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EU Jersey Market – Consumption Posted Solid Gains, Reaching $26B

jersey

EU Jersey Market – Consumption Posted Solid Gains, Reaching $26B

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Jerseys, Pullovers, Cardigans And Similar Articles – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the jersey market in the European Union amounted to $26.1B in 2018, growing by 9.2% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Over the period under review, jersey consumption continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2008 when the market value increased by 18% y-o-y. In that year, the jersey market attained its peak level of $28.9B. From 2009 to 2018, the growth of the jersey market remained at a lower figure.

Production in the EU

In 2018, approx. 229M units of jerseys, pullovers, cardigans and similar articles were produced in the European Union; lowering by -3.2% against the previous year. Over the period under review, jersey production continues to indicate a deep curtailment. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2017 with an increase of 10% year-to-year. The volume of jersey production peaked at 398M units in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, production remained at a lower figure.

In value terms, jersey production amounted to $4.3B in 2018 estimated in export prices. In general, jersey production continues to indicate a drastic contraction. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2017 with an increase of 17% y-o-y. Over the period under review, jersey production reached its maximum level at $7.8B in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, production remained at a lower figure.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, approx. 1B units of jerseys, pullovers, cardigans and similar articles were exported in the European Union; picking up by 2.9% against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.8% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2016 when Exports increased by 23% year-to-year. The volume of exports peaked in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, jersey exports totaled $13.3B in 2018. The total export value increased at an average annual rate of +2.0% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed over the period under review. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2017 when Exports increased by 15% year-to-year. In that year, jersey exports reached their peak of $13.5B, and then declined slightly in the following year.

Exports by Country

In 2018, Germany (215M units), distantly followed by Belgium (120M units), Italy (119M units), Spain (102M units), France (85M units), the Netherlands (70M units), Poland (68M units) and Denmark (64M units) were the main exporters of jerseys, pullovers, cardigans and similar articles, together generating 81% of total exports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Italy ($3.2B), Germany ($2.7B) and France ($1.4B) appeared to be the countries with the highest levels of exports in 2018, with a combined 55% share of total exports. Belgium, Spain, Poland, Denmark and the Netherlands lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 29%.

Poland experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to exports, among the main exporting countries over the last eleven years, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

The jersey export price in the European Union stood at $13 per unit in 2018, lowering by -4.4% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the jersey export price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2017 when the export price increased by 17% against the previous year. The level of export price peaked at $15 per unit in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, export prices failed to regain their momentum.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Italy ($27 per unit), while Spain ($6.9 per unit) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, approx. 2.7B units of jerseys, pullovers, cardigans and similar articles were imported in the European Union; growing by 7.3% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.9% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2008 when Imports increased by 16% year-to-year. The volume of imports peaked in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, jersey imports stood at $22.6B in 2018. The total import value increased at an average annual rate of +1.9% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2008 when Imports increased by 19% y-o-y. The level of imports peaked in 2018 and are likely to see steady growth in the near future.

Imports by Country

Germany (598M units) and the UK (473M units) represented roughly 40% of total imports of jerseys, pullovers, cardigans and similar articles in 2018. France (305M units) ranks next in terms of the total imports with a 11% share, followed by Italy (9.6%), the Netherlands (6.6%), Spain (4.8%), Belgium (4.6%) and Poland (4.6%).

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Germany ($5B), France ($3.2B) and the UK ($3.2B) constituted the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2018, with a combined 50% share of total imports. Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Belgium and Poland lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 32%.

Among the main importing countries, Poland experienced the highest rates of growth with regard to imports, over the last eleven year period, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Import Prices by Country

The jersey import price in the European Union stood at $8,501 per thousand units in 2018, coming down by -1.7% against the previous year. Overall, the jersey import price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 an increase of 12% y-o-y. In that year, the import prices for jerseys, pullovers, cardigans and similar articles reached their peak level of $10,568 per thousand units. From 2012 to 2018, the growth in terms of the import prices for jerseys, pullovers, cardigans and similar articles failed to regain its momentum.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was France ($10,555 per thousand units), while the UK ($6,731 per thousand units) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

technical textiles

Technical Textiles Market in the EU – Poland Emerges as the Fastest-growing Exporter

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Textile Products And Articles For Technical Uses – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the technical textiles market in the European Union amounted to $1.6B in 2018, stabilizing at the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price).

Overall, technical textiles consumption continues to indicate a slight descent. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2016 when the market value increased by 6.6% year-to-year. Over the period under review, the technical textiles market attained its maximum level at $1.9B in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, consumption stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Consumption By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of technical textiles consumption in 2018 were the UK (19K tonnes), Germany (12K tonnes) and France (12K tonnes), together accounting for 36% of total consumption. These countries were followed by Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, the Czech Republic, Romania, Poland, Sweden, Belgium and Portugal, which together accounted for a further 47%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of technical textiles consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest technical textiles markets in the European Union were Germany ($311M), France ($248M) and the UK ($170M), with a combined 47% share of the total market. Sweden, Italy, the Czech Republic, Romania, the Netherlands, Belgium, Poland, Spain and Portugal lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 27%.

The countries with the highest levels of technical textiles per capita consumption in 2018 were the Netherlands (582 kg per 1000 persons), the Czech Republic (536 kg per 1000 persons) and Sweden (415 kg per 1000 persons).

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of technical textiles per capita consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in the EU

Driven by increasing demand for technical textiles in the European Union, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven years. Market performance is forecast to decelerate, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +0.2% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 121K tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in the EU

In 2018, technical textiles production in the European Union stood at 140K tonnes, reducing by -3.2% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.9% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2009 with an increase of 15% against the previous year. The volume of technical textiles production peaked at 161K tonnes in 2011; however, from 2012 to 2018, production remained at a lower figure.

