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INDIA TARIFFS COULD DENT GAINS FROM CALIFORNIA’S BUMPER ALMOND CROP

India

INDIA TARIFFS COULD DENT GAINS FROM CALIFORNIA’S BUMPER ALMOND CROP

Celebrating Diwali in India with California almonds

Fall festivals and the wedding season are already ramping up in India. There’s Janmashtami which celebrates the birth of Lord Krishna, the festival for Lord Ganesha, the elephant-headed God of the Hindus, and Diwali, the famously elegant festival of lights, and many more throughout the various regions of India. Almonds are a popular gift for such occasions.

The timing is perfect for California’s almond growers. Across California’s lush green valleys, almonds are being harvested from orchards, loaded on trucks and delivered to mills where the essential nut will be separated from its shell and hull. Almond traders in India await the arrival of the best quality shipments for the festival season demand beginning early September.

Almonds have deep roots in India

Almonds in India date as far back as prehistoric times. Ancient Indian Sanskrit texts on Ayurveda, the Indian traditional medicine, detail the role of almonds and other nuts in providing health benefits. Almonds were exclusive and prestigious health supplements for the rich and royal during the Mughal rule from the 15th to the 19th century.

To this day, consuming raw almonds on a daily basis as a standalone morning chew, added to milk shakes, as oils or as a garnish to dishes, is widely prevalent in India and elsewhere on the sub-continent.

Indian consumers choose from types of almonds available in Indian street markets and grocery stores – Mamra, Gurbandi and California almonds. California almonds command a majority market share due to its wide availability and lower price. Sweeter in taste, California almonds are favored in Indian cooking and garnishing.

Tariffs could dampen California’s bumper crop

California produces 80 percent of the world’s almonds. Americans consume just over a third of California’s harvest. The remaining 67 percent is exported to other countries. California almond growers are on track for a bumper crop this year, producing a record 2.5 billion pounds of almonds, which would be a nine percent increase of over last year’s crop.

TradeVistas- Global almond production

California growers have reason to worry about access to one of their biggest export markets. The Indian government increased tariffs on U.S. shelled almonds by 20 percent and non-shelled almonds by 17 percent in June. The move came days after the Trump administration announced plans to remove India from eligibility for key trade privileges under the U.S. Generalized System of Preference (GSP) program. India was the biggest beneficiary under the GSP program, exporting $5.6 billion worth of Indian products to the United States duty-free in 2017.

The latest tariff increase by India comes on top of an increase in customs duties last year and in addition to a 12 percent tax the Indian Ministry of Finance imposes on both domestic and imported almonds. The U.S. Department of Agriculture forecasts the increased cost will cause a five percent drop in U.S. almond exports to India, impacting the 6,800 almond growers in California, who are mostly small to medium-size, family-run enterprises.

According to a study by the Almond Board of California, the almond industry generates more than 100,000 jobs in California, mostly in the Central Valley. Almond growers are California contribute about $11 billion annually to the state’s economy.

“Tomorrow Begins Today”

India has become such an important market for California almond growers that the state almond board has an office in New Delhi with a $5.5 million annual budget.

In July of 2015, the Almond Board of California launched a successful marketing campaign in India, promoting the lesser-known nutrition benefits of almonds such as heart health, weight management and diabetes management.

The campaign, called “Tomorrow Begins Today,” reached 4.05 billion broadcast impressions and is credited with helping grow the snack category by 100 percent.

TradeVistas- Export destinations for U.S. almonds

Tariffs are a tough nut to crack

In the face of new tariffs and competition from Vietnam, Hong Kong, Australia and Chile, California growers need to crack open new markets.

Unfortunately, the tariff wars are being fought in another of California’s important export markets – China. In 2018, China imposed a 50-percent retaliatory tariff on almond imports from the United States. U.S. exports declined by 33 percent from August 2018 to April 2019 compared with the same period of the prior year, according to Almond Board of California.

Higher tariffs could ultimately cost major U.S. fruit and nut industries over $2.6 billion per year in exports, according to a report by Daniel A. Sumner, an economist with the University of California Davis’ Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics. The economic blow could rise to as much as $3.3 billion because of lost market share overtaken by lower-priced alternatives from competing exporters.

Australia has taken advantage of their free trade agreement with China to expand exports. The free trade agreement between the two countries grants zero tariffs on almonds and other commodities starting January 1, 2019. Australian producers recorded a 20-fold increase in exports to China this year, according to the Australian Board of Almonds.

