-o-y. The volume of exports peaked at 423K tonnes in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, exports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, preserved pork exports totaled $2.2B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. Over the period under review, preserved pork exports continue to indicate a slight descent. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 when exports increased by 8.1% year-to-year. The level of exports peaked at $2.4B in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, exports failed to regain their momentum.

Exports by Country

In 2018, the Netherlands (98K tonnes), distantly followed by Italy (60K tonnes), Germany (58K tonnes), Denmark (55K tonnes), Spain (50K tonnes), Poland (31K tonnes) and the UK (18K tonnes) were the major exporters of pig meat salted (salted, in brine, dried or smoked), together committing 93% of total exports.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Italy ($648M), Spain ($423M) and the Netherlands ($292M) constituted the countries with the highest levels of exports in 2018, with a combined 63% share of total exports.

Spain experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to exports, in terms of the main exporting countries over the last decade, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the preserved pork export price in the European Union amounted to $5,399 per tonne, remaining relatively unchanged against the previous year. Overall, the preserved pork export price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 when the export price increased by 6.7% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the export prices for pig meat salted (salted, in brine, dried or smoked) attained their peak figure at $6,151 per tonne in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, export prices stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Italy ($10,792 per tonne), while Denmark ($2,876 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Spain, while the other leaders experienced a decline in the export price figures.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, the amount of pig meat salted (salted, in brine, dried or smoked) imported in the European Union totaled 339K tonnes, going up by 1.9% against the previous year. Over the period under review, preserved pork imports, however, continue to indicate a temperate slump. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2010 with an increase of 48% y-o-y. In that year, preserved pork imports attained their peak of 433K tonnes. From 2011 to 2018, the growth of preserved pork imports remained at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, preserved pork imports stood at $1.8B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. In general, preserved pork imports, however, continue to indicate a temperate setback. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2013 with an increase of 10% against the previous year. The level of imports peaked at $2.3B in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, imports failed to regain their momentum.

Imports by Country

The UK prevails in preserved pork imports structure, accounting for 190K tonnes, which was approx. 56% of total imports in 2018. France (34K tonnes) ranks second in terms of the total imports with a 10% share, followed by Germany (7%) and Ireland (4.9%). The following importers – Italy (13,638 tonnes), Austria (8,514 tonnes), Denmark (8,242 tonnes), Belgium (8,025 tonnes) and the Netherlands (5,643 tonnes) – together made up 13% of total imports.

From 2008 to 2018, average annual rates of growth with regard to preserved pork imports into the UK stood at -4.0%. At the same time, Austria (+9.6%), France (+3.5%), Germany (+3.0%), Italy (+2.3%) and Ireland (+2.2%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Austria emerged as the fastest-growing importer in the European Union, with a CAGR of +9.6% from 2008-2018. By contrast, Belgium (-1.6%), Denmark (-5.5%) and the Netherlands (-8.0%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period. France (+2.9 p.p.), Germany (+1.8 p.p.) and Austria (+1.5 p.p.) significantly strengthened its position in terms of the total imports, while Denmark, the Netherlands and the UK saw its share reduced by -1.9%, -2.2% and -27.9% from 2008 to 2018, respectively. The shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, the UK ($634M) constitutes the largest market for imported pig meat salted (salted, in brine, dried or smoked) in the European Union, comprising 36% of total preserved pork imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by France ($280M), with a 16% share of total imports. It was followed by Germany, with a 14% share.

In the UK, preserved pork imports shrank by an average annual rate of -6.5% over the period from 2008-2018. The remaining importing countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: France (+1.7% per year) and Germany (+1.6% per year).

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the preserved pork import price in the European Union amounted to $5,220 per tonne, jumping by 2.5% against the previous year. Overall, the preserved pork import price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2009 an increase of 22% against the previous year. In that year, the import prices for pig meat salted (salted, in brine, dried or smoked) reached their peak level of $6,609 per tonne. From 2010 to 2018, the growth in terms of the import prices for pig meat salted (salted, in brine, dried or smoked) remained at a somewhat lower figure.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Belgium ($11,387 per tonne), while the UK ($3,331 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2008 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced mixed trends in the import price figures.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

Goods

Is Your Supply Chain Prepared for Potential U.S. Tariffs on EU Goods?