In value terms, technical textiles production totaled $1.9B in 2018 estimated in export prices. Overall, technical textiles production, however, continues to indicate a mild deduction. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2016 with an increase of 3.8% y-o-y. The level of technical textiles production peaked at $2.3B in 2007; however, from 2008 to 2018, production failed to regain its momentum.

Production By Country in the EU

The countries with the highest volumes of technical textiles production in 2018 were Germany (32K tonnes), Italy (18K tonnes) and the UK (15K tonnes), with a combined 47% share of total production. These countries were followed by the Netherlands, Spain, Belgium, France, the Czech Republic, Sweden, Poland, Hungary and Romania, which together accounted for a further 43%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of technical textiles production, amongst the main producing countries, was attained by Romania, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, the amount of textile products and articles for technical uses exported in the European Union stood at 138K tonnes, declining by -5.6% against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.5% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2010 when exports increased by 30% year-to-year. The volume of exports peaked at 152K tonnes in 2011; however, from 2012 to 2018, exports remained at a lower figure.

In value terms, technical textiles exports amounted to $2.8B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. In general, technical textiles exports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 with an increase of 14% year-to-year. Over the period under review, technical textiles exports reached their peak figure at $2.9B in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, exports remained at a lower figure.

Exports by Country

Germany represented the major exporting country with an export of about 41K tonnes, which amounted to 30% of total exports. It was distantly followed by Italy (18K tonnes), the Netherlands (9.6K tonnes), Belgium (9.6K tonnes), Poland (8.4K tonnes), the Czech Republic (7K tonnes), Spain (6.9K tonnes) and France (6.5K tonnes), together mixing up a 48% share of total exports. The following exporters – the UK (5.8K tonnes), Sweden (4.2K tonnes), Austria (3.8K tonnes) and Slovakia (3K tonnes) – together made up 12% of total exports.

Exports from Germany increased at an average annual rate of +2.4% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, Poland (+11.3%), the Czech Republic (+7.9%), Slovakia (+6.6%), the Netherlands (+5.5%) and Italy (+2.5%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Poland emerged as the fastest-growing exporter in the European Union, with a CAGR of +11.3% from 2007-2018. Sweden, France and Austria experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. By contrast, Belgium (-1.8%), Spain (-4.7%) and the UK (-5.7%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period. From 2007 to 2018, the share of Germany, Poland, Italy, the Netherlands and the Czech Republic increased by +6.7%, +4.2%, +3.1%, +3.1% and +2.9% percentage points, while Belgium (-1.6 p.p.), Spain (-3.5 p.p.) and the UK (-3.9 p.p.) saw their share reduced. The shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, Germany ($1B) remains the largest technical textiles supplier in the European Union, comprising 37% of total technical textiles exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Italy ($297M), with a 10% share of total exports. It was followed by France, with a 5.9% share.

In Germany, technical textiles exports expanded at an average annual rate of +1.2% over the period from 2007-2018. The remaining exporting countries recorded the following average annual rates of exports growth: Italy (+1.1% per year) and France (-1.6% per year).

Export Prices by Country

The technical textiles export price in the European Union stood at $21 per kg in 2018, jumping by 12% against the previous year. Overall, the technical textiles export price, however, continues to indicate a slight downturn. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2018 when the export price increased by 12% year-to-year. Over the period under review, the export prices for textile products and articles for technical uses attained their peak figure at $23 per kg in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, export prices failed to regain their momentum.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was Austria ($36 per kg), while Spain ($13 per kg) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the Czech Republic, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, technical textiles imports in the European Union amounted to 116K tonnes, dropping by -2.9% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.0% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being observed in certain years. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2010 when imports increased by 19% y-o-y. The volume of imports peaked at 120K tonnes in 2016; however, from 2017 to 2018, imports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

In value terms, technical textiles imports totaled $2.1B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. The total import value increased at an average annual rate of +1.2% over the period from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations in certain years. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 with an increase of 16% y-o-y. Over the period under review, technical textiles imports reached their maximum in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Imports by Country

In 2018, Germany (21K tonnes), distantly followed by Italy (12K tonnes), France (11K tonnes), the Netherlands (10K tonnes), the UK (9.1K tonnes), Poland (7.5K tonnes), the Czech Republic (5.7K tonnes) and Spain (5.4K tonnes) represented the major importers of textile products and articles for technical uses, together creating 70% of total imports. The following importers – Belgium (4.5K tonnes), Romania (3.9K tonnes), Austria (3.1K tonnes) and Sweden (3K tonnes) – together made up 12% of total imports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Germany ($497M) constitutes the largest market for imported textile products and articles for technical uses in the European Union, comprising 24% of total technical textiles imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by France ($223M), with a 11% share of total imports. It was followed by the Netherlands, with a 8.9% share.

In Germany, technical textiles imports increased at an average annual rate of +1.3% over the period from 2007-2018. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: France (+1.5% per year) and the Netherlands (+7.6% per year).

Import Prices by Country

The technical textiles import price in the European Union stood at $18 per kg in 2018, jumping by 9.9% against the previous year. Overall, the technical textiles import price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2011 an increase of 15% year-to-year. The level of import price peaked in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest price was Germany ($24 per kg), while Romania ($11 per kg) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by Romania, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

Vinegar Market in the EU – Germany Emerges As The Largest Importer, Italy Lags Behind Slightly

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Vinegar – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the vinegar market in the European Union amounted to $1B in 2018, surging by 5.8% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). In general, vinegar consumption continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2011, with an increase of 12% year-to-year. In that year, the vinegar market attained its peak level of $1.1B. From 2012 to 2018, the growth of the vinegar market remained at a somewhat lower figure.