Nothing to celebrate

Retaliatory tariffs imposed by India will shortchange the gains hoped for by California almond growers who are expecting a bumper harvest this year, but who also face tariffs in another top export market: China.

Indian importers might look for other sources but no other global exporter can match the volume of production by California’s almond growers. As long as India’s appetite for sweet almonds continues to grow, Indian consumers will pay a higher price for U.S. almonds at their upcoming celebrations.

PBhatnagar

Pragya Bhatnagar is a Research Associate with the Hinrich Foundation where he focuses on International Trade Research. He is a Hinrich Foundation Global Trade Leader Scholar alumnus, earning his Master’s degree in International Journalism, specializing in Business and Financial Journalism, from Hong Kong Baptist University. He received his bachelor’s degree in Economics from Lucknow University, India.

This article originally appeared on TradeVistas.org. Republished with permission.

top states

TOP 10 STATES FOR MANUFACTURING 2019

It’s safe to say that most of the products we use daily were manufactured somewhere. From the clothes we wear to the cars we drive, a long line of wheels must be set in motion before the things we own end up in our hands. That’s why manufacturing and the people who manufacture are so important. 

Whether you have a product that needs manufacturing or need a manufacturer to make that product, finding the best team for the job is paramount to your product’s success and your businesses survival. These 10 states have an edge over the rest when it comes to manufacturing. From incentives to low tax rates to education programs that encourage students to consider manufacturing careers, these states are leading the country in manufacturing. Here’s why.

OHIO

With manufacturers in Ohio accounting for 12.56 percent of the state workforce, this Rust Belt state remains a manufacturing powerhouse despite recent shifts in the manufacturing landscape. Though smaller in size than many other states, Ohio is still the third largest in American when it comes to manufacturing, with a total output of $107.95 billion in 2017, and $50.40 billion in exports in 2018. To date, Ohio is home to more than 12,000 manufacturing firms, with 89 percent of those exporters being small businesses. 

MICHIGAN

Boasting total manufacturing output of $96.22 billion in 2017, Michigan has seen a significant resurgence in manufacturing in the past decade. Still king in the motor vehicle and vehicle parts manufacturing marketplace, the Wolverine State has also begun to earn a reputation for manufacturing quality machine parts, chemicals and pharmaceuticals. A small business friendly state, nearly 90 percent of all exporters in Michigan in 2018 were from that sector. Manufactured goods exports in 2018 alone totaled $55.35 billion.

CALIFORNIA

Consistently ranked among the top 10 states for manufacturing in the U.S., the Golden State workforce has nearly 8 percent of its employees working in that sector. California’s total manufacturing output was more than $300 billion in 2017, and 2018 saw nearly $155 billion in exported manufactured goods. With over 25,000 manufacturing firms (of which 93 percent are considered small to medium-sized businesses), California boasts a skilled workforce that is in it for the long haul, with many workers considering manufacturing a career, not just another job. California manufacturing jobs pay an average of over $100,000 in salary and benefits, compared to the U.S. average of $54,329.

TEXAS

Home to its own power grid and no personal or corporate income taxes, Texas is about as business friendly as you can get among the states. With $247.46 billion in manufactured goods exported from the Lone Star State in 2018, manufacturing accounts for 13.33 percent of the total Texas output while employing 7.04 percent of the state’s workforce. They say everything’s bigger in Texas, and the incentive programs in the state are no exception. Between the ample Texas Enterprise Fund, which has invested more than half a billion dollars since 2004, and major cuts to the state’s franchise tax, Texas is poised to remain one of the top manufacturing states in the nation.

NORTH CAROLINA

The second-largest food and beverage manufacturing state and the overall fifth-largest manufacturing state in America, North Carolina is home to the largest manufacturing workforce in the Southeast. The manufacturing industry employs 460,000 skilled workers in North Carolina–nearly 11 percent of the state’s workforce. North Carolina manufacturing makes up about 20 percent of the state’s gross state product, to the tune of $102.48 billion in 2017 and $31.06 billion in exports in 2018. North Carolina has experienced tremendous growth in manufacturing goods in recent years, with a nearly 35 percent increase in exports from 2010 to 2018. North Carolina’s pro-business climate and expert workforce make it an ideal state for manufacturers.