Transatlantic tariffs came closer to reality in recent months after the United States Trade Representative (USTR) proposed tariffs on a list of products from the European Union (EU). 

Unfortunately, even if you’ve already gone through something similar with goods imported from China, the same strategy may not be effective for the tariffs on EU goods. This is due in large part to the types of proposed commodities from the EU.

The good news is there are things you can do today to adjust your import strategy to maintain compliance while insulating your company from the proposed tariffs.

Up to $25 billion worth of EU goods at stake

The USTR announcements in April and July proposed tariffs targeting up to $25 billion worth of goods. This includes items such as new aircraft and aircraft parts, foods ranging from seafood and meat to cheese and pasta, wine and whiskey, and even ceramics and cleaning chemicals. 

To date, the USTR has only provided a preliminary commodity list for the proposed U.S. tariffs on EU goods. No percentages have been announced, leaving many to wonder if the tariffs will be manageable—in the 5-10% range—or more substantial, like the 25% tariffs applied to China imports. 

On top of the tariffs, when the French Senate announced a 3% tax on revenue from digital services earned in France, President Trump threatened a counter-tax on French wine. But it’s unclear if this tax will come to fruition or fizzle out—especially since the USTR’s tariff list already includes many types of wine. 

5 key questions to insulate your supply chain

Looking for the best way to prepare your business from the potential tariff increases? Answering these key questions may help you adapt and insulate your company. 

-Do you have a plan to cover the costs? 

You may not be able to avoid paying the tariffs, but there are various strategies you may consider to help cover their costs. 

While not ideal, you could increase prices to end consumers. It may not be feasible to recover the entire cost of an added tariff, but you can at least offset a small portion of the tariff this way.

You can also adjust the cost of the goods with suppliers and manufacturers to cover a portion of the tariff. Just remember: pricing changes still need to meet the valuation regulations with U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP). 

-Will you need to increase your customs bond? 

The smallest customs bond an importer can hold is $50,000. That used to be enough for many importers to cover generally 10% of the duties and taxes you expect to pay CBP. 

Unfortunately, as many importers from China are learning, a 25% tariff on products can quickly exceed your bond amount. And bond insufficiency can shut down all your imports while resulting in delays and added expenses. 

To help avoid bond insufficiency, consider any increased duty amounts in advance of your next bond renewal period. And don’t wait to do this until the last minute, because raising your customs bond with your surety company can take up to four weeks. 

-Do you re-export goods brought into the U.S.? 

Duty drawback programs can’t be used by every importer. But if you can take advantage of them, they can result in big savings for your company.

In fact, you can get back 99% of certain import duties, taxes, and fees on imported goods that you re-export out of the U.S. Just be aware that you still need to pay the duties up front. And you might need to wait up to two years to get your refund. 

-Are your product classifications current and accurate?

With potential tariffs looming, consider reviewing your product classifications and make sure they’re accurate. If you find an issue, discuss it with your broker or customs counsel to discuss how you can properly rectify the issue, and avoid penalties from doing it incorrectly.

And while we’re on the topic of product classifications, never change them to evade tariffs. CBP will be on the lookout for this kind of activity, and the penalties for noncompliance can be steep.

-Do you have the support you need?

Changing your customs brokers may not sound appealing, but ensuring they provide all the services you need to stay compliant should be your top priority when working with them.

Your provider should help make sure you pay the appropriate duty rates for your products. And they should have people and services available globally to support your freight wherever it is located throughout the world. 

Also, consider simplifying your support by working with one provider that offers not only customs brokerage and trade compliance services but also global ocean and air freight logistics services. 