Production in the EU

In 2018, production of vinegar in the European Union stood at 1.2B litres, growing by 4.4% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.6% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being observed in certain years.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, vinegar exports in the European Union amounted to 409M litres, jumping by 3.7% against the previous year. The total exports indicated a pronounced increase from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +3.4% over the last eleven year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, the vinegar exports increased by +31.7% against 2015 indices. In value terms, vinegar exports totaled $520M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

In 2018, Italy (124M litres) was the key exporter for vinegar, achieving 30% of total exports. Germany (63M litres) took the second position in the ranking, followed by the Czech Republic (38M litres), Greece (36M litres), Spain (30M litres), the Netherlands (28M litres) and France (26M litres). All these countries together held approx. 54% share of total exports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by the Czech Republic, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Italy ($303M) remains the largest vinegar supplier in the European Union, comprising 58% of total vinegar exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Spain ($45M), with a 8.7% share of total exports. It was followed by Germany, with a 7.1% share.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the vinegar export price in the European Union amounted to $1,273 per thousand litres, going up by 6.5% against the previous year. In general, the vinegar export price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. There were significant differences in the average export prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest export price was Italy ($2,432 per thousand litres), while the Czech Republic ($325 per thousand litres) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of export prices was attained by Spain, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

The imports stood at 306M litres in 2018, growing by 4% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +4.0% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. In value terms, vinegar imports totaled $349M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

Germany (60M litres) and Italy (58M litres) represented roughly 39% of total imports of vinegar in 2018. The UK (32M litres) held a 10% share (based on tonnes) of total imports, which put it in second place, followed by France (8.6%), the Netherlands (6.5%) and Hungary (4.5%). The Czech Republic (12M litres), Austria (12M litres), Poland (10M litres), Sweden (9.1M litres), Spain (8.9M litres) and Belgium (7.9M litres) held a minor share of total imports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Hungary, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Germany ($86M), the UK ($53M) and France ($52M) were the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2018, with a combined 55% share of total imports. Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Austria, Belgium, Sweden, the Czech Republic, Poland and Hungary lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 35%.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the vinegar import price in the European Union amounted to $1,142 per thousand litres, jumping by 13% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the vinegar import price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2018, an increase of 13% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the import prices for vinegar attained their peak figure at $1,186 per thousand litres in 2009; however, from 2010 to 2018, import prices stood at a somewhat lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average import prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest import price was France ($1,956 per thousand litres), while Hungary ($331 per thousand litres) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of import prices was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

Apricot Market in Eastern Europe – The Growth of Russian Imports Is Losing Momentum

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘Eastern Europe – Apricots – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the apricot market in Eastern Europe amounted to $318M in 2018, reducing by -5.8% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +3.5% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2013, when the market value increased by 32% year-to-year. In that year, the apricot market reached its peak level of $361M. From 2014 to 2018, the growth of the apricot market remained at a lower figure.

Production in Eastern Europe

In 2018, the amount of apricots produced in Eastern Europe stood at 245K tonnes, picking up by 2.6% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.4% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2013, when the output figure increased by 56% year-to-year. In that year, apricot production reached its peak volume of 281K tonnes. From 2014 to 2018, apricot production growth failed to regain its momentum. The general positive trend in terms of apricot output was largely conditioned by a temperate expansion of the harvested area and a noticeable growth in yield figures.

Exports in Eastern Europe

In 2018, exports of apricots in Eastern Europe amounted to 9.6K tonnes, shrinking by -17% against the previous year. The total exports indicated a slight growth from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.3% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, the apricot exports decreased by -36.3% against 2016 indices. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2016, when exports increased by 51% y-o-y. In that year, apricot exports attained their peak of 15K tonnes. From 2017 to 2018, the growth of apricot exports remained at a lower figure.

In value terms, apricot exports stood at $9.2M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. In general, apricot exports, however, continue to indicate a slight drop. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2016, when exports increased by 44% y-o-y. Over the period under review, apricot exports reached their peak figure at $17M in 2013; however, from 2014 to 2018, exports stood at a somewhat lower figure.

Exports by Country

In 2018, Bulgaria (2.4K tonnes), Hungary (2.3K tonnes) and Moldova (1.9K tonnes) represented the largest exporters of apricots in Eastern Europe, constituting 68% of total export. It was distantly followed by Lithuania (1K tonnes), Poland (548 tonnes) and the Czech Republic (502 tonnes), together generating 22% share of total exports. Belarus (424 tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Bulgaria, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest apricot markets in Eastern Europe were Hungary ($2.9M), Bulgaria ($1.5M) and Moldova ($1.4M), together accounting for 62% of total exports.

Export Prices by Country

The apricot export price in Eastern Europe stood at $962 per tonne in 2018, declining by -4.3% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the apricot export price continues to indicate a measured downturn. There were significant differences in the average export prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest export price was the Czech Republic ($1,550 per tonne), while Belarus ($363 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of export prices was attained by the Czech Republic, while the other leaders experienced mixed trends in the export price figures.

Imports in Eastern Europe

In 2018, imports of apricots in Eastern Europe amounted to 95K tonnes, shrinking by -10.7% against the previous year. The total imports indicated a prominent growth from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +5.8% over the last eleven year period. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, the apricot imports increased by +45.9% against 2016 indices. In value terms, apricot imports amounted to $92M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

Russia was the key importer of apricots in Eastern Europe, with the volume of imports resulting at 53K tonnes, which was near 56% of total imports in 2018. Poland (9.9K tonnes) ranks second in terms of the total imports with a 10% share, followed by the Czech Republic (8.2%), Romania (8.1%) and Bulgaria (5%). The following importers – Belarus (2.4K tonnes), Slovakia (2.2K tonnes) and Ukraine (2.1K tonnes) – together made up 7% of total imports.

