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Case Study Reveals Bulk Terminal Pest Challenges

Case Study Reveals Bulk Terminal Pest Challenges

Information released in a case study by bulk terminal operator, HSE at Terminales Marítimos de Galicia (TMGA), is urging other terminal operators to reconsider their approach to effective pest control, as cargo fumigation isn’t making the cut and leaving too much risk for infestation. One of the causes identified is the presence of Weevils left behind long after lots have been shipped.

“We are finding that the pupae and larvae inside maize kernels in various consignments, and which were subjected to in-transit fumigation, are not affected by phosphine or phosphine generating fumigants and growing into weevils while cargoes are in storage,” said Javier Quintero Saavedra, head of HSE at Terminales Marítimos de Galicia (TMGA).

“Bulk terminals need to implement a fully integrated pest management plan. Operators must monitor silo temperatures and moisture and be able to spot insect and larvae infestations in large storage premises. They should also carry out regular cleaning of empty stores and better understand the use of different pesticides and their effects,” Saavedra added.

Balancing pest management while ensuring safety measures are in place is another challenge identified in the case study – which will be presented by Saavedra at this year’s  Association of Bulk Terminal Operator’s (ABTO) conference – Bulk Terminals,  in October.

“While grain cargoes are usually fumigated at origin or in-transit if larvae survive and evolve it can be a real issue for terminal operators,” ABTO CE Simon Gutteridge said. “It can write-off the whole consignment. There is obviously a strong case for fumigating cargoes stored in silos at discharge ports, especially where maize kernels are stored, but this is not without its own problems.”

As phosphine and methyl bromide are known as top chemical choices for fumigation, both are linked to high-risk health hazards including acute intoxication, hypoxia, asphyxiation, seafarer fatalities, and run the risk of leaks to other facilities. This risks and more will be discussed in detail during Saavedra’s presentation covering port-side fumigation.

“There are IMO guidelines for the use of pesticides in-transit, but the rules governing their use in storage facilities ashore is at national level. Although the European Commission oversees the approval of active substances, it is the individual state that decides whether to allow their use or not,” said Saavedra. “What the bulk terminals industry needs is more globally-focused best practice guidelines, an initiative supported both by ICHCA and ABTO.”

 

 

Blockchain Changes the Pace for Agricultural Supply Chain

Farmers and buyers are now provided streamlined visibility for their deals through the new blockchain platform, Grain Discovery. As a result of the start-up technology, the first global corn trade transaction was successfully processed for Prince Edward County farmers Larry Reynolds and Lloyd Crowe following the discovery of vomitoxin beyond the threshold for corn and leading to rejection of two loads. The two were in need of a quick and reliable solution to locate a new buyer and process the transaction. Grain Discovery did just that.

“By using Grain Discovery, we were not only able to avoid hours of searching for a new buyer, but found one just down the road, at a better price than the original deal, and were paid instantly,” said Mr. Reynolds. “If blockchain technology means a few extra dollars in my pocket and a few hours less trucking, then that’s a win.”

The goal for Grain Discovery is to create a revolutionary approach to agricultural supply chain through the use of blockchain technology while providing increased visibility, control, and simplicity for farmers and buyers.

“Farming technology in the agricultural industry is incredibly advanced,” explained Rory O’Sullivan, CEO of Grain Discovery. “However, the way grain is bought and sold hasn’t changed much since our grandparents were farming! In the age of Amazon and eBay, we reckoned the industry deserves better.”

“We are participating in a number of other pilot projects this year, including tracing soybeans from seeds in Canada to the export market in Japan and coffee from Columbia to your local café,” said Mr. O’Sullivan. “This transaction was the vital first step towards realizing our goals.”

Source: EIN Presswire 

Trump Steps in to Assist Suffering Farmers

Just in time for the season of giving and hope, President Donald Trump approves another round of mitigation payments this week to assist farmers feeling the impacts of foreign trade retaliations, according to a release this week from the USDA.

The release confirms this is the second and final round of mitigation payments. Moving forward, certain producers that fall within the required categories will have the opportunity to leverage the Market Facilitation Program for the second half of 2018 production.

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue commented:

“The President reaffirmed his support for American farmers and ranchers and made good on his promise, authorizing the second round of payments to be made in short order. While there have been positive movements on the trade front, American farmers are continuing to experience losses due to unjustified trade retaliation by foreign nations. This assistance will help with short-term cash flow issues as we move into the new year.”

Producers interested in the MFP opportunity will have until January 15, 2019 to sign up for the program. The release specifically outlines the program was designed to help, “almond, cotton, corn, dairy, hog, sorghum, soybean, fresh sweet cherry, and wheat producers who have been significantly impacted by actions of foreign governments resulting in the loss of traditional exports,” (USDA).

Beyond the mitigation payments, Secretary Perdue followed through on Trump’s command to create other solutions for short-term relief, including:

-USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) which offers a food purchase and distribution program to purchase up to $1.2 billion in commodities unfairly targeted by unjustified retaliation.

-USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) has been administering MFP to provide the first payments to applicable producers.

– Agricultural Trade Promotion (ATP) program provides $200 million to be made available to develop foreign markets for U.S. agricultural products.

Producers interested in reading more about these solutions can visit: www.farmers.gov/mfp

Source: USDA

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