If you only employ one strategy…

Discuss your import strategy with your customs attorney or customs compliance expert. Bringing in specialized expertise is the most effective way to analyze how these tariffs could affect your products, your supply chain, and your business. 

If you don’t yet have a customs broker who can meet all your needs in today’s changing environment, consider C.H. Robinson’s customs compliance services. With over 100 licensed customs brokers in North America, and a Trusted Advisor® approach, our experts are ready to help.

____________________________________________________________

Ben Bidwell serves as the Director of U.S. Customs at  C.H. Robinson

Wood Kitchenware And Tableware Market in the EU – A Ban on Single-Use Plastics Drives Demand for Wooden Products

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Tableware And Kitchenware Of Wood – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The European parliament has voted to ban single-use plastic cutlery, cotton buds, straws and stirrers as part of a sweeping law against plastic waste that despoils beaches and pollutes oceans. The vote by MEPs paves the way for a ban on single-use plastics to come into force by 2021 in all EU member states.

Against this background, there is an increase in the consumption of wooden cutlery and tableware instead of disposable plastic ones. Growing demand is supported by both expanding domestic production and accelerated growth in imports.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, the wood kitchenware and tableware imports in the European Union amounted to 117K tonnes, surging by 3.3% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.2% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2014 with an increase of 14% against the previous year. Over the period under review, wood kitchenware and tableware imports attained their peak figure in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, wood kitchenware and tableware imports totaled $528M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total imports indicated a resilient expansion from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +1.2% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, wood kitchenware and tableware imports increased by +18.6% against 2014 indices. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2014 when imports increased by 24% y-o-y. The level of imports peaked in 2018 and are likely to continue their growth in the near future.

Imports by Country

In 2018, Germany (26K tonnes), distantly followed by the UK (17K tonnes), France (15K tonnes), the Netherlands (14K tonnes), Italy (8.5K tonnes) and Belgium (6.8K tonnes) were the major importers of tableware and kitchenware of wood, together making up 75% of total imports. The following importers – Poland (4,740 tonnes), Sweden (3,802 tonnes), the Czech Republic (3,462 tonnes), Denmark (2,749 tonnes), Spain (2,325 tonnes) and Portugal (2,265 tonnes) – together made up 17% of total imports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by the Czech Republic, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest wood kitchenware and tableware importing markets in the European Union were Germany ($112M), the UK ($78M) and France ($72M), together accounting for 50% of total imports. These countries were followed by the Netherlands, Italy, Belgium, Sweden, Denmark, Poland, Spain, Portugal and the Czech Republic, which together accounted for a further 41%.

The Netherlands recorded the highest rates of growth with regard to imports, among the main importing countries over the last eleven years, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the wood kitchenware and tableware import price in the European Union amounted to $4,518 per tonne, picking up by 8.2% against the previous year. Over the last eleven years, it increased at an average annual rate of +2.7%. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 an increase of 10% y-o-y. The level of import price peaked in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Denmark ($6,814 per tonne), while the Czech Republic ($2,322 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Spain, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, approx. 42K tonnes of tableware and kitchenware of wood were exported in the European Union; lowering by -5.4% against the previous year. In general, wood kitchenware and tableware exports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 when exports increased by 21% against the previous year. Over the period under review, wood kitchenware and tableware exports reached their peak figure at 49K tonnes in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2018, exports remained at a lower figure.

In value terms, wood kitchenware and tableware exports totaled $223M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total exports indicated a tangible expansion from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +0.8% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, wood kitchenware and tableware exports decreased by -6.0% against 2016 indices. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2014 with an increase of 23% year-to-year. Over the period under review, wood kitchenware and tableware exports reached their peak figure at $238M in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, exports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Exports by Country

In 2018, Germany (8,014 tonnes), the Netherlands (6,656 tonnes) and Romania (5,687 tonnes) were the major exporters of tableware and kitchenware of wood in the European Union, generating 48% of total export. Poland (3,622 tonnes) held an 8.6% share (based on tonnes) of total exports, which put it in second place, followed by Italy (6.2%) and Belgium (5%). Spain (1,844 tonnes), Slovenia (1,652 tonnes), France (1,602 tonnes), Portugal (1,491 tonnes), the Czech Republic (1,276 tonnes) and Sweden (1,206 tonnes) held a little share of total exports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Slovenia, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Germany ($39M), the Netherlands ($34M) and Italy ($22M) appeared to be the countries with the highest levels of exports in 2018, together comprising 42% of total exports.