From 2007 to 2018, average annual rates of growth with regard to apricot imports into Russia stood at +3.8%. At the same time, the Czech Republic (+10.9%), Romania (+10.6%), Slovakia (+10.2%), Bulgaria (+10.2%), Belarus (+8.5%), Poland (+7.7%) and Ukraine (+3.1%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, the Czech Republic emerged as the fastest growing importer in Eastern Europe, with a CAGR of +10.9% from 2007-2018. Slovakia (-1.5%), Bulgaria (-3.3%), Romania (-5.4%), the Czech Republic (-5.6%), Poland (-5.8%) and Russia (-19%) significantly weakened its position in terms of the global imports, while the shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, Russia ($42M) constitutes the largest market for imported apricots in Eastern Europe, comprising 46% of total apricot imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Poland ($14M), with a 15% share of total imports. It was followed by the Czech Republic, with a 12% share.

Import Prices by Country

The apricot import price in Eastern Europe stood at $964 per tonne in 2018, rising by 3.8% against the previous year. In general, the apricot import price, however, continues to indicate a slight slump. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2010, when the import price increased by 30% y-o-y. In that year, the import prices for apricots reached their peak level of $1,258 per tonne. From 2011 to 2018, the growth in terms of the import prices for apricots remained at a somewhat lower figure.

Import prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest import price was Slovakia ($1,530 per tonne), while Bulgaria ($358 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of import prices was attained by Slovakia, while the other leaders experienced mixed trends in the import price figures.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

frozen fruit

European Frozen Fruit Market Posted Sixth Consecutive Year of Growth and Reached $5.3B in 2018

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Frozen Fruit – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the frozen fruit market in the European Union amounted to $5.3B in 2018, increasing by 2.3% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price).

The market value increased at an average annual rate of +3.0% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2010, with an increase of 10% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the frozen fruit market attained its maximum level in 2018, and is expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

Production in the EU

In 2018, approx. 1.3M tonnes of frozen fruits were produced in the European Union; lowering by -2.8% against the previous year.

Exports in the EU

In 2018, frozen fruit exports in the European Union amounted to 783K tonnes, declining by -4.1% against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.1% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. In value terms, frozen fruit exports stood at $1.6B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

Poland represented the major exporting country with an export of around 272K tonnes, which resulted at 35% of total exports. The Netherlands (117K tonnes) occupied the second position in the ranking, followed by Belgium (73K tonnes), Spain (65K tonnes) and Germany (48K tonnes). All these countries together occupied near 39% share of total exports. Italy (32K tonnes), Greece (29K tonnes), France (20K tonnes), Sweden (17K tonnes), Bulgaria (15K tonnes) and the UK (12K tonnes) took a relatively small share of total exports.

Poland experienced a relatively flat trend pattern of frozen fruits exports. At the same time, the Netherlands (+4.3%), Bulgaria (+4.2%), Spain (+4.1%), the UK (+3.6%), Germany (+3.6%), Italy (+2.9%), Sweden (+2.6%) and France (+1.8%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, the Netherlands emerged as the fastest growing exporter in the European Union, with a CAGR of +4.3% from 2007-2018. Belgium and Greece experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. From 2007 to 2018, the share of Germany, Spain and the Netherlands decreased by -1.9%, -3% and -5.5% percentage points, while the shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, Poland ($489M) remains the largest frozen fruit supplier in the European Union, comprising 31% of total frozen fruit exports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the Netherlands ($226M), with a 14% share of total exports. It was followed by Belgium, with a 9.8% share.

Export Prices by Country

In 2018, the frozen fruit export price in the European Union amounted to $2,009 per tonne, growing by 6.7% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the frozen fruit export price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

There were significant differences in the average export prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2018, the country with the highest export price was Sweden ($2,908 per tonne), while Greece ($1,588 per tonne) was amongst the lowest. From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of export prices was attained by Spain, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, approx. 1.2M tonnes of frozen fruits were imported in the European Union; remaining relatively unchanged against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.3% from 2007 to 2018; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with only minor fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. In value terms, frozen fruit imports amounted to $2.4B (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Imports by Country

In 2018, Germany (323K tonnes), distantly followed by France (183K tonnes), the Netherlands (122K tonnes), Belgium (119K tonnes), Poland (98K tonnes) and the UK (79K tonnes) were the key importers of frozen fruits, together constituting 77% of total imports. The following importers – Italy (47K tonnes), Austria (46K tonnes), Sweden (37K tonnes), the Czech Republic (23K tonnes), Denmark (20K tonnes) and Lithuania (18K tonnes) – together made up 16% of total imports. From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by the Czech Republic, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest frozen fruit importing markets in the European Union were Germany ($566M), France ($382M) and Belgium ($233M), with a combined 49% share of total imports. The Netherlands, Poland, the UK, Austria, Italy, Sweden, Denmark, the Czech Republic and Lithuania lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 42%.

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the frozen fruit import price in the European Union amounted to $1,984 per tonne, jumping by 6.2% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the frozen fruit import price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2011, an increase of 23% y-o-y. Over the period under review, the import prices for frozen fruits reached their maximum at $2,218 per tonne in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2018, import prices failed to regain their momentum.

Import prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest import price was Sweden ($2,638 per tonne), while Germany ($1,752 per tonne) was amongst the lowest. From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of import prices was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

couscous

EU Couscous Market 2019 – France is the Undisputed Leader in Consumption, Production, and Imports

IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Couscous – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the couscous market in the European Union amounted to $538M in 2018, approximately equating the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +2.2% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 with an increase of 13% y-o-y. The level of couscous consumption peaked in 2018 and is likely to see steady growth in the near future.

Consumption By Country in the EU

France (143K tonnes) remains the largest couscous consuming country in the European Union, comprising approx. 43% of total consumption. Moreover, couscous consumption in France exceeded the figures recorded by the region’s second-largest consumer, Germany (53K tonnes), threefold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Italy (25K tonnes), with a 7.5% share.

In France, couscous consumption remained relatively stable over the period from 2007-2018. In the other countries, the average annual rates were as follows: Germany (+7.7% per year) and Italy (+4.1% per year).

In value terms, France ($238M) led the market, alone. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the UK ($79M). It was followed by Germany.

