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Asendia to Utilize Tigers Logistics for Oceania Launch

Asendia to Utilize Tigers Logistics for Oceania Launch

As expansion takes shape for Asendia, Tigers will maintain local logistics for the soon-to-be launched Asendia Oceania subsidiary throughout Australia. The international shipping and distribution company released information this week confirming Tigers is the provider of choice and will utilize its robust warehousing network to support efforts in B2C and omnichannel fulfillment.

“E-commerce fulfillment and international cross-border products continue to be a major focus for Tigers across the Asia-Pacific region, and builds on our cooperation across the USA into Europe, Russia, and Asia,” said Andrew Jillings, Chief Executive Officer, Tigers.

“Partnering with Asendia as it launches Asendia Oceania across Australia and New Zealand is an exciting moment that reflects Tigers’ ongoing global growth, and our support for the logistics and supply chain industry as it evolves through digitization and e-commerce.”

The companies announced the collaborative efforts will ultimately support increasing demand within the B2C cross-border e-commerce market, while focusing on strategies in supply chain optimizations in the near future. The Oceania launch is representative of Asendia’s global expansion plan and how the company will meet demand while offering fresh digital, logistics, and delivery services.

“The launch of Asendia Oceania is an exciting new milestone for Asendia in the Asia-Pacific region,” said Lionel Berthe, Head of Asia-Pacific, Asendia.

“It’s another sign of our commitment to growth in the region, and partnering with a global logistics player with strong capacities and experience in Australia such as Tigers is a key differentiator for cross border end-to-end services.“

Lords of War: Visualizing the Global Arms Trade Network

Selling weapons to other countries is big business. It’s so lucrative that President Trump famously refused to cancel an American arms deal with Saudi Arabia in the aftermath of Jamal Khashoggi’s murder. So just how big is the international market?

The Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) and the World Bank keep detailed figures on international arms imports and exports, counting every major conventional weapon from missiles to radar systems and military airplanes. We used the latest available complete data, sometimes going as far back as 2016 for some countries, to create a unique set of maps. The larger a country appears, the more arms it imports or exports. Plus, we added a color-coded outer ring corresponding to the level of each country’s contribution.

Let’s start by looking at who’s selling the most weapons. The U.S. stands out as the world leader by a long shot, shipping well over $12B in arms to other countries. To be sure, a significant amount of American arms exports go to Israel, but there are several other large customers across the Middle East as well, like Saudi Arabia, Egypt and the UAE.

To understand the extent to which Americans dominate the international market for weapons, just look around the world. The second most prolific exporter, Russia, only sees half as much business ($6.15B). France ($2.16B) is the only other country topping $2 billion, with the rest of the major players from Western Europe contributing less. Israel for its part is actually a net exporter of arms ($1.26B exports vs. $528M imports). And China, despite being the second largest economy in the world, only exports some $1.13B. There is only one country from Africa on our map (South Africa at $74M), and only a couple from Latin America. This means that developed countries in the West are, by far, the biggest exporters of arms around the world.

But let’s see who’s buying all those weapons. The world map of importers looks radically different from the exporters. For starters, Saudi Arabia and India are major players, soaking up some $4.11B and $3.36B of the market, respectively. Each country is surrounded by a smattering of other countries making big purchases too.

There are lots of reasons why some countries are major importers. There’s efficiency in a global market where a country can simply purchase weapons as opposed to manufacturing everything at home. Why would Australia, for example, try to build military aircraft when it can simply buy them from the U.S.? There are also lots of regional conflicts pressuring countries to spend top dollar for the latest military technologies, like India and Pakistan. And then there are a number of disreputable countries led by strongmen or oligarchies. They have their own agenda, and clearly they’re willing to spend big bucks for the best weapons.

Data: Table 1.1

DB Schenker’s “Direct Express – Australia” Creates Competitive Speed for Global Shippers

Global logistics and transportation provider, DB Schenker, announced that it now offers speedy and reliable air cargo delivery to Australia through its newly launched “Direct Express” service. Specifically created to offer the fastest and most reliable air cargo service to the region, “Direct Express” begins every Monday morning with departure in Chicago with direct 777-300 freighter service.

“We are very excited about our new service down under,” said Chad Heller, DB Schenker’s Chief Commercial Officer in the U.S. “The U.S. is Australia’s third largest trading partner and represents a significant portion of imports to the country. A large portion of these imports include the automotive, pharmaceutical and industrial manufacturing industries, many of which are located in the Midwest. With speed-to-market becoming more and more critical, our new Direct Express – Australia service is well positioned to meet this need,” he added.

The 777-F has its advantages as well as it’s known as the most energy-efficient and environmentally-friendly aircraft. Additionally, its 102 metric ton plus payload provides more opportunities for increased capacity.