INDIANA

Manufacturing accounts for nearly 30 percent of the output in Indiana, where $102.59 billion was generated in 2017. Manufacturing accounts for almost 20 percent of the state’s workforce, with 516,900 workers employed in the sector statewide–an estimated one in five workers. In fact, Indiana has the highest concentration of manufacturing jobs in America. With more than 8,500 manufacturing firms already in the state, Indiana is the second-largest automobile manufacturing state in the nation. Along major truck routes and freight lines, goods manufactured in Indiana can reach 75 percent of the U.S. and Canada’s populations within a day’s drive.

FLORIDA

With more than 12,000 manufacturing firms in Florida, the state has made a big push in recent years to encourage more manufacturing. With the fifth-lowest corporate income tax in the country, the Sunshine State employs more than 331,000 workers in the manufacturing sector. Your manufactured goods can get to their destination with ease, because Florida’s multi-modal transportation system offers everything from air and rail to deep-water shipping and highways, all at a low cost of living and a low cost of doing business.

GEORGIA

Another  Southeast state that’s blazing trails in the manufacturing industry, Georgia boasts more 480,000 manufacturing jobs, ensuring that the future remains bright for the industry. That’s why the Peach State developed the Quick Start program and partnered with many in-state universities to teach rising students the skills they need for careers in manufacturing. Industry employs nearly nine percent of Georgia’s workforce across 6,600 firms. In 2018, manufacturers in the state generated $36.81 billion in exports, with a total manufacturing output of $61.06 billion in 2017.

TENNESSEE

According to the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development, the state’s growth in advanced manufacturing is higher than anywhere else in the nation; in fact, it’s 42 percent higher than the U.S. average. Manufacturing accounts for 16.13 percent of the state’s total output, which was $55.70 billion in 2017. Tennessee has numerous initiatives to help train its manufacturing workforce, including the NIST Manufacturing Extension Partnership, which provides small to medium-sized manufacturers with training and consulting, all with the goal of helping Tennessee-based manufacturers increase competitiveness in the marketplace via workplace initiatives to increase productivity and lower costs.

SOUTH CAROLINA

Over the past decade, South Carolina has seen manufacturing growth of 18 percent, the second largest jump in the Southeast. Manufacturers in the Palmetto State account for a total of nearly 17 percent of the state’s total output and 11.55 percent of South Carolina workers are employed in the manufacturing industry. In 2018, South Carolina’s exported goods totaled $33.89 billion. In 2018, South Carolina earned an A grade in the Manufacturing and Logistics Report Card by Ball State University’s Center for Business and Economic Research and Conexus Indiana. The report rated each state on criteria such as how desirable it is to site selectors, and the share of Income earned by manufacturing workers within the state.

honey

HONEY BEES POLLINATE TRADE OPPORTUNITIES

Harvesting season in the Central Valley

Stretched across some 500 miles throughout California’s Central Valley, almond hulls are splitting open, signaling the beginning of harvesting season.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is forecasting that California’s almond growers are set to produce a bumper crop this year of about 2.5 billion pounds, about 70 percent of which will be exported around the world.

It’s an industry that drives about one-quarter of California’s farm exports and generates about $21.5 billion in economic output for the region including growing, processing and manufacturing activities.

A productive crop must be nourished

California is blessed with the perfect climate for almond production, but it must import one of its most important ingredients: pollinators for the almond blooms.

Every February, two out of every three commercial bee hives in the United States are transported to California, their bee residents pressed into service of the almond bloom.

In fact, it’s just the start of an annual food pollinating bee tour. Anywhere from 60 to 75 percent of the bee population kept as livestock crisscross the United States foraging on the blooms of crops that will eventually make their way into our grocery stores and into overseas markets.

Pollinated crop acreage

First stop, almond orchards

For most commercial bees, the pollinating season begins with almonds, California’s largest crop. To provide a sense of scale, Scientific American estimates it takes some two million hives – more than 31 billion honeybees – to pollinate the Central Valley’s 90 million almond trees during their two-week bloom. It’s a symbiotic relationship: the bees gather nectar and pollen to feed their colonies, enabling them to triple their population.

Once almonds bloom in January, hives are moved to other spring-blooming orchards such as cherries and plums in California or apples in the Pacific Northwest. Some head to Texas to pollinate squashes, others to citrus fruit orchards in Florida, and others are dispatched to pollinate cranberries in Wisconsin and cherries in Michigan.

In all, these busy bee travelers pollinate over 90 different crops and then sweeten the deal by shifting into delicious honey production by the end of summer, which they will nourish themselves on over winter while we get to consume the rest. Americans consume a staggering 1.6 pounds of honey per person every year. Even though U.S. beekeepers produced 148 million pounds of honey in 2017 and exported 9.9 million pounds, we imported 447.5 million pounds to keep up with demand from consumers and food producers.

Mobile beehive on trucks
Millions of bees are “exported” state to state to pollinate 90 different American crops.

One in every three bites of food

From cucumbers and citrus fruits to watermelon, kiwis, berries, cherries, apples, melons, peaches, figs, tomatoes, pumpkins and almonds, one-third of the U.S. food supply relies on pollination by the hard-working honey bee.

And, of course, since the United States is a major exporter of agricultural crops, we could say that honey bees help pollinate our trade opportunities. That’s true globally for hundreds of billions worth of crop production and internationally traded food that depends on pollinators.

$15 billion in value for 90 crops

Healthy bees, healthy trade in food

When bees get sick, the health of the U.S. agriculture economy and agricultural exports is imperiled.

Although honey bees are not the only pollinators supporting U.S. agriculture, they are the most important, adding more than $15 billion in value to U.S. agricultural crops each year according to the U.S. Pollinator Health Task Force.

Colony collapse disorder over the last few years drew widespread attention, but the decline in North American honey bees is a long-term trend. In 1947, there were about six million colonies but today we are down to about 2.5 million.

Sharp declines were seen following the introduction in 1987 of an external parasitic mite, aptly named Varroa destructor, that feeds on the blood of honey bees. Loss rates over the winter have been averaging around 31 percent since 2006, far exceeding the 15-17 percent that commercial bee keepers say is economically sustainable.

The rise of monoculture agriculture with increased reliance on pesticides and reduced use of cover crops is thought to add stress on bee health. The bees are struggling to maintain a varied and high-quality diet – they need protein from pollen and carbohydrates from the nectar of flowering plants. Without adequate nutrition, they are also more vulnerable to viruses.

1 in 3 bites

Experts have organized into research consortia, working groups and task forces to try to determine what can be done. The factors negatively impacting bee health are multiple, complex, and interacting, requiring a similarly comprehensive approach to combat them, including restoration of habitats, dissemination of best practices in hive management, and investments in research to better understand how to prevent colony loss.

We are all invested in their success, and when you see honey bees buzzing around your garden this summer, think about the humble but essential role their busywork plays in U.S. food production and agricultural exports.

This article is adapted from “Honey Bee Health is Serious Business” by Andrea Durkin for Progressive Economy.

Andrea Durkin is the Editor-in-Chief of TradeVistas and Founder of Sparkplug, LLC. Ms. Durkin previously served as a U.S. Government trade negotiator and has proudly taught international trade policy and negotiations for the last fourteen years as an Adjunct Professor at Georgetown University’s Master of Science in Foreign Service program.

This article originally appeared on TradeVistas.org. Republished with permission.

Coalition For Clean Air Recognizes TTSI for Sustainable Initiatives

The Coalition For Clean Air awarded what is known as the highest award focusing on air quality initiatives to Total Transportation Services, Inc. (TTSI) during the 28th annual Clean Air Awards program. TTSI is a Southern California-based logistics leader specializing in distributing imports throughout North America. TTSI President Victor La Rosa was part of the recognition for spearheading efforts in creating a sustainable company culture and operations, specifically related diesel truck fleets.

“When we committed to the zero-emission transportation pathway, all the technology companies who are manufacturing in the alternative fuels sector sought us out, said Vic La Rosa. “At TTSI, we’ve all learned about alternative fuel technologies, sustainability, and why reducing emissions from diesel matters. We are committed to the environment. We have a Director of Compliance and Sustainability, which has been very fruitful for TTSI, as they’ve been able to focus on what new technologies are emerging that we should incorporate.”

The annual Coalition for Clean Air evaluates and identifies leaders promoting environmental awareness and sustainable initiatives throughout California. TTSI’s focus on clean technology in trucking and supply chain industries is attributed for this year’s recognition, adding to previous recognition from the EPA, the California Air Resources Board and many  Congressional members.

“This year’s California Air Quality Awards Honoree, Vic La Rosa, founded TTSI in 1986, to create a customer-focused business that makes a difference in the trucking industry. TTSI distinguished itself early on by its commitment to sustainable practices and by fostering a company-wide awareness of the urgency to reduce diesel emissions. Vic has tested and put in operation every single type of heavy-duty truck available and has set himself the ambitious goal of converting his entire fleet to zero or near-zero-emission vehicles by 2020,” said the Coalition for Clean Air.

“Vic La Rosa understands clearly that the market is dominated by outdated diesel vehicles and feels there is room for all available clean technologies like renewable natural gas, hydrogen, battery or fuel cell technology,” said Joe Lyou, President & CEO, Coalition for Clean Air and a board member at the South Coast Air Quality Management District. “Like us, Vic hopes that the technology providers will come together to remove diesel trucks from California roads so that we can start making progress toward a clean air future! We’re going to clean up the trucks that use the ports, rail yards and warehouses and Vic is the guy who’s making that happen.”

Source: EIN News

Sun Valley Rice Confirms First-Ever Contract to Export Rice to China

Sun Valley Rice is officially the name behind the very first contract confirming a U.S. company to export rice to China. The company will specifically supply the company’s premium California Calrose medium-grain rice for a variety of purposes including retail and food distribution.

“Fifteen years of patience and hard work have paid off. It is truly an honor and a privilege to blaze this trail of trading history — American rice in China,” said Ken LaGrande, CEO of Sun Valley Rice.

The California-based LaGrande Family Foods Group member company will supply this rice directly to Shenzhen Hong Tai – known as one of the largest importers of rice in the region.

“We chose Sun Valley Rice because when we first toured the U.S., we went to California and witnessed that Sun Valley Rice had clearly studied Asian cultures deeply (especially Japanese and Chinese),” commented William Li, Overseas Director, Shenzhen Yintuo & Vice President, Dragon Ocean Hing Group.

LaGrande Family Foods Group boasts agricultural roots in the Sacramento Valley going back over one hundred years, as the family called the region home in the 1850’s after relocating from France. The company’s location is also known as one of the most ideal regions for growing short and medium-grained rice as it offers an optimal environment and agricultural advantage.

“We understand the role that small, local family farms play in feeding the world — since we come from one,” concluded LaGrande.

Negotiation Team participants (left to right)
Jim Guinn, Director, Asia Promotion Programs, USA Rice Federation; William Li, Overseas Director, Shenzhen Yintuo & Vice President, Dragon Ocean Hing Group, Jim Levy, U.S. Consul General to China, U.S. Embassy; Chris Zhang, President, Dragon Ocean Hing Group; Erin O’Donnell, Assistant Vice President of Global Rice Trading, Sun Valley Rice; Bobby Richey Jr., Minister-Counselor for Agricultural Affairs in China, USDA

Source: LaGrande Family Food Groups: Sun Valley Rice

2019 China-California Business Forum Focuses on Sub-National Cooperation

California’s trade and investment involvement with Chinese provinces will take the spotlight at the third annual 2019 China-California Business Forum scheduled for June 5th in Los Angeles. An estimated 150 top Chinese business leaders are expected to attend with the goal of developing
business opportunities between California and Chinese business leaders.

“As the Chinese Secretariat of the China Provinces and U.S. California Joint Working Group on Trade and Investment Cooperation, CCCME together the seven member provinces all attach great importance to the China-California Business Forum and will actively participate in it as always. Over the past few years, as it has become an important platform of facilitating more exchanges and cooperation between Chinese and Californian businesses, the Forum has been fully recognized by Chinese enterprises and has become an annual focus of China-U.S. sub-national cooperation,” said Liu Chun, Vice President of CCCME.

The forum will take place in downtown at the Millennium Biltmore Hotel and dedicate a full day of various sessions discussing trade and investment, clean-tech, cross-border e-commerce, advanced manufacturing, and more.

“Sub-national cooperation is the foundation of China-U.S. economic and trade relations. The China-California Business Forum plays an important role in promoting this cooperation. The Forum is a joint effort by both sides. It not only brings business opportunities, but also enhances China-U.S. sub-national exchanges and cooperation. I look forward to welcoming more Chinese and California business leaders at the event,” said Amb. Zhang Ping, Chinese Consul General in Los Angeles.

Despite previous trade tensions between the two economy’s, business executives are displaying optimism for both sides to reach an agreement through bilateral trade discussions. This year’s Business Forum will ultimately support efforts to strengthen ties and develop mutually beneficial business initiatives.

“California was the number one recipient of foreign direct investment from China, totaling more than $16 Billion in 2017. We are also home to a vibrant Chinese American community. This forum will build on our strong business and cultural ties, strengthen our international partnerships, and grow our economy.” Said Lt. Governor Eleni Kounalakis.


INTERNATIONAL TRADE SUPPORTS MORE THAN 4.7 MILLION CALIFORNIA JOBS: STUDY

A recently released Business Roundtable study finds that international trade supports 4,710,600 jobs in California, representing one out of every five jobs in the state. 

Trade with Canada and Mexico alone supports 1,470,700 jobs in California, which should be a key factor before members of Congress deciding the fate this year of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA). Exports from California to Canada and Mexico have increased by 235 percent since the implementation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

“We stand united to preserve and modernize North American trade, which supports over 12 million jobs and a strong U.S. economy,” says Tom Linebarger, chairman and CEO of Cummins Inc. and chair of the Trade & International Committee for Business Roundtable, whose CEO members lead companies with more than 15 million employees and $7.5 trillion in revenues.

The study – prepared by Trade Partnership Worldwide with the latest-available employment data from 2017 – examines the net impacts of both exports and imports of goods and services on U.S. jobs in all 50 states. It also compared 2017 data to pre-NAFTA data from 1992. The study found that trade-supported jobs in California increased by 88 percent from 1992 (when NAFTA was implemented) to 2017 – nearly three times faster than total employment. 

Find the study here: https://s3.amazonaws.com/brt.org/Trade_and_American_Jobs_2019.pdf

BYD Opens San Carlos Service Center

Known as “The Official Sponsor of Mother Nature” and the world’s leading electric vehicle company, Build Your Dreams (BYD), announced the opening of its newest North American service center in San Carlos, California last week. The expansion adds to the more than $250 million the company has already invested in the North American region.

With its double-bay and warehouse center equipped facility spanning 15,600 square feet, the new service center will provide added support for customers seeking quick access to parts, services, and maintenance for its buses and trucks which include the 30-foot K7M, the 35-foot K9S, 40-foot K9M transit buses, the 23-foot C6 coach, the 35-foot C8 coach, and BYD’s 45-foot double-deck bus, C10MS.

Transportation agencies in BYD’s customer portfolio that will benefit from the service center include agencies such as Marin Transit, Napa Valley Vine Transit, Solano County’s Soltrans, Fresno County’s Rural Transit Agency, Tri Delta Transit, and Monterey-Salinas Transit.

Other industries involved within the company’s robust customer portfolio include global tech companies and universities in the Bay Area and Central California regions.

“With more than 100 BYD buses operating in the Bay Area, BYD wants to make sure our customers receive quick, expert care,” said Bobby Hill, BYD Vice President, Coach & Bus. “BYD is committed to top-quality customer care.”

global trade

Study Shows Global Trade Represents 1 out of 5 jobs in California

The Golden State makes news headlines once again boasting its impressive job market. The latest numbers from a study released by Business Roundtable and prepared by Trade Partnership Worldwide confirms a whopping 4,710,600 jobs are supported by global trade in California. The study gathered the most recent information available reflecting employment data from 2017.

“The CEO members of Business Roundtable, who lead companies with more than 15 million employees, strongly support congressional passage of USMCA implementing legislation this year. We stand united to preserve and modernize North American trade, which supports over 12 million jobs and a strong U.S. economy,” said Tom Linebarger, Chairman and CEO of Cummins Inc. and Chair of the Business Roundtable Trade & International Committee.

In addition to the massive employment numbers supported by global trade, California’s export market is also revealing impressive numbers. The same study also revealed goods and services exports made up 11.2 percent of the state’s overall GDP as it exported up to $59.5 billion in goods and services to Mexico and Canada in 2017.

The study in its entirety can be found here.

Report Reveals California as Tech Employment Hub

In 2018, the state of California increased its tech-related jobs by 51,567 according to the CompTIA Cyberstates 2019™ report, ultimately contributing to the state economy.

“Clearly the broad-based impact of the tech industry touches virtually every community, industry and market across California, especially when you consider the millions of knowledge workers who rely on technology to do their jobs,” said Todd Thibodeaux, president and CEO, CompTIA.

These numbers confirm that the state is increasingly becoming a tech-employment hub in the nation, with a reported increase of an estimated 360,000 jobs over the last two decades.

“When it comes to tech jobs, California is at the top in all categories from tech workforce total, tech jobs added and innovation score. More than 1.78 million Californians have a tech-related job, contributing more than $481.7 billion to the state’s economy and median annual wages of more than $96,000,” said Kelly Hitt, director of state government affairs for CompTIA in California.

“The findings attest to a tech labor market that will remain tight as employers balance short-term needs with an eye towards the future,” said Tim Herbert, senior vice president for research and market intelligence at CompTIA. “As digital-human models begin to unfold, employers and employees alike will face new challenges – and opportunities, in shaping the workforce of tomorrow.“