In 2018, the highest levels of couscous per capita consumption was registered in France (2,198 kg per 1000 persons), followed by the Netherlands (690 kg per 1000 persons), Belgium (669 kg per 1000 persons) and Germany (640 kg per 1000 persons), while the world average per capita consumption of couscous was estimated at 654 kg per 1000 persons.

In France, couscous per capita consumption remained relatively stable over the period from 2007-2018. The remaining consuming countries recorded the following average annual rates of per capita consumption growth: the Netherlands (+5.7% per year) and Belgium (+5.3% per year).

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in the EU

Driven by increasing demand for couscous in the European Union, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven years. Market performance is forecast to decelerate, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +1.1% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 361K tonnes by the end of 2025.

Production in the EU

In 2018, the amount of couscous produced in the European Union stood at 333K tonnes, growing by 3.6% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.8% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded over the period under review. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2016 with an increase of 8.3% against the previous year. Over the period under review, couscous production attained its peak figure volume in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the near future.

In value terms, couscous production stood at $509M in 2018 estimated in export prices. The total output value increased at an average annual rate of +1.5% from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern remained consistent, with only minor fluctuations in certain years. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2011 with an increase of 9% against the previous year. The level of couscous production peaked in 2018 and is likely to continue its growth in the near future.

Production By Country in the EU

France (140K tonnes) remains the largest couscous producing country in the European Union, accounting for 42% of total production. Moreover, couscous production in France exceeded the figures recorded by the region’s second-largest producer, Italy (67K tonnes), twofold. The third position in this ranking was occupied by Germany (46K tonnes), with a 14% share.

In France, couscous production remained relatively stable over the period from 2007-2018. The remaining producing countries recorded the following average annual rates of production growth: Italy (+6.4% per year) and Germany (+6.8% per year).

Exports in the EU

The exports stood at 77K tonnes in 2018, lowering by -8.1% against the previous year. The total exports indicated a remarkable expansion from 2007 to 2018: its volume increased at an average annual rate of +4.0% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2010 with an increase of 18% against the previous year. The volume of exports peaked at 84K tonnes in 2017, and then declined slightly in the following year.

In value terms, couscous exports totaled $107M in 2018. The total export value increased at an average annual rate of +3.7% over the period from 2007 to 2018; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded in certain years. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2008 with an increase of 29% y-o-y. The level of exports peaked in 2018 and are expected to retain its growth in the near future.

Exports by Country

Italy represented the largest exporter of couscous in the European Union, with the volume of exports resulting at 44K tonnes, which was approx. 57% of total exports in 2018. It was distantly followed by France (23K tonnes), making up a 30% share of total exports. The following exporters – Belgium (2.8K tonnes), the UK (1.8K tonnes), the Netherlands (1.5K tonnes) and Germany (1.2K tonnes) – together made up 9.5% of total exports.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest couscous markets in the European Union were Italy ($47M), France ($39M) and Belgium ($6.1M), together accounting for 86% of total exports. These countries were followed by the UK, the Netherlands and Germany, which together accounted for a further 9.2%.

In terms of the main exporting countries, the Netherlands experienced the highest growth rate of exports, over the last eleven-year period, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Export Prices by Country

The couscous export price in the European Union stood at $1,381 per tonne in 2018, surging by 12% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the couscous export price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth appeared the most rapid in 2008 an increase of 28% against the previous year. In that year, the export prices for couscous reached their peak level of $1,825 per tonne. From 2009 to 2018, the growth in terms of the export prices for couscous failed to regain its momentum.

Prices varied noticeably by the country of origin; the country with the highest price was Germany ($2,524 per tonne), while Italy ($1,058 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

In 2018, couscous imports in the European Union amounted to 77K tonnes, reducing by -12.7% against the previous year. Overall, couscous imports, however, continue to indicate resilient growth. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2013 with an increase of 19% against the previous year. Over the period under review, couscous imports attained their maximum at 89K tonnes in 2017, and then declined slightly in the following year.

In value terms, couscous imports stood at $106M in 2018. The total imports indicated a buoyant increase from 2007 to 2018: its value increased at an average annual rate of +5.9% over the last eleven years. The trend pattern, however, indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period. Based on 2018 figures, couscous imports increased by +84.0% against 2010 indices. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2011 with an increase of 27% year-to-year. Over the period under review, couscous imports attained their peak figure at $108M in 2017, and then declined slightly in the following year.

Imports by Country

France was the key importer of couscous in the European Union, with the volume of imports reaching 26K tonnes, which was near 34% of total imports in 2018. It was distantly followed by the UK (11K tonnes), Belgium (8.7K tonnes), Germany (7.8K tonnes), Spain (5.1K tonnes) and the Netherlands (3.5K tonnes), together comprising a 47% share of total imports. The Czech Republic (2.8K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2018, average annual rates of growth with regard to couscous imports into France stood at +2.8%. At the same time, the Czech Republic (+17.9%), Germany (+14.8%), the UK (+8.9%), Spain (+6.6%), Belgium (+5.5%) and the Netherlands (+4.7%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, the Czech Republic emerged as the fastest-growing importer in the European Union, with a CAGR of +17.9% from 2007-2018. While the share of the UK (+8.7 p.p.), France (+8.7 p.p.), Germany (+7.9 p.p.), Belgium (+5 p.p.), Spain (+3.3 p.p.), the Czech Republic (+3 p.p.) and the Netherlands (+1.8 p.p.) increased significantly, the shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, France ($35M) constitutes the largest market for imported couscous in the European Union, comprising 33% of total couscous imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by Belgium ($15M), with a 14% share of total imports. It was followed by the UK, with a 12% share.

In France, couscous imports increased at an average annual rate of +5.3% over the period from 2007-2018. The remaining importing countries recorded the following average annual rates of imports growth: Belgium (+6.0% per year) and the UK (+8.7% per year).