Among the main exporting countries, the Netherlands experienced the highest growth rate of exports, over the last eleven years, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the wood kitchenware and tableware export price in the European Union amounted to $5,306 per tonne, therefore, remained relatively stable against the previous year. Over the period from 2007 to 2018, it increased at an average annual rate of +2.2%. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2011 an increase of 12% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the export prices for tableware and kitchenware of wood attained their peak figure in 2018 and is likely to continue its growth in the immediate term.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Italy ($8,408 per tonne), while Romania ($2,803 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

jersey

EU Jersey Market – Consumption Posted Solid Gains, Reaching $26B

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Jerseys, Pullovers, Cardigans And Similar Articles – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the jersey market in the European Union amounted to $26.1B in 2018, growing by 9.2% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Over the period under review, jersey consumption continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2008 when the market value increased by 18% y-o-y. In that year, the jersey market attained its peak level of $28.9B. From 2009 to 2018, the growth of the jersey market remained at a lower figure.

Production in the EU

In 2018, approx. 229M units of jerseys, pullovers, cardigans and similar articles were produced in the European Union; lowering by -3.2% against the previous year. Over the period under review, jersey production continues to indicate a deep curtailment. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2017 with an increase of 10% year-to-year. The volume of jersey production peaked at 398M units in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, production remained at a lower figure.

In value terms, jersey production amounted to $4.3B in 2018 estimated in export prices. In general, jersey production continues to indicate a drastic contraction. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2017 with an increase of 17% y-o-y. Over the period under review, jersey production reached its maximum level at $7.8B in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, production remained at a lower figure.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, approx. 1B units of jerseys, pullovers, cardigans and similar articles were exported in the European Union; picking up by 2.9% against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.8% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2016 when Exports increased by 23% year-to-year. The volume of exports peaked in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, jersey exports totaled $13.3B in 2018. The total export value increased at an average annual rate of +2.0% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed over the period under review. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 when Exports increased by 15% year-to-year. In that year, jersey exports reached their peak of $13.5B, and then declined slightly in the following year.

Exports by Country

In 2018, Germany (215M units), distantly followed by Belgium (120M units), Italy (119M units), Spain (102M units), France (85M units), the Netherlands (70M units), Poland (68M units) and Denmark (64M units) were the main exporters of jerseys, pullovers, cardigans and similar articles, together generating 81% of total exports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Italy ($3.2B), Germany ($2.7B) and France ($1.4B) appeared to be the countries with the highest levels of exports in 2018, with a combined 55% share of total exports. Belgium, Spain, Poland, Denmark and the Netherlands lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 29%.

Poland experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to exports, among the main exporting countries over the last eleven years, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

The jersey export price in the European Union stood at $13 per unit in 2018, lowering by -4.4% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the jersey export price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2017 when the export price increased by 17% against the previous year. The level of export price peaked at $15 per unit in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, export prices failed to regain their momentum.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Italy ($27 per unit), while Spain ($6.9 per unit) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, approx. 2.7B units of jerseys, pullovers, cardigans and similar articles were imported in the European Union; growing by 7.3% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.9% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2008 when Imports increased by 16% year-to-year. The volume of imports peaked in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, jersey imports stood at $22.6B in 2018. The total import value increased at an average annual rate of +1.9% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2008 when Imports increased by 19% y-o-y. The level of imports peaked in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the near future.

