Port of Vancouver USA Confirms Record-Breaking Shipment - Global Trade Magazine
  July 3rd, 2019 | Written by

Port of Vancouver USA Confirms Record-Breaking Shipment

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  • “We’re excited to bring this upgrade to the Marengo Wind Project near Dayton..."
  • “The port is uniquely qualified to handle these types of projects."

Port of Vancouver USA confirmed the receipt of a record-breaking, single shipment of Vestas blades on June 24. A total of 198 wind turbine blades measuring 161 feet represent the largest single shipment in Vestas history.

“The port is uniquely qualified to handle these types of projects,” said Chief Commercial Officer Alex Strogen. “Our heavy lift mobile cranes, acres of laydown space, highly-skilled workforce, and dedication to renewable energy make the Port of Vancouver the perfect port for receiving wind energy components.”

“We are grateful for our partners including ILWU Local 4Local 40 and Local 92,” said  Strogen. “We also thank the hard work of Jones StevedoringTransmarineand Combi Dock. Their talent, expertise and hard work are integral to the port’s continued commercial success.”

PacifiCorp and Vestas provided joint efforts in the record-setting shipment, as the blades were transported to the port’s Terminal 5 laydown area where they will then be transported via truck to re-power turbines at the Marengo wind farm in Washington.

Thanks to added efforts by logistics industry stakeholders High, Wide, Heavy Corridor Coalition, Port of Vancouver USA is able to continue supporting needed equipment and infrastructure needs within the wind energy components sector.

“We’re excited to bring this upgrade to the Marengo Wind Project near Dayton, a town that’s helping to grow clean, renewable energy right here in our region,” said Tim Hemstreet, Managing Director for Renewable Energy at PacifiCorp. “By using the latest technology to repower these existing wind turbines, we’re able to deliver to our customers a boost of clean, wind energy while keeping energy costs low.” 

Source: Port of Vancouver