Import Prices by Country

In 2018, the couscous import price in the European Union amounted to $1,369 per tonne, rising by 13% against the previous year. Over the last eleven years, it increased at an average annual rate of +1.2%. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2008 when the import price increased by 30% y-o-y. In that year, the import prices for couscous reached their peak level of $1,572 per tonne. From 2009 to 2018, the growth in terms of the import prices for couscous remained at a somewhat lower figure.

There were significant differences in the average prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2018, the country with the highest price was the Netherlands ($1,837 per tonne), while the Czech Republic ($1,109 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of prices was attained by the Netherlands, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

EU Chewing Gum Market | Mondelez International Inc., Mars, Tootsie Roll Industries Inc.

IndexBox has just published a new report, the EU – Chewing Gum – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the chewing gum market in the European Union amounted to $117M in 2017, standing approx. at the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price).

Over the last decade, chewing gum consumption continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2008, when the market value increased by 17% against the previous year. In that year, the chewing gum market reached its peak level of $148M. From 2009 to 2017, the growth of the chewing gum market failed to regain its momentum.

Production in the EU

In 2017, chewing gum production in the European Union totaled 15K tonnes, approximately reflecting the previous year.

Exports in the EU

In 2017, the amount of chewing gum exported in the European Union totaled 28K tonnes, coming down by -2.6% against the previous year. Over the period under review, chewing gum exports continue to indicate a perceptible reduction.

In value terms, chewing gum exports amounted to $183M (IndexBox estimates) in 2017.

Exports by Country

Spain (5.1K tonnes), the Netherlands (5K tonnes), France (4.7K tonnes) and the UK (3.4K tonnes) represented roughly 65% of total exports of chewing gum in 2017. It was distantly followed by Germany (2.2K tonnes), making up 7.7% share of total exports. Portugal (943 tonnes), Belgium (912 tonnes), Italy (761 tonnes), Poland (715 tonnes), Romania (676 tonnes), Denmark (649 tonnes) and Greece (525 tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2017, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Romania, while the other leaders experienced mixed trends in the exports figures.

In value terms, the Netherlands ($39M), France ($38M) and Spain ($23M) were the countries with the highest levels of exports in 2017, together comprising 55% of total exports. These countries were followed by the UK, Germany, Poland, Italy, Belgium, Romania, Portugal, Greece and Denmark, which together accounted for a further 36%.

Export Prices by Country

The chewing gum export price in the European Union stood at $6.5 per kg in 2017, increasing by 5.4% against the previous year. Over the last decade, it increased at an average annual rate of +1.0%.

There were significant differences in the average export prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2017, the country with the highest export price was France ($8,025 per tonne), while Portugal ($3,895 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2017, the most notable rate of growth in terms of export prices was attained by Poland, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Imports in the EU

In 2017, imports of chewing gum in the European Union totaled 36K tonnes, coming down by -3.8% against the previous year.

In value terms, chewing gum imports totaled $183M (IndexBox estimates) in 2017. In general, chewing gum imports continue to indicate a measured reduction. The level of imports peaked at $251M in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2017, imports failed to regain their momentum.

Imports by Country

In 2017, Germany (9K tonnes), distantly followed by the Netherlands (4.8K tonnes), Spain (3.4K tonnes), the UK (2.7K tonnes), Belgium (2.3K tonnes) and France (1.9K tonnes) were the key importers of chewing gum, together creating 67% of total imports. Romania (1.3K tonnes), Poland (1.2K tonnes), Italy (1.2K tonnes), Denmark (897 tonnes), the Czech Republic (821 tonnes) and Sweden (771 tonnes) took a minor share of total imports.

From 2007 to 2017, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Spain, while the other leaders experienced mixed trends in the imports figures.

In value terms, Germany ($49M) constitutes the largest market for imported chewing gum in the European Union, comprising 27% of total chewing gum imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the Netherlands ($23M), with a 13% share of total imports. It was followed by Spain, with a 8.4% share.

Import Prices by Country

In 2017, the chewing gum import price in the European Union amounted to $5.1 per kg, approximately reflecting the previous year. Over the period under review, the chewing gum import price, however, continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

Average import prices varied somewhat amongst the major importing countries. In 2017, major importing countries recorded the following import prices: in the Czech Republic ($6,141 per tonne) and Belgium ($5,452 per tonne), while Romania ($4,197 per tonne) and Spain ($4,539 per tonne) were amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2017, the most notable rate of growth in terms of import prices was attained by Romania, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

Modified Starches Market in the EU – Key Insights

IndexBox has just published a new report, the EU – Dextrins And Other Modified Starches – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends And Insights. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the modified starches market in the European Union amounted to $2.2B in 2017, surging by 4% against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The modified starches consumption continues to indicate a noticeable curtailment. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2011, with an increase of 31% against the previous year. Over the period under review, the modified starches market attained its maximum level at $3.7B in 2008; however, from 2009 to 2017, consumption failed to regain its momentum.

Production in the EU

The modified starches production amounted to 2.9M tonnes in 2017, jumping by 5.1% against the previous year. The modified starches production continues to indicate a mild shrinkage.

Modified Starches Exports

Exports in the EU

In 2017, approx. 1.8M tonnes of dextrins and other modified starches were exported in the European Union; rising by 6.1% against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +1.1% from 2007 to 2017; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations being observed throughout the analyzed period. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2010, with an increase of 16% y-o-y. Over the period under review, modified starches exports attained their maximum in 2017, and are expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

In value terms, modified starches exports stood at $1.7B (IndexBox estimates) in 2017. The modified starches exports continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The level of exports peaked at $2B in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2017, exports remained at a lower figure.

Exports by Country

France (486K tonnes) and the Netherlands (468K tonnes) represented roughly 52% of total exports of dextrins and other modified starches in 2017. Germany (303K tonnes) held the second position in the ranking, distantly followed by Italy (131K tonnes), Belgium (94K tonnes) and Austria (84K tonnes). All these countries together held approx. 33% share of total exports. Sweden (69K tonnes) followed a long way behind the leaders.

From 2007 to 2017, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by Austria (+11.7% per year), while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest modified starches markets worldwide were the Netherlands ($441M), France ($377M) and Germany ($354M), with a combined 67% share of total exports. Austria, Italy, Sweden and Belgium lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 22%.

Export Prices by Country

The modified starches export price in the European Union stood at $947 per tonne in 2017, coming down by -1.9% against the previous year. The the modified starches export price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

Export prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest export price was Austria ($1.6 per kg), while Belgium ($736 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2017, the most notable rate of growth in terms of export prices was attained by Germany (+1.0% per year), while the other leaders experienced a decline in the export price figures.

Modified Starches Imports

Imports in the EU

In 2017, approx. 1.4M tonnes of dextrins and other modified starches were imported in the European Union; remaining stable against the previous year. The modified starches imports continue to indicate a slight deduction.

In value terms, modified starches imports totaled $1.3B (IndexBox estimates) in 2017. The modified starches imports continue to indicate a slight contraction. In that year, modified starches imports attained their peak of $1.7B. From 2012 to 2017, the growth of modified starches imports failed to regain its momentum.

Imports by Country

In 2017, Germany (360K tonnes) represented the largest importer for dextrins and other modified starches, constituting 26% of total imports. It was distantly followed by Finland (132K tonnes), the UK (129K tonnes), Sweden (105K tonnes), France (101K tonnes), Italy (86K tonnes), Belgium (82K tonnes), Poland (74K tonnes), the Netherlands (73K tonnes) and Spain (65K tonnes), together making up 60% share of total imports.

Germany was also the fastest growing in terms of the dextrins and other modified starches imports, with a CAGR of +1.7% from 2007 to 2017. Poland, Spain and Belgium experienced a relatively flat trend pattern. Sweden (-2.2%), Finland (-2.8%), the UK (-2.8%), France (-3.0%), Italy (-3.2%) and the Netherlands (-9.4%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period. From 2007 to 2017, the share of the Netherlands, the UK, Finland, France, Italy and Sweden increased by 8.7%, 3.1%, 3%, 2.6%, 2.4% and 1.9% percentage points, while Germany (-4%) saw their share reduced. The shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, Germany ($330M) constitutes the largest market for imported dextrins and other modified starches in the European Union, comprising 26% of global imports. The second position in the ranking was occupied by the UK ($130M), with a 10% share of global imports. It was followed by France, with a 9.8% share.

Import Prices by Country

The modified starches import price in the European Union stood at $922 per tonne in 2017, rising by 3.9% against the previous year. The the modified starches import price continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The growth pace was the most rapid in 2011, an increase of 28% against the previous year. In that year, the import prices for dextrins and other modified starches attained their peak level of $1.1 per kg. From 2012 to 2017, the growth in terms of the import prices for dextrins and other modified starches failed to regain its momentum.

Import prices varied noticeably by the country of destination; the country with the highest import price was France ($1.3 per kg), while Finland ($654 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2017, the most notable rate of growth in terms of import prices was attained by the Netherlands (+2.5% per year), while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform


Preserved Sweet Corn Market in the EU – Key Insights

IndexBox has just published a new report, the EU – Sweet Corn Prepared Or Preserved – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the preserved sweet corn market in the European Union amounted to $459M in 2017, remaining relatively unchanged against the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). The market value increased at an average annual rate of +1.9% from 2007 to 2017; the trend pattern remained relatively stable, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations throughout the analyzed period.

The pace of growth was the most pronounced in 2008, when the market value increased by 28% against the previous year. The level of preserved sweet corn consumption peaked at $505M in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2017, consumption failed to regain its momentum.

Production in the EU

The preserved sweet corn production amounted to 350K tonnes in 2017, growing by 2.5% against the previous year. The total output volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.7% over the period from 2007 to 2017; however, the trend pattern indicated some noticeable fluctuations being recorded throughout the analyzed period.

Preserved Sweet Corn Exports

Exports in the EU

In 2017, approx. 376K tonnes of sweet corn prepared or preserved were exported in the European Union; jumping by 4.7% against the previous year. The total export volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.1% over the period from 2007 to 2017; the trend pattern remained consistent, with somewhat noticeable fluctuations throughout the analyzed period.

In value terms, preserved sweet corn exports totaled $474M (IndexBox estimates) in 2017. The preserved sweet corn exports continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. Over the period under review, preserved sweet corn exports reached their peak figure at $582M in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2017, exports failed to regain their momentum.

Exports by Country

Hungary was the largest exporter of sweet corn prepared or preserved in the European Union, with the volume of exports resulting at 187K tonnes, which was near 50% of total exports in 2017. France (105K tonnes) took a 28% share (based on tonnes) of total exports, which put it in second place, followed by Spain (6.4%) and Belgium (5%). The following exporters – the Netherlands (9K tonnes), Germany (7.8K tonnes), Sweden (7.1K tonnes) and Italy (6.2K tonnes) each accounted for a 8% share of total exports.

From 2007 to 2017, the most notable rate of growth in terms of exports, amongst the main exporting countries, was attained by the Netherlands (+25.4% per year), while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest preserved sweet corn markets worldwide were Hungary ($198M), France ($153M) and Spain ($41M), together accounting for 83% of total exports. These countries were followed by Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany, Italy and Sweden, which together accounted for a further 14%.

Export Prices by Country

The preserved sweet corn export price in the European Union stood at $1.3 per kg in 2017, approximately reflecting the previous year. The the preserved sweet corn export price continues to indicate a mild shrinkage.