Imports by Country

Germany (598M units) and the UK (473M units) represented roughly 40% of total imports of jerseys, pullovers, cardigans and similar articles in 2018. France (305M units) ranks next in terms of the total imports with a 11% share, followed by Italy (9.6%), the Netherlands (6.6%), Spain (4.8%), Belgium (4.6%) and Poland (4.6%).

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Germany ($5B), France ($3.2B) and the UK ($3.2B) constituted the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2018, with a combined 50% share of total imports. Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Belgium and Poland lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 32%.

Among the main importing countries, Poland experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to imports, over the last eleven year period, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

The jersey import price in the European Union stood at $8,501 per thousand units in 2018, coming down by -1.7% against the previous year. Overall, the jersey import price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 an increase of 12% y-o-y. In that year, the import prices for jerseys, pullovers, cardigans and similar articles reached their peak level of $10,568 per thousand units. From 2012 to 2018, the growth in terms of the import prices for jerseys, pullovers, cardigans and similar articles failed to regain its momentum.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was France ($10,555 per thousand units), while the UK ($6,731 per thousand units) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

technical textiles

Technical Textiles Market in the EU – Poland Emerges as the Fastest-growing Exporter

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Textile Products And Articles For Technical Uses – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the technical textiles market in the European Union amounted to $1.6B in 2018, stabilizing at the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price).

Overall, technical textiles consumption continues to indicate a slight descent. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2016 when the market value increased by 6.6% year-to-year. Over the period under review, the technical textiles market attained its maximum level at $1.9B in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, consumption stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Consumption By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of technical textiles consumption in 2018 were the UK (19K tonnes), Germany (12K tonnes) and France (12K tonnes), together accounting for 36% of total consumption. These countries were followed by Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, the Czech Republic, Romania, Poland, Sweden, Belgium and Portugal, which together accounted for a further 47%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of technical textiles consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest technical textiles markets in the European Union were Germany ($311M), France ($248M) and the UK ($170M), with a combined 47% share of the total market. Sweden, Italy, the Czech Republic, Romania, the Netherlands, Belgium, Poland, Spain and Portugal lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 27%.

The countries with the highest levels of technical textiles per capita consumption in 2018 were the Netherlands (582 kg per 1000 persons), the Czech Republic (536 kg per 1000 persons) and Sweden (415 kg per 1000 persons).

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of technical textiles per capita consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in the EU

Driven by increasing demand for technical textiles in the European Union, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven years. Market performance is forecast to decelerate, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +0.2% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 121K tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in the EU

In 2018, technical textiles production in the European Union stood at 140K tonnes, reducing by -3.2% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.9% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2009 with an increase of 15% against the previous year. The volume of technical textiles production peaked at 161K tonnes in 2011; however, from 2012 to 2018, production remained at a lower figure.

In value terms, technical textiles production totaled $1.9B in 2018 estimated in export prices. Overall, technical textiles production, however, continues to indicate a mild deduction. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2016 with an increase of 3.8% y-o-y. The level of technical textiles production peaked at $2.3B in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, production failed to regain its momentum.

Production By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of technical textiles production in 2018 were Germany (32K tonnes), Italy (18K tonnes) and the UK (15K tonnes), with a combined 47% share of total production. These countries were followed by the Netherlands, Spain, Belgium, France, the Czech Republic, Sweden, Poland, Hungary and Romania, which together accounted for a further 43%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of technical textiles production, amongst the main producing countries, was attained by Romania, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, the amount of textile products and articles for technical uses exported in the European Union stood at 138K tonnes, declining by -5.6% against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.5% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2010 when exports increased by 30% year-to-year. The volume of exports peaked at 152K tonnes in 2011; however, from 2012 to 2018, exports remained at a lower figure.

In value terms, technical textiles exports amounted to $2.8B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. In general, technical textiles exports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 with an increase of 14% year-to-year. Over the period under review, technical textiles exports reached their peak figure at $2.9B in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, exports remained at a lower figure.