Additional benefits of “Direct Express” include cold chain storage operations, guaranteed lift during heavy or peak periods of the year for shippers, and a variety of shipping solutions for heavy and outsized products.

 

Source: DB Schenker

Air Cargo Exports Process Expedited with New Technology in Perth

Air cargo exports are now being processed faster and more efficiently following the investment of new screening technology for Tigers Australia Perth facility. This technology enables the company to perform export screenings internally, making the location the only one in Australia with internal screening capabilities. Tigers is a global organization that specializes in technology enabled supply chain solutions. Based in Hong Kong, the company has international locations including Perth, Adelaide, Melbourne, and Sydney.

The Perth location will continue staying one step ahead through Regulated Air Cargo Agent accreditation before the March 1 national date for the introduction of new policies for conducting air cargo inspections.

“Tigers Australia has purchased the equipment to support our customer base with the new legal requirements, which will impact all air cargo export commodities,” said Jason Radford, General Manager, Tigers Perth. “At the Perth facility, we operate 24 hours a day, seven days a week, so we will also offer the service to the entire Perth airfreight market.

“This will allow export cargo screening to be completed after-hours, therefore reducing the need for customers to deliver directly to the Cargo Terminal Operator (CTO) where wait times can be in excess of six hours. The investment in this equipment will ensure that Tigers Perth remains efficient and will be fully compliant with the Australian government’s air cargo security legislation in time for the implementation date.”

Additional features of the new technology include state-of-the-art X-ray equipment, two explosive trace detection units, and an electro-magnetic detection (EMD) machine.

Source: Tigers

Australia, China Ink Major Free Trade Agreement

Los Angeles, CA – Australia and China, it largest trading partner, have inked a preliminary free-trade deal that would give Australia’s service industry unsurpassed access to the Chinese market and hand the Australian agriculture sector some significant market advantages over its U.S., Canadian and European competitors.

Under the terms of the “Declaration of Intent” deal, China will reportedly make 85 percent of Australian goods imports tariff-free from the outset, rising to 93 percent four years later, the Australian government said.

In return, Australia will lift tariffs on imports of Chinese manufactured goods and alter the threshold at which privately-owned Chinese companies can invest in non-sensitive areas without government scrutiny from 248 million Australian dollars ($218 million) to AU$1,078 million.

The pact would be signed soon after the first of the year and could take effect as early as March if it is endorsed by the Australian Parliament. No modeling has been done on the value of the free-trade deal, the government said.

The removal of tariffs on Australian farm products would give Australia an advantage over U.S., Canadian and E.U. competitors while negating advantages New Zealand and Chile have enjoyed through their free-trade deals with China, the government said.

According to press reports, stumbling blocks in the negotiations, which began in 2005, were Chinese protection of its rice, cotton, wheat, sugar and oil seed industries and demands for less Australian government restrictions on Australian companies and assets being sold to Chinese state-owned businesses.

Those specific areas were excluded from the agreement, which will be renegotiated in three years, reports said.

Two-way trade between Australia and China grew from $86 million in the early 1970s to $136 billion in 2013.

11/20/2014

US Coal Exports Decline on Lower EU Demand

Washington, DC – US coal exports have continued to decline from their record volumes in 2012 with exports during the first half of this year totaling 52.3 million short tons (MMst), 16 percent below the same period in 2013.

 

Most of these exports go to countries in Europe and Asia, according to the US Department of Energy.

 

The decline, the agency said, reflects both lower European demand for steam coal and increased steam coal supply from Australia and Indonesia.

 

Metallurgical coal supply from Australia, Canada, and Russia has also increased. These factors have led to a cumulative decline of 9.0 MMst in coal exports to Europe and Asia during the first half of 2014.

 

Coal exports fall into two categories: metallurgical coal, which is used in the production of steel, and steam coal, which is commonly used to fuel boilers that generate steam used to produce electricity. With relatively minor coal imports, the US has been a net exporter of coal since 1949, the earliest year of data collection.

 

Metallurgical coal production, primarily from the Illinois and Appalachian coal basins, represented less than 8 percent of production but 56 percent of total US coal exports in 2013.

 

Europe is the leading destination for metallurgical coal exports, followed by Asia. Together, these two regions accounted for nearly 80 percent of US metallurgical coal exports in the first half of 2014.

 

Steam coal is mainly used to generate electricity, but also has applications at combined heat and power plants to produce steam used in industrial processes.

 

Steam coal generally has lower heat content than metallurgical coal and can be found at most coal-producing basins in the US. In recent years, steam coal accounted for more than 90 percent of domestic coal production.

 

During the first half of 2014, Europe received 8.8 MMst of US steam coal exports, a drop of 7.4 MMst from the same period in 2013. Asia’s share of US steam coal exports increased in 2014, but export tonnage to Asia decreased 2.4 percent from the first half of 2013.

 

In 2013, six US ports shipped 89 percent of US coal exports. Among them, Baltimore and Norfolk represent 55 percent, while Houston, Mobile, and New Orleans make up 30 percent. Seattle accounted for 5 MMst, or 4 percent, all of which was comprised of steam coal exports.

 

Eastern and southern ports are used to export metallurgical coal because it is produced in the Illinois and Appalachian Basins.

 

10/06/2014

Marketo Opens New Australia Data Center

San Mateo, CA – Marketo Inc., a provider of marketing software, announced the opening of its data center in Sydney, Australia.

The data center, the company said, “is key to Marketo’s international growth strategy and is part of the company’s overall investment in expanding its presence and operations in Australia and New Zealand.”

The new data center “will also mitigate risk for Marketo customers concerned about offshore data storage, enable customers to comply with their own data sovereignty mandates and to better conform to Australia’s new privacy laws,” it added.

Marketo’s last data center was opened in London in 2009 to assist its clients in complying with the European Union privacy regulations.

Earlier this year, the company unveiled a partnership with partnering with the Orfalea College of Business at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo to develop curricula to prepare students there for careers in marketing.

The program, Marketo said, “serves as the cornerstone of Marketo’s broader strategy to create training programs focused on next generation marketing technology and strategies for students throughout the US.”

Headquartered in San Mateo, California, with offices in Europe, Australia and Japan, Marketo “is a strategic marketing partner to more than 3,000 large enterprises and fast-growing small companies across a wide variety of industries.”

09/03/2014

Bechtel Advances Australia LNG Project

San Francisco, CA – Bechtel has successfully ‘hydro-tested’ two additional liquefied natural gas (LNG) storage tanks built on Curtis Island in Queensland, Australia.

The tests confirm that the tanks built for the Australia Pacific LNG and Santos GLNG plants are ready to store LNG and follow the successful test of a tank at the Queensland Curtis LNG project earlier this year. Bechtel is the engineering, procurement, and construction contractor for both projects.

Hydro testing takes between two and four weeks to complete. Water is pumped into each of the tanks and held for 24 hours while various tests are carried out.

Once testing is complete, it takes about five days to empty the tanks. Hydro-testing verifies that each tank can hold its design capacity of LNG at -260 degrees Fahrenheit.

Each of the QCLNG and GLNG tanks is capable of holding more than 140,000 cubic meters of LNG with Australia Pacific LNG’s tanks each holding 160,000 cubic meters.

In addition to the work on Curtis Island, Bechtel is the principal downstream contractor for the Chevron-operated Wheatstone Project in Western Australia.

Bechtel also constructed the LNG facility, in Darwin, in 2005 and is responsible for about half the LNG liquefaction capacity under construction.

International engineering giant Bechtel operates through five global business units that specialize in civil infrastructure; power generation, communications, and transmission; mining and metals; oil, gas, and chemicals; and government services.

Since its founding in 1898, Bechtel has worked on more than 25,000 projects in 160 countries on all seven continents. Currently, the company is involved in diverse projects in nearly 40 countries.

08/21/2014

 

Bechtel Completes Australian LNG Production Project

Gladstone, Australia – Bechtel has successfully delivered and installed all of the modules for the first liquefied natural gas production train at the GLNG facility on Curtis Island in Queensland, Australia.

The successful installation marks a major milestone in the construction of the plant, which will consist of two production trains, designated Trains 1 and 2.

Train 1 is made up of 82 modules that were built at a Bechtel-managed module yard facility in the Philippines and transported to Curtis Island over a 19-month period.

The modules for Train 2 are being constructed at the same facility and shipped to the island. The final modules for the second train are scheduled to be delivered and installed later this year.

US-based Bechtel is acting as the engineering, procurement, and construction contractor for three LNG facilities on Curtis Island.

GLNG, Queensland Curtis LNG, and Australia Pacific LNG are all being built simultaneously, side-by-side, making these projects the largest concentration of Bechtel work anywhere in the world.

In addition, the company is the principal contractor for the Chevron Wheatstone LNG project in Western Australia and constructed Australia’s first LNG facility, at Darwin, in 2005.

Global engineering giant Bechtel operates through five global business units that specialize in civil infrastructure; power generation, communications, and transmission; mining and metals; oil, gas, and chemicals; and government services.

Since its founding in 1898, Bechtel has worked on more than 25,000 projects in 160 countries on all seven continents. The company is currently involved in diverse projects in nearly 40 countries.

07/10/2014