There were significant differences in the average export prices amongst the major exporting countries. In 2017, the country with the highest export price was Spain ($1.7 per kg), while Sweden ($890 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2017, the most notable rate of growth in terms of export prices was attained by Germany (+0.7% per year), while the other leaders experienced mixed trends in the export price figures.

Preserved Sweet Corn Imports

Imports in the EU

In 2017, approx. 384K tonnes of sweet corn prepared or preserved were imported in the European Union; growing by 6.4% against the previous year. The total import volume increased at an average annual rate of +2.0% over the period from 2007 to 2017; the trend pattern remained consistent, with only minor fluctuations being observed in certain years.

In value terms, preserved sweet corn imports stood at $470M (IndexBox estimates) in 2017. The total import value increased at an average annual rate of +1.1% over the period from 2007 to 2017; the trend pattern remained consistent, with only minor fluctuations being observed throughout the analyzed period. Over the period under review, preserved sweet corn imports attained their maximum at $562M in 2014; however, from 2015 to 2017, imports remained at a lower figure.

Imports by Country

The countries with the highest levels of preserved sweet corn imports in 2017 were Germany (75K tonnes), the UK (67K tonnes), Belgium (46K tonnes), Spain (42K tonnes), France (28K tonnes), Italy (23K tonnes), Sweden (18K tonnes), the Netherlands (17K tonnes) and Poland (16K tonnes), together accounting for 86% of total import.

From 2007 to 2017, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Belgium (+12.7% per year), while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest preserved sweet corn markets worldwide were the UK ($88M), Germany ($86M) and Spain ($60M), together accounting for 50% of total imports. These countries were followed by Belgium, France, Italy, Sweden, the Netherlands and Poland, which together accounted for a further 37%.

Import Prices by Country

The preserved sweet corn import price in the European Union stood at $1.2 per kg in 2017, reducing by -2.4% against the previous year. The the preserved sweet corn import price continues to indicate a slight contraction.

There were significant differences in the average import prices amongst the major importing countries. In 2017, the country with the highest import price was Sweden ($1.6 per kg), while Belgium ($888 per tonne) was amongst the lowest.

From 2007 to 2017, the most notable rate of growth in terms of import prices was attained by Poland (+0.1% per year), while the other leaders experienced mixed trends in the import price figures.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform

Uncertainty Over Brexit Leaves the B2B World in Suspense

When talk turns to Brexit, much of the discussion revolves around what will happen once the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland leaves the European Union. While the United Kingdom Parliament hashes out a withdrawal agreement, with Prime Minister Theresa May at the helm, the economy is already shifting in anticipation of… what? The trouble is, no one is quite sure. Even experts can only make educated guesses since their research hinges on the type of withdrawal the United Kingdom and European Union ultimately consent to.

Where Brexit currently stands – A high-level view

The European Union recently approved a second extension of the Brexit deadline to allow May additional time to forge a deal in Parliament and finalize the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the Union. While the new October 31, 2019 deadline offers some breathing room, it leaves the United Kingdom and European Union in an uncertain economic limbo for most of this year.

The spiderweb of potential events that lay ahead for the United Kingdom stem from two of the most likely outcomes:

-May passes her withdrawal agreement in Parliament by October 31st. If she succeeds, the United Kingdom can hammer out future trade deals with the European Union, to be expanded upon after the separation is finalized.

-May does not pass her withdrawal agreement by October 31st. This would mean the United Kingdom leaves with no trade deals in place, and very little room to negotiate ideal terms in the future. A “no-deal” situation has the potential to create lingering consequences, particularly at the border between Northern Ireland – which is part of the United Kingdom – and the Republic of Ireland, with the European Union.

While those in favor of Brexit are eager for a more economically independent United Kingdom, others hope that the withdrawal agreement will come with lenient tariffs, not just at the Irish border, but for trade across the United Kingdom and European Union. Unfortunately, only time (and an approved withdrawal agreement) will tell how the trade relationship between the United Kingdom and Europe continues.

What Brexit means for businesses in the United Kingdom

Politics aside, the United Kingdom has already seen changes to their market and businesses since the original Brexit vote in late 2016. The pound sterling (GBP), which dropped drastically after the majority of United Kingdom citizens voted to leave the European Union, remains weakened in comparison to the United States Dollar (USD). The approach of each Brexit deadline has triggered a slight drop in the market, followed by a recovery a few days after the granted extensions.

The GBP and Euro (EUR) have become tied to shifts in the political sphere, rather than the market. Companies are making financial decisions in anticipation of a plummeting currency values caused by Brexit.  Many banks have already moved their home offices  from London to various European cities. Healthcare facilities are stockpiling life-saving medicines in the event of a shortage. United Kingdom-based businesses are reducing their investments and employment opportunities. 

How will Brexit affect U.S. business with the United Kingdom?

With a diminished value for pound sterling, currency exchanges between USD, GBP, and EUR won’t be very attractive for a while, especially when considering the added per-payment fees charged by banks to transmit funds across international borders. Global businesses depend on stable markets to keep exchange rates as uniform as possible; someone will always be paying the difference, whether it’s the buyer purchasing more currency, or the supplier receiving a reduced amount.

Companies whose accounts payable teams have adopted payment automation into their processes can use their rebates to mitigate irregular exchange rates. Payment solutions that lower the cost of electronic payments through exchange rate transparency ultimately improve the buyer’s relationships with their suppliers.

Only one thing left to do

The United Kingdom and European Union are in a transitory stage – and that is an enormous understatement. The Brexit experience is genuinely frustrating because it has no precedent, so no one’s sure what will ultimately happen. Economic growth may stagnate for a while, but as with any market, where there are ebbs, there will be flows. The only thing left to do is what the United Kingdom already does best: “Keep calm and carry on.”

Alyssa Callahan is a Technical Marketing Writer at Nvoicepay.  She has four years of experience in the B2B payment industry, specializing in cross-border B2B payment processes.