Exports by Country

Germany represented the major exporting country with an export of about 41K tonnes, which amounted to 30% of total exports. It was distantly followed by Italy (18K tonnes), the Netherlands (9.6K tonnes), Belgium (9.6K tonnes), Poland (8.4K tonnes), the Czech Republic (7K tonnes), Spain (6.9K tonnes) and France (6.5K tonnes), together mixing up a 48% share of total exports. The following exporters – the UK (5.8K tonnes), Sweden (4.2K tonnes), Austria (3.8K tonnes) and Slovakia (3K tonnes) – together made up 12% of total exports.

Exports from Germany increased at an average annual rate of +2.4% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, Poland (+11.3%), the Czech Republic (+7.9%), Slovakia (+6.6%), the Netherlands (+5.5%) and Italy (+2.5%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Poland emerged as the fastest-growing exporter in the European Union, with a CAGR of +11.3% from 2007-2018. Sweden, France and Austria experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. By contrast, Belgium (-1.8%), Spain (-4.7%) and the UK (-5.7%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period. From 2007 to 2018, the share of Germany, Poland, Italy, the Netherlands and the Czech Republic increased by +6.7%, +4.2%, +3.1%, +3.1% and +2.9% percentage points, while Belgium (-1.6 p.p.), Spain (-3.5 p.p.) and the UK (-3.9 p.p.) saw their share reduced. The shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, Germany ($1B) remains the largest technical textiles supplier in the European Union, comprising 37% of total technical textiles exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Italy ($297M), with a 10% share of total exports. It was followed by France, with a 5.9% share.

In Germany, technical textiles exports expanded at an average annual rate of +1.2% over the period from 2007-2018. The remaining exporting countries recorded the following average annual rates of exports growth: Italy (+1.1% per year) and France (-1.6% per year).

Export Prices by Country

The technical textiles export price in the European Union stood at $21 per kg in 2018, jumping by 12% against the previous year. Overall, the technical textiles export price, however, continues to indicate a slight downturn. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2018 when the export price increased by 12% year-to-year. Over the period under review, the export prices for textile products and articles for technical uses attained their peak figure at $23 per kg in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, export prices failed to regain their momentum.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Austria ($36 per kg), while Spain ($13 per kg) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the Czech Republic, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, technical textiles imports in the European Union amounted to 116K tonnes, dropping by -2.9% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.0% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being observed in certain years. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2010 when imports increased by 19% y-o-y. The volume of imports peaked at 120K tonnes in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, imports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, technical textiles imports totaled $2.1B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total import value increased at an average annual rate of +1.2% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations in certain years. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 with an increase of 16% y-o-y. Over the period under review, technical textiles imports reached their maximum in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Imports by Country

In 2018, Germany (21K tonnes), distantly followed by Italy (12K tonnes), France (11K tonnes), the Netherlands (10K tonnes), the UK (9.1K tonnes), Poland (7.5K tonnes), the Czech Republic (5.7K tonnes) and Spain (5.4K tonnes) represented the major importers of textile products and articles for technical uses, together creating 70% of total imports. The following importers – Belgium (4.5K tonnes), Romania (3.9K tonnes), Austria (3.1K tonnes) and Sweden (3K tonnes) – together made up 12% of total imports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Germany ($497M) constitutes the largest market for imported textile products and articles for technical uses in the European Union, comprising 24% of total technical textiles imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by France ($223M), with a 11% share of total imports. It was followed by the Netherlands, with a 8.9% share.

In Germany, technical textiles imports increased at an average annual rate of +1.3% over the period from 2007-2018. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: France (+1.5% per year) and the Netherlands (+7.6% per year).

Import Prices by Country

The technical textiles import price in the European Union stood at $18 per kg in 2018, jumping by 9.9% against the previous year. Overall, the technical textiles import price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 an increase of 15% year-to-year. The level of import price peaked in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Germany ($24 per kg), while Romania ($11 per kg) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Romania, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform